How Do You Spell A?

Pronunciation: [ˈe͡ɪ] (IPA)

The spelling of the single letter word "A" is quite simple. In IPA phonetic transcription, it is represented as /eɪ/, which is a diphthong consisting of the open front unrounded vowel (as in "cat") and the near-close near-front unrounded vowel (as in "bid"). This diphthong is used to represent the sound of the letter "A" which is commonly used as an indefinite article, a vowel, or as a symbol in mathematics and physics. Overall, the spelling of "A" follows the basic rules of English phonetics.

A Meaning and Definition

A is the first letter of the English alphabet and is also considered a vowel. It is represented by a lowercase letter "a" or an uppercase letter "A". In its lowercase form, "a" is pronounced as the short vowel sound, similar to the "a" in cat or bat.

As an indefinite article, "a" is used before nouns that begin with a consonant sound. It is used to refer to one non-specific object or person. For example, "She has a book" implies that she has one book, but it does not specify which book.

"A" can also function as a prefix, forming words that indicate absence, negation, or exclusion. For instance, the word "asexual" means lacking sexual attraction or orientation, while "atheist" refers to someone who does not believe in the existence of God.

In expressions such as "in a hurry" or "at a distance," "a" is used to emphasize the non-specific nature of the quantity or measurement. It indicates an indefinite amount or degree.

In some contexts, "A" or "a" is used as an abbreviation for words such as "ampere" (a unit of electric current), "area" (a measurement of space), or "annum" (a year).

"A" is a versatile and frequently used letter in the English language, serving various functions as an article, prefix, and abbreviation. Its presence or absence can significantly affect the meaning and specificity of words and sentences.

Common Misspellings for A

Idioms with the word A

  • square peg (in a round hole) The idiom "square peg in a round hole" refers to a person or thing that does not fit or belong in a particular situation or environment. It suggests a mismatch or incongruity between the individual or object and the surrounding context, often implying that the person's skills, abilities, or characteristics are not well suited for the task or role at hand.
  • run round like a headless chicken The idiom "run round like a headless chicken" means to behave or act in a frantic, disorganized, or panicked manner, often without thinking or without having a clear purpose or goal in mind. It implies a state of extreme busyness or agitation, similar to a chicken running around aimlessly after its head has been cut off.
  • be (like) a millstone around/round your neck The idiom "be (like) a millstone around/round your neck" refers to a burden or responsibility that becomes increasingly difficult or oppressive to bear. It implies that a situation or person is weighing heavily on someone, impeding their progress or causing them significant hardship. The use of the millstone metaphor suggests a heavy and inescapable weight, similar to the way a literal millstone would drag someone down in water.
  • a hard/tough row to hoe "A hard/tough row to hoe" is an idiom that means dealing with a difficult or challenging task. It refers to laborious work or a challenging situation that requires a lot of effort and perseverance to handle. It stems from the image of a farmer having to break up and cultivate a tough, unyielding row of soil using a hoe, which requires substantial physical strength and persistence to accomplish.
  • kick up a fuss/row/stink The idiom "kick up a fuss/row/stink" refers to acting out or displaying intense anger, protest, or disagreement over something, often in a public or noticeable way. It implies causing a commotion or making a lot of complaints and objections to draw attention and assert one's feelings or position on a particular matter.
  • not have two pennies to rub together, at not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have two pennies to rub together" or "not have a penny to your name" refers to a state of extreme poverty, indicating that someone lacks even the most basic financial resources. It suggests that the person is so destitute that they don't even possess a small amount of money.
  • a load of crap, nonsense, rubbish, etc. The idiom "a load of crap, nonsense, rubbish, etc." refers to something that is entirely false, ridiculous, or lacking in truth or value. It is often used to express strong disbelief or to dismiss a statement, idea, or argument as completely without merit or substance.
  • as a (general) rule The idiom "as a (general) rule" refers to a standard or principle that usually applies or is commonly followed. It indicates that something is typically true or widely accepted but acknowledges that there may be exceptions or instances where the rule does not apply.
  • make it a rule The idiom "make it a rule" means to establish a specific guideline or principle that should be followed consistently in a particular situation or context. It suggests implementing a firm policy or protocol to regulate behavior or actions.
  • raise a rumpus The idiom "raise a rumpus" means to cause a loud commotion or disturbance, typically with a lot of noise and confusion. It implies creating a scene, uproar, or disruption, often in a vigorously energetic or lively manner.
  • kick up a rumpus, at raise a rumpus The idiom "kick up a rumpus" or "raise a rumpus" means to cause a commotion or disturbance; to create a loud and energetic uproar. It refers to expressing strong emotions or protesting loudly and disruptively in a situation.
  • run a mile The idiom "run a mile" means to quickly and instinctively avoid or be highly cautious about someone or something because they seem dangerous, untrustworthy, or unfavorable. It suggests that the person would go to great lengths or distance to keep away from the situation or individual.
  • be running a fever The idiom "be running a fever" means to have an elevated body temperature typically as a result of an illness or infection. It refers to the condition when one is experiencing a fever, which is often accompanied by symptoms like sweating, chills, and general discomfort.
  • run sb out of town (on a rail) The idiom "run someone out of town (on a rail)" refers to forcefully and unanimously expelling or driving someone away from a place or community due to their undesirable behavior or actions. The phrase often implies strong disapproval, hostility, or outrage towards the person being targeted. The imagery of being "run out of town on a rail" suggests a public humiliation or ostracism, where the person is forced to leave town in a disgraceful manner, potentially being subjected to ridicule or punishment along the way.
  • give sb a run for their money The idiom "give someone a run for their money" means to provide strong competition or opposition to someone, usually in a contest or competition. It suggests that the person being referred to is giving their opponent a tough challenge, making them work hard and exert significant effort to succeed. The phrase also implies that the person being challenged is not expected to win easily and might face a possible defeat.
  • have a good run for your money The idiom "have a good run for your money" means to receive or experience a worthwhile, enjoyable, or satisfying experience or challenge in return for one's efforts, investment, or participation. It often refers to situations where one's expectations are met or exceeded, providing a sense of satisfaction or value for the time, money, or effort put in.
  • make a run for it The idiom "make a run for it" means to sprint or flee from a place or situation quickly, often in an attempt to escape or avoid capture or trouble.
  • (go and) take a running jump The idiom "(go and) take a running jump" is an expression used to dismiss someone, often in a rude or impolite manner. It suggests that the person should leave or go away, possibly with a connotation of annoyance or frustration.
  • drive a hard bargain The idiom "drive a hard bargain" means to negotiate or make a deal in a shrewd and uncompromising manner, often looking for the best possible outcome for oneself or one's interests, with little regard for the other party involved.
  • be a safe bet The idiom "be a safe bet" means to be a very likely and reliable choice or option that is expected to be successful or favorable in a given situation or outcome. It suggests a high level of certainty, dependability, and low risk involved in choosing or relying on someone or something.
  • a safe pair of hands The idiom "a safe pair of hands" refers to a person who is reliable, trustworthy, and capable of handling a task or responsibility skillfully and successfully. It implies that the person can be trusted to execute a task or make decisions without causing any harm or mistakes.
  • there's a lot to be said for, at there's sth to be said for The idiom "there's a lot to be said for" or "there's something to be said for" acknowledges that there are valid arguments or advantages to consider regarding a particular situation or alternative. It suggests that one should acknowledge and appreciate the merits or positive aspects of a particular idea, opinion, or course of action, even if it may not be the most popular or obvious choice.
  • won't hear a word (said) against sb/sth The idiom "won't hear a word (said) against someone/something" means that a person is refusing to listen to any negative comments, criticisms, or complaints about a particular person or thing. It implies that they are vehemently defending or supporting that person or thing, even if it may be warranted to acknowledge or consider the criticisms.
  • why keep a dog and bark yourself? The idiom "why keep a dog and bark yourself?" means that there is no need to do a job or perform a task yourself when you have someone else who can do it for you. It implies that it's pointless to have someone or something if you end up doing the work yourself.
  • take sth with a pinch of salt The idiom "take something with a pinch of salt" means to be skeptical or not completely believe or trust something that is being said or presented. It implies that one should view the information or statement with a level of skepticism or caution, as it may not be entirely accurate or reliable.
  • take sth with a grain of salt, at take sth with a pinch of salt The idiom "take something with a grain of salt" (or "take something with a pinch of salt") means to view or interpret something skeptically or with caution. It suggests not fully accepting or believing something as completely true or accurate due to doubts or skepticism. It implies considering the information or statement as possibly exaggerated, misleading, or not entirely reliable.
  • save/keep money for a rainy day The idiom "save/keep money for a rainy day" means to set aside or save money for a future time of need or unexpected circumstances. It advocates for the importance of financial prudence and preparation, urging individuals to save money as a safety net to be used during difficult or unforeseen situations.
  • a penny saved is a penny earned The idiom "a penny saved is a penny earned" means that it is just as valuable to save money as it is to earn it. It signifies the importance of saving and being frugal with one's finances. By conserving and not spending money unnecessarily, one can accumulate wealth or avoid financial difficulties.
  • be a barrel of laughs/fun The idiom "be a barrel of laughs/fun" refers to a person, event, or situation that is highly entertaining, enjoyable, or amusing. It suggests that being around that person or participating in that event brings abundant amusement and laughter.
  • have sb over a barrel The idiom "have sb over a barrel" means to have someone in a difficult or disadvantageous situation where they have no other option but to comply with one's demands or wishes. It implies that the person being "over a barrel" is trapped, powerless, and unable to negotiate or escape the situation.
  • have a lot to say for yourself The idiom "have a lot to say for yourself" is used to describe someone who is confident, assertive, and outspoken, often expressing their opinions or thoughts freely and without hesitation. It suggests that the person is not easily swayed or intimidated and is capable of effectively expressing themselves.
  • it says a lot for sb/sth The idiom "it says a lot for sb/sth" means that something or someone's actions or characteristics reveal important information or reflect positively on their qualities or abilities. It implies that the subject has provided evidence or shown attributes that are highly commendable or noteworthy.
  • breathe/say a word The idiom "breathe/say a word" means to speak or communicate, especially to reveal a secret or share information that may have been held back. It can also imply sharing one's thoughts, opinions, or concerns on a particular matter. For example, "She promised not to breathe a word about their surprise party," means she committed to keeping the event a secret.
  • not say boo to a goose, at not say boo The idiom "not say boo to a goose" or "not say boo" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid, shy, or quiet. It means that the person doesn't speak up or make any noise, just like how someone might avoid saying anything to frighten or disturb a goose.
  • not have a civil word to say about sb The idiom "not have a civil word to say about someone" means that one cannot find anything good, positive, or polite to say about that person. It implies a complete lack of respect or appreciation for the individual mentioned.
  • feed sb a line The idiom "feed someone a line" means to provide someone with a false or exaggerated story, excuse, or explanation in order to deceive or manipulate them.
  • settle a score The idiom "settle a score" means to address or resolve a dispute or seek revenge for a past wrong or injustice. It refers to taking action to achieve retribution or a sense of justice for a perceived offense or harm.
  • have a passing/slight/nodding acquaintance with sth The idiom "have a passing/slight/nodding acquaintance with something" refers to having a limited or superficial knowledge or familiarity with a particular subject, person, or thing. It implies that the knowledge or acquaintance is only superficial or cursory and not in-depth or extensive.
  • have a nodding acquaintance with sb/sth The idiom "have a nodding acquaintance with someone/something" means to have a very basic or superficial knowledge or familiarity with a person or a topic. It implies that the level of acquaintance is casual and limited, often only enough for a brief nod of recognition or acknowledgement.
  • scrape a living The idiom "scrape a living" refers to barely managing or struggling to earn enough income to meet basic needs or survive. It implies a situation where the person's income is meager and they must work hard to barely make ends meet.
  • be a rich seam to mine The idiom "be a rich seam to mine" refers to a situation, subject, or source that contains or offers a great wealth of valuable information, ideas, or possibilities. It suggests that there is a vast amount of valuable content or knowledge that can be extracted or discovered from that particular source or situation. It is often used to describe something that can be explored or utilized extensively for benefit or gain.
  • mine a rich seam of sth The phrase "mine a rich seam of something" is an idiomatic expression that typically refers to the act of exploring or discovering a valuable resource, idea, or source of inspiration. It originally derived from the practice of mining, where a "rich seam" refers to a vein of valuable minerals or ore found within the Earth. In a broader sense, it implies finding a profitable or abundant source of something, be it knowledge, creativity, or opportunities.
  • take a back seat The idiom "take a back seat" means to assume a less important or prominent role or position, to become less involved or influential in a situation, or to allow others to take the lead. It suggests a metaphorical representation of sitting in the backseat of a vehicle and relinquishing control or visibility to others.
  • just a minute/moment/second The idiom "just a minute/moment/second" is used to express a very short amount of time, usually indicating a brief delay or request for patience. It implies that the person needs a small amount of time to complete a task or attend to something before they can address the situation.
  • wait a minute/moment/second The idiom "wait a minute/moment/second" is typically used to express a request for patience or a pause in a conversation or activity. It implies the need for a brief delay in order to think, respond, or fully understand something before proceeding further.
  • come/be a poor second, third, etc. The idiom "come/be a poor second, third, etc." refers to being significantly less successful, desirable, or effective compared to someone or something else. It implies being in a position of lesser importance, skill, or value in relation to others.
  • let sb in on a secret The idiom "let someone in on a secret" means to share private or confidential information with someone, allowing them to be included in the knowledge or understanding of something that others may not be aware of.
  • see a man about a dog The idiom "see a man about a dog" is a humorous and euphemistic way of saying that one needs to excuse oneself temporarily or leave a gathering to attend to a personal or private matter, often without disclosing the specific reason. It is often used to politely decline or avoid providing further details about one's intended course of action.
  • look like/as though you've seen a ghost The idiom "look like/as though you've seen a ghost" means to appear extremely scared, shocked, or startled. It is used to describe someone's facial expression or overall demeanor when they appear pale, wide-eyed, and showing clear signs of distress or fear. It suggests that the individual's reaction is comparable to encountering something incredibly terrifying, as if they had come face to face with a supernatural entity.
  • be a shadow of your former self The idiom "be a shadow of your former self" refers to a person who has significantly deteriorated, either physically or in terms of ability, talent, or success, compared to their previous state. It implies that the person has become weaker, less influential, or less remarkable than they once were.
  • on a needtoknow basis The idiom "on a need-to-know basis" refers to the practice of sharing certain information only with individuals who require it for a specific purpose or task. In this context, information is shared selectively, usually due to confidentiality, security, or the need to avoid overwhelming or burdening individuals with unnecessary facts.
  • sell sb a bill of goods The idiom "sell someone a bill of goods" means to deceive or trick someone by providing false or misleading information in order to persuade them or get them to buy or believe something.
  • sell sb a pup, at sell sb a bill of goods "Sell sb a pup" and "sell sb a bill of goods" are idioms that mean to deceive or trick someone, often by providing false information or making false promises. It implies that someone has been convinced or persuaded to believe something that turns out to be untrue or worthless. This can happen in various situations, such as selling a defective product, providing misleading information, or making false claims about something.
  • send a signal to sb The idiom "send a signal to someone" means to communicate or convey a message, usually nonverbally, to someone else in order to express a particular intention, request, warning, or indication. It implies the act of transmitting a message through some form of action or behavior, often with the purpose of influencing or eliciting a response from the recipient.
  • send sb away with a flea in their ear The idiom "send sb away with a flea in their ear" means to dismiss or reject someone in a particularly harsh or reprimanding manner. It implies a scolding or rebuke that leaves the person feeling embarrassed, chastised, or humiliated.
  • be a victory for common sense The idiom "be a victory for common sense" refers to a situation or decision that underscores the importance of logical and practical thinking. It means that a certain outcome or result is considered a triumph because it aligns with what most people would see as reasonable, rational, or sensible. It emphasizes the rejection of excessive complexity, overthinking, or irrational thoughts in favor of practicality and sound judgment.
  • do sb a service The idiom "do sb a service" refers to the act of benefiting or assisting someone by performing a helpful action or favor on their behalf. It often implies going out of one's way to assist someone and generally carries a positive connotation.
  • have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects, plans, or opportunities that one is actively pursuing or involved in simultaneously. It implies that the person is engaged in various activities and keeping multiple options open in order to increase the chances of success or achieve desired outcomes.
  • cast a shadow over/on sth To "cast a shadow over/on something" is an idiom that means to create a feeling of sadness, gloom, or negativity, usually by causing a problem or setback that affects a particular situation or person. It implies that the negative influence is causing a dampening or overshadowing effect on the positive or hopeful aspects of the situation.
  • beyond a shadow of a doubt The idiom "beyond a shadow of a doubt" means to be completely certain or convinced about something without any room for doubt or uncertainty.
  • more (...) than you can shake a stick at The idiom "more (...) than you can shake a stick at" refers to an abundance or excessive quantity of something. It is often used to express the idea that there is an overwhelming number or quantity of things, people, or options available. The phrase suggests that there are so many of those items that shaking a stick to count or point at them would be futile or insufficient.
  • shake a leg The idiom "shake a leg" is defined as an expression urging someone to hurry up or move quickly.
  • in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" means performing a task quickly or completing something in a short period of time. It refers to the idea of something being done in just a few moments, as lambs are known to quickly shake their tails.
  • a fair shake, at a fair crack of the whip The idiom "a fair shake, at a fair crack of the whip" means giving someone equal and just opportunity or treatment. It refers to providing an individual with a fair chance or fair share in a particular situation or endeavor. The phrase often emphasizes the importance of equitable treatment and equal opportunities for everyone involved.
  • it's a crying shame The idiom "it's a crying shame" means expressing strong disappointment or disapproval about a situation or occurrence. It suggests that the situation is so regrettable or unfortunate that it provokes deep sadness or indignation.
  • (as) blind as a bat The idiom "(as) blind as a bat" refers to someone who has very poor eyesight or is completely unable to see.
  • a problem shared is a problem halved The idiom "a problem shared is a problem halved" means that discussing or sharing a problem with someone else reduces its weight and difficulty by half. It implies that by seeking support, advice, or simply venting to someone, the burden and impact of the problem can be significantly reduced.
  • share a platform The idiom "share a platform" refers to the act of collaborating or working together with someone, often in a public setting, to promote or advocate for a common cause, idea, or goal. It implies standing alongside someone to express and support similar views or principles while addressing a particular audience. This term is commonly used in political contexts when multiple individuals or groups with similar ideologies come together to speak on a specific issue or participate in a joint event.
  • have a sharp tongue The idiom "have a sharp tongue" refers to someone who has a tendency to speak harshly, critically, or sarcastically. It describes an individual who frequently uses cutting or biting remarks in their speech, often without considering the impact or effect it may have on others.
  • be sharptongued, at have a sharp tongue The idiom "be sharp-tongued" or "have a sharp tongue" refers to someone who tends to speak in a direct and critical manner, frequently using sarcasm or delivering harsh comments. This person is known for their ability to speak candidly, often without considering the impact their words may have on others.
  • a wolf in sheep's clothing The idiom "a wolf in sheep's clothing" refers to someone who appears harmless or friendly but is actually dangerous, deceitful, or malicious. It suggests that the person or thing in question is pretending to be gentle or innocent, yet has ulterior motives or harmful intentions.
  • you might as well be hung for a sheep as for a lamb The idiom "you might as well be hung for a sheep as for a lamb" means that if you are going to get in trouble or face severe consequences for doing something, you might as well do something even more significant or daring. It implies that the risk or punishment is already significant, so there is no point in holding back or being cautious.
  • a clean sheet/slate The idiom "a clean sheet/slate" refers to starting fresh or anew, usually after a previous mistake, failure, or negative experience. It means to have a clean, empty, or clear record or situation, without any past errors or obstacles. It emphasizes the idea of being given a chance to start from scratch and make things better or do things differently.
  • keep a clean sheet The idiom "keep a clean sheet" is often used in sports, particularly in soccer or football. It means to successfully prevent the opposing team from scoring any goals or points throughout the entire duration of a game or match. It implies maintaining a perfect defensive record without conceding any goals. Outside the sports context, it can be used metaphorically to signify successfully avoiding any mistakes, errors, or failures in a particular endeavor.
  • (as) white as a sheet The idiom "(as) white as a sheet" is typically used to describe someone's face or complexion when they appear extremely pale or frightened. It suggests that the person's skin has lost all color and turned as white as a plain sheet of paper.
  • take a shine to sb The idiom "take a shine to sb" means to develop a sudden and strong liking or attraction towards someone. It often implies an instant, positive impression or fondness.
  • shoot a glance at sb To "shoot a glance at someone" means to give them a quick, sharp, or discreet look, often to convey a particular message, emotion, or intention without directly addressing them verbally. It is a non-verbal form of communication that is usually done instinctively or in reaction to something happening in the surroundings.
  • like a bull in a china shop The expression "like a bull in a china shop" is an idiom used to describe someone who is clumsy, reckless, or lacking finesse and causes damage or disruption in delicate, sensitive, or unfamiliar situations. It typically refers to a person who acts impulsively or without regard for the consequences, often on account of their physical size, strength, or lack of grace.
  • have a short memory The idiom "have a short memory" is used to describe someone who quickly forgets negative experiences or past mistakes. It refers to a person's ability to easily move on from disappointments, failures, or conflicts, without dwelling on them or holding grudges. They may also be resilient and able to maintain a positive outlook despite setbacks or challenges.
  • not be short of a bob or two The idiom "not be short of a bob or two" means that someone is wealthy or has enough money. It implies that the person is financially comfortable or even affluent. In British English, "bob" is slang for a shilling, which was a coin used in the past, but the phrase is still understood to refer to having enough money.
  • have a short fuse The idiom "have a short fuse" means to have a quick and easily aroused temper. It refers to someone who gets angry or explodes in anger rapidly and without warning.
  • a shot in the arm The idiom "a shot in the arm" refers to an action or event that gives a boost or revitalizes something or someone's spirits, energy, or confidence. It can serve as a source of motivation, encouragement, or renewed strength.
  • a shot in the dark The idiom "a shot in the dark" refers to a wild guess or attempt at something without much hope of success, often based on very limited information or knowledge. It implies taking a chance or making an uncertain attempt without any clear expectations of positive results.
  • like a shot The idiom "like a shot" means to move or act quickly, without hesitation or delay. It implies a sense of urgency and immediate action.
  • a cheap shot The idiom "a cheap shot" refers to a sneaky or unfair attack, often taking advantage of someone in a vulnerable or unsuspecting position. It is usually used to describe an action or remark that is meant to harm or belittle someone without proper justification, typically lacking in sportsmanship or ethical conduct.
  • not by a long chalk/shot The idiom "not by a long chalk/shot" means that something is not even close to being true or accurate. It suggests that there is a significant difference or distance between the expected outcome and the actual outcome.
  • fire a (warning) shot across sb's bow The idiom "fire a (warning) shot across someone's bow" is derived from naval warfare and refers to issuing a warning or indication of potential aggression or conflict. It means to send a preemptive message or signal to someone to deter them from certain actions or behaviors by demonstrating one's readiness or willingness to take action if necessary. It implies the use of a metaphorical warning shot, similar to how a warship might fire a shot across the bow of another vessel as a signal to halt or change course.
  • a shoulder to cry on The idiom "a shoulder to cry on" means someone who offers comfort, support, and understanding to someone who is sad, upset, or in need of emotional consolation. It refers to a person who is willing to listen and provide empathy during difficult times, offering a source of strength and solace.
  • have a chip on your shoulder To have a chip on your shoulder means to have a persistent attitude of resentment or readiness for confrontation. It refers to harboring a grudge or feeling unjustly treated, often leading to a confrontational or defensive demeanor.
  • give sb a shout The phrase "give someone a shout" is an idiom that means to contact or call someone. It suggests getting in touch with someone, usually to inform or meet up with them.
  • show sm in a bad light The idiom "show someone in a bad light" means to present or portray someone or something in a negative or unfavorable way, often by highlighting their faults, flaws, or negative aspects. It suggests that the representation is not a fair or accurate reflection of the person or thing being depicted.
  • shudder to a halt The idiom "shudder to a halt" refers to a sudden and abrupt stop or cessation of movement, often accompanied by a trembling or shaking motion. It indicates a halt that is not smooth or controlled, but rather characterized by a jarring or uneasy effect.
  • sick as a dog The idiom "sick as a dog" refers to being extremely ill or feeling very unwell, usually experiencing symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or severe physical discomfort.
  • sick as a parrot The idiom "sick as a parrot" refers to a feeling of extreme disappointment, dejection, or sadness, often when something expected or desired does not happen or goes awry. It signifies a state of deep unhappiness or frustration.
  • fight a losing battle The idiom "fight a losing battle" means to continue vigorously to pursue or defend a cause or belief that is destined to fail or be unsuccessful. It implies that one's efforts are futile, and it is best to accept the inevitable outcome rather than persisting with no hope of success.
  • a bit on the side The idiom "a bit on the side" refers to having a secret or extramarital affair or a hidden romantic relationship outside one's primary relationship or marriage. It implies engaging in an additional or secondary romantic or sexual involvement alongside the existing one.
  • memory/mind like a sieve The idiom "memory/mind like a sieve" refers to someone who has a poor or unreliable memory. It is used to describe a person who forgets things easily or quickly, often implying that they have difficulty retaining information or remembering details. Just like a sieve, which has holes through which liquid or small particles pass, this idiomatic expression suggests that the person's thoughts and memories tend to slip away or be forgotten easily.
  • leak like a sieve The idiom "leak like a sieve" means to have a large number of holes or openings through which fluid or information escapes easily and continuously. It implies that something is leaking or losing contents rapidly and easily, much like a sieve (a mesh or perforated device used for straining liquids) that allows fluids to flow through it without restriction or control.
  • a sight for sore eyes The idiom "a sight for sore eyes" is used to describe something or someone that is very pleasant, beautiful, or comforting to behold, especially after a period of difficulty or absence. It implies that seeing the person or thing brings a sense of relief or joy to the eyes, as if they were tired or hurting before.
  • not be a pretty sight "Not be a pretty sight" is an idiom used to describe something or someone that looks unpleasant, unsightly, or unattractive. It implies that the appearance is not appealing or aesthetically pleasing to witness.
  • you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear The idiom "you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear" means that it is impossible to turn something of poor quality or low value into something of higher quality or value. Just as it would be impossible to create an elegant silk purse from the ear of a pig, this expression emphasizes the futility of attempting to transform something fundamentally flawed or inferior into something superior or exceptional.
  • every cloud has a silver lining The idiom "every cloud has a silver lining" means that even in a difficult or negative situation, there is usually something positive or beneficial that can be found or realized.
  • born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family and has been provided with abundant resources and opportunities right from birth. It implies that their life has been marked by privilege and ease, often lacking first-hand experience of financial or social challenges.
  • give/hand sth to sb on a (silver) platter The idiom "give/hand something to someone on a (silver) platter" means to give or provide something to someone very easily or without any effort or struggle. It implies that the person receiving it did not have to work hard or make any significant effort to obtain what they desire. Similar to serving a meal on a platter, it suggests that something is being delivered or presented in a convenient, effortless manner.
  • sink like a stone 1 The idiom "sink like a stone" means to quickly and completely descend or fall, often with great speed and without any chance of recovery or improvement. It is typically used to describe a situation, plan, or endeavor that quickly fails or becomes unsuccessful.
  • sink to a whisper The idiom "sink to a whisper" means to gradually decrease in volume, usually referring to someone's voice or a sound. It implies that the initial loudness or intensity is gradually reduced until it becomes a soft whisper.
  • sink to such a level/such depths The idiom "sink to such a level/such depths" refers to a situation or behavior that has deteriorated or stooped to an extremely low or disgraceful point. It suggests a decline in standards, morals, or integrity, reaching a level that is considered unacceptable or shameful.
  • sink so low, at sink to such a level/such depths The idiom "sink so low" or "sink to such a level/such depths" refers to a situation where someone's behavior or actions deteriorate dramatically, often to an unacceptable or morally debased degree. It implies a descent from a higher standard or moral position to a low or despicable state.
  • sink like a stone 2 The idiom "sink like a stone" is typically used to describe something, such as an idea or a business venture, that fails or falls rapidly and completely, often with little chance of recovery. It implies that the subject matter or situation quickly loses support, popularity, or value, similar to a heavy stone that quickly and decisively sinks to the bottom of a body of water.
  • sink like a lead balloon, at sink like a stone The idiom "sink like a lead balloon" is interchangeable with "sink like a stone" and it means to fail miserably, to achieve no success or to receive a negative response. Just as a lead balloon would quickly and inevitably fall to the ground instead of floating like a regular balloon, the idiom suggests that something or someone is met with an immediate and total lack of support or enthusiasm.
  • drop/fall/sink like a stone The idiom "drop/fall/sink like a stone" refers to something or someone rapidly descending or declining without any hindrance or delay. It signifies a quick and dramatic drop or failure. It can be used in various contexts, such as in financial markets, sports, or personal situations.
  • six of one and half a dozen of the other The idiom "six of one and half a dozen of the other" means that two choices or options are essentially the same. It implies that neither option is significantly better or worse than the other, so it doesn't matter which one you choose since the outcome will be similar either way.
  • not sleep a wink The idiom "not sleep a wink" means to be unable to sleep at all or to have a sleepless night. It implies that someone did not get any sleep during a particular period and struggled to stay awake throughout the night.
  • not get a wink of sleep, at not sleep a wink The idiom "not get a wink of sleep" or "not sleep a wink" means to be unable to sleep at all. It suggests a complete lack of sleep or rest during a specific period of time.
  • have a card up your sleeve The idiom "have a card up your sleeve" means to have a secret plan or hidden advantage that can be used to gain an advantage over others, especially in a competitive or challenging situation. It suggests being prepared with a surprise or alternative strategy to outsmart or outmaneuver others when needed. The phrase is derived from the practice of cheating in card games, where players may hide a valuable card up their sleeves to use it to their advantage.
  • a slice of life The idiom "a slice of life" refers to a realistic depiction or representation of everyday experiences and situations. It is typically used to describe a narrative, artwork, or performance that portrays familiar and ordinary aspects of human life in a genuine and relatable manner. It focuses on the essence of ordinary life, often highlighting mundane or commonplace events and interactions.
  • a piece/slice of the action The idiom "a piece/slice of the action" refers to one's involvement or participation in a particular event, investment, or endeavor, typically in order to obtain a share of the profit or benefits that result from it. It implies having a part in something exciting, profitable, or meaningful.
  • there's many a slip twixt cup and lip The idiom "there's many a slip twixt cup and lip" means that even though something seems certain or promising, there are often unforeseen events or circumstances that can cause plans to go awry. It suggests that between the moment of anticipation or expectation (when the cup is raised to the lip) and the desired outcome, many obstacles or mishaps can occur. Therefore, one should not assume success or completion until it has actually happened.
  • it's a small world The idiom "it's a small world" means that despite the vastness and diversity of the world, people often encounter coincidences, unexpected connections, or familiarity with others regardless of distance or circumstances. It suggests that the world can seem smaller and more interconnected than one may initially perceive.
  • a small fortune The idiom "a small fortune" refers to a relatively large amount of money, usually more than expected or required for a certain purpose. It implies that the sum of money, while not necessarily substantial in comparison to great riches, is still notable or considerable.
  • be a big fish in a small pond The idiom "be a big fish in a small pond" means to be highly important, influential, or successful in a limited or confined environment. It implies that the person excels or stands out among a small or less competitive group, but might not have the same level of significance or recognition in a larger, more competitive setting.
  • cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" or "cost a small fortune" refers to something that is very expensive, requiring a significant amount of money to obtain or purchase. It implies that the cost is exorbitant or excessively high, often beyond what is considered reasonable or affordable.
  • smell a rat The idiom "smell a rat" means to become suspicious or to sense that something is not right or honest in a situation.
  • vanish/go up/disappear in a puff of smoke The idiom "vanish/go up/disappear in a puff of smoke" means to suddenly and mysteriously vanish or disappear. It refers to something or someone disappearing so quickly and completely that it almost seems like they have turned into smoke and vanished into thin air. It is often used figuratively to describe a sudden and unexpected disappearance or cessation.
  • be a hoot The idiom "be a hoot" means to be very amusing, funny, or entertaining in a lighthearted and comical way. It implies that something or someone is highly entertaining and capable of making others laugh or be amused.
  • be a one The idiom "be a one" typically means to be an extraordinary or exceptional individual. It suggests that someone possesses unique qualities, skills, or attributes that make them stand out from others. It can also imply that someone is eccentric, unconventional, or one-of-a-kind.
  • be a picture The idiom "be a picture" means to look very beautiful, attractive, or visually pleasing. It implies that a person or thing has an appearance that is striking or picture-perfect.
  • be on a roll The idiom "be on a roll" means to be experiencing a series of repeated successes or victories, often consecutively or without interruption. It refers to a period of time when someone is performing exceptionally well or having a winning streak in various aspects of life, such as work, sports, or personal accomplishments.
  • be on the move, at make a move The idiom "be on the move" and "make a move" generally refer to taking action or making progress in a situation. It implies being proactive, actively engaging, or initiating movement towards a goal or objective. It can also denote a state of constant activity, restlessness, or a desire for change and new experiences.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" means that someone or something has no possibility or chance of success or achieving a desired outcome. It emphasizes the extreme unlikelihood of a particular event or situation occurring, comparing it to the idea of a snowball surviving in the extremely hot conditions of Hell.
  • a snowball effect The idiom "a snowball effect" refers to a situation where something, typically an action or event, starts small but gains momentum and grows rapidly over time, much like a snowball rolling down a hill that becomes larger as it accumulates more snow. It suggests that initial actions or consequences can lead to further and increasingly significant impacts or consequences, often beyond what was initially expected or intended.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell, at not have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" (or "not have a cat in hell's chance") means that someone or something has no possibility or hope of success. It emphasizes the extreme unlikelihood or impossibility of a desired outcome or goal being achieved.
  • (I'm so hungry), I could eat a horse The idiom "(I'm so hungry), I could eat a horse" means being extremely hungry to the point where one could consume a large amount of food, even to the extent of eating a whole horse. It is used figuratively to emphasize one's hunger and exaggerate the intensity of their appetite.
  • without (so much as) a backward glance The idiom "without (so much as) a backward glance" means to leave or depart from a place or situation without expressing any regret, hesitation, or attachment to what is left behind. It implies that the person is completely unconcerned or indifferent about what they are leaving behind or the consequences of their departure.
  • without so much as a byyourleave The idiom "without so much as a by-your-leave" means to do something or take action without seeking permission or informing someone beforehand. It refers to a situation where someone acts or makes a decision abruptly or rudely without any courtesy or consideration for others.
  • put a sock in it! The idiom "put a sock in it!" is used as a direct and sometimes rude way to tell someone to be quiet or stop talking. It is an expression that is typically used when someone's voice or words are irritating, unnecessary, or disruptive.
  • not care/give a sod The idiom "not care/give a sod" means to feel indifferent or unconcerned about something or someone. It indicates a lack of interest, importance, or willingness to invest emotional energy or attention in a particular matter.
  • bugger, sod, etc. this for a lark! The idiom "bugger, sod, etc. this for a lark!" typically expresses the sentiment of discarding or abandoning a particular task or situation, usually out of frustration or annoyance, in favor of engaging in a more enjoyable or carefree activity. It can be seen as a colloquial, informal way of saying "forget about it" or "let's do something fun instead." The specific expletive used in the construction of the idiom may vary, but it serves to enhance the emotive effect.
  • give sm a mouthful The idiom "give someone a mouthful" is an expression commonly used to describe an angry or forceful verbal response or a thorough scolding. It implies speaking with great intensity and harshness, usually in response to a situation or someone's actions that have caused frustration, annoyance, or anger.
  • give sm an inch and they'll take a mile The idiom "give someone an inch and they'll take a mile" means that when you grant someone a small opportunity or concession, they will use it as an excuse to demand or take much more than what was originally given. It implies that some individuals may exhibit a tendency to exploit a situation to their advantage, even if it was intended to be a small favor or concession.
  • be sth of a sth The idiom "be something of a something" is used to describe a person or thing that possesses certain characteristics or qualities, although perhaps not fully or completely. It implies that they partially exhibit the specified attribute or trait, but might not fully embody it. It suggests a moderate or moderate level of being the described thing.
  • sth a little stronger The idiom "something a little stronger" is typically used in a figurative sense to suggest the need for something more intense or powerful, often in terms of emotions or actions. It implies a desire for a more impactful or potent response or solution to a situation or problem.
  • for a song The idiom "for a song" means to acquire or obtain something at a very low cost or price, often significantly lower than its actual worth or value.
  • make a song and dance about sth The idiom "make a song and dance about something" means to excessively complain, argue, or express dissatisfaction about a relatively unimportant or trivial matter. It refers to someone exaggerating or drawing excessive attention to a situation, often in a dramatic or melodramatic way.
  • not a moment too soon The idiom "not a moment too soon" means that something has happened exactly at the right time, just before it was too late or just in time to prevent a negative consequence. It implies a sense of relief or gratitude that the event or action occurred when it did.
  • stand/stick out like a sore thumb The idiom "stand/stick out like a sore thumb" refers to someone or something being very noticeable, easily distinguished, or clearly different from the surrounding people or things. It implies that the person or object stands out prominently and often awkwardly, drawing attention and not fitting in with the general context.
  • be like a bear with a sore head The idiom "be like a bear with a sore head" is used to describe someone who is extremely irritable, bad-tempered, or grumpy. It emphasizes the sense of intense annoyance or discomfort that a bear with a sore head might experience, thus implying that the person in question is in a similar state of hostility or irritability.
  • it takes all sorts (to make a world) The idiom "it takes all sorts (to make a world)" means that there is a variety of people in the world, with different opinions, characteristics, and behaviors, and this diversity is necessary or essential for the functioning and richness of society or the world. It emphasizes the idea that everyone is unique and contributes in their own way to the overall makeup of society.
  • of a sort, at of sorts The idiom "of a sort" or "of sorts" is used to describe something that is not a perfect or ideal version of something, but is still somewhat representative or can be considered as a kind of that thing. It implies that the thing or situation being referred to is not exactly what is expected or desired, but is somewhat similar or has some qualities of it.
  • like a (real) bear, at be like a bear with a sore head The idiom "like a bear, at be like a bear with a sore head" is used to describe someone who is in a very irritable or grumpy mood, behaving aggressively or impatiently. It implies that the person's temperament resembles that of an actual bear (known for their occasional aggression and short temper) dealing with discomfort or pain.
  • a (heavy) cross to bear The idiom "a (heavy) cross to bear" refers to a burden, responsibility, or hardship that one must endure or carry, often implying that it is particularly difficult or challenging to manage. The phrase draws its origins from the Christian biblical reference to Jesus carrying a large cross before his crucifixion, symbolizing the weight and suffering of his sacrifice.
  • be as sound as a bell The idiom "be as sound as a bell" means to be in excellent condition or health, with no faults, issues, or weaknesses. It refers to something or someone that is sturdy, reliable, and functioning well.
  • call a spade a spade The idiom "call a spade a spade" means to speak plainly and directly, without using euphemisms or avoiding unpleasant or blunt truths. It implies expressing a truth or opinion honestly, without sugar-coating or using less direct language.
  • in a manner of speaking The idiom "in a manner of speaking" means expressing something in a figurative or indirect way rather than stating it directly. It is often used to indicate that what is being said may not be entirely accurate or literal, but it serves as a way to convey a particular idea or sentiment.
  • beat a path to sb's door The idiom "beat a path to someone's door" means that a lot of people are frequently going to or visiting someone because they are seeking their expertise, assistance, or advice. It implies that the person is highly sought-after or renowned in a specific field or for a particular reason.
  • beat a retreat The idiom "beat a retreat" means to withdraw or leave a place, typically quickly and discreetly, especially to avoid trouble or confrontation. It originated from military language, referring to the beating of a drum to signal soldiers to retreat or withdraw from a battle or dangerous situation. In a broader context, it can also be used metaphorically to describe someone's hasty departure from any situation that they find uncomfortable or undesirable.
  • beat your retreat, at beat a retreat The idiom "beat your retreat" or "beat a retreat" means to withdraw quickly or to escape from a situation or place that is difficult, dangerous, or unfavorable. It originates from military terminology, where "beating a retreat" refers to the act of sounding a drumbeat or a bugle call to signal soldiers to reverse direction and retreat from the battlefield. In a broader sense, this idiom can apply to any situation where someone needs to leave swiftly or retreat from an unfavorable circumstance.
  • beat sb to a pulp The idiom "beat sb to a pulp" means to physically assault or beat someone very severely, typically resulting in serious injuries or extreme harm.
  • beat sb to a jelly The idiomatic expression "beat sb to a jelly" is a figurative phrase that means to severely or mercilessly beat someone to the point where they are badly bruised, injured, or incapacitated. It implies a violent and brutal act of physically assaulting someone.
  • a stick to beat sb with The idiom "a stick to beat sb with" refers to an argument, criticism, or mistake that is used as a weapon against someone, often to prove them wrong or to blame them for something. It symbolizes a tool that is used to attack or punish someone in a figurative sense.
  • your heart skips/misses a beat The idiom "your heart skips/misses a beat" refers to a sudden feeling of excitement, surprise, fear, or intense emotion that causes one's heart to momentarily stop or beat irregularly. It indicates a strong and often unexpected reaction to something.
  • spend a penny The idiom "spend a penny" is a British expression used to euphemistically describe the act of using a restroom or going to the toilet. It originated from the practice of having to pay a penny to use public toilets in the past.
  • take a spill The idiom "take a spill" means to fall or to have a sudden and unexpected tumble, often resulting in losing balance and physically hitting the ground or an object. It implies a sudden accident or mishap that causes someone to fall.
  • in a spin The idiom "in a spin" refers to a state of extreme confusion, panic, or distress. It describes a situation in which someone is feeling overwhelmed or mentally disoriented, often due to stress, uncertainty, or an unexpected event.
  • be spoiling for a fight The idiom "be spoiling for a fight" means to be eagerly or aggressively looking for a confrontation or argument. It refers to someone who is actively seeking or desiring conflict or a physical altercation.
  • many a true word is spoken in jest The idiom "many a true word is spoken in jest" means that often, a seemingly joking or humorous statement contains an element of truth or reveals deeper underlying thoughts or feelings. It suggests that humor or jokes can be a way people express their genuine opinions or beliefs.
  • be in a tight corner/spot The idiom "be in a tight corner/spot" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation where there are few or limited options available, often resulting in feeling trapped or uncertain about how to proceed.
  • a leopard can't/doesn't change its spots The idiom "a leopard can't/doesn't change its spots" means that a person's fundamental nature or characteristics do not change over time. It implies that someone's inherent qualities, behaviors, or tendencies remain consistent and predictable regardless of their attempts or claims to change.
  • not a bed of roses, at not all roses The idiom "not a bed of roses, at not all roses" means that a particular situation or experience is not easy or pleasant, and may involve challenges, difficulties, or hardships. It implies that there are thorny aspects or unpleasant realities to be faced along with the positive aspects. It suggests that success or happiness requires effort, perseverance, and the ability to endure hardships.
  • early to bed and early to rise (makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise) The idiom "early to bed and early to rise (makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise)" is a proverb that suggests that one's well-being, financial success, and wisdom are results of having a consistent routine of going to bed early and waking up early. It implies that being disciplined, responsible, and proactive in managing one's time and daily habits can lead to overall prosperity and a fulfilled life.
  • a spring in your step The idiom "a spring in your step" refers to having an energetic, lively, or buoyant manner of walking or moving. It indicates that someone is feeling happy, optimistic, or enthusiastic about something, which is reflected in their physical movements.
  • have/make a stab at sth The idiom "have/make a stab at sth" means to attempt or try something, usually without a lot of confidence or certainty. It implies giving it a shot or making an effort, even if there is a chance of failure.
  • stake a claim The idiom "stake a claim" means to officially assert ownership or make a strong declaration of one's rights or interests in a particular area or matter. It originates from the practice of physically marking or placing stakes on a piece of land to indicate one's intention to possess or utilize it. Today, it is often used metaphorically to assert one's position or lay a strong claim over something, such as a territory, idea, or opportunity.
  • stand/stick out a mile The idiom "stand/stick out a mile" means that something is very obvious, noticeable, or easily seen. It implies that there is no effort required to recognize or identify the thing in question because it is so clear or apparent.
  • not have a leg to stand on The idiom "not have a leg to stand on" means to lack evidence, justification, or a valid argument to support one's position or claim. It signifies a situation where someone is unable to provide solid proof or credible reasoning to support their case.
  • from a standing start The idiom "from a standing start" refers to starting something quickly or suddenly without any prior momentum, preparation, or advantage. It indicates that someone or something is beginning a task or competition from a completely stationary position or with no initial progress or advantage.
  • behind every great/successful man there stands a woman The idiom "behind every great/successful man there stands a woman" suggests that the success or achievements of a man are often supported or made possible by the efforts, contributions, or influence of a woman. It implies that women play significant roles in the background, providing support, guidance, inspiration, or assistance to facilitate the greatness or success of men.
  • be (as) busy as a bee The idiom "be (as) busy as a bee" means to be very industrious, hardworking, or occupied with various tasks and activities. It is derived from the observation that bees are known for their constant activity and diligence when it comes to building their hives, gathering nectar, and producing honey.
  • have a bee in your bonnet The idiom "have a bee in your bonnet" means to have an obsessive or fixed idea that occupies one's thoughts and causes an individual to act irrationally or excessively focused on a particular subject or topic.
  • be in/get into a state The idiom "be in/get into a state" means to be in a state of distress, anxiety, or agitation. It refers to someone being emotionally overwhelmed, upset, or extremely anxious about a particular situation.
  • in a good, bad, etc. state of repair, at in good, bad, etc. repair The idiom "in a good, bad, etc. state of repair" or "in good, bad, etc. repair" is used to describe the condition or quality of something, typically a physical object or a property. It indicates whether an item or property is well-maintained, functioning properly, and visually appealing, or alternatively, if it is poorly maintained, damaged, or deteriorated. This expression highlights the overall state of condition and repair of the particular object or property being referred to.
  • steal a march on sb The idiom "steal a march on someone" means to gain an advantage over someone or to take action secretly or without their knowledge in order to get ahead or be in a better position. It implies being one step ahead or having a head start on a particular situation or competition.
  • a head of steam The idiom "a head of steam" is used to describe someone or something that has gathered momentum, energy, or enthusiasm, often in pursuit of a specific goal or task. It implies that the person or thing is moving forward quickly and forcefully, with determination and intensity. It originates from the literal meaning of steam locomotives building up pressure in their boilers to generate power and speed.
  • steer a course/path The idiom "steer a course/path" means to carefully plan and navigate one's way through a particular situation or set of circumstances. It refers to making deliberate choices and strategies to reach a desired goal while avoiding obstacles or difficulties along the way.
  • a few/couple of steps The idiom "a few/couple of steps" typically means a short distance or a small number. It refers to the idea of moving a short distance forward or making a small amount of progress.
  • a step backwards The idiom "a step backwards" means a regressive or retrogressive action, generally implying that progress is being halted or reversed. It refers to a situation where there is a decline or setback, contrary to what is expected or desired.
  • a step forward The idiom "a step forward" typically refers to making progress or moving in a positive direction. It suggests advancing or improving a situation or condition. It can be used to describe an action or decision that contributes to positive change or development.
  • a backward step, at a step backwards The idiom "a backward step" or "a step backwards" means to regress or move in the opposite direction of progress or improvement. It refers to taking actions or making decisions that hinder or undo previous advancements or achievements.
  • step/move up a gear The idiom "step/move up a gear" is used to describe the act of increasing one's effort or performance, usually with the intention of achieving better results or completing a task more efficiently. It signifies taking things to a higher level, often implying increased intensity or speed. It can be used in various contexts, such as work, sports, or personal development.
  • in a stew The idiom "in a stew" typically means to be in a state of worry, confusion, or agitation. It refers to feeling anxious or troubled, often about a particular situation or problem.
  • a blanket of sth The idiom "a blanket of sth" refers to a situation or condition where something covers, envelops, or spreads evenly over a particular area or object. It implies a coverage that is complete, thorough, or all-encompassing, much like a blanket that completely covers a bed or a person. This idiom is often used metaphorically to describe the extent or impact of something that is widespread, pervasive, or all-inclusive.
  • a blitz on sth The idiom "a blitz on sth" refers to a concentrated and intense effort or attack on something, usually in a rapid and overwhelming manner. It is derived from the military term "blitzkrieg," which means a swift and powerful offensive. In a figurative sense, "a blitz on sth" implies a strong and focused assault or effort aimed at accomplishing a specific goal or addressing a particular issue.
  • come to/meet a sticky end The idiom "come to/meet a sticky end" means to have a gruesome, unfortunate, or unpleasant fate or outcome, often resulting in a tragic or tragicomic demise. It suggests a sense of the person facing an untimely and problematic end.
  • go through a bad/difficult/rough/sticky patch The idiom "go through a bad/difficult/rough/sticky patch" means to experience a period of time characterized by challenging or unfavorable circumstances. It implies facing an extended period of hardship, problems, or obstacles in one's life or a specific situation. During this period, one may encounter difficulties, setbacks, or struggles that require perseverance and resilience to overcome.
  • (as) stiff/straight as a ramrod The idiom "(as) stiff/straight as a ramrod" is used to describe someone who is very rigid, disciplined, or upright in posture and demeanor. It implies a person who maintains a perfectly straight and rigid posture, resembling the stiffness of a ramrod—a metal or wooden bar used to clean and load firearms, which needs to remain straight for efficient use. The idiom can also convey a sense of strictness or inflexibility in someone's behavior or mannerisms.
  • have a sting in the/its tail The idiom "have a sting in the/its tail" means that there is an unexpected or unpleasant surprise or consequence to something. It implies that even though something may initially seem positive or harmless, there is a hidden problem or disadvantage that will eventually reveal itself.
  • cause a stink The idiom "cause a stink" means to create a strong and negative reaction or protest about something, typically by complaining loudly or fiercely. It refers to making a fuss or raising a commotion to draw attention to a particular issue or to express one's dissatisfaction.
  • create/kick up/raise a stink The idiom "create/kick up/raise a stink" means to cause a major fuss or uproar about something, often involving complaints, protests, or a strong expression of disapproval. It implies making a situation highly visible and attention-grabbing in order to bring about changes or rectify a problem.
  • a stitch in time (saves nine) The idiom "a stitch in time (saves nine)" means that taking prompt action to fix a small problem now can prevent it from becoming a larger problem in the future. It emphasizes the importance of addressing issues early on to avoid more significant consequences or repairs later.
  • go as red as a beet, at go/turn beetroot (red) The idiom "go as red as a beet" or "go/turn beetroot (red)" refers to a situation when someone becomes noticeably embarrassed or blushes extensively, resulting in their face turning red, similar to the color of a beet vegetable. It signifies extreme embarrassment or heightened emotional response, often triggered by an embarrassing or uncomfortable event or situation.
  • have a strong stomach The idiom "have a strong stomach" means to have the ability to withstand or tolerate things that are unpleasant, disturbing, or revolting, often referring to graphic or morbid situations. It indicates a person's resilience or lack of sensitivity towards such matters.
  • have a weak stomach The idiom "have a weak stomach" means to be easily nauseated or to have a low tolerance for unpleasant sights or smells, often causing one to feel sick or queasy. It is used to describe someone who is sensitive or unable to handle situations or substances that others find tolerable.
  • a strong stomach, at strong nerves The idiom "a strong stomach, and strong nerves" is used to describe someone who has the ability to tolerate or handle unpleasant, disturbing, or terrifying situations without feeling nauseous, afraid, or disturbed. It implies that the person possesses a great deal of physical and emotional resilience, keeping calm and composed even in challenging or gruesome circumstances.
  • the way to a man's heart is through his stomach The idiom "the way to a man's heart is through his stomach" means that one can win a man's affection or love by satisfying him with good food. It implies that cooking or preparing delicious meals for someone can be a way to gain their affection or favor.
  • a stone's throw The idiom "a stone's throw" means a very short distance away, typically referring to something that is within close proximity or easily reachable.
  • have a heart of stone The idiom "have a heart of stone" means to be cold, unsympathetic, or lacking in compassion or empathy. It suggests that a person is unfeeling and unaffected by emotional or sensitive matters.
  • get blood out of/from a stone The idiom "get blood out of/from a stone" means attempting to extract something from someone or something that is unwilling or unyielding. It implies a situation or task that is extremely difficult or impossible to achieve. Just as it is impossible to squeeze blood from a stone, it suggests that obtaining the desired result or response is equally improbable.
  • a rolling stone (gathers no moss) The idiom "a rolling stone (gathers no moss)" means that a person who is constantly on the move or changing their circumstances does not accumulate responsibilities, attachments, or obligations. It suggests that individuals who are constantly exploring or changing their environment have less stability and fewer lasting connections, but also have fewer burdens or troubles.
  • go as red as a beetroot, at go/turn beetroot (red) The idiom "go as red as a beetroot" or "go/turn beetroot (red)" means to become intensely embarrassed or ashamed, causing one's face to noticeably redden, resembling the color of a beetroot, a deep red vegetable. It signifies a sudden and obvious display of embarrassment or humiliation.
  • come to a full stop The idiom "come to a full stop" means to completely cease or halt any movement or activity. It is often used to convey the idea of pausing or completely ending a particular action or progression.
  • cook up, dance up, talk up, etc. a storm The idiom "cook up, dance up, talk up, etc. a storm" means to do something with great intensity, energy, or enthusiasm. It implies that the subject of the action is done in an exaggerated or overwhelming manner, often producing impressive or excessive results. This expression often suggests a level of excitement, fervor, or creativity being put into the activity, resulting in a significant impact or outcome.
  • storm in a teacup The idiom "storm in a teacup" refers to an overblown or exaggerated reaction to a minor issue or problem. It implies that people are excessively concerned or making a big fuss about something relatively unimportant or trivial.
  • pride comes/goes before a fall The idiom "pride comes/goes before a fall" means that excessive arrogance or overconfidence often leads to a person's downfall or failure. It suggests that those who are too proud or complacent about their success are more vulnerable to experiencing a sudden loss, setback, or failure.
  • it's a long story The idiom "it's a long story" is used to indicate that the explanation of a situation or event would require a significant amount of time to fully explain or recount. It suggests that the story is complex, detailed or convoluted, and the speaker may not have the time, patience, or desire to go into all the necessary details at that moment.
  • (that's) a likely story! The idiom "(that's) a likely story!" is used to express skepticism or disbelief towards someone's explanation or excuse. It implies that the statement being made is improbable, exaggerated, or simply not believable.
  • every picture tells a story The idiom "every picture tells a story" means that a single image or visual representation can convey a complete narrative or message. It suggests that there is significant meaning or information embedded within a picture, and by analyzing its details, one can understand the story being expressed. This phrase emphasizes the idea that visual imagery can be powerful and evocative, capable of expressing emotions, experiences, or perspectives without the need for words.
  • (as) straight as a die The idiom "(as) straight as a die" means to be completely honest, trustworthy, and reliable. It implies that someone or something is very straightforward and has a strong moral or ethical character. The phrase originates from the idea of a perfectly shaped and accurate die used in gambling, implying that there is no chance of deception or unfairness.
  • keep a straight face The idiom "keep a straight face" means to remain serious and not show any signs of amusement or laughter, even in a humorous or absurd situation. It refers to maintaining a neutral and composed facial expression.
  • a drowning man will clutch at a straw The idiom "a drowning man will clutch at a straw" means that when a person is desperate or in a dire situation, they will grasp onto any slight chance or hope, no matter how unlikely or insignificant, to try to save themselves or improve their situation. It implies that when someone is at their most vulnerable, they will desperately seek any possible solution, no matter how futile it may be.
  • like a streak of lightning The idiom "like a streak of lightning" refers to someone or something that moves very quickly, often describing a person's exceptional speed, agility, or swiftness in accomplishing a task or covering a distance. It implies rapidity and efficiency, emphasizing the fast and sudden nature of the movement or action being described.
  • talk a blue streak The idiom "talk a blue streak" means to talk rapidly, incessantly, or without pause. It refers to someone who talks at a fast pace, often without taking a breath or interruption.
  • a tower of strength The idiom "a tower of strength" refers to someone who is exceptionally strong, supportive, and reliable during challenging times or difficult situations. This person acts as a source of comfort, guidance, and stability, providing unwavering support and assistance to others.
  • stretch a point The idiom "stretch a point" means to exaggerate or distort the truth or rules in order to accommodate or achieve something. It refers to bending or not strictly adhering to the facts or principles to make a situation more favorable or convenient.
  • strike a balance The idiom "strike a balance" means to find a compromise or middle ground between two opposing ideas, interests, or perspectives in order to create a harmonious or fair outcome. It refers to the act of achieving equilibrium or a suitable combination that satisfies multiple parties or factors involved.
  • strike a blow against/at sth The idiom "strike a blow against/at something" means to take action or make an effort to undermine, damage, or weaken a particular thing, typically an institution, system, belief, or ideal. It often implies an attempt to challenge or disrupt the status quo and create a significant impact or setback for the target.
  • strike a blow for sth The idiom "strike a blow for sth" means to take action or make an effort in support of a particular cause or idea, especially if it involves challenging the existing status quo or making a significant impact towards achieving a desired outcome. It often implies actively fighting for, defending, or promoting something one believes in, in order to bring about positive change or progress.
  • strike a chord The idiom "strike a chord" typically means to evoke a strong emotional response or resonate with someone. It refers to deeply connecting with or stirring a familiar feeling or memory within a person.
  • strike a note The idiom "strike a note" means to mention or emphasize a particular theme or topic, often to generate a specific reaction or response. It can also refer to setting a particular tone or mood in speech, writing, or music.
  • touch/strike/hit a (raw) nerve To touch/strike/hit a (raw) nerve means to say or do something that deeply upsets or angers someone because it directly relates to a sensitive or personal issue they have. It refers to an action that triggers a strong emotional response, causing discomfort or annoyance. The term "raw nerve" implies an area of heightened sensitivity.
  • tear a strip off sb To "tear a strip off someone" means to criticize or reprimand them severely and angrily. It is a figurative expression conveying the idea of forcefully tearing a piece from someone, representing the act of scolding or berating them with harsh words.
  • tear sb off a strip, at tear a strip off sb To "tear someone off a strip" or "tear a strip off someone" is an idiomatic expression that means to scold, criticize, or reprimand someone severely or angrily. It implies speaking to someone using harsh and forceful language, often with the intention of conveying disapproval or expressing anger towards their behavior or actions.
  • be stuck in a groove The idiom "be stuck in a groove" means to be stuck in a repetitive or stagnant pattern of behavior, thoughts, or actions without making progress or experiencing any change. It often implies being trapped in a routine that lacks variety or innovation, leading to boredom or a lack of personal growth. The phrase is derived from the repetitive pattern made by a needle on a vinyl record that seems unable to move forward or explore different tracks.
  • have your head (buried/stuck) in a book The idiom "have your head (buried/stuck) in a book" means that a person is deeply engrossed in reading and paying full attention to the content of a book, often to the exclusion of other activities or distractions. It implies being fully absorbed in the world created by the book, often leading to a lack of awareness of one's surroundings or social interactions.
  • a bit of fluff/stuff/skirt The idiom "a bit of fluff/stuff/skirt" is used to refer to a person, usually a woman, who is seen as a casual, temporary romantic partner or someone who is not taken seriously in a relationship. It often implies a lack of commitment or emotional connection.
  • a roaring success The idiom "a roaring success" is used to describe something that is extremely successful or widely praised. It implies that the venture, event, or accomplishment is booming, achieving great results, or receiving enthusiastic acclaim.
  • be a victim of your own success The idiom "be a victim of your own success" means that someone experiences unforeseen or negative consequences as a result of achieving great success or achieving their goals. It implies that the success or accomplishment brings about unexpected challenges, pressures, or problems that can be overwhelming or burdensome.
  • be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc. The idiom "be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc." means that a particular course of action or situation is very likely to result in a specified outcome, which could be negative (disaster, trouble) or positive (success). It implies that the elements or components involved in the situation are combined in such a way that they are likely to lead to a predictable result. The phrase often highlights the potential consequences of the current path or plan being followed.
  • there's no such thing as a free lunch The idiom "there's no such thing as a free lunch" means that nothing comes without a cost or consequence. It suggests that every opportunity or benefit usually has a hidden price or drawback.
  • be a hard/tough act to follow The idiom "be a hard/tough act to follow" means to be someone or something that is exceptionally impressive, skillful, or successful, making it difficult for the next person or thing to live up to or match their performance or achievements. It implies that the previous person's or thing's performance sets a high standard that is difficult to surpass.
  • do a disappearing/vanishing act The idiom "do a disappearing/vanishing act" means to suddenly and unexpectedly leave without informing or explaining one's departure, usually in order to avoid a difficult or uncomfortable situation. It implies disappearing or vanishing in a manner comparable to a magician's act, where someone seems to vanish instantly and without a trace.
  • sb couldn't act, argue, fight, etc. their way out of a paper bag The idiom "sb couldn't act, argue, fight, etc. their way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who lacks the ability or skill to accomplish a specific task or achieve a desired outcome. It implies that the person is completely incapable and incompetent.
  • give sb a bell The idiom "give sb a bell" means to phone or call someone.
  • ring a bell The idiom "ring a bell" means to sound familiar or to trigger a memory.
  • (as) clear as a bell The idiom "(as) clear as a bell" means that something is very clear, distinct, and easily understood. It refers to a sound produced by a bell, which is sharp, pure, and easily heard.
  • a place in the sun The idiom "a place in the sun" refers to a situation or position of prominence, success, or advantage. It often implies achieving a desired position, recognition, or a comfortable and favorable position in life.
  • a sure thing The idiom "a sure thing" refers to something that is guaranteed to happen or be successful. It indicates a high level of certainty or confidence in the outcome or result of a particular situation or event.
  • swear like a trooper The idiom "swear like a trooper" refers to someone who frequently and fervently uses profanity or strong language. It implies that the person's speech is characterized by a heavy and continuous use of swear words, similar to a soldier or trooper known for their colorful language.
  • get in a sweat To "get in a sweat" is an idiomatic expression that means to become anxious, worried, or stressed about something. It implies feeling overwhelmed or worked up about a particular situation or problem.
  • no/not enough room to swing a cat The idiom "no/not enough room to swing a cat" refers to a very cramped or confined space where there is barely enough room for movement. It implies that the area is so small that even attempting to swing a small object like a cat would be difficult or impossible.
  • be like taking candy from a baby The idiom "be like taking candy from a baby" means that something is incredibly easy or effortless to accomplish, often referring to a task or challenge that requires little skill or effort to complete. It implies that the task is almost too simple, similar to how taking candy from a baby would be effortless and uncomplicated.
  • take one (thing) at a time The idiom "take one (thing) at a time" means to approach tasks or problems by dealing with them individually and sequentially, rather than trying to handle them all at once. It advises focusing on one task or issue before moving on to the next, promoting a methodical and less overwhelming approach.
  • take a walk! The idiom "take a walk!" is an informal and usually rude way of telling someone to go away or leave a particular place. It implies that the speaker does not want the person to be present or involved in the situation anymore.
  • take a pew! The idiom "take a pew!" is a humorous or informal way of inviting someone to sit down, often used when there is limited seating available. The phrase "pew" refers to a long bench with a back, typically found in churches.
  • take a joke The idiom "take a joke" means to be able to accept or understand humor without taking offense or becoming upset. It implies being able to handle lighthearted or teasing remarks without reacting defensively or negatively.
  • take a tumble The idiom "take a tumble" means to fall or stumble, often unexpectedly or unintentionally, resulting in a loss of balance or composure. It can be used both literally and figuratively to describe physical or emotional falls or setbacks.
  • take a hike! The idiom "take a hike!" is an informal and somewhat impolite way of telling someone to go away or leave. It is often used when someone is annoying, bothering, or simply unwanted in a situation or conversation.
  • have/take a dump The idiom "have/take a dump" is a colloquial expression that is used to describe the act of defecating or having a bowel movement. It is a more informal and crude way of referring to this bodily function.
  • take a battering The idiom "take a battering" means to endure or suffer from a series of repeated and forceful attacks, whether physical, emotional, or metaphorical. It implies facing difficult and challenging circumstances that can cause damage or distress.
  • take/have a knock The idiom "take/have a knock" typically means to experience a setback or difficulty in life, career, or personal endeavors. It implies facing a temporary setback that may affect one's confidence or progress toward a goal.
  • make/take a note The idiom "make/take a note" refers to the act of recording or writing down important information or instructions for future reference. It implies actively listening, paying attention, and ensuring that the information is not forgotten or overlooked.
  • take/get a pounding The idiom "take/get a pounding" means to be subjected to a severe or significant physical or psychological beating, defeat, or criticism. It implies enduring a punishing or relentless attack or a negative situation that causes immense difficulty or distress.
  • bring/take sb down a peg (or two) To "bring/take someone down a peg (or two)" means to humble or deflate their ego or self-importance. It refers to the act of reducing someone's inflated sense of superiority or arrogance, reminding them of their rightful place.
  • take a stroll/trip/walk down memory lane The idiom "take a stroll/trip/walk down memory lane" refers to revisiting or reminiscing about past memories or events, often in a nostalgic manner. It implies going back in time mentally to reflect on and relive memorable experiences or moments from the past.
  • take sb for a ride The definition of the idiom "take someone for a ride" means to deceive, trick, or manipulate someone, often for personal gain or amusement. It can refer to taking advantage of someone's naivety or gullibility by leading them astray or misguiding them for one's own purposes.
  • not take a blind bit of notice The idiom "not take a blind bit of notice" means to completely ignore or disregard something or someone, paying no attention whatsoever.
  • take a rain check (on sth) The idiom "take a rain check (on sth)" means to politely decline an invitation or offer, but express interest in accepting it at a later time or date. It implies postponing or rescheduling a planned engagement or experience.
  • take a hard line on sb/sth The idiom "take a hard line on sb/sth" means to adopt a strict, uncompromising stance or approach towards someone or something. It refers to being firm, resolute, and unwavering in dealing with a particular person or situation, often without showing leniency or flexibility.
  • take a rise out of, at get a rise out of The idiom "take a rise out of" or "get a rise out of" refers to provoking or teasing someone in order to elicit a strong reaction or emotional response from them, often for one's own amusement.
  • take a leaf out of sb's book The idiom "take a leaf out of someone's book" means to imitate or learn from someone's behavior, actions, or strategies that have been successful or effective. It suggests adopting similar approaches or methods in order to achieve similar results.
  • have/take a notion to do sth The idiom "have/take a notion to do something" means to suddenly or unexpectedly have a desire or inclination to do something. It refers to a spontaneous or impulsive decision or urge to engage in a specific activity or action. It usually implies that the person's motivation or choice is driven by a passing whim or a change in mood.
  • take to sth like a duck to water The idiom "take to something like a duck to water" means to adapt quickly and easily to something new or unfamiliar, just as a duck instinctively feels comfortable and at ease when in the water. It suggests that the person or creature being referred to demonstrates a natural affinity or talent for the activity or situation.
  • be as easy as taking candy from a baby, at be like taking candy from a baby The idiom "be as easy as taking candy from a baby" or "be like taking candy from a baby" is a simile used to describe a task or activity that is considered extremely simple, effortless, or requiring no skill or effort at all. It implies that the task is so easy that even a child, who is easily tricked or manipulated, could accomplish it without any challenge or resistance.
  • a tall tale The idiom "a tall tale" refers to an exaggerated or wildly fictional story or account, often presented as fact. It is a narrative or anecdote that stretches the bounds of credibility, featuring characters, events, or details that are highly unlikely or impossible.
  • thereby hangs a tale The idiom "thereby hangs a tale" is used to indicate that there is an interesting or significant story behind a situation or event. It implies that there is more to the situation than meets the eye and that there is a story to be told.
  • be like talking to a brick wall The idiom "be like talking to a brick wall" means attempting to communicate with someone who is completely unresponsive or unyielding, as if their lack of understanding or reaction makes it as futile as talking to an inanimate object.
  • talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey The idiom "talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey" means to talk excessively or for an unusually long time, often in a persuasive or argumentative manner. It suggests that someone is capable of talking so much that they could even convince a donkey to lose one or both of its hind legs.
  • you're a fine one to talk!, at look who's talking! The idiom "you're a fine one to talk!" or "look who's talking!" is used to sarcastically point out the hypocrisy or irony in someone's comment or complaint, especially when they are guilty of the same or similar behavior. It highlights the contradiction between what they are saying and their own actions or characteristics.
  • be a tall order The idiom "be a tall order" means that a task or requirement is difficult or challenging to accomplish, often implying that it may be unrealistic or demanding an extraordinary effort.
  • go/fly off at a tangent The idiom "go/fly off at a tangent" means to suddenly change the subject or direction of a conversation or thought, often diverting from the main point or topic. It refers to a leap or deviation from the intended path or focus, leading into a different direction entirely.
  • go off on a tangent, at go/fly off at a tangent The idiom "go off on a tangent, at go/fly off at a tangent" means to suddenly shift or veer from the main topic of conversation or main focus of attention onto an unrelated or unrelated direction. It describes a situation where someone starts discussing or pursuing a completely different idea or topic, often irrelevant or tangential to the original discussion or context.
  • leave a bad taste in sb's mouth The idiom "leave a bad taste in someone's mouth" means to have a negative or undesirable impression or feeling about something or someone. It usually refers to an experience that has left a person feeling unsatisfied, disappointed, or disgusted.
  • give sb a dose/taste of their own medicine The idiom "give someone a dose/taste of their own medicine" means to retaliate or treat someone in the same negative or hurtful way that they have treated others. It refers to reciprocating the same kind of behavior or treatment that someone has inflicted upon others, in order to make them experience the same consequences or feelings they have caused.
  • teach sb a lesson The idiom "teach someone a lesson" means to do something in order to punish or discipline someone, usually as a way to help them learn from their mistakes or misbehavior. It implies a form of retribution that is intended to make someone understand the consequences of their actions and to ensure they don't repeat the behavior in the future.
  • be in a tearing hurry The idiom "be in a tearing hurry" means to be in a state of extreme haste or urgency. It implies a sense of rushing or rushing through something quickly and forcefully.
  • I tell a lie The idiom "I tell a lie" is a phrase used to indicate that the speaker has made an error or said something untrue. It is often used to correct a previous statement or clarify a misperception.
  • fly into a temper/fury, at fly into a rage The idiom "fly into a temper/fury" or "fly into a rage" is used to describe someone suddenly becoming extremely angry or losing their temper. It implies that their anger escalates rapidly, as if it were triggered by an external force or happening in a spontaneous manner.
  • be two/ten a penny, at be a dime a dozen The idiom "be two a penny" (or "be ten a penny") is synonymous with the idiom "be a dime a dozen." It means that something or someone is very common, ordinary, or easily found. It implies that the item or person being referred to is of little value or significance due to its abundance or lack of uniqueness.
  • be two/ten a penny The idiom "be two/ten a penny" means that something or someone is very common, easily accessible, or not valuable or unique. It implies that there are many similar or identical things or people and they are not particularly special or rare.
  • nine times out of ten, at ninetynine times out of a hundred The idiom "nine times out of ten, at ninetynine times out of a hundred" means that something is almost always true or likely to happen. It indicates a high probability or a consistent pattern of occurrence. In other words, it implies that the mentioned statement or situation is true in the majority of cases, with only a rare exception.
  • wouldn't touch sth with a tenfoot pole, at wouldn't touch sth with a barge pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something with a ten-foot pole" (or "wouldn't touch something with a barge pole") means to have absolutely no desire or interest in being involved with something or someone. It implies a strong aversion or unwillingness to engage, typically due to the perceived negative aspects or consequences of the matter at hand.
  • a reign of terror The idiom "a reign of terror" refers to a period characterized by extreme violence, brutality, and fear, often associated with oppressive or tyrannical rule. It denotes a time when a person or a group employs coercion, intimidation, or ruthless methods to control and dominate others, instilling a state of constant dismay and unrest within a particular community or society.
  • thanks a lot, at thanks for nothing The idiom "thanks a lot, or thanks for nothing" is a sarcastic or ironic expression used to convey dissatisfaction or disappointment towards someone or something. It suggests that even though gratitude is expressed, the sentiment behind it is insincere or entirely undeserved.
  • thanks a bunch, at thanks for nothing The idiom "thanks a bunch" is a sarcastic way of expressing gratitude, suggesting that the speaker is not genuinely appreciative of the gesture or help received. It is often used to convey disappointment or dissatisfaction with the situation. On the other hand, the idiom "thanks for nothing" is an even stronger expression of sarcasm and disappointment. It implies that the speaker received no help or benefit from the other person's actions or assistance and is consequently feeling unappreciated or let down.
  • thanks a million The idiom "thanks a million" is used to express extreme gratitude or appreciation for someone or something. It implies that the person feels incredibly thankful and values the help, kindness, or support they have received as if it were worth a million units of gratitude.
  • the/a devil of a sth The idiom "the/a devil of a sth" is used to emphasize that something is extremely difficult, troublesome, or extraordinary in some way. It often conveys a sense of exasperation or frustration.
  • like a thief in the night The idiom "like a thief in the night" refers to doing something in a secretive or unexpected manner, often without being noticed or causing alarm. It implies swift and stealthy actions, similar to how a thief operates, taking something or performing an act without being detected or arousing suspicion.
  • like a lamb to the slaughter The idiom "like a lamb to the slaughter" refers to a situation where someone goes into a dangerous or harmful situation unknowingly, unsuspectingly, or willingly, without realizing the potential risks or consequences. It signifies a person's innocence, vulnerability, or naivety in a given situation, similar to a lamb that is led to its own death without understanding its fate.
  • have a face like the back end of a bus The idiom "have a face like the back end of a bus" refers to someone who has an unattractive or unpleasant facial expression. It suggests that the person's face resembles the unattractive rear or back end of a bus.
  • need sth like you need a hole in the head The idiom "need something like you need a hole in the head" is used to express a strong sentiment of not needing or not wanting something at all. It implies that the thing in question is completely unnecessary, undesirable, or burdensome. It emphasizes the lack of any personal benefit or value derived from having or experiencing that particular thing.
  • be like a deer/rabbit caught in the headlights The idiom "be like a deer/rabbit caught in the headlights" means to be frozen or stunned with fear and indecision, often in a situation where one feels overwhelmed or surprised. It refers to the behavior of a deer or rabbit when caught in the bright headlights of a vehicle, causing them to become momentarily paralyzed.
  • life's a bitch (and then you die) The idiom "life's a bitch (and then you die)" is a phrase commonly used to convey a pessimistic or cynical perspective on life. It suggests that life can be challenging, difficult, and filled with suffering, and ultimately leads to death. It highlights the notion that life is often harsh and unfulfilling, emphasizing the transient nature of human existence and the inevitability of death.
  • there's a good boy/girl/dog! The idiom "there's a good boy/girl/dog!" is a phrase often used to commend someone for performing a task or action correctly, just like praising a well-behaved pet. It typically expresses approval, encouragement, or praise for someone's behavior or accomplishment.
  • there is a God! The idiom "there is a God!" is an exclamation of relief or gratitude, often uttered when a desirable outcome or solution is realized unexpectedly. It implies the belief in a higher power or divine intervention that has brought about a favorable outcome.
  • there's a lot of it about The idiom "there's a lot of it about" means that a particular behavior, attitude, or situation is commonly or frequently observed or noticed.
  • where there's a will there's a way The idiom "where there's a will there's a way" means that if someone is determined and motivated enough to achieve something, they will find a solution or method to make it happen, regardless of the obstacles or difficulties. It implies that having a strong desire or resolve to accomplish a goal will lead to finding the necessary means or resources to succeed.
  • a nip (here) and a tuck (there) The idiom "a nip (here) and a tuck (there)" refers to making small adjustments or improvements to something in order to enhance its overall appearance or performance. It suggests making minor modifications or refinements to achieve a desired outcome, often referring to cosmetic changes. The expression is commonly used metaphorically to describe actions taken to improve a person's physical appearance or to enhance the functionality or aesthetics of an object or situation.
  • lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overdo something, especially when trying to make something seem more emotional, dramatic, or impressive than it actually is. It refers to emphasizing or embellishing a statement, story, or performance in an excessively noticeable or conspicuous way.
  • a full, good, thick, etc. head of hair The idiom "a full, good, thick, etc. head of hair" refers to someone having a large amount of hair on their scalp, which is typically associated with a desirable or healthy appearance. It implies that the person has a plentiful and voluminous head of hair.
  • it takes a thief to catch a thief The idiom "it takes a thief to catch a thief" means that sometimes the best person to catch or understand the methods of a criminal is another criminal. In other words, someone who has engaged in dishonest or illegal activities is often more capable of recognizing and apprehending another person involved in similar actions. This phrase suggests that a person with similar experience and knowledge is needed to outsmart or expose a fellow offender.
  • have a thin time (of it) The idiom "have a thin time (of it)" means to experience a difficult or challenging period or situation. It implies that someone is facing hardships, struggles, or adversity in their life, often referring to a specific period of time. It can also suggest a lack of resources, opportunities, or support during that time.
  • a close/near thing The idiom "a close/near thing" refers to a situation or event that was very narrowly or barely avoided. It means that the outcome or result was extremely close to being unfavorable, dangerous, or disastrous, but ultimately turned out okay.
  • a thing of the past The idiom "a thing of the past" is used to describe something that is no longer relevant or in existence, usually as a result of progress, technological advancements, or changing circumstances. It implies that something has become outdated or obsolete and is no longer part of the present or future.
  • a thing or two The idiom "a thing or two" means to have a considerable or extensive amount of knowledge or experience in a particular subject or field. It implies having gained expertise through firsthand observation, practice, or learning.
  • be on to a good thing The idiom "be on to a good thing" means to be engaged in or connected to something advantageous or promising. It implies that someone has found or discovered a positive opportunity or situation that is likely to bring benefits or success.
  • have a thing about sth/sb The idiom "have a thing about sth/sb" means to have a particular obsession, preference, or fascination with something or someone. It refers to having a strong attraction, interest, or inclination towards a specific person or thing.
  • make a big thing (out) of sth The idiom "make a big thing (out) of sth" means to overly emphasize, exaggerate or give too much importance to something that is relatively insignificant or unremarkable. It refers to someone making a situation, issue, or event seem much more important or difficult than it actually is.
  • be a good job/thing The idiom "be a good job/thing" typically means that something is favorable, advantageous, or beneficial. It implies that whatever is being referred to is a positive outcome or situation.
  • too much of a good thing The idiom "too much of a good thing" means that although something may be enjoyable or beneficial, if it is experienced or consumed excessively, it can become negative or harmful. It suggests that an excessive quantity or duration can change a positive experience or situation into something less desirable.
  • chance would be a fine thing The idiom "chance would be a fine thing" is used sarcastically to express skepticism or dismiss the possibility of something happening because it is considered highly unlikely or unattainable.
  • a fifth/third wheel The idiom "a fifth/third wheel" refers to a person who is unnecessary or feels excluded in a social situation, particularly when they are accompanying or joining a couple or a closely-knit group of people. This person feels superfluous or out of place, as if their presence is not required or valued.
  • that's a thought "That's a thought" is an idiomatic expression used to convey agreement or approval of an idea or suggestion that has been mentioned. It implies that the idea or suggestion is interesting, worth considering, or brings a new perspective to a situation.
  • hang by a thread The idiom "hang by a thread" means to be in a precarious or unstable situation, where something is at risk of falling apart or coming to an end very soon. It implies a state of extreme vulnerability or fragility.
  • two's company, three's a crowd The idiom "two's company, three's a crowd" means that adding a third person to a private or intimate situation can make it awkward or uncomfortable for the original two people. It suggests that a group of two people is more enjoyable and harmonious, while the presence of a third person interferes with the dynamics or closeness between the initial two individuals.
  • the best of a bad bunch/lot The idiom "the best of a bad bunch/lot" refers to a situation where, although all the available options or choices are not ideal or satisfactory, there is still one option that stands out as the least unfavorable or the most acceptable. It signifies selecting or settling for the best option among a group of unsatisfactory alternatives.
  • have a frog in your throat The idiom "have a frog in your throat" means to have difficulty speaking or to have a temporary hoarseness or difficulty in producing sound when speaking, usually due to a sore throat or hoarseness.
  • bring a lump to your throat The idiom "bring a lump to your throat” is used to describe the deep emotional feeling of sadness or sentimentality that causes one's throat to constrict or tighten, often leading to the sensation of a lump forming in the throat. It is commonly used to express a mixture of sorrow, nostalgia, or overwhelming emotions that may lead to one becoming teary-eyed or having difficulty speaking due to the overwhelming emotions being experienced.
  • cut a swathe through sth The idiom "cut a swathe through something" means to make rapid and significant progress through a situation or a group of people, often with great power or influence. It implies that one is making a noticeable impact, leaving a marked impression or achieving a high level of success in the process.
  • a (quick/brisk) trot through sth The idiom "a (quick/brisk) trot through sth" typically refers to a brief or quick overview or examination of something, usually a topic or a subject matter. It suggests a cursory or superficial exploration rather than a thorough and detailed analysis.
  • drive a coach and horses through sth The idiom "drive a coach and horses through something" means to completely and effectively undermine or destroy a plan, belief, argument, or system. It implies that the person or situation has found a significant flaw or weakness that can be exploited, much like driving a large vehicle forcefully through a weak point.
  • throw (sb) a curve (ball) The idiom "throw (sb) a curve (ball)" means to surprise or deceive someone with an unexpected or challenging situation or piece of information. It is often used in a figurative sense, referring to a sudden change of plans or unforeseen difficulty that catches someone off guard.
  • have/throw a fit The idiom "have/throw a fit" means to express strong anger, frustration, or disappointment, often by shouting, screaming, or behaving irrationally. It implies an intense emotional reaction to a situation that is unexpected or undesirable.
  • knock/throw sb for a loop The idiom "knock/throw sb for a loop" means to greatly surprise or confuse someone. It refers to an unexpected event or information that catches someone off guard and disrupts their understanding or plans.
  • put/throw a spanner in the works The idiom "put/throw a spanner in the works" means to disrupt or interfere with a plan or a process, causing difficulties or obstacles that hinder progress or prevent success. It refers to the unexpected introduction of a problem or complication that derails or complicates a situation, similar to how throwing a wrench (or spanner) into machinery causes it to malfunction.
  • throw a (monkey) wrench in the works, at put/throw a spanner in the works The idiom "throw a (monkey) wrench in the works" (also known as "put/throw a spanner in the works" in British English) means to create an unexpected problem or obstacle that disrupts or hinders progress or plans. It refers to the act of introducing a complication or interference that obstructs the smooth functioning or successful completion of a task, goal, or process. It implies the introduction of a sudden and unexpected difficulty that causes delays or complications.
  • be a fair bet The idiom "be a fair bet" means that something is very likely to happen or be true. It implies that there is a high probability or likelihood of a particular outcome or event occurring. It suggests that it is reasonable and sensible to expect or believe that something will happen.
  • be a good bet The idiom "be a good bet" means to be a likely or safe choice or option. It implies that something or someone is reliable, trustworthy, or has a high probability of success or favorable outcome.
  • do sth for a bet The idiom "do something for a bet" means to perform an action or task with the motivation or incentive of winning money or some other form of reward. It implies that the individual does not have a personal preference or interest in carrying out the action, but is willing to do it solely for the sake of winning a bet.
  • do sth on a bet, at do sth for a bet The idiom "do something on a bet" or "do something for a bet" refers to engaging in an action or task as a result of a wager or a challenge. It implies that the individual is motivated to take part in an activity due to the possibility of winning a bet or the desire to prove themselves in a challenge.
  • be in a tight corner The idiom "be in a tight corner" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation where one has few options or resources available. It implies being trapped, figuratively speaking, and often refers to a predicament or a dilemma with no easy solution.
  • keep a tight rein on sb/sth The idiom "keep a tight rein on sb/sth" means to maintain strict control or close supervision over someone or something. It implies the need for close monitoring and regulation, often to prevent mistakes, misbehavior, or deviation from a particular course of action. This expression is derived from the imagery of a horse bridle, where a tight rein gives the rider complete control over the horse's movements.
  • keep sb/sth on a tight rein, at keep a tight rein on sb/sth The idiom "keep sb/sth on a tight rein" or "keep a tight rein on sb/sth" means to exercise strict control or supervision over someone or something. It implies keeping a close watch or tightly regulating someone's actions, behaviors, or a situation to avoid any mistakes, negative outcomes, or deviations from expected standards. It suggests maintaining a firm grip on the situation or person in order to prevent any potential problems or maintain discipline.
  • give sb a hard time The idiom "give someone a hard time" means to intentionally make things difficult or challenging for someone, usually by criticizing, teasing, or bothering them. It can also refer to treating someone with hostility, creating obstacles, or causing trouble for them intentionally.
  • have a lot of time for sb When someone says they "have a lot of time for someone," it means they hold that person in high regard, admire them, or respect them greatly. It implies a willingness to invest time and attention in their company or to support their endeavors.
  • a matter/question of time The idiom "a matter/question of time" means that something is inevitable or bound to happen eventually, but the exact timing or duration is uncertain. It suggests that the outcome or occurrence is predictable or expected, but it will require patience or the passage of time to happen.
  • there's a time and a place (for everything) The idiom "there's a time and a place (for everything)" means that certain actions or behaviors are only appropriate or acceptable in specific situations or circumstances. It suggests that one should consider the appropriate timing and location for their actions or words, emphasizing the importance of appropriateness and context.
  • time's a great healer The idiom "time's a great healer" means that the passing of time can help heal emotional pain, grief, or heartache. It suggests that with the passage of time, wounds can be gradually healed and that time has a comforting and soothing effect on emotional suffering.
  • many a time The idiom "many a time" means frequently or on numerous occasions.
  • a torrid time The idiom "a torrid time" refers to a period of difficulty, struggle, or extreme hardship that someone goes through. It implies that the experience was intense, emotionally or physically draining, and possibly causing distress or suffering.
  • once upon a time The idiom "once upon a time" is used to begin a story or narrative, typically in fairy tales or folklore. It signifies the beginning of a mythical or fictional account by referring to a time in the past, often without a precise date or historical context.
  • have a rare old time The idiom "have a rare old time" means to have a joyous or excellent experience, often used to describe a period of enjoyment or merriment. It implies that the individual is thoroughly enjoying themselves and having an extraordinary or memorable time.
  • time heals (all wounds), at time's a great healer The idiomatic expressions "time heals" and "time's a great healer" convey the idea that, with the passage of time, emotional or physical pain tends to diminish and eventually disappear. It suggests that over time, people become less hurt or affected by negative experiences or traumas. The proverbial saying implies that given enough time, any pain, grief, or resentment can gradually fade away and heal.
  • ninetynine times out of a hundred, at nine times out of ten The idiom "ninetynine times out of a hundred, at nine times out of ten" means that something is very likely or almost certain to happen or be true in almost all situations or instances. It implies a high degree of probability or consistency.
  • ninetynine times out of a hundred The idiom "ninetynine times out of a hundred" means that something happens or is true in the vast majority of cases, almost always, or nearly all the time. It implies a high degree of probability or reliability.
  • like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "like a cat on a hot tin roof" refers to a state of extreme nervousness, restlessness, or agitation. It implies a person's inability to sit still or be at ease in a situation, typically due to high levels of anxiety, tension, or discomfort.
  • not give a tinker's cuss The idiom "not give a tinker's cuss" means to not care or show any interest in something. It implies a complete indifference or lack of concern towards a particular matter. The term "tinker's cuss" refers to the curse or profanity uttered by tinkers, who were traditionally itinerant workers often associated with lower social classes.
  • not give a tinker's damn, at not give a tinker's cuss The idiom "not give a tinker's damn" (or "not give a tinker's cuss") means to not care at all about something or someone. It implies a complete lack of interest, concern, or importance towards a particular matter or individual. The term "tinker's damn" originated from a derogatory use of the word "damn" associated with tinkers, who were itinerant or traveling menders of household utensils. It conveys a sense of worthlessness or insignificance.
  • half a loaf is better than none The idiom "half a loaf is better than none" means that it is better to have or receive something, even if it is not as much as one wanted or expected, rather than having nothing at all. It suggests that it is preferable to have a partial or limited amount of something than to have nothing.
  • to a man The idiom "to a man" means that every individual in a particular group or situation is in complete agreement or united in a particular action, opinion, or characteristic. It emphasizes the unanimity or solidarity of the group.
  • can't hold a candle to The idiom "can't hold a candle to" means that someone or something is far inferior or cannot compare to another person or thing in terms of skill, ability, or quality.
  • you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink The idiom "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink" means that it is possible to provide someone with an opportunity or the necessary information, but you cannot force them to take advantage of it or act upon it. It often refers to situations where you can offer advice or assistance, but ultimately, the decision to accept or act lies with the individual.
  • have half a mind/a good mind to do sth The idiom "have half a mind/a good mind to do something" means to be strongly inclined or tempted to do a particular action without actually intending to follow through with it. It implies a strong feeling or desire to do something, but often lacks the determination or commitment to actually carry out the action.
  • birds of a feather flock together The idiom "birds of a feather flock together" means that people who have similar interests, characteristics, or behaviors tend to associate or form groups with one another. It suggests that individuals with common attributes or preferences are naturally drawn to one another and prefer to spend time or interact with those who are similar to them.
  • drive a wedge between sb The idiom "drive a wedge between sb" means to create conflict or deepen division between two or more people or groups who were previously united or friendly. It refers to actions or behavior that purposely undermines relationships or fosters animosity, making it difficult for the individuals involved to maintain harmony or work together effectively.
  • be (caught) between a rock and a hard place The idiom "be (caught) between a rock and a hard place" means to be in a difficult situation where there are no desirable options or solutions. It refers to feeling stuck or trapped between two equally challenging or unpleasant choices, with no easy way out.
  • like a ton of bricks The idiom "like a ton of bricks" means a sudden and forceful impact or reaction that is so intense it is likened to being hit by a heavy weight or burden. It describes a situation or event that bears a significant and overwhelming effect on someone.
  • weigh a ton The idiom "weigh a ton" is used to describe something that is extremely heavy or weighs a lot. It is often used metaphorically to exaggerate the weight or difficulty of a particular situation or burden.
  • come down on sb like a ton of bricks The idiom "come down on sb like a ton of bricks" means to express extreme disapproval or punishment towards someone. It implies confronting or criticizing someone strongly and forcefully.
  • have a few (too many) The idiom "have a few (too many)" is typically used to refer to consuming more alcoholic beverages than one should, leading to a state of intoxication or drunkenness. It portrays the idea of surpassing the desired or acceptable limit of alcohol consumption.
  • a drop too much (to drink) The idiom "a drop too much (to drink)" refers to consuming excessive amounts of alcohol or a substance that leads to intoxication or impairment. It suggests that just one additional drink would be excessive, indicating that the person has already consumed enough to be intoxicated. This idiom emphasizes the idea of exceeding one's limit or going beyond what is reasonable or safe in terms of alcohol consumption.
  • not to put too fine a point on The idiom "not to put too fine a point on" means to express something directly or to be blunt and straightforward in conveying an idea or opinion. It is often used when someone wants to emphasize a point without being too subtle or diplomatic.
  • an eye for an eye (and a tooth for a tooth) The idiom "an eye for an eye (and a tooth for a tooth)" refers to the principle of seeking revenge or retribution by inflicting the same kind of harm upon someone who has caused harm to you or someone you care about. It suggests that the punishment should be proportionate to the offense or harm committed. This idiom is often used to emphasize the concept of justice or to express a desire for fairness and equal treatment.
  • beyond a joke The idiom "beyond a joke" means to exceed the limit of what is considered acceptable or humorous. It refers to a situation or behavior that has become serious, unpleasant, or no longer amusing.
  • get/go beyond a joke The idiom "get/go beyond a joke" refers to a situation or behavior that has reached a point where it is no longer amusing or humorous. It implies that the situation has become serious, excessive, or intolerable.
  • not give/care a toss The idiom "not give/care a toss" is a colloquial expression used to indicate a complete lack of interest or concern about something. It implies that the person has no emotional investment or attachment to the subject, and therefore, they are indifferent or apathetic towards it.
  • wouldn't touch sth with a barge pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something with a barge pole" means that someone wants absolutely no association or involvement with a particular thing or person. It signifies a strong aversion or refusal to be associated due to perceived risk, danger, or undesirability.
  • a magic touch The idiom "a magic touch" refers to someone's special ability or skill to make things successful, impressive, or effective with seemingly little effort. It implies that the person has a unique talent or knack for achieving positive outcomes or creating a sense of awe.
  • hit/touch a (raw) nerve The idiom "hit/touch a (raw) nerve" is used to describe a situation or comment that triggers a strong emotional response or deeply upsets someone. It refers to a sensitive topic or issue that evokes a visceral reaction, often leading to defensive or angry behavior.
  • a tough/hard nut The idiom "a tough/hard nut" refers to a person or situation that is difficult to deal with or understand. It implies that the person or situation presents challenges and requires great effort or skill to overcome or comprehend.
  • a hard/tough nut to crack The idiom "a hard/tough nut to crack" refers to a person or a problem that is difficult to understand, solve, or influence. It typically describes a situation or an individual that is challenging or resistant to change, persuasion, or comprehension.
  • a night on the town The idiom "a night on the town" refers to an evening spent outside the usual routines or activities, often involving entertainment, socializing, dining out, or engaging in enjoyable leisure pursuits. It implies an outing or gathering that offers excitement, fun, and a break from the ordinary.
  • do a roaring trade The idiom "do a roaring trade" is used to describe a situation where a business, shop, or establishment is experiencing a high volume of sales or trade. It suggests that the business is doing exceptionally well, usually bringing in a significant amount of profit or revenue.
  • blaze a trail The idiom "blaze a trail" means to be the first to do something or to create a new path or a new way of doing things. It implies being a pioneer and breaking new ground in a particular field or area of interest.
  • walk/tread a tightrope The idiom "walk/tread a tightrope" means to navigate a situation or circumstance that requires delicate balance, caution, and careful decision-making in order to avoid making mistakes or causing conflict. It refers to the act of walking on a thin rope, where a slight misstep could lead to falling or failure.
  • a treat The definition of the idiom "a treat" is something that is enjoyable, pleasant, or gratifying. It refers to an experience or an event that provides great satisfaction or pleasure.
  • work a treat The idiom "work a treat" means that something is highly effective or achieves the desired result in a perfect or satisfying manner. It implies that the method or action used accomplishes its purpose exceptionally well, often exceeding expectations.
  • work a treat, at work wonders/miracles The definition of the idiom "work a treat" or "work wonders/miracles" is when something or someone achieves an exceptional result or outcome. It suggests that the method, solution, or action employed surpasses expectations and brings about positive and impressive results. This idiom is often used to describe the effectiveness or efficiency of a remedy, strategy, or course of action.
  • not miss a trick The idiom "not miss a trick" means to be very observant and aware of everything that is happening around, not overlooking even the smallest details or opportunities. It implies being highly vigilant and attentive in order to exploit or benefit from every situation or advantage.
  • play a joke/trick on sb The idiom "play a joke/trick on someone" means to deceive or prank someone in a mischievous or playful manner, often with the intent of causing laughter or amusement.
  • a man of action The idiom "a man of action" refers to someone who is proactive, decisive, and takes immediate steps to achieve their goals or solve problems. It describes a person who prefers to take action rather than just talk or contemplate.
  • a big ask The idiom "a big ask" refers to a request or task that is demanding, challenging, or difficult to fulfill. It implies that the request exceeds the capabilities, resources, or expectations of the person being asked. It often involves a significant effort or sacrifice to accomplish.
  • a big/great girl's blouse The idiom "a big/great girl's blouse" is a derogatory expression used to describe someone, typically a man, who is seen as weak, cowardly, or overly sensitive. It implies that the person lacks strength or a masculine behavior typically associated with a man and is instead characterized as being similar to a timid or overly emotional girl who wears a blouse.
  • a nip and tuck The idiom "a nip and tuck" refers to a closely contested or competitive situation where the outcome is uncertain or could go either way. It often implies that the competition or battle is extremely close and could be decided by just a small margin or slight advantage. The idiom is typically used in informal contexts and can be applied to various scenarios, such as sports, elections, or business.
  • not turn a hair The idiom "not turn a hair" means to show no signs of shock, surprise, or emotional agitation, particularly in situations that would typically elicit such reactions. It implies remaining calm, composed, and unaffected, without any visible change in facial expression or behavior.
  • turn a blind eye The idiom "turn a blind eye" means to consciously ignore or deliberately ignore something, usually by pretending not to see or be aware of it, despite knowing that it is happening or should be addressed.
  • turn a deaf ear The idiom "turn a deaf ear" is used to describe someone's deliberate act of ignoring or refusing to listen to someone or something, often because they do not want to consider or acknowledge it. It refers to the refusal to pay attention or give importance to someone's words or concerns.
  • turn over a new leaf The idiom "turn over a new leaf" means to make a fresh start, to change one's behavior or attitude for the better. It implies a willingness to leave behind old habits or mistakes and begin anew with a more positive approach.
  • a good/bad turn The idiom "a good/bad turn" refers to a favor or an action that is helpful or beneficial (good turn), or detrimental or harmful (bad turn) to someone or something. It often implies an act of support or assistance, or conversely, a deed that causes inconvenience or harm.
  • a turn of the screw The idiom "a turn of the screw" refers to a situation or action that intensifies pressure, tension, or difficulty, making a current problem or situation worse or more challenging. It often conveys the idea of a gradual escalation or tightening of circumstances, often leading to a crisis or an additional test of resilience.
  • cooked/done to a turn The idiom "cooked/done to a turn" typically refers to food or a dish that has been cooked perfectly or exactly as it should be, reaching the desired level of doneness or preparation.
  • turn into a pumpkin The idiom "turn into a pumpkin" refers to the concept of one's allotted time ending or coming to an end. It is derived from the fairy tale of "Cinderella," where her magical enchantment expires at midnight, causing her golden carriage to transform back into a pumpkin. Therefore, when someone says "turn into a pumpkin," it typically means that a specific event or period is reaching its conclusion or expiration.
  • turn a place inside out The idiom "turn a place inside out" refers to thoroughly searching or rummaging through a location or space in order to find something specific or to create a mess. It implies an extensive and exhaustive search or disruption, often with the intention of uncovering hidden or lost items.
  • get your knickers in a twist The idiom "get your knickers in a twist" means to become overly upset, agitated, or anxious over a trivial or unimportant matter. It suggests that someone is overreacting or making a mountain out of a molehill. The term "knickers" refers to women's underpants, adding a humorous or slightly derogatory tone to the expression.
  • be two of a kind The idiom "be two of a kind" means that two people or things are very similar in many ways, often implying that they share negative traits or behaviors. It suggests a similarity or likeness between two individuals or items, usually in a negative or undesirable context.
  • like two peas in a pod The idiom "like two peas in a pod" is used to describe two people or things that are extremely similar or nearly identical in appearance, behavior, or characteristics. It signifies a strong resemblance between two entities, emphasizing the notion that they are inseparable or closely associated with one another, just like peas in the same pod.
  • be a game of two halves The idiom "be a game of two halves" refers to a situation or event that has two distinct and contrasting parts. It is often used in the context of sports, particularly football (soccer), to describe a match where the conditions, tactics, or performance significantly change from the first half to the second half. It implies that the outcome or overall experience of the situation is determined by the two separate parts.
  • two wrongs don't make a right The idiom "two wrongs don't make a right" means that it is not justified to respond to a wrongdoing or injustice with another wrongdoing. Just because someone has done something bad or wrong, it does not give someone else the right to do the same. The phrase highlights the importance of seeking a morally or ethically right solution in any situation, rather than perpetuating a cycle of wrongdoing or seeking revenge.
  • a bird in the hand (is worth two in the bush) The idiom "a bird in the hand (is worth two in the bush)" means that it is better to hold onto something you already have, even if it may seem less appealing, rather than risking it for something potentially better but uncertain. It advises against taking unnecessary risks or giving up a certain advantage for uncertain gains.
  • a clean bill of health The idiom "a clean bill of health" refers to a statement or official document given by a medical professional indicating that a person is in good physical condition, free from any diseases, infections, or other health issues. It is often used figuratively to suggest that something or someone has been confirmed to be in a satisfactory or positive state, not posing any potential problems or risks.
  • I'll be a monkey's uncle! The idiom "I'll be a monkey's uncle!" is an exclamation used to express disbelief or surprise about something unexpected or unlikely. It is often used sarcastically or humorously.
  • be under a cloud The idiom "be under a cloud" means to be in a state of suspicion, disfavor, or discontent. It implies that someone's reputation or actions have caused others to view them with doubt or disapproval.
  • up to a point The idiom "up to a point" means partially or to some degree, but not completely. It suggests that there is a limit or boundary beyond which something is no longer valid or true.
  • have a leg up on sb The idiom "have a leg up on sb" means to have an advantage or head start over someone in a competitive situation. It implies having a higher position, more resources, or superior knowledge that gives you an edge over others.
  • a bird's eye view The idiom "a bird's eye view" refers to a perspective or viewpoint from a high vantage point, allowing a comprehensive and overall understanding of a situation, location, or issue. It implies a broad, comprehensive, and encompassing perspective as if one were looking down from above, like a bird in flight.
  • birds of a feather The idiom "birds of a feather" means that people who are similar in character, interests, or values tend to associate with or be friends with each other. It suggests that individuals with similar traits are often drawn together and form social connections.
  • (as) free as a bird The idiom "(as) free as a bird" means to be completely unrestricted and unrestrained, feeling a sense of liberation and independence. It is often used to describe a person or a feeling of being unburdened or unconstrained.
  • not a dicky bird The idiom "not a dicky bird" means complete silence or absence of any sound or information. It is used to convey that there is no communication or response whatsoever.
  • a little bird told me The idiom "a little bird told me" is an expression that suggests the speaker knows something without revealing the source of their information. It implies that they have obtained information through an indirect or secretive means, often through gossip or whispered conversations. It is used to protect the identity of the person who provided the information or to add an air of mystery to the knowledge shared.
  • be a bit much The idiom "be a bit much" means that something or someone is excessive or overwhelming in terms of quantity, intensity, or behavior. It implies that the situation, task, or person is more than what is considered reasonable, tolerable, or manageable.
  • be a bit of all right The idiom "be a bit of all right" is used to describe someone or something that is attractive, appealing, or impressive in some way. It can refer to physical attractiveness, talent, charm, or any other desirable quality.
  • a bit of rough The idiom "a bit of rough" typically refers to a casual or brief sexual encounter with someone who is perceived as rugged, unrefined, or lacking in sophistication. It usually implies a temporary physical relationship rather than a deeper emotional connection.
  • not a bit of it The idiom "not a bit of it" means to strongly disagree or to deny something completely. It is often used to express disbelief or to contradict a previously mentioned statement or assumption.
  • a bit of a lad The idiom "a bit of a lad" typically refers to a person, particularly a young man or boy, who is lively, mischievous, and often behaves in a playful or daring manner. It is used to describe someone who is confident, independent, and sometimes rebellious.
  • with a bit of luck, at with any luck The idiom "with a bit of luck" or "with any luck" is used to express the hope or possibility that something desired will happen, indicating that the outcome is dependent on favorable circumstances or chance. It suggests that a positive result is anticipated, but there is uncertainty or reliance on external factors for it to occur.
  • with a view to doing sth The idiom "with a view to doing something" means having the intention or purpose of doing something. It implies that there is a specific goal or objective in mind while taking an action or making plans. It suggests that the action is done in order to achieve a desired outcome or result.
  • have a grandstand view The idiom "have a grandstand view" means to have a prime or advantageous position to observe an event or situation. It refers to being in a prominent position, typically in a grandstand at a stadium or arena, where one can have an excellent view of the action or spectacle. It signifies being able to witness something from a privileged or prominent vantage point.
  • take a dim view of sth The idiom "take a dim view of something" means to have a negative or disapproving opinion or perception of a particular thing or situation. It suggests that one has a pessimistic or unfavorable perspective regarding the subject in question.
  • a bitter pill (to swallow) The idiom "a bitter pill (to swallow)" refers to something unpleasant, difficult, or disappointing that one must accept and deal with, even though it is hard to do so. It often implies that the situation or information is hard to accept but must be acknowledged or faced.
  • paint a black picture of sth/sb The idiom "paint a black picture of something/someone" means to depict or describe something or someone in an excessively negative or bleak manner. It refers to presenting a highly pessimistic or unfavorable view, emphasizing the negative aspects while downplaying or ignoring any positive attributes or potential.
  • a walk in the park The idiom "a walk in the park" refers to a task, activity, or situation that is very easy, simple, and effortless to handle. It suggests that the endeavor is as effortless as taking a leisurely stroll in a park, with no challenges or difficulties involved.
  • that was a game, meal, walk, etc. and a half! The idiom "that was a game, meal, walk, etc. and a half!" is an expression used to emphasize that something was exceptionally enjoyable, eventful, or of great magnitude. It implies that the experience exceeded expectations or was beyond what was anticipated, often leaving a lasting impression. This idiom can be applied to various activities or situations and is often used to convey enthusiasm or excitement.
  • be/come up against a brick wall The idiom "be/come up against a brick wall" means to encounter a situation or obstacle that seemingly cannot be overcome, resulting in a frustration or sense of being stuck. It suggests experiencing difficulty in making progress or finding a solution despite persistent efforts.
  • be banging, etc. your head against a brick wall The idiom "be banging, etc. your head against a brick wall" means to be persistently trying to achieve something that is futile or impossible, despite facing numerous obstacles or resistance. It implies that one is expending a great amount of effort without making any progress or achieving the desired outcome.
  • water off a duck's back The idiom "water off a duck's back" refers to situations where criticism or negative remarks have no effect on someone. It means that just like water slides off a duck's waterproof feathers without having any impact, individuals are able to easily disregard or ignore negative comments or criticism directed towards them.
  • be like a fish out of water The idiom "be like a fish out of water" means to feel uncomfortable, awkward, or out of place in a particular situation or environment. It refers to the feeling of not belonging or being unfamiliar, similar to a fish being taken out of its natural habitat, where it is unable to breathe or move freely.
  • ride (on) a wave of sth The idiom "ride (on) a wave of sth" means to enjoy or benefit from a period of favorable conditions, opportunities, or popularity. It refers to being carried or propelled along by a strong and positive trend, often resulting in success or prosperity.
  • be riding/on the crest of a wave The idiom "be riding/on the crest of a wave" means to be experiencing a period of great success, popularity, or achievement. It implies being at the peak of one's performance or accomplishments, often associated with a feeling of excitement and momentum.
  • find a way The idiom "find a way" means to discover a solution or method to accomplish something, especially in challenging or difficult circumstances. It suggests being resourceful, determined, and persistent in overcoming obstacles or achieving a goal.
  • go a long way, at go far The idiom "go a long way" or "go far" is used to describe someone's or something's potential or ability to achieve success, make progress, or have a significant impact. It suggests that the person or thing has the necessary qualities, skills, or characteristics that can take them far in life or a particular endeavor. It emphasizes the idea that they have a promising future or can make a significant difference in their chosen field.
  • go a long way The idiom "go a long way" means to have a significant positive impact or be highly effective in achieving a desired outcome. It implies that something or someone has the ability to make a significant contribution or create a lasting impression.
  • be in a bad way The idiom "be in a bad way" refers to being in a poor or difficult condition, whether physically, mentally, emotionally, or financially. It signifies a state of distress, trouble, or adversity.
  • a long way to go The idiom "a long way to go" means that there is still much progress or improvement needed in a particular situation or endeavor. It implies that the current state or level achieved is far from satisfactory, and there is still considerable work or effort required to reach the desired outcome.
  • a parting of the ways "A parting of the ways" is an idiom that refers to a situation where two or more people or groups separate or go their separate ways because of a disagreement, difference of opinion, or conflict. It implies the end of a relationship or association and the divergence of paths or interests.
  • a wet weekend The idiom "a wet weekend" typically refers to a period of time or an event that is considered dull, disappointing, or lacking excitement. It implies a sense of being uneventful, unfulfilling, or generally unpleasant, similar to spending a weekend in rainy weather.
  • make a day/night/evening/weekend of it The idiom "make a day/night/evening/weekend of it" means to fully enjoy and take advantage of a particular period of time by engaging in pleasurable or special activities. It suggests making the most out of the given duration and creating memorable experiences.
  • be/take a weight off your mind The idiom "be/take a weight off your mind" means to feel relieved or less worried about something. It refers to the sensation of having a heavy burden or concern lifted, resulting in a sense of peace or freedom.
  • a load/weight off your mind The idiom "a load/weight off your mind" refers to a feeling of relief or freedom that one experiences when a burden or worry is resolved or removed. It implies that a problematic or stressful situation has been resolved, leading to a sense of lightness or relaxation.
  • a few wellchosen words The idiom "a few well-chosen words" refers to a concise and skillfully constructed statement or speech that effectively conveys a message or meaning. It suggests that just a few words, carefully selected, can have a powerful impact or be more persuasive than a lengthy communication.
  • have a whale of a time The idiom "have a whale of a time" means to have an exceptionally enjoyable and exciting experience or to have a lot of fun. It implies that someone is having a great time, often in a lively or exuberant manner.
  • a whale of a The idiom "a whale of a" is used to describe something or someone that is great in size, impressive, or extraordinary. It emphasizes the magnitude or colossal nature of the subject being discussed.
  • put a spoke in sb's wheel The idiom "put a spoke in someone's wheel" means to hinder or disrupt someone's plans, progress, or efforts. It refers to the act of inserting a spoke into the wheel of a bicycle or cart, which consequently causes it to stop or slow down.
  • when sb was a (mere) twinkle in their father's eye The idiom "when sb was a (mere) twinkle in their father's eye" refers to a period of time before someone was born or conceived. It suggests that the person being referred to did not yet exist, and their existence was merely a possibility or a future plan in the mind of their parent.
  • a fair crack of the whip The idiom "a fair crack of the whip" means giving someone a reasonable and equal opportunity or chance to succeed or accomplish something. It implies providing a just and fair treatment to all parties involved, ensuring that no one is at a disadvantage, and allowing them a fair chance to showcase their abilities or make their case.
  • be in a whirl The idiom "be in a whirl" means to be in a state of confusion, excitement, or intense activity. It implies feeling overwhelmed or experiencing a flurry of emotions or events.
  • give it a whirl To "give it a whirl" means to try something out or give it a try, even if unsure about the outcome or success. It typically refers to attempting a new activity, task, or idea with an open mind and without being overly concerned about potential failure.
  • by a whisker The idiom "by a whisker" means to win or achieve something narrowly, often by a very small margin or by just a small amount. It implies that the outcome was extremely close and could have easily gone the other way.
  • come within a whisker of (doing) sth The idiom "come within a whisker of (doing) sth" means to come extremely close to achieving or experiencing something, often narrowly missing it. It implies being just a hair's breadth away from accomplishing a goal or encountering a particular outcome.
  • (as) clean as a whistle, at (as) clean as a (new) pin The idioms "as clean as a whistle" and "as clean as a (new) pin" both refer to something being extremely clean or pristine. "(As) clean as a whistle" implies that something is completely free from dirt, stains, or any signs of dirtiness. The origin of this phrase is not entirely clear, but it is believed to come from the fact that whistles need to be clean in order to produce a clear sound. "(As) clean as a (new) pin" suggests that something is not only clean but also neat and orderly. Originally, this phrase referred to a pin that is shiny and new, without any signs of rust or damage. Over time, it has come to imply the overall cleanliness and
  • a whole lot The idiom "a whole lot" means a large amount or quantity of something. It is often used to emphasize the extent or magnitude of a situation or to express a significant degree of importance or intensity.
  • as a whole The definition of the idiom "as a whole" refers to considering or treating something in its entirety, without focusing on individual parts or aspects. It emphasizes looking at the complete or overall picture rather than analyzing specific details.
  • a whole new ballgame The idiom "a whole new ballgame" refers to a situation that is completely different or has significantly changed from what was previously experienced. It implies a shift in circumstances or dynamics, often requiring a fresh approach or strategy.
  • a (whole) heap of sth The idiom "a (whole) heap of sth" refers to a large amount or quantity of something, typically referring to an unspecified but significant number or quantity. It suggests that there is a lot or an excessive amount of the mentioned thing. The term "heap" is often used to emphasize the quantity or magnitude of something.
  • give sth/sb a wide berth The idiom "give something or someone a wide berth" means to intentionally avoid or keep a safe distance from something or someone, typically due to a perceived or actual danger, threat, or unpleasantness. It suggests the act of deliberately staying away from a situation or person to ensure one's own well-being.
  • with a will The idiom "with a will" means to do something with great determination, enthusiasm, or effort. It implies that an individual is fully committed and wholeheartedly dedicated to achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • on a wing and a prayer The idiom "on a wing and a prayer" means to do or achieve something with the greatest of difficulty and with little chance of success or support. It originates from the phrase used during World War II when pilots tried to bring damaged planes back to base with minimal fuel or resources – relying solely on their skills and hope. Thus, the idiom implies relying on good luck or sheer determination rather than on practical means or support.
  • a nod is as good as a wink The expression "a nod is as good as a wink" is an idiomatic phrase that implies that a subtle or indirect hint or suggestion is easily understood and equally effective as a more obvious or direct communication. It suggests that when someone gives a nod (a slight inclination of the head), it can convey the same message or understanding as a wink (a quick closing and opening of one eye). It signifies the idea that a small gesture or subtle hint is sufficient to establish mutual understanding or agreement.
  • a man/woman of few words The idiom "a man/woman of few words" refers to a person who tends to speak very little or only says what is necessary. They are typically reserved or introverted and choose not to communicate at length or in great detail.
  • like a man/woman possessed The idiom "like a man/woman possessed" is used to describe someone who is intensely focused, determined, or exuberantly engaged in a particular activity, often to the extent that it appears as if they are possessed by an uncontrollable force or passion. It suggests that the person is behaving with an extreme level of energy, enthusiasm, or dedication, often surpassing what is considered normal or reasonable.
  • feel like a new woman/man The idiom "feel like a new woman/man" refers to experiencing a complete transformation or revitalization, typically after a positive change or improvement in one's life. It implies feeling refreshed, renewed, and rejuvenated, as if one has been reborn or has undergone a significant positive change.
  • a man/woman of the world A man/woman of the world is an idiom referring to someone who is well-traveled, worldly, and experienced in various cultures and situations. They have a broad understanding of the world, possess sophistication, and are knowledgeable about different customs, languages, and lifestyles. They have a cosmopolitan outlook and are often seen as socially adept, adaptable, and cultured individuals.
  • a fine figure of a man/woman The idiom "a fine figure of a man/woman" refers to someone who is physically attractive or well-proportioned. It suggests that the person being described possesses an appealing and pleasing physique or appearance.
  • a man/woman of his/her word The idiom "a man/woman of his/her word" refers to someone who is reliable, trustworthy, and consistently keeps their promises or commitments. It implies that the person can be counted on to fulfill their word and can be trusted to follow through with their stated intentions.
  • for a man/woman/person of his/her years The idiom "for a man/woman/person of his/her years" can be defined as an expression used to describe someone who is still capable, active, or accomplished despite their advanced age. It emphasizes that the individual is exceptional or exceptional in comparison to others of the same age group.
  • it's a wonder The idiom "it's a wonder" is used to express astonishment or disbelief at something surprising or remarkable. It conveys the idea that something is so extraordinary or impressive that it creates a sense of wonder or amazement.
  • be a nine days' wonder The idiom "be a nine days' wonder" means that something or someone is able to capture a lot of attention and interest for a short period of time, typically for about nine days, but then quickly loses its novelty and fades into obscurity.
  • draw a blank The idiom "draw a blank" means to be unable to remember or think of something, to have no ideas or suggestions, or to get no response or information when expecting or seeking a specific answer or result.
  • your mind is a blank/goes blank The idiom "your mind is a blank/goes blank" is used to describe a state of mental blankness or lack of comprehension. It implies a temporary inability to think clearly or recall information, often occurring when asked a question or challenged with a problem. It suggests that one's mind is momentarily devoid of thoughts or ideas, leaving the person feeling mentally stumped or confused.
  • have a word in sb's ear The idiom "have a word in sb's ear" means to speak privately with someone in a confidential or secretive manner, usually to give them advice, information, or make a request. It implies a more intimate and personal conversation between two people.
  • in a word The idiom "in a word" is typically used to preface a succinct and concise summary or description of something, often emphasizing its essence or main point.
  • not get a word in edgeways The idiom "not get a word in edgeways" means to be unable to speak or contribute to a conversation because someone else is talking incessantly or dominating the discussion. It suggests that no matter how hard one tries to interject or say something, there is no opportunity to be heard due to the dominant presence of another person.
  • put in a good word for sb The idiom "put in a good word for someone" means to speak positively or recommend someone to another person or organization in order to help them secure a benefit or opportunity. It involves vouching for the person's character, abilities, or suitability for a particular situation. This act of advocacy or support can enhance someone's chances of being selected, hired, or chosen for something.
  • not get a word in edgewise, at not get a word in edgeways The idiom "not get a word in edgewise" or "not get a word in edgeways" refers to someone being unable to speak or express their thoughts because another person is talking incessantly, dominating the conversation with their constant chatter. It implies that the person has no opportunity to interject or contribute to the discussion.
  • all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy) The idiom "all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy)" means that if someone only focuses on work with no time for leisure or fun activities, they will become boring, uninteresting, or unhappy. It emphasizes the importance of striking a balance between one's professional obligations and personal enjoyment.
  • work like a charm The idiom "work like a charm" is used to describe something that works effectively and successfully, often beyond expectations. It implies that something operates smoothly and achieves the desired outcome without any complications or issues.
  • work like a Trojan The definition of the idiom "work like a Trojan" refers to a person who works tirelessly and with great effort, often exceeding expectations or going above and beyond in their work. It is inspired by the image of the Trojan warriors who were known for their fierce and persistent efforts in battle.
  • work like magic, at work like a charm The idiom "work like magic" or "work like a charm" is used to describe something that operates or functions extremely well or effectively, often beyond expectations. It implies that the solution or method employed produces desired results smoothly, effortlessly, and with remarkable success.
  • work like a dog, at work like a Trojan The idiomatic phrases "work like a dog" and "work like a Trojan" both convey the idea of working very hard and tirelessly. "Work like a dog" refers to exerting a great amount of effort and dedication, often working long hours or putting in extra energy to accomplish a task or meet a goal. It emphasizes the intensity and perseverance in one's work. "Work like a Trojan" is derived from the legendary warriors in Greek mythology, the Trojans, who were renowned for their endurance, strength, and dedication. When someone is described as working like a Trojan, it implies that they are working with unwavering commitment, resilience, and tenacity, even in the face of challenges or difficulties. Both idioms essentially
  • all in a day's work The idiom "all in a day's work" means that something, typically a task or responsibility, is considered routine, normal, or expected as part of one's job or daily activities. It implies that the task at hand is not particularly challenging or remarkable and should be handled without fuss or complaint.
  • work/go like a dream The idiom "work/go like a dream" means that something is running smoothly and effortlessly, without any issues or complications. It implies that the process or situation is going exceptionally well and is meeting one's expectations or desires.
  • a nasty piece of work The idiom "a nasty piece of work" is used to describe someone who is unpleasant, wicked, or difficult to deal with. It refers to a person who exhibits rude, malicious, or cruel behavior, making them challenging or unpleasant to interact with.
  • in a world of your own The idiom "in a world of your own" means to be completely absorbed in one's own thoughts, daydreams, or imagination, often resulting in a lack of awareness or detachment from one's surroundings. It suggests that a person is mentally disconnected or preoccupied and not fully present or engaged with the present moment or reality.
  • make a world of difference The idiom "make a world of difference" means to significantly or noticeably improve a situation or outcome. It implies that the change is so significant that it would create a different world or entirely alter the circumstances in a positive way.
  • a world of difference The idiom "a world of difference" means a significant change or contrast between two things or situations. It emphasizes the magnitude of the difference, highlighting that the contrast is substantial and impactful.
  • in another world, at in a world of your own The idiom "in another world" or "in a world of your own" refers to a state where someone is mentally or emotionally detached from their surroundings or preoccupied with their own thoughts. It suggests that the person is not fully engaged or attentive to the present situation, often lost in their own imagination or mental space.
  • it's a funny old world The idiom "it's a funny old world" is used to express surprise or astonishment about the unpredictable and peculiar nature of life. It suggests that circumstances, events, or people can be strange, unexpected, or inexplicable.
  • without a care in the world The idiom "without a care in the world" means to be completely carefree or unconcerned about anything. It suggests a state of being peaceful, relaxed, and not burdened by worries or responsibilities.
  • not a care in the world, at without a care in the world The idiom "not a care in the world" or "without a care in the world" implies a state of being completely unconcerned or free from worry or serious responsibility. It describes a person who doesn't have any immediate concerns or troubles, experiencing a sense of blissful contentment or carefree happiness.
  • be (living) in a dream world The idiom "be (living) in a dream world" means to have unrealistic or impractical beliefs, expectations, or perceptions about a situation. It implies that someone is disconnected from reality and may be overly optimistic or oblivious to practical limitations.
  • a fate worse than death The idiom "a fate worse than death" refers to a situation or outcome that is considered so terrible or undesirable that it is worse than dying. It implies that the prospect of experiencing or enduring this fate is seen as more distressing, painful, or unbearable than death itself.
  • an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, at prevention is better than cure The idiom "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" means that it is easier and more effective to prevent a problem or take precautions beforehand rather than trying to fix or solve it after it has occurred. This implies that putting effort and taking preventive measures can save a significant amount of time, money, or trouble in the future. It is often used to emphasize the importance of being proactive and prepared rather than dealing with the consequences of neglect or inaction. Another common and synonymous phrase for this idiom is "prevention is better than cure."
  • it's a wrap The idiom "it's a wrap" is typically used to indicate that a task, project, or event is completed or finished. It conveys the notion that everything is finalized and can also imply that the matter in question has been successful, successfully concluded, or has reached its intended outcome. This phrase is often used in the context of the entertainment industry, particularly in film and television, as a way to signify the completion of shooting or production.
  • a blast from the past The idiom "a blast from the past" typically refers to something or someone that unexpectedly reminds someone of a previous era or period in their life. It can be used to describe a nostalgic experience or the sudden reappearance of someone or something that was prominent in the past.
  • not put a foot wrong The idiom "not put a foot wrong" means to not make any mistakes or to act flawlessly. It refers to someone who consistently makes the correct decisions or exhibits a high level of competence and accuracy in their actions. It implies a state of being faultless or having an impeccable record.
  • a chip off the old block The idiom "a chip off the old block" refers to someone who closely resembles or emulates their parent, particularly in terms of personality, behavior, or capability. It implies that the person has inherited the qualities or traits of their parent and embodies similar characteristics.
  • have a blonde moment The idiom "have a blonde moment" is typically used to describe a temporary lapse in cognitive abilities or knowledge, often characterized as absent-mindedness or a silly mistake. It stems from a stereotypical portrayal of blonde-haired individuals as being less intelligent. However, it's important to note that this idiom perpetuates a harmful stereotype, and it's advised to avoid using such language.
  • (almost) burst a blood vessel The idiom "(almost) burst a blood vessel" refers to an exaggerated reaction of extreme anger, frustration, or exasperation that is so intense it feels like the blood vessels might rupture. It implies that someone is extremely upset or enraged to the point where their blood pressure rises significantly.
  • a blot on sb's character The idiom "a blot on someone's character" refers to a fault, flaw, or negative characteristic that tarnishes or diminishes someone's overall reputation, moral standing, or integrity. It suggests that this particular aspect of their character is seen as a stain or blemish that brings into question their trustworthiness or goodness.
  • a blot on the landscape The idiom "a blot on the landscape" refers to something, such as a building, structure, or feature, that is considered unattractive or out of place in an otherwise beautiful or natural environment. It suggests that the presence of this element negatively affects the overall aesthetic or harmony of the surrounding scenery.
  • blow a fuse/gasket The idiom "blow a fuse/gasket" refers to losing one's temper or becoming extremely angry or frustrated in a sudden and explosive manner. It implies a metaphorical comparison to an electrical fuse or a mechanical gasket malfunctioning in an abrupt and uncontrollable manner.
  • a knockout blow The idiom "a knockout blow" refers to a devastating or severe action or event that completely overwhelms or incapacitates someone or something. It originated from the sport of boxing, where a knockout blow refers to a powerful punch that renders an opponent unconscious and unable to continue the fight. In a broader context, it is used metaphorically to describe any striking or decisive action that causes a significant and usually irreversible impact.
  • (as) easy as pie/ABC/anything/falling off a log The idiom "(as) easy as pie/ABC/anything/falling off a log" means that something is extremely simple, effortless, or easy to accomplish. It implies that the task at hand requires no significant effort or skill, just like the act of eating a pie, reciting the alphabet, or effortlessly stepping off a log.
  • once in a blue moon The idiom "once in a blue moon" is used to describe something that happens very rarely or infrequently. It refers to the occurrence of a second full moon within a calendar month, which is considered quite uncommon and happens approximately once every two to three years.
  • a bolt from/out of the blue The idiom "a bolt from/out of the blue" refers to something unexpected or surprising that happens suddenly and without warning. It can be used to describe an unforeseen event, situation, or piece of news that catches someone off guard. The phrase implies that the occurrence is so sudden and out of context that it is comparable to a bolt of lightning appearing seemingly out of nowhere in a clear blue sky.
  • take each day as it comes/take it one day at a time The idiom "take each day as it comes" or "take it one day at a time" means to focus on managing and dealing with events or problems on a daily basis, without worrying too much about the future or making long-term plans. It emphasizes living in the present moment, tackling each day's challenges as they arise, and not getting overwhelmed by the uncertainties of the future.
  • from A to B The idiom "from A to B" refers to the journey or process of going from one specific location, task, or situation (A) to another (B). It is often used to describe the movement or transition between two points, whether it is physical, metaphorical, or sequential. The idiom emphasizes the movement and progression from one stage or place to another.
  • with a capital A, B, etc. The idiom "with a capital A, B, etc." is used to emphasize or emphasize someone or something. It is often used to highlight the intensity, extremeness, importance, or significance of a particular quality or trait.
  • a good time was had by all The idiom "a good time was had by all" is used to express that everyone present at an event or gathering thoroughly enjoyed themselves and had a pleasurable experience.
  • go (like/down) a bomb The idiom "go (like/down) a bomb" is typically used in British English and means to be extremely successful or popular. The phrase draws an analogy to the explosive and powerful nature of a bomb, suggesting that something is happening in a highly effective, exciting, or positive way.
  • go like a bomb The idiom "go like a bomb" is used to describe something or someone that is very successful, popular, or efficient, moving or progressing at a fast and impressive pace. It implies a high level of dynamism, energy, or productivity.
  • cost a bomb/the earth/a packet, at cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idioms "cost a bomb" or "cost the earth" or "cost a packet" all mean that something is very expensive. The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" means that something is extremely costly, often to the point of being unaffordable or requiring a significant sacrifice in order to obtain it. Similarly, "cost a small fortune" suggests that something is very expensive, usually beyond what most people would consider reasonable or affordable.
  • you can't judge a book by its cover The idiom "you can't judge a book by its cover" means that one should not form an opinion about someone or something based solely on its external appearance. It emphasizes the importance of looking past superficial characteristics and evaluating the true qualities or nature of a person or thing.
  • a bone of contention The idiom "a bone of contention" means a subject or issue that causes disagreement or ongoing dispute between people or groups.
  • have a bone to pick with sb The idiom "have a bone to pick with someone" means to have a complaint, disagreement, or issue to discuss with someone. It implies that there is a problem or conflict that the person wants to address or resolve.
  • bone dry, at as dry as a bone The idiom "bone dry" or "as dry as a bone" refers to something that is completely devoid of moisture or liquid. It suggests that an object or an area is extremely dry, thoroughly lacking any moisture content.
  • as dry as a bone The idiom "as dry as a bone" means completely devoid of moisture or wetness. It typically describes something that is extremely dry or arid.
  • have your nose in a book The idiom "have your nose in a book" means that someone is deeply engrossed or absorbed in reading a book. It implies that the person is so captivated by the content of the book that they are completely focused on it, often to the extent of disregarding their surroundings or other activities.
  • a boot/kick up the/your backside The idiom "a boot/kick up the/your backside" refers to a figurative phrase used to describe a forceful or motivating action intended to stimulate someone into taking action or correcting their behavior. It implies a metaphorical act of physically kicking or booting someone from behind in order to prompt them to act or improve.
  • have a foot in both camps The idiom "have a foot in both camps" means to be involved or associated with two conflicting or opposing parties, groups, or ideas. It implies the ability or status of someone to maintain connections or affiliations with different sides of an argument, situation, or issue without fully committing to either. They often maintain a neutral position, giving them a unique perspective or advantage.
  • make a point of doing sth The idiom "make a point of doing something" means to ensure that a particular action is done intentionally, deliberately, or as a priority, often to emphasize its significance or importance. It suggests that the person is determined to do the specified task or action purposefully, so that it does not go unnoticed or forgotten.
  • be a question of doing sth The idiom "be a question of doing something" means that something depends on or is determined by a particular action or task. It implies that the outcome or resolution to a problem or situation relies on taking specific steps or actions.
  • go a long way towards doing sth The idiom "go a long way towards doing something" means that a particular action or contribution has a significant impact or makes significant progress towards achieving a particular result or goal. It implies that the action or effort being made is helpful, meaningful, and influential in reaching the intended outcome.
  • a rum do The idiom "a rum do" typically means a strange, unusual, or dubious situation. It can refer to an event or circumstance that is unexpected, peculiar, perplexing, or suspicious. It is often used to describe a situation that is difficult to understand or explain.
  • do a runner The idiom "do a runner" means to leave or escape hastily or secretly, often in an attempt to avoid paying for something or to evade a difficult or dangerous situation. It can also refer to fleeing from responsibilities or commitments.
  • do a good/bad job The idiom "do a good/bad job" refers to the quality or level of performance in completing a task or responsibility. Doing a good job means performing well, effectively, or satisfactorily, while doing a bad job implies performing poorly, inadequately, or unsatisfactorily. It emphasizes the outcome or result of one's efforts in relation to the expected standards or expectations.
  • do a moonlight flit The idiom "do a moonlight flit" means to leave a place suddenly and secretly, often to avoid paying debts or to escape from a situation without notice. It usually implies sneaking away under the cover of darkness, especially during the night (moonlight), to avoid detection.
  • do me/us a favour! The idiom "do me/us a favour!" is an expression used to request someone to do something helpful or beneficial for oneself or a group. It is often used in a sarcastic or annoyed manner to emphasize a plea for assistance or to sarcastically ask someone for something that they are expected to do.
  • do a number on sb To "do a number on someone" is an idiomatic expression that means to harm or have a significant negative impact on someone, either physically, emotionally, or psychologically. It suggests inflicting damage, causing distress, or causing someone to be affected in a negative way.
  • do sb a power of good The idiom "do sb a power of good" means to have a significant positive impact on someone's well-being or health. It suggests that something or someone has the ability to greatly improve someone's physical or mental condition.
  • do sb/yourself a mischief The idiom "do sb/yourself a mischief" means to cause harm, trouble, or injury to someone or oneself, often unintentionally or carelessly. It implies the idea of engaging in actions that may lead to negative consequences or mishaps.
  • do/make a good/bad job of sth The idiom "do/make a good/bad job of something" means to do something with excellence or proficiency (do a good job) or to perform poorly or incompetently (do a bad job). It is commonly used to evaluate the outcome or quality of someone's work, task, or assignment.
  • a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do The idiom "a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do" is primarily used to express the idea that sometimes individuals, particularly men, have to fulfill their obligations or commitments, regardless of the difficulties or challenges involved. It implies that taking responsibility and doing what needs to be done, regardless of personal preferences, is a characteristic associated with being a man. The phrase often emphasizes the necessity of perseverance, determination, and a sense of duty.
  • give sb a box on the ears, at box sb's ears The idiom "give someone a box on the ears" or "boxing someone's ears" refers to physically striking someone's ears with a forceful blow using open palms or fists. This action is often employed as a form of punishment or to reprimand someone for their behavior, using the ears as a target.
  • pissed out of your brain/head/mind, at pissed as a newt/fart The idiom "pissed out of your brain/head/mind" is slang and informal, typically used in British English, to describe a state of extreme intoxication or drunkenness. It implies that someone is heavily under the influence of alcohol to the point of impaired cognitive function. On the other hand, the idiom "pissed as a newt/fart" is a variation of the aforementioned phrase and has a similar meaning. It is used to convey that someone is extremely drunk, drawing an exaggerated comparison to the degree of intoxication with that of a newt or fart. Both idioms emphasize excessive drinking and being completely inebriated, highlighting the loss of control, impaired judgment, or general behavioral changes associated with heavy alcohol
  • put the brakes on, at put a brake on The idiom "put the brakes on" or "put a brake on" refers to the act of slowing down or stopping the progress or momentum of something. It means to take measures to halt or limit a particular activity, process, or situation. This idiom often implies the need for caution, control, or moderation in order to prevent negative consequences or excessive speed.
  • be cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey The idiom "be cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey" is an exaggerated expression used to describe extremely cold weather conditions. It suggests that the temperature is so frigid that it could freeze or cause harm to an object, such as the balls (cannonballs) on a brass monkey figurine.
  • a place for everything and everything in its place The idiom "a place for everything and everything in its place" means that everything should have its designated spot or purpose, and it should always be returned to that spot after use or completion. It emphasizes the importance of organization and orderliness in managing one's belongings or tasks.
  • put on a brave face The idiom "put on a brave face" means to hide one's true feelings or fears behind a facade of strength or courage, especially in difficult or challenging situations. It is often used to describe an individual who tries to appear brave, confident, or unaffected even when they may be feeling scared, anxious, or overwhelmed.
  • put a brave face on it, at put on a brave face The idiom "put a brave face on it" or "put on a brave face" means to conceal one's true feelings or fears and act in a courageous or confident manner, especially in a challenging or difficult situation. It involves presenting a strong or positive outward appearance despite feeling scared, worried, or uncertain on the inside. It often signifies making an effort to mask vulnerability or maintain composure in the face of adversity.
  • a hair's breadth The idiom "a hair's breadth" refers to an extremely small or narrow distance, amount, or difference. It implies a very close or near miss, often used to describe a situation where something almost happened or someone narrowly avoided a particular outcome.
  • break a leg The idiom "break a leg" is a phrase commonly used in the performing arts, particularly theater and show business, to wish someone good luck. It is often said to performers before they take the stage. Despite the literal meaning of the words, the phrase is not meant as a literal command to break one's leg, but rather as an expression of encouragement and success.
  • a dog's breakfast The idiom "a dog's breakfast" is used to describe something that is extremely messy, disorganized, or poorly done. It suggests that whatever it refers to is in a chaotic or unappealing state, similar to how a dog might eat its food in a messy manner.
  • a breath of fresh air The idiom "a breath of fresh air" refers to someone or something that is refreshing, rejuvenating, or a positive change in a situation. It can describe a person who brings new ideas, energy, or positivity to a group or environment. It is often used to express the feeling of relief or revitalization that comes with encountering someone or something different and uplifting.
  • for a laugh The idiom "for a laugh" means doing something for amusement or entertainment purposes, even if it may be silly, outrageous, or not entirely serious. It implies engaging in an activity purely for fun and enjoyment without any ulterior motives.
  • a cry for help The idiom "a cry for help" refers to a desperate, urgent, or intense expression of need or distress. It implies that someone is seeking assistance or intervention, often in a situation or circumstance where they are unable to overcome or cope with the challenge on their own.
  • at/for a price The idiom "at/for a price" means that something is attainable or achievable, but only if one is willing to pay a significant cost or make sacrifices. It implies that there is a cost or consequence associated with obtaining or achieving something.
  • shit a brick The idiom "shit a brick" is a vulgar phrase used to describe a state of extreme surprise, shock, or fear. It implies that the person experiencing these emotions is so startled or alarmed that they would metaphorically pass feces in the shape of a brick. It is an exaggerated way of expressing intense astonishment or panic.
  • drop a brick/clanger The idiom "drop a brick/clanger" is typically used to describe a situation when someone says or does something tactless, embarrassing, or inappropriate, possibly causing awkwardness or offense. It implies a social blunder or an unintentional mistake, often resulting in an embarrassing or regretful moment.
  • from A to Z The idiom "from A to Z" means covering everything or including all aspects or items, from the beginning to the end, or from the first step to the last. It implies a complete and comprehensive coverage or understanding of a topic or subject.
  • a gift from the gods The idiom "a gift from the gods" refers to something extraordinary or exceptionally fortunate that is seemingly bestowed upon someone unexpectedly or miraculously. It implies that the described thing or situation is of such high value or significance that it is believed to have been sent or granted by divine forces or luck.
  • be a far cry from sth The idiom "be a far cry from something" means that something is significantly different, usually worse or less desirable, than another thing being compared to. It implies a large or notable difference between two things.
  • bring sth to a head, at come to a head The idiom "bring something to a head" or "come to a head" is used to describe a situation or problem reaching a critical point or becoming extremely intense. It refers to the moment when tensions, conflicts, or issues escalate and become impossible to ignore or delay any longer. At this point, it often becomes necessary to take action or resolve the situation.
  • be having a moment The idiom "be having a moment" typically refers to a temporary period of great success, recognition, or popularity in someone's life or career. It describes a time when someone is particularly in the spotlight or experiencing a surge in positive outcomes, often sudden or unexpected.
  • you're having a laugh The idiom "you're having a laugh" is commonly used in British English to express disbelief or to communicate that someone is joking or not being serious. It can be seen as a more informal way of saying "you must be kidding" or "you're joking, right?".
  • a bad workman blames his tools The idiom "a bad workman blames his tools" means that a person who performs a task poorly or fails to achieve desired results often tries to shift the blame onto the tools, equipment, or materials they were provided with, instead of admitting their own lack of skill, effort, or competence. In essence, it suggests that one should take responsibility for their own failures or shortcomings rather than blaming external factors.
  • be (as) daft as a brush The idiom "be (as) daft as a brush" means to be foolish, silly, or unintelligent. It is used to describe someone who lacks common sense or acts in a foolish manner. The comparison to a brush, an inanimate object incapable of rationality, underscores the extent of someone's foolishness or lack of intelligence.
  • I'm a Dutchman The idiom "I'm a Dutchman" is used to express extreme disbelief or astonishment in response to a statement or situation. It implies that the speaker finds the idea or assertion highly unlikely, often emphasizing their skepticism or skepticism others should have towards it.
  • a drop in the bucket, at a drop in the ocean The idiom "a drop in the bucket, at a drop in the ocean" is used to describe something that is considered insignificant or a small, insignificant part of a larger whole. It suggests that the contribution or impact being made is so minimal that it would have little effect on the overall situation or outcome.
  • Rome wasn't built in a day The idiom "Rome wasn't built in a day" means that achieving something significant or substantial takes time and effort. It reminds us that great accomplishments or developments require patience, perseverance, and a long-term commitment. It emphasizes the need for gradual progress and discourages expecting immediate results.
  • fly into a rage The idiom "fly into a rage" means to suddenly become extremely angry or furious in a swift and explosive manner. It refers to a person losing control of their emotions and exhibiting intense anger.
  • dig yourself into a hole The idiom "dig yourself into a hole" means to get oneself into a difficult or problematic situation by saying or doing something that creates more trouble or complications than originally intended. It refers to the act of figuratively digging a hole in the ground, in which the individual becomes trapped or stuck and finds it challenging to escape the consequences of their actions.
  • sb's face is a picture The idiom "sb's face is a picture" means that someone's facial expression is very clear or vivid, usually conveying a strong emotion or reaction to something amusing, surprising, or shocking.
  • is the Pope a Catholic? The idiom "is the Pope a Catholic?" is a rhetorical question used to sarcastically express absolute certainty or a fact that is considered obvious or known by everyone. It is often used to emphasize that the answer to a question is incredibly evident or self-evident.
  • be like a red rag to a bull The idiom "be like a red rag to a bull" is used to describe a situation or action that strongly provokes or irritates someone, typically resulting in an angry or aggressive reaction. It is derived from the behavior of bulls being provoked by the sight of a red cloth, causing them to charge aggressively.
  • have a mind of its own The idiom "have a mind of its own" refers to an object, system, or situation that behaves or functions independently, contrary to what is expected or intended. It suggests that it possesses autonomy or unpredictability, exhibiting a will or character that goes beyond the control or influence of others.
  • a bunch of fives The idiom "a bunch of fives" is a slang expression that originated in British English. It refers to a fist, typically when someone is ready to fight or punch someone. It implies the act of using one's hand, specifically a closed fist, as a weapon. Therefore, the idiom "a bunch of fives" suggests someone preparing to throw a punch or engaging in physical confrontation.
  • a bundle of laughs The idiom "a bundle of laughs" is used to describe someone or something that is highly amusing, entertaining, or hilarious. It refers to a person or situation that brings laughter and joy to others.
  • a bundle of nerves The idiom "a bundle of nerves" refers to a person who is extremely anxious, stressed, or jittery. It implies that the individual is overwhelmed or unable to control their emotions due to nervousness or anxiety.
  • go a bundle on sth The idiom "go a bundle on sth" means to have a strong preference or enthusiasm for something, often to the point of being obsessive or excessive about it. It implies a great amount of interest, dedication, or investment in a particular activity, hobby, or object.
  • make a bundle The definition of the idiom "make a bundle" is to earn or accumulate a large amount of money or wealth, often in a quick or unexpected manner.
  • burn a hole in sb's pocket The idiom "burn a hole in someone's pocket" means having a strong desire to spend money; feeling compelled to spend money quickly or impulsively.
  • what a business! The idiom "what a business!" is typically used as an exclamation to express surprise, annoyance, or discontent about a situation. It conveys a sense of frustration or incredulity towards a particular event, circumstance, or behavior.
  • pain in the ass/butt, at a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "pain in the ass/butt" (alternatively "pain in the arse/backside") is an informal expression used to describe something or someone that is extremely irritating, frustrating, or troublesome. It refers to a situation or individual that causes inconvenience, discomfort, or annoyance.
  • a kick in the butt/pants, at a kick up the arse/backside The idiom "a kick in the butt/pants" or "a kick up the arse/backside" refers to a metaphorical action of receiving a strong dose of motivation, often as a result of someone being scolded, criticized, or pushed to improve their efforts or behavior. It implies a figurative kick that serves as a wake-up call to take action or make necessary changes.
  • at the push of a button The idiom "at the push of a button" means something that can be easily or instantly achieved or activated, usually with the simple act of pressing a button or a switch. It implies that the desired action or outcome can be accomplished quickly and effortlessly.
  • by a nose The idiom "by a nose" refers to winning or succeeding in a close or narrow margin. It originates from horse racing, where a horse can win a race by a narrow distance, often measured in lengths or noses. Therefore, "by a nose" signifies achieving victory, triumph, or success by a very small margin or slim advantage.
  • a baptism of/by fire The idiom "a baptism of/by fire" refers to a challenging or difficult initiation or introduction to a new experience or situation. It often implies being immediately subjected to intense or stressful circumstances, requiring one to quickly adapt and learn through trial and error. The term originates from the idea of using fire to purify or initiate someone, as water is used in baptism rituals.
  • it's my pleasure, at it's a pleasure The idiom "it's my pleasure" or "it's a pleasure" is a polite and courteous response often used to express one's willingness and delight in doing something for someone else or to indicate that one is happy to offer assistance or provide a service. It conveys a sense of pleasure and satisfaction in being able to help or please others.
  • hell of a The idiom "hell of a" is used to express intensity, extremeness, or emphasis on a subject or situation. It is often used to describe something or someone exceptional, impressive, or remarkable.
  • of a kind The idiom "of a kind" refers to something or someone that is unique, exceptional, or uncommon. It suggests that the thing being referred to does not easily fit into any existing category or classification, making it distinctive in its own way.
  • a heck of a The idiom "a heck of a" is typically used to emphasize or intensify the qualities or characteristics of something or someone. It suggests that the noun it modifies is exceptional, remarkable, or impressive. Example: "That was a heck of a party!"
  • call it a day The idiom "call it a day" means to decide to stop working or to bring an end to a task or activity, often due to being satisfied with the progress made or feeling that further effort would not be productive. It can also imply the need to rest or preserve energy for another time.
  • a close call, at a close/near thing The idiom "a close call" or "a near thing" refers to a situation where something almost goes wrong or has a negative outcome, but narrowly avoids it. It describes a situation where there is a small margin between success and failure, usually leaving the person involved feeling relieved or grateful that things turned out fine despite the narrow margin.
  • it's a date The idiom "it's a date" is an informal expression used to confirm or accept a proposed or agreed-upon time, typically for a romantic outing or meeting between two individuals. It implies that the plans or arrangement are sealed and that the speaker is looking forward to the scheduled event.
  • a man's man The idiom "a man's man" refers to a man who is perceived to possess qualities or characteristics traditionally associated with masculinity and manliness. This individual is typically strong, brave, independent, self-reliant, and exhibits a rugged or tough exterior. A man's man is often admired by other men and seen as someone who embodies traditional ideals of masculinity.
  • a dog's life The idiom "a dog's life" refers to a difficult or unfortunate existence full of hardship, struggle, or unpleasant experiences. It conveys the idea of a life that is challenging, relentless, or lacking in comfort and pleasure.
  • a mug's game The idiom "a mug's game" refers to an activity, endeavor, or pursuit that is seen as futile, meaningless, or has little chance of success. It implies that engaging in such an activity would only result in loss, disappointment, or being taken advantage of. It suggests that the person participating in the game is being foolish or naive.
  • it's a fair cop The idiom "it's a fair cop" is used to admit guilt or wrongdoing in a situation where one has been caught or accused, acknowledging that the accusation or charge is just or deserved. It is often used humorously to accept the consequences without argument or complaint.
  • a feather in your cap The idiom "a feather in your cap" refers to an accomplishment, achievement, or honor that a person can be proud of and is often used as a symbol of success or recognition. It can represent something noteworthy or impressive that adds to one's reputation or personal achievements.
  • wouldn't harm/hurt a fly The idiom "wouldn't harm/hurt a fly" is used to describe someone who is extremely gentle, peaceful, or harmless. It suggests that the person is not capable of causing harm or being aggressive towards others, even towards small creatures like flies.
  • get a load of that! "Get a load of that!" is an informal expression used to draw someone's attention or astonishment towards something noteworthy, surprising, or impressive. It implies urging someone to look or pay attention to something remarkable or unusual.
  • to a tee The idiom "to a tee" means to do something precisely or exactly as it should be done, without any error or deviation. It suggests perfection or adherence to all details and requirements.
  • be a name to conjure with The idiom "be a name to conjure with" means that someone or something is highly respected, powerful, or influential. It suggests that the mentioned person or thing has a reputation that holds great significance and evokes awe or admiration.
  • not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have a penny to your name" means to be completely broke or penniless, having no money at all.
  • be a law unto yourself The idiom "be a law unto yourself" means to act independently and according to one's own principles or rules, disregarding rules or regulations imposed by others. It refers to a person who does not feel bound by the usual standards or expectations of society or authority figures and prefers to set their own standards and guidelines.
  • have a care The idiom "have a care" means to be cautious, careful, or vigilant. It is often used as a way to remind someone to consider the possible consequences of their actions or decisions.
  • not care/give a fig The idiom "not care/give a fig" means to not have any interest or concern about something or someone. It implies indifference or lack of importance placed on the subject matter.
  • not give/care a damn The idiom "not give/care a damn" refers to a state of complete unimportance or indifference towards something. It means having a complete lack of concern, interest, or regard for a particular situation or person. It signifies a strong apathy or lack of emotional investment in the matter at hand.
  • not care/give a hoot, at not care/give two hoots The idiom "not care/give a hoot" or "not care/give two hoots" means to not have any concern or interest in something or someone. It implies a lack of interest or indifference towards a particular matter or situation.
  • go with a bang The idiom "go with a bang" means to end or finish something in a dramatic or exciting manner, often with a lot of energy, enthusiasm, or success. It signifies a strong and impressive conclusion to an event, performance, or experience.
  • with a vengeance The idiom "with a vengeance" means to do something with great intensity, energy, or fierceness.
  • without a murmur The idiom "without a murmur" means that someone does or accepts something without any complaint, protest, or objection. It indicates a silent or uncomplaining acceptance of a situation or decision.
  • go (off) without a hitch The idiom "go (off) without a hitch" means that an event or plan is successfully executed without any problems, difficulties, or issues. It implies that everything proceeds smoothly and according to plan. The phrase often implies a sense of ease and absence of any unexpected obstacles or delays.
  • carry a torch for sb The idiom "carry a torch for someone" means to have strong romantic feelings or an enduring infatuation for someone, often without the other person reciprocating the same level of affection or interest. It implies a lingering attachment or emotional longing towards that person, even if they are no longer present or accessible.
  • you're a star! The idiom "you're a star!" is an expression used to praise or compliment someone for their exceptional performance, achievements, or noteworthy qualities. It implies that the person being referred to is talented, outstanding, or deserving of recognition.
  • make a pig of yourself The idiom "make a pig of yourself" means to eat excessively or greedily, without self-control or manners. It describes someone indulging in food or drink to an extent that is considered gluttonous or excessive.
  • make a spectacle of yourself The idiom "make a spectacle of yourself" means to behave in a way that draws attention to oneself, often in a foolish, embarrassing, or attention-seeking manner. It implies that someone is acting in a manner that is excessive or inappropriate, causing others to notice and form negative opinions.
  • make a name for yourself The idiom "make a name for yourself" means to become well-known or establish a reputation for oneself through one's achievements, skills, or accomplishments. It refers to gaining recognition and respect in a particular field or community.
  • get/keep a grip on yourself The idiom "get/keep a grip on yourself" means to regain or maintain control over one's emotions or behavior, especially in difficult or chaotic situations. It implies the need to stay calm, composed, and rational.
  • make a case for sth To "make a case for something" means to present reasons or arguments in support of a particular idea, proposition, or point of view. It involves providing evidence, logical reasoning, and persuasive arguments to support the validity or importance of something. This phrase is commonly used in discussions or debates where someone is trying to convince others of the merits or worthiness of a particular position or action.
  • make out a case for sth, at make a case for sth The idiom "make out a case for something" or "make a case for something" means to provide a convincing or persuasive argument or evidence in support of a particular idea, claim, or course of action. It involves presenting a strong case or justification for something, usually in order to convince others of its validity or importance.
  • not have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "not have a cat in hell's chance" is used to mean that someone or something has no possibility or chance of success or achieving a desired outcome. It implies that the situation or odds are incredibly difficult or impossible to overcome, much like a cat surviving in the fiery depths of hell.
  • like a cat on hot bricks, at like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "like a cat on hot bricks" typically means someone who is very nervous, restless, or agitated, unable to sit still or relax. Similarly, the idiom "like a cat on a hot tin roof" also describes someone who is highly anxious, fidgety, or ill at ease. Both expressions draw a parallel between the uneasy behavior of a cat on a hot surface and someone who is unable to find calm or comfort in a given situation.
  • hold down a job The idiom "hold down a job" means to maintain or keep a job for a certain period of time. It implies a level of stability and competence in performing one's work duties consistently.
  • an iron hand/fist in a velvet glove The idiom "an iron hand/fist in a velvet glove" refers to someone who appears gentle and mild on the surface, but in reality, they possess a strong and decisive approach in their actions or decision-making. It suggests that while a person may seem kind and benevolent, they also have the ability and willingness to exercise power and authority when necessary.
  • a laundry list The idiom "a laundry list" refers to a long, detailed list of items or tasks. It originated from the practice of writing down lists of clothing items for laundry services. It is now commonly used to describe any extensive or overwhelming enumeration of things.
  • a list as long as your arm The idiom "a list as long as your arm" is used to describe a very long list of items or tasks. It suggests that the list is so lengthy that it could potentially extend as far as the length of one's arm.
  • a level playing field The idiom "a level playing field" refers to a situation where everyone has an equal opportunity to compete or succeed, without any advantage or disadvantage. It signifies fairness and equal conditions for all, eliminating any inherent advantage or inequality.
  • put a brake on The idiom "put a brake on" means to slow down or control something, often to prevent it from progressing or escalating further. It refers to the act of using brakes on a vehicle to reduce its speed or bring it to a halt. In a figurative sense, it suggests applying restraint or imposing limitations on a particular activity, behavior, or situation.
  • put a figure on it The idiom "put a figure on it" means to assign a specific numerical value or provide a specific estimate for something that was previously uncertain or unclear. It is often used when discussing financial matters, budgeting, or quantifying a particular situation.
  • put a gloss on sth The idiom "put a gloss on something" means to give a positive or favorable interpretation or presentation of something, often to make it appear better or more appealing than it actually is. It involves providing a superficial or deceptive explanation to hide the true nature or shortcomings of a situation or thing.
  • put sb on a pedestal The idiom "put sb on a pedestal" means to greatly admire or idealize someone, often to the point of considering them perfect or infallible. It suggests the act of elevating someone's status or attributes to an unrealistic or exaggerated level.
  • look/feel (like) a million dollars The idiom "look/feel (like) a million dollars" means to appear or feel extremely attractive, confident, or successful. It suggests that someone looks or feels exceptionally good, usually in terms of appearance or overall demeanor.
  • look/feel (like) a million bucks, at look/feel (like) a million dollars The idiom "look/feel (like) a million bucks, or look/feel (like) a million dollars" is used to describe someone or something that appears or feels exceptionally stylish, confident, and well-presented. It implies that the person or object in question seems extremely valuable, attractive, refined, or successful. It is often used to express admiration or appreciation for someone's appearance or demeanor.
  • go out like a light The idiom "go out like a light" means to fall asleep very quickly and deeply or to lose consciousness suddenly and completely.
  • lay it on with a trowel, at lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on with a trowel" or "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, typically for dramatic effect or to emphasize a point. It implies that someone is presenting information, compliments, or flattery in an excessively embellished and insincere manner. It suggests an over-the-top expression that may seem exaggerated or unbelievable.
  • come to a head The idiom "come to a head" means that a situation or problem has reached a critical or decisive point where action or resolution is required. It implies that the situation has escalated or intensified and can no longer be ignored or postponed.
  • a means to an end The idiom "a means to an end" refers to a situation where something is done or used as a way to achieve a desired outcome or goal, even if the method or action itself is not particularly enjoyable or important. It suggests that a particular action or process is only valuable because it will lead to a desired result or objective.
  • give/hand sth to sb on a plate The idiom "give/hand something to someone on a plate" means to provide or offer something to someone very easily or without much effort on their part. It implies that the person receiving it did not have to work for or strive for it. It is often used to express the idea that something was given or provided too easily, without any challenge or opportunity for personal growth or achievement.
  • be kind, generous, etc. to a fault The idiom "be kind, generous, etc. to a fault" refers to someone who possesses an excessive or extreme level of kindness, generosity, or any other positive quality. It suggests that the person's virtuous behavior may sometimes be taken to an extreme extent, leading to potential problems or disadvantages.
  • pull a gun, knife, etc. on sb The idiom "pull a gun, knife, etc. on someone" means to physically brandish or draw a firearm, knife, or any other weapon in a threatening or aggressive manner towards another person. It suggests the intention to harm, intimidate, or force the other person into compliance through the display of a weapon.
  • a miserable, poor, etc. excuse for sth The idiom "a miserable, poor, etc. excuse for something" is used to describe something or someone that is considered to be extremely inadequate, unsatisfactory, or substandard in quality or performance. It implies that the thing being referred to is far below the expected or desired level.
  • given half a chance, at given the chance/choice The idiom "given half a chance" or "given the chance/choice" is used to express the opportunity or possibility of achieving something if only a small or limited opportunity is provided. It implies that with even a limited chance, the person being referred to is likely to succeed or take advantage of the situation.
  • miss a chance/opportunity The idiom "miss a chance/opportunity" means to not take advantage of or make use of an opportunity when it is presented. It refers to failing to seize a favorable or advantageous moment to achieve a desired outcome or benefit.
  • not have a/the ghost of a chance The idiom "not have a/the ghost of a chance" means to have no possibility or extremely slim odds of succeeding or achieving something. It implies that one's chances are so negligible or nonexistent that they are comparable to the likelihood of encountering a ghost, which is believed to be highly unlikely to occur.
  • a change is as good as a rest The idiom "a change is as good as a rest" means that doing something different or taking a break from one's usual routine can have a rejuvenating or refreshing effect, similar to the rest gained from simply resting or doing nothing. It suggests that variety or a change in activities can be just as beneficial as taking time off or relaxing.
  • be a chapter of accidents The idiom "be a chapter of accidents" means that a series of unfortunate events or mishaps have occurred in a person's life or a particular situation. It implies that these events were unexpected, random, or out of one's control and have resulted in a chain of unfortunate circumstances.
  • a paper chase The idiom "a paper chase" refers to a relentless pursuit of paperwork or a monotonous and bureaucratic process, often associated with administrative tasks or excessive documentation requirements. It implies a long and tedious quest for paperwork that may be burdensome or unnecessary.
  • a rubber check The idiom "a rubber check" refers to a check that is written on an account with insufficient funds to cover the amount specified. It implies that the check will bounce or "bounce back" when presented to the bank for payment, just like a rubber ball would bounce back when dropped. Therefore, "a rubber check" is a term used to describe a check that cannot be cashed due to lack of funds in the account.
  • a chicken and egg situation The idiom "a chicken and egg situation" refers to a predicament where it is challenging to determine which came first or which event caused the other. It depicts a circular or interdependent relationship where it is difficult to identify the initial cause or establish a clear sequence of events.
  • one in a million The idiom "one in a million" is used to describe something or someone extremely rare, unique, exceptional, or extraordinary. It implies that the subject being referred to is exceptionally special or outstanding, standing out from a large group or population.
  • be one in a million The idiom "be one in a million" means to be extremely rare, unique, or outstanding. It emphasizes the exceptional qualities or characteristics of a person or thing, highlighting that they stand out from the rest.
  • a hundred/thousand/million and one The idiom "a hundred/thousand/million and one" is used to emphasize a large number or a multitude of things. It implies that there are countless or an abundance of something, often conveying the idea of numerous options, possibilities, or tasks.
  • keep a civil tongue in your head The idiom "keep a civil tongue in your head" means to speak respectfully and refrain from using offensive or rude language. It suggests exercising self-control and manners in one's speech to maintain a polite and constructive communication.
  • (as) clean as a (new) pin The idiom "clean as a (new) pin" means very clean or neat and tidy. It refers to something that is impeccably clean, just like a brand new pin.
  • make a clean breast of it The idiom "make a clean breast of it" means to confess or make a full disclosure about something, especially a wrongdoing or a secret that has been kept hidden. It implies admitting or revealing the truth openly and honestly, without holding anything back.
  • a new broom sweeps clean The idiom "a new broom sweeps clean" means that a person who has just taken charge of a situation or a new organization tends to make immediate and drastic changes, often for the better, with a lot of energy and enthusiasm.
  • a cloud hanging over sb The idiom "a cloud hanging over someone" is used to describe a situation in which someone is experiencing a persistent feeling of sadness, worry, or guilt. It can also indicate the presence of a looming problem or a sense of impending doom that negatively affects someone's mood or outlook on life.
  • a cloud on the horizon The idiom "a cloud on the horizon" refers to a potential problem or difficulty that is anticipated or expected in the future. It implies a situation that may potentially cause trouble or disruptions, similar to how a cloud on the horizon can indicate an incoming storm.
  • to coin a phrase The idiom "to coin a phrase" means to use an expression or phrase that is already well-known or commonly used, often ironically acknowledging the use of a cliché or overused saying. It is typically said before or after using a familiar phrase to add a humorous or sarcastic tone.
  • take/need a cold shower The idiom "take/need a cold shower" refers to a situation where someone needs to calm down or control their emotions or desires. It implies a figurative need to cool off, regain composure, or suppress strong feelings, particularly of excitement, arousal, or anger. This expression is often used humorously or to suggest that someone's enthusiasm or passion is excessive or inappropriate.
  • a riot of colour The idiom "a riot of color" means a display or arrangement of vivid, bright, and contrasting colors that is visually striking and intense. It suggests a plethora of colors that are bold, vibrant, and energetic, creating a lively or chaotic visual effect.
  • have come a long way The idiom "have come a long way" means to have made significant progress or improvement in a particular area, situation, or personal journey. It often signifies a notable transformation or development from a previous state or condition.
  • (as) cool as a cucumber The idiom "as cool as a cucumber" means to remain calm, composed, and unruffled, especially in stressful or tense situations. It implies that someone can maintain a calm demeanor even when others might be agitated or panicking.
  • keep a cool head The idiom "keep a cool head" means to remain calm and composed, especially in stressful or challenging situations. It refers to maintaining control over one's emotions and not succumbing to panic or agitation.
  • keep a cool head, at keep your head The idiom "keep a cool head" or "keep your head" means to remain calm and composed in a tense or challenging situation, without letting one's emotions or panic take over. It suggests maintaining rationality, level-headedness, and clear thinking even in the face of adversity or pressure.
  • cop a feel The idiom "cop a feel" is a colloquial expression that means to surreptitiously or casually touch someone, especially sexually, in a manner that is usually inappropriate or unwelcome. It typically refers to taking advantage of a situation or engaging in improper physical contact without the other person's consent.
  • cop a plea The idiom "cop a plea" is a colloquial expression that means to plead guilty or make a deal with prosecutors in a criminal case, often with the intention of receiving a lesser punishment or charge. It refers to an individual accepting responsibility for a crime and requesting leniency from the court.
  • have a corner on a market The idiom "have a corner on a market" refers to the situation when a person or business has exclusive control or monopoly over a particular product, service, or industry. It means they have secured a dominant position in the market, giving them significant influence or power over pricing, supply, and competition.
  • cost sb a pretty penny The idiom "cost sb a pretty penny" means that something is very expensive or costly. It suggests that a significant amount of money has been spent or will be spent on something.
  • you could have heard a pin drop The idiom "you could have heard a pin drop" refers to a moment of profound silence or quietness in a particular situation or environment. It suggests that the atmosphere is so silent that even the slightest noise, like the dropping of a pin, would be heard clearly. It emphasizes the absence of any sound or disturbance, often indicating surprise, suspense, or anticipation.
  • you could cut the atmosphere with a knife The idiom "you could cut the atmosphere with a knife" is used to describe an intense and palpable tension or hostility in a room or environment. It suggests that the atmosphere is so thick and heavy with negative emotions that it feels almost physical, as if you could slice through it with a knife.
  • you could have knocked me down/over with a feather The idiom "you could have knocked me down/over with a feather" is used to express great surprise or astonishment at something unexpected or shocking that has just occurred. It conveys the idea that the speaker was so shocked that they felt like they could have been physically knocked down by something as light and insignificant as a feather.
  • a couple of shakes, at in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "a couple of shakes" or "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" refers to a very short period of time or a quick action. It can be used to convey that something will be done or completed rapidly, implying that it will take no more than a few moments or "shakes" to accomplish. The idiom is often used in casual or informal conversations.
  • be on a collision course The idiom "be on a collision course" means that two individuals, groups, or things are heading towards a conflict or direct confrontation. It implies that their paths are set to intersect in a potentially harmful or destructive manner.
  • as a matter of course The idiom "as a matter of course" means something that is considered normal, customary, or expected; an action or event that is done or happens routinely or naturally.
  • cover/hide a multitude of sins The idiom "cover/hide a multitude of sins" typically means that something, often an attractive or positive quality, can serve as a distraction or make up for other shortcomings or flaws. It suggests that one aspect can overshadow or diminish the negative aspects of a person, object, or situation.
  • have a cow, at have kittens The idiom "have a cow" or "have kittens" is an informal expression used to describe someone's reaction of extreme anger, frustration, or distress over a particular situation or event. The phrase suggests that the person's emotional response has escalated to such a degree that it is likened to a cow giving birth or a cat having multiple kittens, emphasizing the intensity of their reaction.
  • go far, at go a long way The idiom "go far" or "go a long way" is used to describe someone's potential for success or accomplishment. It implies that a person possesses qualities or skills that will lead to great achievements or recognition in their chosen field or endeavors. It can also refer to the notion of someone having a persistent and determined mindset that will enable them to overcome obstacles and achieve their goals.
  • cut a fine figure The idiom "cut a fine figure" typically means to appear or present oneself in an impressive and elegant manner. It suggests looking smart, well-dressed, and confident, often leaving a positive and memorable impression on others.
  • a cut above The idiom "a cut above" means to be of superior quality or excellence compared to others. It suggests being at a higher standard or standing out in terms of skill, ability, or performance.
  • cut quite a figure/dash, at cut a fine figure The idiom "cut quite a figure/dash" or "cut a fine figure" refers to someone who appears particularly impressive, striking, or elegant in their manner or appearance. It suggests that the person stands out or draws attention due to their confident and stylish demeanor, leaving a lasting impression on others.
  • make a noise about sth The idiom "make a noise about sth" means to complain loudly or vocally about something, usually in order to draw attention to an issue, express dissatisfaction, or seek change. It implies a forceful or assertive expression of dissatisfaction.
  • says a lot about sb/sth, at says sth about sb/sth The idiom "says a lot about sb/sth" or "says sth about sb/sth" is used to describe how a certain characteristic, trait, action, or circumstance reveals important information or provides insight into someone or something's true nature, behavior, qualities, or values. It implies that the specific example or situation being observed or discussed carries a significant and telling message or inference about the person or thing being referred to.
  • lead sb a (merry) dance To "lead someone a (merry) dance" means to cause someone to have a lot of difficulty or trouble by making them follow a complex or confusing course of actions or instructions. It often implies that the person is being intentionally misled or deceived.
  • a leap in the dark The idiom "a leap in the dark" refers to taking a risk or making a decision without being fully aware of the potential consequences or outcome. It implies an act of uncertainty or venturing into the unknown.
  • a heavy date The idiom "a heavy date" refers to a significant or important event or appointment planned in advance, typically involving romantic or social interactions. It implies that the occasion holds considerable weight or importance for the individuals involved, often with high expectations and anticipation.
  • have a field day The idiom "have a field day" typically means to have a great time or enjoy oneself abundantly in a particular situation. It suggests that someone is taking advantage of an opportunity or indulging in something with great enthusiasm.
  • an apple a day keeps the doctor away The idiom "an apple a day keeps the doctor away" means that by eating nutritious and healthy foods, like apples, regularly, one can prevent or reduce the risk of illnesses and therefore avoid needing to consult a doctor. It emphasizes the importance of maintaining a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle for overall well-being.
  • be as dead as a doornail The idiom "be as dead as a doornail" means to be completely lifeless, no longer functional, or beyond any hope of revival or use.
  • flog a dead horse The idiom "flog a dead horse" means to waste time, effort, or resources on a futile or hopeless task or cause. It implies persisting with an endeavor that is already doomed to fail or trying to revive something that is no longer viable or useful.
  • (as) deaf as a post The idiom "(as) deaf as a post" means to be completely or extremely deaf, unable to hear even the loudest sounds or noises. The phrase suggests that the person's hearing is as ineffective as a post, which does not possess the ability to hear at all.
  • a raw deal The idiom "a raw deal" refers to a situation or outcome in which someone is treated unfairly or given unfavorable conditions or terms. It suggests that the person involved has received an arrangement or agreement that is unjust, unfavorable, or disadvantageous.
  • die a natural death, at die a/the death The idiom "die a natural death" means for something to end or fade away gradually or without any intervention or dramatic consequences. It refers to a situation or idea losing relevance or significance over time until it eventually disappears. On the other hand, "die a/the death" is a phrase used to emphasize the finality or seriousness of a situation. It can refer to the actual physical death of a person or the end of something, such as a project, relationship, or idea. It implies a definitive and irreversible termination.
  • be a matter of life and/or death The idiom "be a matter of life and/or death" means that a particular situation or decision is extremely crucial and may determine whether someone lives or dies. It refers to circumstances where the outcome holds significant consequences, especially in terms of personal safety or well-being.
  • all of a flutter The idiom "all of a flutter" means to be in a state of nervous excitement or agitation.
  • at a push The idiom "at a push" means that something is only possible or achievable with great effort, pushing the limits or resources to their maximum capacity.
  • in a rut The idiom "in a rut" means being stuck in a monotonous or unproductive routine or pattern, often leading to a feeling of boredom, frustration, or lack of progress in one's personal or professional life. It implies a state of being stuck in a fixed and unvarying situation, lacking inspiration or motivation to make any significant changes.
  • a fine line The idiom "a fine line" is used to describe a very narrow or subtle distinction between two things or concepts. It refers to a situation where the difference between two options or actions is very delicate, thin, or hard to discern, often implying that making a decision or choosing one side over the other can be challenging or problematic due to the closely related nature of both choices.
  • a firm hand The idiom "a firm hand" refers to exercising strict control or discipline over someone or something in a strong and decisive manner. It typically describes someone who maintains authority and control, often in a leadership position or while handling a situation.
  • in a flash The idiom "in a flash" means to happen very quickly or suddenly, almost instantaneously.
  • a free ride The idiom "a free ride" refers to a situation where someone is able to benefit, enjoy, or take advantage of something without having to make any effort, pay for it, or face consequences. It implies obtaining something without any cost or responsibility.
  • in a dream The phrase "in a dream" is an idiomatic expression that is used to describe something that seems too good, unreal, or impossible to happen in reality. It implies a situation or experience that is imaginary, fanciful, or idealized, similar to how one might envision things in a dream.
  • bust a gut The idiom "bust a gut" means to put forth an extreme amount of effort or work very hard, often to the point of straining oneself physically or mentally.
  • have a ball "Have a ball" is an idiom that means to have a great time or enjoy oneself immensely. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is experiencing a lot of fun and pleasure.
  • make a pile The idiom "make a pile" typically means to accumulate a large amount of money or wealth, often quickly or unexpectedly. It can also refer to amassing a substantial amount of something, such as possessions or resources.
  • at a pinch The idiom "at a pinch" refers to being able to manage or accomplish something with difficulty or in challenging circumstances when other options are not available or practical. It implies making do or finding a solution, albeit with some difficulty or compromise.
  • in a pinch, at at a pinch The idiom "in a pinch" or "at a pinch" refers to a situation where one is facing difficulty or a tight spot, usually in terms of resources, time, or options. It signifies a moment when immediate action or a quick solution is required, even if it may not be ideal or preferred. In such circumstances, one may have to make do with what is available or come up with creative alternatives to overcome the challenge or problem at hand.
  • a right one The idiom "a right one" typically refers to a person who is considered suitable, appropriate, or a good match for a particular situation, task, or desired outcome. It suggests that the person is the correct choice or the best option available.
  • all of a doodah The idiom "all of a doodah" is used to describe a state of extreme confusion, agitation, or distress. It refers to a situation or a person being overwhelmed or thrown into disarray.
  • all of a sudden The idiom "all of a sudden" means something happening unexpectedly, without any warning or prior indication. It refers to a sudden, abrupt, or surprising occurrence or change.
  • sb deserves a medal The idiom "sb deserves a medal" means that someone has performed an act or achieved something deserving of recognition, honor, or praise. It is used to emphasize someone's exceptional efforts, bravery, or accomplishments.
  • be on the horns of a dilemma The idiom "be on the horns of a dilemma" means to be faced with a difficult choice between two equally undesirable options or outcomes. It refers to being caught between a "rock and a hard place" or being in a predicament where any decision leads to a negative consequence.
  • be in a different league The idiom "be in a different league" means to be significantly superior or in a class of one's own compared to others in terms of skill, ability, or quality. It suggests that a person or thing is on a level that surpasses or stands above the competition or average.
  • be a dime a dozen The idiom "be a dime a dozen" means that something is very common, abundant, or easily found. It implies that the mentioned item or person holds little value or uniqueness, as it can be easily replaced or obtained without much effort or expense.
  • be a dime a dozen, at be two/ten a penny The idiom "be a dime a dozen" or "be two/ten a penny" means that something is very common, easily accessible, or readily available. It implies that the object or person in question has no special value or uniqueness and can be found in large quantities. It suggests that the item or individual is ordinary, with little or no rarity or distinction.
  • at a rate of knots The idiom "at a rate of knots" means doing something very quickly or rapidly. It refers to the speed at which something is being done or accomplished.
  • a meeting of minds The idiom "a meeting of minds" refers to a situation where two or more people come together to share ideas, opinions, or goals, and reach a mutual understanding or agreement. It implies that everyone involved in the conversation is on the same page and shares a similar viewpoint or perspective.
  • ring any bells, at ring a bell The idiom "ring any bells" or "ring a bell" is used to ask someone if something sounds familiar or if they can remember something. It is often used when trying to jog someone's memory or see if they can recall a particular piece of information or an event.
  • give sb a dirty look The idiom "give somebody a dirty look" refers to making a facial expression of disapproval, anger, or contempt towards someone, typically through a mean or hostile glare. It is an act of expressing negative emotions or hostility nonverbally through a disapproving or unpleasant facial expression.
  • be a slave to sth The idiom "be a slave to sth" means to be excessively controlled or dominated by something, usually a habit, addiction, or certain behavior. It implies being unable to break free from its influence or becoming completely submissive to it.
  • be a martyr to sth The idiom "be a martyr to sth" refers to someone who is constantly suffering or sacrificing themselves for a particular cause, belief, or duty, often to the point of neglecting their own well-being or enjoyment. It implies that this person willingly endures difficulties or hardships for the sake of others or a higher purpose.
  • be a pack of lies The idiom "be a pack of lies" means that something is completely untrue or filled with falsehoods. It implies that the information or statement being referred to is not at all honest or reliable.
  • be a tissue of lies, at be a pack of lies The idiom "be a tissue of lies" or "be a pack of lies" is used to describe a statement, story, or information that is completely false or full of lies. It implies that the information or story is not based on truth or facts, but rather a fabrication or deception.
  • not a hair out of place The idiom "not a hair out of place" refers to someone or something that is impeccably well-groomed, tidy, or organized. It implies that every detail is in perfect order and nothing is disheveled or amiss.
  • make a noise, at make noises The idiom "make a noise" or "make noises" means to voice opinions, objections, or complaints in a forceful or persistent manner, typically in order to bring attention to a particular issue or to advocate for a specific cause. It implies taking action or making oneself heard in order to make a statement or effect a change.
  • are/make a hit with The idiom "are/make a hit with" means to become popular or well-liked by a person or a group of people. It suggests that someone or something has made a strong positive impression on others and is highly regarded or admired.
  • nearly/almost have a heart attack The idiom "nearly/almost have a heart attack" is used to describe an extreme emotional or physical response to a surprising, shocking, or alarming event. It implies a sense of intense fear, astonishment, or distress, often causing an individual's heart to race or skip a beat, though it does not necessarily indicate a serious medical condition.
  • a dog in the manger The idiom "a dog in the manger" refers to a person who selfishly withholds or prevents others from using or enjoying something that they themselves have no use for or interest in. It originates from the fable "The Dog in the Manger," attributed to Aesop, in which a dog lies in a manger filled with hay, preventing the other animals from eating it. Consequently, this phrase is often used to describe someone who exhibits possessiveness, spitefulness, or a lack of altruism.
  • done up/dressed up like a dog's dinner The idiom "done up/dressed up like a dog's dinner" means that someone is overly or flamboyantly dressed, usually in a way that is considered excessive, ridiculous, or inappropriate for the occasion. It implies that their attire is disorganized or chaotic, similar to how a dog's dinner would appear messy and unattractive. This idiom is often used humorously to criticize or mock someone's fashion sense or style.
  • give a dog a bad name The idiom "give a dog a bad name" means to unfairly or unjustly tarnish someone's reputation or character, often by spreading false or misleading information about them. It implies that once someone's reputation is damaged or associated with negativity, it becomes challenging for them to regain a positive image or be perceived differently.
  • like a dose of salts The idiom "like a dose of salts" refers to something having a sudden and strong impact or effect on a person or situation. It relates to the speed and intensity with which a dose of salts, typically a laxative, can cause a rapid change or improvement in one's condition.
  • be a drag on sb/sth The idiom "be a drag on sb/sth" means to be a burden or hindrance to someone or something, causing them to slow down or become less successful. It implies that one's presence or actions are negatively affecting the progress, efficiency, or enjoyment of another person or situation.
  • laugh like a drain The idiom "laugh like a drain" means to laugh very loudly, heartily, and uncontrollably. It implies that someone's laughter is as loud and intense as the sound of water draining through a pipe.
  • have a butcher's The idiom "have a butcher's" is a British slang phrase that means to take a quick look or to examine something or someone with curiosity or interest. It is derived from the Cockney rhyming slang of "butcher's hook," where "hook" rhymes with "look." Thus, "having a butcher's" is equivalent to "having a look."
  • it's a pleasure The idiom "it's a pleasure" is a phrase used to express one's enjoyment or satisfaction in doing something or being in someone's company. It is a polite and positive way to convey that the experience has been enjoyable and that one has found pleasure or delight in the situation.
  • a king's ransom The idiom "a king's ransom" refers to an enormous amount of money or valuable possessions required as a ransom or payment. It implies an exorbitant or hefty sum of money or an extraordinary price for something. The term is derived from the historical practice of demanding a vast amount of money or treasures for the release of a king or a person of high significance who has been captured or held hostage.
  • payback's a bitch The idiom "payback's a bitch" is a colloquial expression used to convey the idea that someone will eventually face negative consequences or comeuppance for their previous actions or behavior. It suggests that payback or revenge can be unpleasant, difficult, or harsh.
  • at a snail's pace The idiom "at a snail's pace" refers to moving extremely slowly or at a sluggish and leisurely tempo.
  • not give a monkey's The idiom "not give a monkey's" is a colloquial expression used primarily in British English. It means not to care at all about something or someone, indicating a complete lack of interest, concern, or importance. The phrase is often used in a dismissive or nonchalant manner.
  • make a pig's ear of sth The idiom "make a pig's ear of sth" means to do something very badly or to make a mess out of it. It implies that the person's actions or efforts have resulted in a complete failure or a botched outcome.
  • that's a matter of opinion The idiom "that's a matter of opinion" means that people may have different perspectives or views on a specific matter, and that it is subjective rather than objective. It suggests that there is no definitive or universally accepted answer, and each person holds their own subjective opinion.
  • that's a new one on me. The idiom "that's a new one on me" is used to express surprise or astonishment at something unknown or previously unheard of. It is often used when someone encounters a new or unusual situation, idea, or information that they had never encountered before. It conveys the idea of being unfamiliar with something or being caught off-guard.
  • harm a hair on sb's head The idiom "harm a hair on someone's head" means to cause any harm or injury to someone, usually emphasizing that one will protect them and ensure their safety. It is often used to convey the speaker's strong determination to prevent any harm from occurring to the person mentioned.
  • draw a veil over sth The idiom "draw a veil over something" means to intentionally conceal or avoid discussing an embarrassing, unpleasant, or sensitive topic. It suggests not bringing attention or further attention to a particular matter so as to maintain discretion or preserve one's dignity or reputation.
  • drink like a fish The idiom "drink like a fish" refers to someone who drinks a large quantity of alcohol, particularly in an excessive or excessive manner. It implies heavy or frequent drinking, often to the point of intoxication.
  • a hole in one The idiom "a hole in one" is used to refer to a remarkable achievement or success, often in sports or any other endeavor. It originally comes from the game of golf, where it signifies hitting the ball directly into the hole with a single stroke from the tee. The phrase has since been adapted to describe any exceptional accomplishment or stroke of luck.
  • pull a fast one The idiom "pull a fast one" means to deceive or trick someone cunningly and unexpectedly, often by using clever tactics or manipulation in order to gain an advantage or deceive them into believing something that is not true.
  • be one of a kind The idiom "be one of a kind" means that something or someone is unique, exceptional, or unlike anything or anyone else. It suggests that the object or person in question is special and cannot be easily compared or matched with others due to its distinctive qualities or characteristics.
  • be a great one for sth The idiom "be a great one for sth" means that someone has a strong inclination or fondness for something. It implies that the person has a great interest or enthusiasm for a particular activity, subject, or habit. They are known to frequently engage in or pursue that particular thing.
  • be in a minority of one The idiom "be in a minority of one" means to hold an opinion or belief that is not shared or supported by anyone else. It implies being the only person with a particular viewpoint, often suggesting that the opinion is unconventional or outside of the mainstream.
  • one swallow doesn't make a summer The idiom "one swallow doesn't make a summer" means that one positive event or occurrence does not necessarily indicate a favorable or successful situation overall. It emphasizes the need for multiple instances or a consistent pattern to establish a conclusion or judgment.
  • drop sb/sth like a hot potato The idiom "drop someone or something like a hot potato" means to quickly and completely abandon or disassociate oneself from someone or something, typically due to an unpleasant or problematic nature or situation. It implies a sudden and drastic rejection or avoidance, often to protect oneself from trouble or to distance oneself from a controversial or undesirable person or thing.
  • a drop in the ocean The idiom "a drop in the ocean" is used to describe a situation or action that has very little impact or importance in comparison to the overall problem or objective. It implies that the contribution being made is too small to make a significant difference.
  • at the drop of a hat The idiom "at the drop of a hat" means to do something instantly or without any hesitation or delay. It refers to being willing and ready to act immediately, often without needing any further explanation or persuasion.
  • look like a drowned rat The idiom "look like a drowned rat" means to appear extremely wet, disheveled, and miserable, much like a rat that has been soaked in water. It is often used to describe someone's physical appearance after being caught in heavy rain, swimming, or any situation where they are thoroughly drenched and in a sorry state.
  • not a dry eye in the house The idiom "not a dry eye in the house" is used to describe a scenario where everyone present, whether in a physical or emotional setting, is moved to tears or deeply moved by a heartfelt or emotional event. It implies that the situation has evoked such strong emotions that nobody remains unaffected, and tears are shed by all.
  • eat like a horse The idiom "eat like a horse" means to have a very large or hearty appetite. It implies that someone consumes a significant amount of food, often in excess or more than others.
  • at a low ebb The idiom "at a low ebb" means to be at the lowest point or in the worst state possible, often referring to one's physical or emotional well-being, energy, or a situation experiencing a decline or being hopeless. It represents a period of decreased morale, vitality, or circumstances.
  • on a razor edge The idiom "on a razor edge" means being in a very delicate or precarious situation, where even the slightest misstep or error could have severe or disastrous consequences. It implies a high level of risk or tension in a particular situation.
  • always a bridesmaid, never the bride The idiom "always a bridesmaid, never the bride" refers to a person who consistently comes close to achieving something desired but never actually attains it. It is often used to describe someone who repeatedly falls short of reaching a significant goal or milestone, while continuously witnessing others achieve it instead.
  • have a memory like an elephant To have a memory like an elephant means to have an exceptional or remarkable ability to remember things accurately and for a long period of time. This idiom is often used to describe individuals who have an extraordinary capacity to recall details, events, or information.
  • be at a loose end The idiom "be at a loose end" means to have nothing specific or important to do; to be idle or without any particular plans or obligations.
  • enter a convent The idiom "enter a convent" typically refers to the act of becoming a nun or joining a religious community, particularly in the Catholic faith. It implies willingly leaving behind worldly pursuits and dedicating oneself to a life of religious devotion and service within the confines of a convent.
  • have a finger in every pie The idiom "have a finger in every pie" means to be involved or have influence in many different activities or endeavors. It refers to someone who has a hand in multiple projects, businesses, or areas of interest. This person often seeks to exert control or maintain an active role in various aspects of their life or the lives of others.
  • be at a loss The idiom "be at a loss" means to be confused or uncertain about what to do or say in a given situation. It indicates a state of being unable to find an appropriate answer or solution, often experiencing a sense of confusion or helplessness.
  • have a roving eye The idiom "have a roving eye" means to have a tendency to look at or be attracted to other people romantically, even when already in a committed relationship. It suggests a lack of fidelity or a wandering interest in potential romantic partners.
  • a long face The idiom "a long face" refers to someone having a sad or disappointed expression on their face, typically due to a feeling of discouragement or frustration. It is often used to describe someone who looks unhappy or dejected.
  • not be just a pretty face The idiom "not be just a pretty face" means that someone is not only attractive or good-looking, but they also possess intelligence, skills, or qualities that go beyond their appearance. It suggests that the person should not be underestimated based solely on their physical appearance, as they have other valuable attributes as well.
  • be riding for a fall The idiom "be riding for a fall" means to be engaged in risky or reckless behavior that is likely to lead to negative consequences or failure in the near future. It implies that someone is heading towards a downfall or failure due to their actions or decisions.
  • collapse/fall in a heap The idiom "collapse/fall in a heap" refers to a situation in which a person or thing suddenly loses energy, strength, or support and becomes extremely exhausted or helpless. It often implies that someone or something has experienced a sudden and complete physical or emotional breakdown, rendering them incapable of continuing their previous activities. It can also describe a sudden and dramatic failure or downfall in various situations.
  • be (as) light as a feather The idiom "be (as) light as a feather" means to feel very light or weightless, either physically or emotionally. It indicates a lack of heaviness or burden, often referring to a sense of carefree or buoyant attitude. It can be used to describe someone who is happy, carefree, or untroubled.
  • (as) light as a feather The idiom "as light as a feather" refers to something or someone that weighs very little or is very easy to handle or carry. It can also be used figuratively to describe a situation or feeling that is carefree, effortless, or lacking in difficulty.
  • a mouth to feed The idiom "a mouth to feed" refers to an additional person, usually a child or dependent, who needs to be provided for, adding to the financial responsibility and burden of the individual or family.
  • feel like a gooseberry, at play gooseberry The idiom "feel like a gooseberry" or "play gooseberry" is used to describe the feeling of being awkwardly present when two other people, often a couple, are spending time together and you do not have an active role or purpose in the situation. It implies a sense of being unwanted or feeling like a third wheel in a social setting.
  • be (as) fit as a fiddle The idiom "be (as) fit as a fiddle" means to be in excellent health or physical condition. It implies that someone is very fit, strong, and well-functioning, similar to how a well-tuned fiddle produces beautiful music.
  • a fight to the finish The idiom "a fight to the finish" means a conflict or competition that is relentless and continues until one side is completely defeated or victorious. It implies a determination to pursue a goal or conquer an opponent without giving up or compromising.
  • pick a fight/quarrel/argument The idiom "pick a fight/quarrel/argument" refers to intentionally starting or initiating a conflict or disagreement with someone, often without any valid reason or provocation. It means instigating a confrontation or argumentative situation.
  • an arm and a leg The idiom "an arm and a leg" is used to describe something that is very expensive or costs a significant amount of money. It implies that the price being paid for something is extremely high, often beyond what is reasonable or expected.
  • have sth down to a fine art The idiom "have something down to a fine art" means to have perfected or mastered a skill, technique, or activity to a high level of expertise or efficiency. It implies that someone has practiced and refined their abilities to the point where they can accomplish the task effortlessly or flawlessly.
  • have sth off to a fine art, at have sth down to a fine art The idiom "have something off to a fine art" or "have something down to a fine art" means to have become extremely skilled at doing something through practice, experience, or repetition. It suggests that the person is proficient and efficient in the specific task or activity being referred to. They have mastered it to a high degree, often being able to accomplish it flawlessly or with great ease.
  • a pretty/fine kettle of fish The idiom "a pretty/fine kettle of fish" is used to describe a troublesome or difficult situation, typically one that is messy, chaotic, or complicated. It implies that the situation is problematic and challenging to resolve.
  • have a finger in the pie The idiom "have a finger in the pie" means to have involvement or influence in a particular matter or situation. It implies that the person has a share or part in something, often referring to having a role or control in a project, decision, or enterprise.
  • not lift/raise a finger The idiom "not lift/raise a finger" means to not make any effort or take any action to assist or help with something. It refers to a state of laziness or unwillingness to contribute.
  • lay a finger on sb The idiom "lay a finger on someone" means to physically harm or touch someone, often used to convey a threat or a warning. It implies the act of taking aggressive action towards someone, potentially resulting in physical violence or confrontation.
  • get on like a house on fire The idiom "get on like a house on fire" means to have an extremely friendly and harmonious relationship with someone. It implies that two or more people quickly and easily establish a strong bond and enjoy each other's company tremendously.
  • keep a firm hand on sth To "keep a firm hand on something" means to maintain control or authority over a particular situation or group of people. It implies having a strong and determined approach in order to ensure things are done or managed properly, without allowing any disruptions or deviations. It often refers to the act of exercising strict control or supervision to maintain order and discipline.
  • a fishing expedition The idiom "a fishing expedition" refers to a search or investigation that is conducted without specific information or evidence, with the intention of discovering something, often a wrongdoing or incriminating evidence. It involves exploring or probing potentially promising areas in the hope of finding useful information or evidence, similar to casting a wide net while fishing, hoping to catch something valuable.
  • be (as) fit as a flea, at be (as) fit as a fiddle The idiom "be (as) fit as a flea" or "be (as) fit as a fiddle" means to be in excellent health or physical condition. It implies that someone is energetic, strong, and robust, similar to a flea or a fiddle that is in perfect working order.
  • a flash in the pan The idiom "a flash in the pan" means something or someone that initially shows great promise or talent but ultimately fails or disappoints. It refers to a short-lived or unsuccessful attempt that fails to have a lasting impact or influence. The expression originates from the flintlock musket, where a flash in the pan occurs when the gunpowder ignites in the pan, but fails to fire the main charge, resulting in a momentary burst of light and noise without any significant result.
  • quick as a flash, at in a flash The idiom "quick as a flash" or "in a flash" is used to describe something that happens very quickly or without delay. It implies that the action is done swiftly, as if it were instant or almost instantaneous.
  • a blinding flash The idiom "a blinding flash" refers to a sudden and intense burst of light that can temporarily impair one's vision. It is often used metaphorically to describe an unexpected and overwhelming realization or understanding.
  • be (as) flat as a pancake The idiom "be (as) flat as a pancake" refers to something that is extremely flat or lacking any significant elevation or unevenness. It is often used to describe landscapes, surfaces, or objects that have no bumps, hills, or curvature at all.
  • have a fling The idiom "have a fling" refers to engaging in a brief, casual, and often passionate romantic or sexual experience, typically with someone who is not a long-term partner. It implies indulging in a temporary affair or relationship for enjoyment or excitement without any serious commitment or long-lasting consequences.
  • a pat on the back The idiom "a pat on the back" is used to describe recognition or praise for someone's achievements or efforts. It is a figurative way of acknowledging someone's success or job well done.
  • in a flutter The idiom "in a flutter" refers to a state of nervousness, excitement, or agitation. It describes a feeling of being unsettled or anxious, often due to anticipation or uncertainty.
  • go fly a kite The idiom "go fly a kite" is a dismissive expression used to tell someone to go away or leave. It can be interpreted as a polite way of telling someone to go and find something else to do or occupy their time instead of bothering the speaker.
  • couldn't organize a pissup in a brewery The idiom "couldn't organize a pissup in a brewery" is a humorous and sarcastic expression often used to describe someone who is extremely disorganized or incompetent in planning even the simplest things. It implies that the person would struggle to successfully manage or coordinate even the most straightforward or obvious tasks, like arranging a social gathering in an environment as straightforward as a brewery.
  • have a heavy foot The idiom "have a heavy foot" can be defined as a colloquial way of describing someone who drives aggressively, often pressing down on the accelerator forcefully, which can lead to speeding or reckless driving.
  • have a (good) nose for sth The idiom "have a (good) nose for something" means to have a natural talent or ability to sense or detect something. It refers to having an intuitive instinct or an uncanny knack for recognizing or finding something, often without any obvious or explicit evidence. It is often used to describe someone with an exceptional ability to perceive or understand things that others may miss.
  • be as fresh as a daisy The idiom "be as fresh as a daisy" means to feel or appear refreshed, energetic, and lively, typically after a good night's sleep or a period of rest. It implies a sense of rejuvenation and vitality, similar to the way a freshly bloomed daisy appears bright and lively.
  • a friend in need is a friend indeed The idiom "a friend in need is a friend indeed" means that a person who helps or supports you in times of difficulty or need is a true friend, as opposed to someone who only pretends to be your friend when things are going well.
  • drunk as a lord The idiom "drunk as a lord" refers to someone who is heavily intoxicated, typically used to describe a person who is extremely drunk. The comparison to a lord suggests excessiveness, luxury, and an indulgent lifestyle often associated with nobility.
  • drunk as a skunk, at drunk as a lord The idiom "drunk as a skunk" refers to someone who is extremely intoxicated, typically beyond the point of being able to control their actions or speech. The phrase "drunk as a lord" also means the same thing, depicting someone who is excessively drunk. Both idioms emphasize the state of being heavily intoxicated.
  • as a last resort The idiom "as a last resort" refers to an action or decision that is considered only after all other options have been exhausted or when there are no alternatives available. It implies that this particular choice is a final option, typically taken in desperate or extreme situations when all else fails.
  • be as high as a kite The idiom "be as high as a kite" means to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, resulting in a state of being euphoric, intoxicated, or excessively energized.
  • be as stubborn as a mule The idiom "be as stubborn as a mule" means to be very obstinate or resistant to change. It refers to someone who is unyielding, often refusing to listen to reason or follow instructions. It suggests a comparison with the stubborn nature of a mule, which is known for its inflexibility and reluctance to move or change direction.
  • be (as) solid as a rock The idiom "be (as) solid as a rock" means to be extremely stable, dependable, or reliable. It suggests that something or someone is steadfast, strong, and unwavering, just like a solid and immovable rock.
  • be (as) plain as a pikestaff, at be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as a pikestaff" or "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is extremely obvious or clear. It describes a situation or fact that is easily noticeable without any effort, just like the plainness of a pikestaff (a long, thick, and unadorned wooden staff) or the nose on someone's face, which is a prominent and unmistakable feature.
  • be (as) nutty as a fruitcake The idiom "be (as) nutty as a fruitcake" is used to describe someone as eccentric, odd, or crazy. It implies that the person's behavior or thoughts are unusual or irrational. The comparison to a fruitcake, which traditionally contains various types of nuts, suggests that the person's level of madness or peculiarity is particularly high.
  • (as) mad as a hatter/March hare The idiom "(as) mad as a hatter/March hare" is used to describe someone who is completely irrational, insane, or behaving in a very eccentric manner. The idiom originated from Lewis Carroll's stories, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass," where the characters the Mad Hatter and the March Hare exhibit nonsensical and bizarre behavior. The phrase implies that the person being referred to is extremely mentally unstable.
  • give sth up as a bad job The idiom "give something up as a bad job" means to abandon or stop pursuing something that is not being successful or productive. It implies accepting the fact that further efforts would be futile or unfruitful.
  • a numbers game The idiom "a numbers game" refers to a situation or activity in which success or outcomes depend on probability, statistics, or sheer volume. It implies that achieving a desired result hinges on a large quantity of attempts, calculations, or opportunities. The emphasis is on quantity rather than quality or skill.
  • a game in hand The idiom "a game in hand" refers to a situation in sports, particularly in a league or tournament, where one team has played fewer matches than their competitors. It means that the team with a game in hand has the advantage of potentially earning more points and improving their position in the standings if they win the additional match.
  • shit bricks, at shit a brick The idiom "shit bricks, or shit a brick" is a colloquial expression used to describe extreme surprise, fear, or anxiety in response to a particular situation or event. It implies such a heightened emotional reaction that one feels as if they are on the verge of excreting literal bricks, symbolizing the intensity of their distress.
  • get a life! The idiom "get a life!" implies a disregard or lack of interest in someone's thoughts, actions, or behavior, suggesting that they should focus on finding something more productive or fulfilling to occupy their time and stop being preoccupied with trivial matters.
  • get a move on The idiom "get a move on" means to hurry up or start moving quickly. It is often used to urge someone to act faster or be more efficient in completing a task or reaching a destination.
  • get a line on sb The idiom "get a line on someone" refers to the act of gathering information or obtaining knowledge about someone or something. It typically implies finding out more details, background, or potentially hidden aspects of a person's life, character, or activities.
  • get a jump on sb/sth The idiom "get a jump on sb/sth" means to gain an advantage or head start over someone or something. It refers to being ahead in terms of progress, preparation, or competition before others. This idiom often implies taking early action or getting an early start in order to have an advantageous position.
  • get a rise out of The definition of the idiom "get a rise out of" is to provoke or elicit an emotional reaction from someone, typically with the intent of causing annoyance, anger, or amusement. It refers to intentionally saying or doing something to get a strong response or to stir up a person's emotions.
  • never look a gift horse in the mouth The idiom "never look a gift horse in the mouth" means that when receiving a gift or benefit, one should not scrutinize or question its value or quality. It originates from the practice of examining a horse's teeth to determine its age and overall health. By metaphorically "looking a gift horse in the mouth," one is being ungrateful or overly critical of something they have received for free.
  • give sb a buzz The idiom "give sb a buzz" means to call or contact someone via telephone or other means of communication in order to have a conversation or convey a message.
  • give it a rest The idiom "give it a rest" means to stop or cease doing something, usually because it is annoying, repetitive, or a waste of time. It is often used in a situation where there is a request or demand to stop a particular action or behavior.
  • not give a shit The idiom "not give a shit" is an informal expression that means to not care at all about something or someone. It implies having no concern or interest in a matter or person, often indicating a strong disregard or indifference.
  • give sb a rocket To give someone a rocket is an idiomatic expression that means to reprimand or scold someone severely for their mistakes or misconduct. It implies a strong and emphatic admonishment, usually in a professional or disciplinary context.
  • give sb a leg up The idiom "give someone a leg up" means to provide assistance, support, or an advantage to someone in order to help them progress, achieve success or overcome obstacles. It usually implies giving someone a boost or a helping hand to reach a higher level or position, both literally and figuratively.
  • be a glutton for sth To be a glutton for something means to have an excessive or insatiable desire or appetite for it. It implies a tendency to indulge in or consume a particular thing excessively or without restraint, often to the point of excess or self-indulgence. This idiom is commonly used to describe someone who has a relentless or voracious inclination towards something, whether it be food, work, attention, excitement, etc.
  • be a glutton for punishment The idiom "be a glutton for punishment" is used to describe someone who willingly and repeatedly seeks out or endures unpleasant situations or experiences. It implies that the person is masochistic or has a high tolerance for pain or suffering. They may be inclined to accept or even enjoy situations that others would find too difficult or challenging.
  • go back a long way The idiom "go back a long way" means to have a long history or to have known someone or something for a significant amount of time. It refers to a relationship or connection that has been established for a considerable period. It can be used in various contexts, such as personal relationships, friendships, partnerships, or affiliations with organizations or institutions.
  • go down like a lead balloon The idiom "go down like a lead balloon" means that something is received or accepted very poorly or unfavorably by others. It suggests that the idea, suggestion, or action fails to make a positive impression and is met with disappointment, disapproval, or indifference.
  • go over with a bang, at go with a bang "Go over with a bang" or "go with a bang" is an idiomatic expression used to describe the successful or impressive completion or conclusion of an event, often with a lot of excitement, energy, or impact. It suggests that something ends on a high note, leaving a lasting impression or making a big impact on the participants or audience.
  • have a heart of gold The idiom "have a heart of gold" refers to someone who is kind, generous, and compassionate. It describes a person who is good-natured, caring, and always willing to help others.
  • have a good innings The idiom "have a good innings" is a cricket metaphor used to describe a long, successful, or satisfying period of one's life or career. It implies that a person has achieved a lot or made the most of their opportunities, much like a batsman scoring many runs in a cricket match before being dismissed.
  • a good listener The idiom "a good listener" refers to a person who pays attention, shows interest, and understands what others are saying. It implies someone who gives their undivided attention, refrains from interrupting, and empathetically listens to others' opinions, concerns, or experiences. A good listener is someone who can understand and remember the information shared, making the person feel acknowledged and valued.
  • a pearl of great price The idiom "a pearl of great price" refers to something very valuable or precious, often used metaphorically. It is derived from the biblical parable of "The Pearl of Great Price," where a merchant sells everything he has to obtain a rare and valuable pearl.
  • grind to a halt/standstill The idiom "grind to a halt/standstill" is used to describe a situation where an activity, process, or progress abruptly stops or ceases completely. It signifies a sudden and complete cessation of movement or development, often implying a lack of forward momentum or productivity.
  • lay a hand on sb The idiom "lay a hand on someone" means to physically harm, attack, or make physical contact with someone in an aggressive or violent manner. It can also imply causing harm or mistreatment towards someone.
  • give/lend sb a helping hand The idiom "give/lend sb a helping hand" means to offer assistance or support to someone in need. It implies offering help or aid to someone who is facing a challenge or difficulty.
  • not be a happy bunny The idiom "not be a happy bunny" is used to describe someone who is unhappy, discontented, or dissatisfied with a particular situation or circumstance. It implies that the person is in a negative or unpleasant state of mind, similar to a rabbit (bunny) that is unhappy.
  • take a long, hard look at sth The idiom "take a long, hard look at something" means to carefully and critically observe or examine something, usually a situation, problem, or one's own actions or attitudes. It implies a thorough and serious evaluation or analysis with the intention of gaining a deeper understanding or finding a solution.
  • have a heart! The idiom "have a heart!" is an expression used to implore someone to be kind, compassionate, or sympathetic towards a particular situation or person. It is often used when urging someone to show mercy or understanding.
  • have a bumpy ride The idiom "have a bumpy ride" refers to experiencing difficulty or facing obstacles during a journey or endeavor. It implies encountering challenges or setbacks along the way, making the experience less smooth or comfortable.
  • not have a clue The idiom "not have a clue" means to have no knowledge or understanding of something, to be completely unaware or uninformed about a particular subject or situation. It implies a lack of knowledge or comprehension.
  • not have a bean The idiom "not have a bean" means to have no money or possessions whatsoever. It conveys a state of extreme poverty or lacking any material resources.
  • not have a prayer The idiom "not have a prayer" means to have no chance or possibility of success or achieving a desired outcome. It conveys the idea that one's efforts or circumstances are so unfavorable or impossible that even prayer or divine intervention would not help.
  • have a strop on The idiom "have a strop on" is primarily used in British English and it refers to a state of anger, frustration, or annoyance. When someone "has a strop on", they are often displaying their frustration or annoyance through their behavior, which can include sulking, throwing a tantrum, or acting in an irritable manner. It is similar to having a short fuse or being in a bad mood.
  • not have a pot to piss in The idiom "not have a pot to piss in" is a slang expression that refers to someone being very poor or lacking any financial resources. It suggests a state of extreme poverty, indicating that an individual does not even have a basic essential item like a pot or container to engage in the most basic bodily functions, let alone any money or possessions.
  • not have a hope in hell The idiom "not have a hope in hell" is used to describe a situation in which someone has very little or no chance of success or achieving their goal. It implies that the likelihood of a positive outcome is extremely low, similar to the chances of someone succeeding in a hopeless situation.
  • have a good/healthy pair of lungs The idiom "have a good/healthy pair of lungs" refers to someone having strong and healthy respiratory organs. It signifies that the person has the ability to speak loudly, project their voice, or make themselves heard easily.
  • a heavy heart The idiom "a heavy heart" typically refers to feeling sadness, guilt, or grief. It signifies a burdened or weighed down emotional state.
  • heave a sigh of relief The idiom "heave a sigh of relief" refers to a deep exhale or audible sigh made when someone experiences a sense of relief or release from stress, anxiety, or tension due to a positive or favorable outcome. It signifies a feeling of relaxation and contentment after a period of worry or uncertainty.
  • a heavy hitter The idiom "a heavy hitter" refers to a person or thing that is powerful, influential, or important. It often describes someone who holds a significant position, who carries a lot of weight in their field, or who has a substantial impact on a particular situation or outcome.
  • hide your light under a bushel To "hide your light under a bushel" means to conceal or downplay one's talents, abilities, or achievements, often due to modesty or a lack of self-confidence. It refers to intentionally keeping one's skills or accomplishments unnoticed or undiscovered, as if placing a light source under a container (bushel) that prevents its glow from being seen.
  • at the stroke of a pen The idiom "at the stroke of a pen" refers to making a decision or taking action in an instant or with a single authoritative action, typically referring to a swift or effortless act of utilizing one's power or authority to bring about a significant change or outcome.
  • be kneehigh to a grasshopper The idiom "be kneehigh to a grasshopper" means someone or something is very young or small in size. It is often used to describe someone who is in their early childhood or has just started something and is at the beginning stages of learning or development.
  • a pig in a poke The idiom "a pig in a poke" means to buy or accept something without fully knowing or understanding its true nature or quality, often resulting in a bad or disappointing outcome. It refers to a situation where someone makes a purchase or takes a risk without examining or verifying the item beforehand, much like buying a pig (or any other animal) inside a bag that prevents the buyer from seeing its actual condition.
  • a page in/of history The idiom "a page in/of history" refers to a significant event or era that has influenced or shaped the course of history. It indicates that something or someone has left a lasting impact or has become a memorable part of the historical narrative.
  • hold a clinic The idiom "hold a clinic" typically means to exhibit great skill or expertise in a particular field or activity, often by demonstrating or teaching others. It implies a level of mastery and proficiency in the given area.
  • have a horror of sth The idiom "have a horror of something" means to strongly fear or detest something. It refers to having an intense aversion or dread towards a particular thing or situation.
  • a reach of the imagination The idiom "a reach of the imagination" is used to describe something that is highly improbable, far-fetched, or highly imaginative. It suggests that the idea or concept being discussed requires a considerable stretch or leap of the imagination to believe or accept. It emphasizes the notion that what is being proposed is beyond the bounds of what is reasonable or within the realm of possibility.
  • in for a penny (in for a pound) The idiom "in for a penny (in for a pound)" is used to express the idea that if one is already involved or committed to something, it is better to fully commit and take on the risks or costs associated with it rather than hold back or do it halfway. It suggests that once a person has made a small commitment or invested a small amount of effort or money, they might as well go all the way and commit fully, regardless of the potential consequences or additional expenses.
  • a mine of information The idiom "a mine of information" refers to a person who possesses a vast amount of knowledge on a particular subject or a variety of topics, making them an abundant source of information. They are like a valuable resource, ready to provide information or insights to others.
  • a conflict of interest A conflict of interest is an expression used to describe a situation where a person or entity is involved in multiple roles or relationships, and the potential for a clash between their personal or professional interests arises, potentially compromising their ability to make impartial or fair judgments. It implies that the conflicting interests or obligations may lead to biased decision-making or a compromise of ethical principles.
  • make a joke of sth The idiom "make a joke of something" means to treat or portray something in a way that makes it seem trivial, unimportant, or not to be taken seriously. It refers to the act of ridiculing or downplaying a particular subject, event, or issue through humor or mockery.
  • life is just a bowl of cherries The idiom "life is just a bowl of cherries" is used to convey the idea that life is enjoyable, pleasant, and free from worries or troubles. It suggests that life is simple and full of happiness and contentment.
  • keep a low profile To "keep a low profile" means to avoid drawing attention to oneself or to maintain a discreet or inconspicuous presence in a certain situation. It suggests to refrain from seeking publicity, avoiding unnecessary attention, or not making oneself noticeable or prominent.
  • a kick up the arse/backside The idiom "a kick up the arse/backside" typically means a strong and forceful action or motivation that is intended to encourage or push someone to get motivated or accomplish something. It often implies a figurative kick in the buttocks to get someone moving, overcome their inertia, or rectify their lack of effort or progress.
  • live like a king/lord The idiom "live like a king/lord" means to lead an extravagant and luxurious lifestyle, often characterized by a high level of comfort, wealth, and privilege. It implies that someone is living in great abundance and surrounded by opulence, just like a king or a lord would traditionally live.
  • a rap on/over the knuckles The idiom "a rap on/over the knuckles" means a reprimand, criticism, or punishment for a mistake or wrongdoing, typically delivered in a stern or authoritative manner. It refers to the act of lightly hitting or tapping someone's knuckles as a form of discipline or admonishment.
  • in the last resort, at as a last resort The idiom "in the last resort" or "as a last resort" refers to something done or considered only after all other options or alternatives have been exhausted. It is a final course of action taken when all other attempts have failed, or when there are no better options available.
  • have/lead a sheltered life The idiom "have/lead a sheltered life" refers to someone who has been protected, guided, or kept isolated from the realities and challenges of everyday life, usually resulting in a lack of experience or understanding of the outside world. Such individuals may be overly innocent, naive, or lacking in street smarts due to their limited exposure to different situations or hardships.
  • take a leak/have a leak The idiom "take a leak/have a leak" is an informal expression that refers to the act of urinating or relieving oneself. It can be used to politely or humorously describe the need to use the bathroom or find a restroom.
  • a new lease of life The idiom "a new lease of life" refers to a renewed or revived state in which someone or something gains a fresh start, renewed energy, or a second chance to improve or succeed. It suggests a positive transformation or an opportunity to make significant changes for the better.
  • a new lease on life, at a new lease of life The idiom "a new lease on life" or "a new lease of life" refers to a fresh start or opportunity given to someone, usually after a difficult or challenging period. It indicates a renewed vitality, enthusiasm, and hopefulness towards life and its possibilities. It suggests that someone has been given a second chance or a positive change that allows them to improve their situation or outlook.
  • leave a lot to be desired The idiom "leave a lot to be desired" refers to something or someone that is inadequate or unsatisfactory in some way, often leaving room for improvement or falling short of expectations.
  • a knight in shining armour The idiom "a knight in shining armor" refers to a person, typically a man, who bravely and gallantly rescues someone from a difficult situation or provides unwavering support and protection. It implies that the person is a heroic figure, like the chivalrous knights in medieval times, ready to come to the aid of others and save them from harm or adversity.
  • a lick and a promise The idiom "a lick and a promise" is used to describe a quick and hasty action, usually in regards to cleaning or completing a task incompletely or superficially with the intention of coming back to it later for further attention or improvement. It implies doing something hastily and without much effort, often leaving the job unfinished or incomplete.
  • live a lie The idiom "live a lie" means to lead a life in which one pretends to be someone or something they are not, often hiding their true feelings, desires, or identity. It implies a state of deception or dishonesty maintained in order to maintain appearances or avoid negative consequences.
  • nail a lie The idiom "nail a lie" means to expose or prove that a statement or claim is false or deceptive, often through evidence or investigation. It suggests uncovering the truth and preventing others from being deceived by deception or falsehoods.
  • like a maniac The idiom "like a maniac" means to do something with extreme enthusiasm, energy, or without restraint or control. It often implies doing something in an intense, wild, or reckless manner.
  • owe sb a living The idiom "owe someone a living" refers to the belief that someone is entirely dependent on another person for sustenance or financial support. It implies that the individual in question does not have the ability or resources to independently provide for themselves, leading them to be indebted to someone for their livelihood.
  • look a fright The idiom "look a fright" refers to someone's appearance being disheveled, untidy, or generally unsightly. It implies that the person's appearance is unpleasant, messy, or even comically alarming.
  • have a screw loose The idiom "have a screw loose" means to be mentally or emotionally unstable, eccentric, or irrational. It suggests that someone's thinking or behavior is erratic or abnormal, as if there is a literal loose screw in their mind.
  • a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "a pain in the arse/backside" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone or something that is irritating, bothersome, or difficult to deal with. It refers to a person, task, or situation that causes frustration, inconvenience, or annoyance.
  • a crock (of shit) The idiom "a crock (of shit)" is a derogatory expression typically used to describe something that is completely false, fabricated, or utterly ridiculous. It suggests that the mentioned subject matter or statement lacks credibility, is full of lies, or lacks any value or truthfulness.
  • have a method to your madness, at have method in your madness The idiom "have a method to your madness" (or "have method in your madness") is used to describe someone who may seem strange, unpredictable, or chaotic in their actions or behavior, but actually has a sensible or logical motive behind it. It implies that there is a purpose or strategy behind their seemingly unconventional or irrational behavior.
  • give sb a piece of your mind The idiom "give someone a piece of your mind" means to express one's strong feelings of anger, frustration, or discontent to someone, usually in a harsh or direct manner. It implies confronting the person and expressing one's displeasure or disagreement without holding back.
  • make a move The idiom "make a move" typically means to take action or to initiate a step towards achieving a goal. It often implies that a decision or action needs to be made in order to progress or make progress in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • make a splash The idiom "make a splash" means to attract attention or create a significant impact or impression. It refers to doing something notable or remarkable that captures people's interest or stands out from the ordinary.
  • make a killing The idiom "make a killing" means to make a large, excessive, or unexpected profit, usually in a financial or business venture. It implies that the person or entity has achieved great success and gained a significant amount of money.
  • make a play for sth/sb The idiom "make a play for sth/sb" means to make an attempt or engage in actions to gain or pursue something or someone, usually in a romantic or competitive context. It implies making a move or showing interest in achieving a particular outcome or acquiring a specific person or object.
  • make a rod for your own back The idiom "make a rod for your own back" means to create a problem or difficulty for yourself through your own actions or choices. It implies that by choosing a certain course of action or behavior, you are setting yourself up for future consequences or difficulties. It suggests that the individual is responsible for the negative outcomes or troubles they encounter due to their own actions or decisions.
  • make a man (out) of sb The idiom "make a man (out) of sb" implies the act of developing or transforming someone into a more competent, courageous, or self-reliant individual, typically through challenging or demanding experiences. It often signifies the process of maturing, gaining maturity, or surpassing certain obstacles in order to become a fully grown, capable person.
  • make a meal (out) of sth The idiom "make a meal (out) of something" means to unnecessarily complicate or exaggerate a situation or task, often by giving it more time, attention, or importance than it deserves. It implies making something more difficult or complex than it actually is.
  • make a monkey out of sb The idiom "make a monkey out of someone" means to make someone look foolish, ridiculous, or stupid, often by playing a joke or prank on them or by manipulating them into doing something embarrassing.
  • make a virtue (out) of sth The idiom "make a virtue (out) of something" means to turn a perceived weakness, flaw, or disadvantage into a positive attribute or advantage. It implies the act of presenting or framing something that might be considered negative in a positive light, usually for the purpose of garnering approval or admiration. It involves emphasizing the positive aspects or using the negative aspect in a way that is beneficial or desirable.
  • make a production (out) of sth The idiom "make a production (out) of something" means to excessively or unnecessarily dramatize or exaggerate a situation or event. It involves making a big fuss or spectacle out of something that may not warrant such attention.
  • make a mountain out of a molehill The idiom "make a mountain out of a molehill" means to exaggerate or make a minor issue seem much larger or more significant than it actually is. It refers to blowing a small problem out of proportion and making it seem much more significant or difficult than it really is.
  • a pain (in the neck) The idiom "a pain in the neck" refers to someone or something that is annoying, troublesome, or bothersome. It describes a person, situation, or task that causes frustration or difficulty.
  • be in a hole The idiom "be in a hole" typically means to be in a difficult or challenging situation, often characterized by a sense of being trapped, overwhelmed, or facing a problem without a clear solution. It implies a state of adversity or hardship that can be difficult to navigate or overcome.
  • make a hole in sth The idiom "make a hole in sth" typically refers to the act of significantly reducing or depleting a particular resource or amount, often referring to money or a budget. It suggests using or spending a substantial portion of something, leaving a noticeable void or impact.
  • be in a funk The idiom "be in a funk" means to be in a state of feeling unhappy, depressed, or emotionally downcast. It refers to a temporary period of feeling low or finding it difficult to find joy or motivation in one's daily life.
  • be in a mood The idiom "be in a mood" refers to someone who is experiencing a particular state of mind or emotional disposition that may be negative, irritated, or having a grumpy attitude. It typically implies that the person is not in a pleasant or cooperative mood and may display a sullen or moody demeanor.
  • be in a lather The idiom "be in a lather" means to be in a state of extreme agitation, anxiety, or excitement. It suggests that someone is worked up or overly stressed about something. The phrase originates from the literal meaning of "lather," which refers to a frothy foam produced when soap is mixed with water or when a horse sweats excessively. Just as soap creates a foamy lather, the idiom implies that the person's emotions or state of mind are similarly frothy and turbulent.
  • be on a hiding to nothing The idiom "be on a hiding to nothing" means to be engaged in a futile or hopeless task that is likely to end in failure or disappointment. It implies that no matter what efforts or actions are taken, the desired outcome is unlikely to be achieved.
  • be in a (pretty/right) pickle The idiom "be in a (pretty/right) pickle" means to be in a difficult or troublesome situation. It suggests being stuck or faced with a problem that is challenging or unfavorable, often implying a sense of confusion or uncertainty about how to resolve it.
  • a question mark over sth The idiom "a question mark over sth" refers to a sense of doubt or uncertainty about something. It suggests that there are unanswered questions or doubts surrounding a particular issue, concept, or situation. It signifies the need for further investigation, clarification, or resolution in order to remove the uncertainty.
  • be (only) a matter of time The idiom "be (only) a matter of time" means that something is certain or inevitable to happen, but the exact timing or when it will occur is uncertain. It suggests that an event or outcome is bound to take place eventually, regardless of any intervening factors or obstacles.
  • be a matter of opinion "Be a matter of opinion" is an idiom used to express that different people may have different views, preferences, or interpretations about a particular topic or issue. It indicates that there is no objective truth or consensus and that perspectives can vary based on individual beliefs or experiences.
  • be a matter of record The idiom "be a matter of record" means that something has been officially documented or recorded. It refers to information or events that are established and can be verified through official records or documentation.
  • a mile a minute The idiom "a mile a minute" is used to describe someone who speaks quickly or rapidly. It means that the person is talking at a very fast pace or thinking and acting quickly. It can also refer to someone who is extremely energetic or always on the move.
  • a mile off The idiom "a mile off" is used to depict the ability to see or recognize something or someone from a great distance, often implying that it is very obvious or easily identifiable. It denotes a sharp perception or awareness of something that may be noticeable to everyone.
  • not for a minute The idiom "not for a minute" means to strongly believe that something is not true or accurate, and refuse to entertain the idea or accept it even for a brief period of time. It emphasizes the speaker's conviction and certainty.
  • not for a moment The idiom "not for a moment" means not even briefly or momentarily. It indicates that something does not happen or exist at any point in time, emphasizing its complete absence or negation.
  • have a senior moment The idiom "have a senior moment" refers to a temporary lapse or forgetfulness often associated with old age. It usually describes instances when older individuals experience a brief memory lapse or difficulty in recalling information that they would normally remember easily.
  • be a licence to print money The idiom "be a licence to print money" means to have a legal or established business, profession, or investment that generates substantial profits effortlessly or consistently, as if one has been granted exclusive permission to create money. It implies that the venture or opportunity is highly lucrative and has great potential for financial success.
  • not in a month of Sundays The idiom "not in a month of Sundays" means something that is extremely unlikely or will never happen. It is used to emphasize the improbability or impossibility of an event or situation occurring.
  • not move a muscle The idiom "not move a muscle" is used to describe a situation where someone remains completely still or does not make any movement at all, either due to fear, shock, or discipline. It emphasizes stillness and the absence of any physical activity or motion.
  • make a muck of sth To "make a muck of something" means to do a task or project carelessly or poorly, resulting in a messy or chaotic situation. It implies that the person involved has made mistakes or has failed to handle the task effectively. It can also refer to someone creating unnecessary confusion or complicating a situation through their actions or decisions.
  • a narrow squeak The idiom "a narrow squeak" refers to a situation where someone narrowly avoids a potentially disastrous or dangerous outcome. It means an extremely close call or a near miss.
  • not a sausage The idiom "not a sausage" means having nothing or absolutely nothing at all. It is typically used to describe a situation where there is a complete absence or lack of something. For example, if someone asks you if there's any food left and you respond "not a sausage," it means there is no food remaining.
  • not a red cent The idiom "not a red cent" means to not have any money or to have no financial resources at all. It suggests complete destitution or being completely broke.
  • retire a number To "retire a number" is an idiom that means to permanently remove a specific jersey number from use in a particular sports team or organization, usually as a way to honor and pay tribute to a highly distinguished player who wore that number. It signifies the respect and recognition of the player's exceptional talent, accomplishments, and contributions to the team or sport.
  • a sledgehammer to crack a nut The idiom "a sledgehammer to crack a nut" is used to describe a situation in which an excessive or disproportionate amount of force, effort, or resources is used to solve a relatively small or simple problem. It implies that the solution is far more complex, intense, or drastic than necessary, resembling the use of a heavy tool like a sledgehammer to crack open a small nut.
  • out on a limb The idiom "out on a limb" means to be in a vulnerable or risky position, often due to taking a controversial or unpopular stance, or supporting an unconventional idea or viewpoint. It suggests being isolated or unsupported, similar to a person venturing out on a weak, unsupported branch of a tree.
  • a roof over your head The idiom "a roof over your head" refers to having shelter or a place to live, typically emphasizing the basic necessity of a stable and secure living arrangement. It implies the availability of a home or dwelling that provides protection and comfort from the elements.
  • pack a punch The idiom "pack a punch" means to have a forceful impact or be surprisingly powerful despite its appearance or size. It is often used to describe something that is unexpectedly strong, intense, or effective.
  • a pack rat The idiom "a pack rat" refers to a person who has a strong tendency to collect or hoard a large number of items, often without any clear purpose or reason. This person tends to accumulate various possessions or materials, sometimes to an excessive or extreme extent.
  • a pretty pass The idiom "a pretty pass" refers to a situation that is in a state of disorder, chaos, or difficulty. It often implies that things have deteriorated to an undesirable or alarming extent.
  • a passing resemblance The idiom "a passing resemblance" means that there is a faint or temporary similarity between two things or individuals, but not a strong or lasting one. It implies that although there may be some resemblance, it is not significant or distinctive enough to be considered significant or important.
  • not be a patch on sth The idiom "not be a patch on sth" means that something is inferior or vastly inferior in comparison to another thing. It describes a situation where one thing cannot even come close to matching the quality, skill, or excellence of the other thing being referenced.
  • have the patience of a saint The idiom "have the patience of a saint" means to have an extraordinary amount of patience, remaining calm and composed in difficult or trying situations, much like the patience displayed by saints or highly virtuous individuals.
  • a political football The idiom "a political football" refers to an issue or topic that is widely debated, exploited, or manipulated for political gain. It implies that the issue is used as a means to score political points, with different parties or individuals attempting to control or influence it to their advantage, often without genuine concern for resolving the issue itself. Much like a football being tossed around in a game, the issue is subject to continuous political maneuvering and may not receive the necessary attention or actions required for a resolution.
  • have a problem with sth/sb The idiom "have a problem with something/someone" means to experience difficulty or dissatisfaction with something or someone, to a point where it causes concern or conflict. It implies disagreeing, disapproving, being bothered, or finding fault with a particular thing or person.
  • pull a stunt The idiom "pull a stunt" refers to the act of doing something, typically unexpected or showy, often with the intention of surprising or shocking others. It involves executing an unconventional or daring action that draws attention or creates a spectacle.
  • make/put a dent in sth The idiom "make/put a dent in sth" means to make progress or achieve a significant impact on something, typically a task, goal, or problem. It implies that there has been noticeable progress or a substantial effect on the object or situation in question. The phrase often conveys the idea of making a notable change, even though it may not completely solve the problem or accomplish the entire task.
  • put sth/sb in a pigeonhole The idiom "put sth/sb in a pigeonhole" means to categorize or classify something or someone based on preconceived notions or stereotypes, often ignoring their individuality or unique characteristics. It implies simplistically assigning someone or something to a particular group or category without considering their true complexity.
  • a bit (too) much The idiom "a bit (too) much" means that something is excessive, over the top, or beyond what is considered acceptable, reasonable, or appropriate in a given situation. It implies that someone or something has gone beyond the usual or expected limit and has become overwhelming, extreme, or even tiresome.
  • a great deal (of sth) The idiom "a great deal (of sth)" means a large or significant amount of something, often referring to a considerable quantity or extent. It implies that there is an abundance or a substantial portion of the mentioned thing.
  • a priori The idiom "a priori" refers to an idea or knowledge that is formed or acquired based on logic, reasoning, or deduction, rather than from experience or observation. It is a Latin phrase that translates to "from the earlier" or "from what comes before." In this context, it implies something that can be known or understood without the need for empirical evidence.
  • Rats abandon a sinking ship. The idiom "Rats abandon a sinking ship" refers to the situation where people or things quickly disassociate or distance themselves from something that is failing or doomed. It implies that when trouble arises or adverse conditions occur, individuals tend to abandon their responsibilities or loyalties without hesitation in order to save themselves.
  • Nature abhors a vacuum. The idiom "Nature abhors a vacuum" means that any empty or unoccupied space tends to be quickly filled or occupied by something else. In a broader sense, it suggests that nature or the universe in general does not tolerate or allow the existence of empty or incomplete spaces or situations.
  • able to take a joke The idiom "able to take a joke" refers to someone's ability to handle or accept light-hearted or humorous comments or teasing without becoming offended or defensive. It implies that the person has a good sense of humor and is not easily offended by others' playful remarks.
  • able to fog a mirror The idiom "able to fog a mirror" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is barely alive or extremely unresponsive. It implies that a person's level of consciousness or activity is so minimal that the only evidence of their existence is their ability to faintly fog or create condensation on a mirror with their breath. This phrase is often used humorously or sarcastically to convey the notion that an individual lacks vitality, awareness, or enthusiasm.
  • be a cut above To be a cut above means to be superior or better than others in terms of skill, quality, or performance. It refers to being outstanding or excelling in a particular area compared to others.
  • a cut above average The idiom "a cut above average" refers to someone or something that exceeds or surpasses the normal or expected level of quality, skill, or performance. It implies being notably better than the average or commonly seen standard.
  • a happy accident The idiom "a happy accident" refers to a fortunate or favorable outcome that occurs unexpectedly or unintentionally. It often describes a positive result that was not planned or anticipated, but brings joy or satisfaction.
  • accompany sm on a musical instrument The idiom "accompany someone on a musical instrument" refers to the act of playing an instrument in support or harmony with someone who is singing or playing another instrument, enhancing and complementing their performance.
  • accompany sm on a journey The idiom "accompany someone on a journey" refers to going along with or joining someone as they travel from one place to another. It implies providing company, support, or assistance to the person during the journey.
  • give a good account of oneself The idiom "give a good account of oneself" means to perform or behave in a way that reflects one's abilities, skills, or character positively. It typically refers to someone demonstrating competence, skill, or composure in a particular situation or task, often exceeding expectations or overcoming challenges.
  • run a red light The idiom "run a red light" means to deliberately ignore or disregard traffic rules and signals, specifically referring to driving through an intersection when the light is red, indicating a stop.
  • red as a cherry The idiom "red as a cherry" is used to describe someone's face turning bright red, typically due to embarrassment, shame, or anger.
  • not worth a dime The idiom "not worth a dime" means that something or someone has little or no value, significance, or worth. It implies that the subject being referred to is of little or no importance or use, comparable to a low-value coin such as a dime.
  • give a red face The idiom "give a red face" means to embarrass or humiliate someone. It refers to an action or event that causes someone to feel ashamed or self-conscious, resulting in their face turning red due to blushing or emotional distress.
  • a redletter day "A red-letter day" refers to a day of special significance or importance, often associated with a positive event or celebration. It can also indicate a memorable or momentous occasion that holds significant value or prominence in a person's life. The term originates from the practice of marking important dates, holidays, or feast days on calendars, where such days were typically highlighted or written in red ink.
  • a red herring The idiom "a red herring" refers to a piece of information or a clue that is intentionally misleading or distracting, leading someone away from the true or important issue. It is often used in reference to an argument or a detective story where a false lead is presented to divert attention from the real solution or truth.
  • a red eye The idiom "a red eye" typically refers to a late-night or overnight flight, often suggesting that it is tiring or exhausting.
  • a red cent The idiom "a red cent" is used to describe the complete absence of money or a negligible amount that is considered insignificant.
  • like stealing acorns from a blind pig The idiom "like stealing acorns from a blind pig" refers to a situation where something is incredibly easy to accomplish due to a combination of luck, lack of competition, or the obliviousness of others. It implies that the act is so effortless or simple that even a blind pig, which would not typically be able to locate acorns, would have no trouble doing it.
  • reef a sail in The idiom "reef a sail in" refers to the action of reducing the area of a sail by folding or rolling it up and securing it in order to lessen the sail's exposure to strong winds or heavy weather. This is typically done to maintain control, stability, and safety of the boat in rough conditions.
  • refill a prescription To "refill a prescription" is an idiomatic expression that refers to the act of obtaining additional medication from a pharmacy in order to continue a prescribed treatment. It involves going back to the pharmacy and requesting a new supply of medication based on the original prescription. This typically occurs when the initial supply of medication has been depleted or is about to run out.
  • fire a shot across bows The idiom "fire a shot across bows" means to issue a warning or threat, usually in a forceful or assertive manner, to signal the start of a conflict or confrontation. It derives from the practice of firing a warning shot from a ship across the bow of another vessel to show intent or to display military superiority. In a figurative sense, it refers to taking an action or making a statement that serves as a clear signal of one's intentions or capabilities.
  • a shot across the bow The idiom "a shot across the bow" typically refers to a warning or a strong signal meant to deter or intimidate someone or a group. It originated from naval warfare, where a warning shot fired across the bow of an approaching vessel served as a signal for it to change course and avoid conflict. In a figurative sense, the phrase implies a display of power or a clear indication that consequences may follow if certain actions or behaviors continue.
  • a rap across the knuckles The idiom "a rap across the knuckles" refers to a warning or reprimand given to someone as a way to discipline or admonish them for their actions. It typically implies a mild or moderate punishment intended to correct behavior and prevent further wrongdoing. The phrase alludes to the act of physically striking someone's knuckles with a light blow as a reprimand.
  • couldn't act way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't act their way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who is a very poor or untalented actor. It suggests that this person is incapable of performing even the simplest acting tasks, and emphasizes their lack of skill or ability in the field of acting.
  • be a hard act to follow The idiom "be a hard act to follow" means that someone or something has set a high standard or achieved such a remarkable level of success or performance that it is challenging for the next person or thing to live up to or exceed that expectation. It implies that the previous performance was exceptional and therefore difficult to replicate or surpass.
  • a tough act to follow The idiom "a tough act to follow" means that someone or something has performed exceptionally well or achieved great success, making it difficult for others to achieve the same level of performance or success.
  • a balancing act The idiom "a balancing act" refers to a situation or task requiring careful management and juggling of multiple factors or priorities in order to maintain equilibrium or achieve success. It implies that one must carefully navigate or handle various conflicting interests, demands, or challenges to ensure stability or obtain desired outcomes.
  • a piece of the action The idiom "a piece of the action" means to have a share or involvement in a particular endeavor, usually referring to a chance to participate in or benefit from a profitable or exciting enterprise. It implies having a stake or interest in a situation or project.
  • fight a rearguard action To "fight a rearguard action" means to engage in a defensive or delaying action to resist an impending defeat or loss. It originates from military tactics, where a rearguard is a group of troops tasked with protecting the rear or retreat of an army while taking on an advancing enemy force. In a broader sense, this idiom is often used metaphorically to describe any effort to resist a setback or maintain a position when faced with overwhelming odds or a disadvantageous situation.
  • a paper tiger The idiom "a paper tiger" refers to something or someone that appears powerful or threatening, but is actually weak or ineffective. It implies that the intimidating exterior of a tiger made of paper can be easily torn apart, highlighting the discrepancy between perceived strength and actual capability.
  • He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount. The idiom "He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount" refers to a situation where a person finds themselves in a challenging or risky position but is too afraid to find a way out or quit because they fear the consequences or difficulties that may arise from doing so. It implies that taking the initial risk or making a dangerous choice can lead to a situation where one becomes trapped or unable to retreat.
  • have a tiger by the tail The idiom "have a tiger by the tail" means to be in a situation where one has taken on a difficult or dangerous task or responsibility that is challenging to control or manage. It suggests that the situation is precarious and that any attempts to let go or back out would result in even more trouble.
  • a judgment call The idiom "a judgment call" refers to a decision or assessment that requires subjective judgment and is based on personal opinion or interpretation rather than on specific rules or guidelines. It is often used when there is no clear right or wrong answer, and the outcome depends on the individual's perception, experience, or analysis of a situation.
  • keep a tight rein on sm or sth The idiom "keep a tight rein on someone or something" means to exercise strict control or close supervision over someone or something, often to prevent any unwanted actions, behavior, or outcomes. It derives from the imagery of holding the reins tightly while riding a horse, ensuring that it stays on track and doesn't stray.
  • It is a poor heart that never rejoices. The idiom "It is a poor heart that never rejoices" means that one should not be so unhappy or negative that they cannot find joy even in small or simple pleasures. It suggests that it is important to be optimistic and appreciate the positive aspects of life.
  • a poor relation The idiom "a poor relation" is used to describe someone or something that is considered to be of lesser value, importance, or quality compared to others in a particular group or context. It suggests a sense of inferiority or being treated with less regard, similar to the way that poor relatives might be disregarded or overlooked in a family.
  • a kangaroo court The idiom "a kangaroo court" refers to a mock or illegitimate court that lacks proper procedures and fairness, as well as impartial judgment. It is often used to describe a judicial or trial process that is biased, prejudiced, or predetermined, typically resulting in an unfair or unjust outcome. The term "kangaroo court" implies a judicial proceeding that is fundamentally flawed and lacks credibility, akin to the erratic and unpredictable movements of a kangaroo.
  • breathe a sigh of relief The idiom "breathe a sigh of relief" means to experience a moment of relief or release of tension after being anxious, worried, or stressed about something. It signifies a feeling of comfort or relaxation that comes after a tense or difficult situation has been resolved.
  • How long is a piece of string? The idiom "How long is a piece of string?" is typically used to express that there is no definitive or fixed answer to a question, or that the answer is unknown or subjective. It implies that the question being asked is either too vague or lacks sufficient context to provide a specific response. It emphasizes the idea that the length of a piece of string can vary greatly, just as the answer to the question cannot be easily determined.
  • have sb on a string The idiom "have someone on a string" refers to having complete control or dominance over someone and being able to manipulate or influence their actions or decisions. It implies that the person being controlled is following the lead or direction of another person without questioning or asserting their own independence.
  • a mutual admiration society The idiom "a mutual admiration society" refers to a situation or group of individuals where members engage in excessive praise, flattery, or admiration towards each other, often without legitimate reason or basis. It describes a scenario where people have a mutual agreement to boost each other's egos and avoid genuine criticism or objective evaluation. This term is commonly used to critique a group or relationship that lacks objectivity and self-awareness.
  • There is a remedy for everything except death. The idiom "There is a remedy for everything except death" means that there is a solution or cure for almost every problem or challenge in life, except for the inevitability of death. It implies that no matter how difficult a situation may seem, there is always a way to find a resolution or overcome it, except in cases where death is involved, as it is an unavoidable and final fate.
  • a Renaissance man The idiom "a Renaissance man" refers to a person who is highly skilled or knowledgeable in a wide variety of fields, such as arts, sciences, literature, and philosophy. This term originates from the Renaissance period in European history, when individuals were encouraged to excel in multiple disciplines. A Renaissance man is versatile, well-rounded, and exhibits a deep curiosity and passion for learning across different areas of knowledge.
  • go at sth like a boy killing snakes The idiom "go at something like a boy killing snakes" means to approach a task or challenge with great intensity, energy, and determination. It implies that one is attacking the situation or problem aggressively, without hesitation or fear, similar to how a young boy might eliminate a group of snakes with relentless force.
  • a rent boy The idiom "a rent boy" refers to a young male prostitute who offers sexual services in exchange for money or gifts. It is a term often associated with the sex trade industry.
  • a banana republic The idiom "a banana republic" refers to a small, politically unstable country, typically in Latin America, that is often economically dependent on a single export commodity, such as bananas. It implies a government that is corrupt, undemocratic, and easily influenced by foreign powers. This term is often used to criticize a nation's political and economic conditions, highlighting the lack of institutional transparency, rule of law, and strong democratic institutions.
  • a sad state of affairs The idiom "a sad state of affairs" refers to a situation or condition that is considered unfortunate, distressing, or undesirable. It implies that things are not going well or are in a disorganized, chaotic, or disappointing condition.
  • There is a tide in the affairs of men. "There is a tide in the affairs of men" is a quote from William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar. It refers to the idea that there are pivotal moments or opportunities in life which must be seized upon and taken advantage of. It emphasizes the importance of recognizing and acting upon these moments, as they can lead to significant changes or advancements in one's life or circumstances.
  • like a house on fire The idiom "like a house on fire" is an expression used to describe something that is developing or progressing quickly and enthusiastically. It implies that the subject or activity is going exceptionally well or with great speed and intensity.
  • when you get a minute The idiom "when you get a minute" is a polite way of asking someone to find the time or take a brief moment to do something or have a conversation. It implies that the person is busy or occupied, and the request is not urgent but should be attended to whenever they have a spare moment.
  • bear a resemblance to sm or sth The idiom "bear a resemblance to someone or something" means that someone or something shares similarities or characteristics with another person or object. It implies that there are noticeable similarities or likeness between two things being compared.
  • After a storm comes a calm The idiom "After a storm comes a calm" means that after going through a difficult or turbulent period, there will eventually be a period of peace, tranquility, and stability. It suggests that troubles and challenges in life are temporary and will be followed by a period of respite or relief.
  • after a fashion The idiom "after a fashion" typically means to accomplish something or imitate something, but in a haphazard or imperfect manner. It suggests that the attempt made is not entirely accurate or successful, but has some resemblance or similarity to the desired outcome.
  • a man after own heart The idiom "a man after my own heart" refers to a person who has similar opinions, characteristics, or interests as oneself. It implies admiration or approval for someone who shares the same values, beliefs, or tastes.
  • make a reservation The idiom "make a reservation" means to secure or arrange for an appointment, a place, or a spot in advance, typically for services such as a hotel room, a restaurant table, or an event ticket. It involves requesting or reserving something ahead of time to ensure availability or to guarantee participation.
  • a babe in the woods The idiom "a babe in the woods" refers to someone who is inexperienced, naive, or vulnerable in unfamiliar or dangerous situations. It implies that the person lacks knowledge or understanding and is easily deceived or taken advantage of.
  • of a certain age The idiom "of a certain age" typically refers to someone who is considered to be at a specific, often advanced, age or stage in life. It implies that the person is neither young nor old, but rather falls into a particular age group that is often associated with certain experiences, expectations, or societal norms.
  • live to a ripe old age The idiom "live to a ripe old age" means to live for a long time, usually referring to reaching an advanced age with good health and vitality. It suggests a long and fulfilling life, typically considered a positive outcome.
  • sb of a certain age The idiom "sb of a certain age" is typically used to refer to someone who is not young anymore, usually implying that the person is middle-aged or older. It suggests a level of maturity, experience, or perhaps even a certain way of thinking that is associated with a particular stage in life.
  • in a coon's age The idiom "in a coon's age" is an informal expression used to describe a long period of time. It suggests that a significant amount of time has passed since a particular event or occurrence. Originating from American English, the term "coon" in this context is a colloquial abbreviation for raccoon.
  • a hidden agenda The idiom "a hidden agenda" refers to a secret motive or ulterior purpose behind someone's actions or plans. It describes a situation where someone conceals their true intentions in order to manipulate or steer events towards their own desired outcome.
  • a free agent Definition: The idiom "a free agent" typically refers to an individual who is not bound or committed to any specific organization, company, or team. It signifies someone who has the freedom to make independent decisions and is not controlled by any external forces or obligations. This term is commonly used in various contexts, such as in business, sports, or relationships, to describe someone who is independent and able to act according to their own interests and priorities.
  • Give me a rest! The idiom "Give me a rest!" is an expression used when someone wants a break from something, often because they find it annoying, tiring, or overwhelming. It signifies a request for respite or relief from a particular situation or person.
  • as a result (of sth) The idiom "as a result (of sth)" means that something happens or exists because of a particular action, event, or circumstance. It indicates that something is an outcome or consequence of a previous action or situation.
  • beat a (hasty) retreat The idiom "beat a (hasty) retreat" means to quickly and hastily withdraw or leave a place or situation, especially in order to avoid danger, conflict, or an undesirable outcome. It conveys the idea of physically and swiftly retreating from a location or situation to ensure personal safety or to avoid further complications.
  • a BandAid The idiom "a BandAid" refers to a temporary or superficial solution to a problem, rather than addressing the root cause or providing a long-lasting fix. It implies a quick fix that may not be sufficient or sustainable in the long term.
  • ain't got the brains God gave a squirrel The idiom "ain't got the brains God gave a squirrel" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence or common sense. It suggests that the person in question possesses a level of intellect comparable to, or perhaps even lower than, that of a squirrel, which stereotypically has limited cognitive abilities.
  • ain't got a grain of sense The idiom "ain't got a grain of sense" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely foolish or lacking in common sense. It implies that the person has no intelligence or understanding whatsoever.
  • ain't fittin' to roll with a pig The idiom "ain't fittin' to roll with a pig" is a Southern American expression that means someone is not willing or interested in engaging in a particular activity or associating with someone or something that is considered inappropriate, unpleasant, or of low social standing. It implies a refusal to participate in something that goes against one's values or standards. The "rolling with a pig" metaphor characterizes the situation as incompatible or unsuitable, as pigs are commonly associated with dirtiness or filth.
  • pull out of a hat The idiom "pull out of a hat" means to produce or come up with something unexpectedly or in a seemingly magical way, often to solve a problem or meet a request. It refers to the idea of a magician pulling an object or a solution from a hat, seemingly out of thin air. It suggests that someone is able to provide an unexpected solution or resource at a crucial moment.
  • light as a feather The idiom "light as a feather" is used to describe something or someone that feels very light in weight. It usually implies a sense of weightlessness or having little mass. It can be used both in the literal sense, referring to objects that are physically lightweight, and in a figurative sense, suggesting something that is not burdensome or difficult to handle.
  • free as a bird The idiom "free as a bird" means to be unrestricted, independent, and having the ability to do as one wishes, without any obligations, limitations, or responsibilities. It suggests a sense of liberation and freedom similar to that of a bird flying effortlessly in the open sky without any bounds or restraints.
  • a nip in the air The idiom "a nip in the air" refers to a slight chill or coldness felt in the atmosphere, usually during the fall or winter seasons. It describes the feeling of the temperature dropping slightly, indicating the onset of colder weather.
  • Revenge is a dish best served cold. The phrase "Revenge is a dish best served cold" means that it is more satisfying to seek revenge in a calm, calculated manner, delaying immediate action and allowing time for careful planning and execution. It suggests that exacting revenge with a cool, detached approach can be more effective and ultimately more satisfying than acting impulsively or seeking instant retaliation.
  • go on a binge The idiom "go on a binge" refers to indulging excessively or uncontrollably in a particular activity, typically one that is considered pleasurable but possibly harmful or excessive. It often refers to excessive consumption of alcohol, but can also be used to describe excessive indulgence in food, shopping, or other activities.
  • a revolving door The idiom "a revolving door" refers to a situation where the same people are constantly entering and leaving a particular place or organization, often due to frequent turnovers, resignations, or replacements of personnel. It implies a sense of instability or a lack of continuity within the organization or system.
  • little knowledge is a dangerous thing The idiom "little knowledge is a dangerous thing" means that having a small amount of understanding or information about something can lead to overconfidence and potentially harmful decisions or actions. It suggests that when one lacks full knowledge or expertise in a particular subject, they may make mistakes or misjudgments that can have negative consequences.
  • a false alarm The idiom "a false alarm" refers to a situation or event that initially appears to be dangerous, urgent, or alarming, but turns out to be incorrect or without any actual threat or harm. It implies a mistaken or exaggerated perception of danger, causing unnecessary panic or concern.
  • on the horns of a dilemma The idiom "on the horns of a dilemma" refers to being trapped between two equally difficult or unpleasant choices or alternatives, where neither option seems desirable, and making a decision becomes challenging.
  • a rich seam The idiom "a rich seam" refers to a valuable or profitable source of information, inspiration, or opportunity. It suggests that a particular area or subject contains abundant resources or potential benefits waiting to be discovered or explored.
  • thumb a ride The idiom "thumb a ride" means to solicit or request a ride from passing vehicles by extending one's thumb in a hitchhiking gesture, typically done by standing on the side of the road.
  • take for a ride The idiom "take for a ride" typically means to deceive or trick someone, often with the intention of harming or swindling them. It can refer to leading someone astray or manipulating them for personal gain.
  • Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil The idiom "Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil" means that if someone who is inexperienced or lacking in moral values is given authority or power, they will often misuse or abuse it, leading to negative consequences for themselves and others. It highlights the idea that sudden elevation can corrupt individuals who are unprepared for such responsibilities.
  • ride a wave of The idiom "ride a wave of" means to capitalize on an advantageous or popular trend, enjoying success or recognition as a result. It references the action of riding a surf wave, which requires balance and skill to stay on top and control the direction. In a figurative sense, it implies taking advantage of a positive situation or trend to achieve personal or professional goals.
  • ride a wave The idiom "ride a wave" typically means to take advantage of or benefit from a particular situation or trend, especially when it is favorable or successful. It refers to the act of going along with the flow and making the most of an opportunity or momentum. It often involves being able to adapt and thrive within a specific context or circumstances.
  • If two ride on a horse, one must ride behind The idiom "If two ride on a horse, one must ride behind" means that in any partnership or group, someone must take a subordinate or secondary role. It implies that in any endeavor involving multiple individuals, there must be a clear leader or dominant person who takes charge while others follow or support.
  • give a lift The idiom "give a lift" means to provide someone with transportation in a vehicle, usually by offering them a ride to a destination.
  • for a spin The idiom "for a spin" means to take someone or something on a short trip, journey, or test drive, often for the purpose of experiencing or evaluating its capabilities or performance. It can also refer to trying something new or different for a brief period.
  • a bumpy ride The idiom "a bumpy ride" means an unpredictable or challenging journey or experience, often characterized by difficulty, obstacles, or setbacks. It implies facing bumps or rough patches along the course or encountering unexpected challenges and hardships.
  • From the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step. The idiom "From the sublime to the ridiculous is only a step" means that the transition from something majestic, impressive, or awe-inspiring to something absurd, laughable, or foolish can happen quite easily, despite the stark contrast between the two. It suggests that the boundaries between the extraordinary and the nonsensical are sometimes blurred, and what may appear to be a monumental achievement can quickly degrade into something comically senseless.
  • be heading/riding for a fall The idiom "be heading/riding for a fall" means that someone is on a path or trajectory that will likely lead to failure, trouble, or disaster. It implies that the person's actions, choices, or circumstances are setting them up for a negative outcome.
  • riding for a fall The idiom "riding for a fall" means behaving in a way that will likely lead to a failure, downfall, or negative consequence. It suggests that someone is taking risks or engaging in overconfidence that will inevitably result in a negative outcome or setback.
  • We've got a right one here! The idiom "We've got a right one here!" is used to express that a particular person, situation, or circumstance is noteworthy or outstanding in some way, often implying that it is challenging, amusing, difficult, or peculiar.
  • Two wrongs do not make a right The idiom "Two wrongs do not make a right" means that responding to a wrongdoing with another wrongdoing does not make the situation better or justified. It emphasizes the importance of handling conflicts or disputes in a fair and morally correct manner rather than seeking revenge or retaliating.
  • hang a right The idiom "hang a right" means to turn right, typically while driving or following directions. It implies making a sharp or noticeable right turn.
  • hang a left The idiom "hang a left" means to turn left while navigating or driving, typically used informally or colloquially. It involves making a left-hand turn at an intersection or a road.
  • a step in the right direction The idiom "a step in the right direction" refers to a positive action or decision taken towards achieving a particular goal or outcome. It signifies progress or improvement, even if it is just a small or initial one.
  • a Godgiven right The idiom "a God-given right" refers to a fundamental entitlement or privilege that is believed to be inherent to every individual as a result of their existence or creation by a higher power, typically associated with divine or natural law. It suggests that this right is innate and cannot be taken away or denied by any human authority.
  • a bit of all right The idiom "a bit of all right" is used to describe someone or something that is considered attractive, pleasing, or good in quality. It implies that the person or thing being described is enjoyable, appealing, or highly regarded.
  • You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear The idiom "You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear" means that you cannot turn something of low quality or little value into something valuable or exceptional. It implies that certain things, like a sow's ear (the ear of a female pig), inherently lack the qualities or potential to be transformed into something superior, like a silk purse. Thus, the idiom conveys the idea that it is futile or impossible to try to elevate or improve something that is fundamentally inferior.
  • use your head for more than a hatrack The idiom "use your head for more than a hatrack" means to encourage someone to think or use their brain for something other than simply holding a hat. It implies that the person should engage their intelligence, reasoning, or common sense to solve problems or make better decisions. It emphasizes the importance of actively thinking and not merely relying on one's head as a passive object.
  • turn a deaf ear to The idiom "turn a deaf ear to" means to intentionally ignore or refuse to listen to something or someone, typically disregarding their pleas, requests, or advice. It implies a deliberate act of ignoring or showing indifference towards someone's opinions, information, or appeals.
  • send away with a flea in ear The idiom "send away with a flea in ear" refers to someone being dismissed or reprimanded in such a manner that they feel ashamed, embarrassed, or insulted. It conveys the idea of being sent off with a lingering feeling of being scolded or criticized.
  • make a pig's ear of The idiom "make a pig's ear of" means to do something very badly, to make a mess of something, or to perform a task with great incompetence or failure.
  • In a pig's eye! The idiom "In a pig's eye!" is an exclamation used to express disbelief, skepticism, or strong disagreement with a statement or suggestion. It indicates that the speaker considers the idea being presented as outrageous, absurd, or highly unlikely.
  • have a word in ear The idiom "have a word in ear" means to privately speak to someone in order to share important or confidential information or to offer advice, instruction, or criticism. It implies a one-on-one conversation that is discreet and meant for the recipient's ears only.
  • give a thick ear "Give a thick ear" is an idiomatic expression that means to hit or strike someone forcefully, usually on the side of the head, as a form of punishment or retribution for their actions or behavior. It refers to physically harming or disciplining someone by delivering a strong blow to their ear.
  • cold as a welldigger's ass The idiom "cold as a welldigger's ass" is a humorous and colloquial expression used to describe extremely cold weather or a very low temperature. It suggests that the coldness is comparable to the extremities experienced by a welldigger working in icy conditions.
  • a tin ear A tin ear refers to a person's inability to appreciate or understand music or sound, especially in terms of discerning tones, melodies, or rhythms. It can also be used more broadly to describe someone who is insensitive or indifferent to people's emotions, opinions, or needs.
  • like a threering circus The idiom "like a three-ring circus" refers to a situation that is chaotic, disorderly, and filled with multiple distractions or competing elements, similar to the chaotic and bustling atmosphere of a circus with three rings operating simultaneously.
  • have a ring to it The idiom "have a ring to it" means that something sounds pleasing or memorable when spoken or heard. It implies that there is a certain quality or rhythm in the way a phrase or name sounds, making it interesting or catchy.
  • have a familiar ring The idiom "have a familiar ring" means that something sounds or seems familiar, as if you have heard or experienced it before. It suggests a sense of recognition or resemblance to something known or previously encountered.
  • Give me a call The idiom "Give me a call" means to request or ask someone to contact or reach out to you by phone.
  • give a ring The idiom "give a ring" means to make a phone call or to contact someone using the telephone.
  • a threering circus The idiom "a three-ring circus" refers to a situation or event that is chaotic, busy, or out of control. It is often used to describe a place or circumstance where there is a lot of confusion, disorder, or commotion happening all at once, similar to the chaos and spectacle of a circus with multiple rings.
  • a blind alley The idiom "a blind alley" refers to a situation or course of action that leads to no progress, success, or solution. It implies that the path being pursued is a dead end and will not lead to any favorable outcome.
  • a dead ringer for sb/sth The idiom "a dead ringer for sb/sth" is used to describe a person or thing that looks or resembles someone else or something closely, in terms of appearance or characteristics. It implies that the similarity between the two is so striking that it is difficult to differentiate or mistake one for the other.
  • be a dead ringer for sb/sth The idiom "be a dead ringer for sb/sth" means to closely resemble or look almost identical to someone or something else. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to is so similar in appearance that it is difficult to tell them apart.
  • a ringside seat/view The idiom "a ringside seat/view" refers to having a close and privileged position from which to observe an event or situation, often implying a clear and direct view of the action. It suggests being able to witness something firsthand or being involved in the most important and critical aspects of a situation.
  • a damp squib The idiom "a damp squib" refers to something that is disappointing, underwhelming, or fails to meet expectations. It is often used to describe an event, activity, or situation that turns out to be anticlimactic or lacks the anticipated excitement or impact. The phrase originates from a squib, which is a small firework or explosive device. If a squib gets wet or damp, it fails to ignite properly, resulting in a less impressive display. Therefore, a "damp squib" is a metaphorical representation of something that falls flat or doesn't live up to its potential.
  • a ripoff The idiom "a ripoff" refers to an unfair or dishonest transaction or deal where someone is charged a price significantly higher than the actual value or quality of a product or service. It implies the feeling of being deceived or cheated out of one's money.
  • a bodiceripper The idiom "a bodiceripper" refers to a genre of romantic novels, typically historical fiction, that features exaggerated, often sensationalized, romantic storylines with intense passion and explicit sexual content. The term "bodiceripper" suggests the genre's focus on strong, dominant male characters and their often forceful or aggressive interactions with female protagonists, sometimes depicted as damsels in distress. The idiom is used to describe novels or stories that are melodramatic, over-the-top, or excessively romanticized.
  • a ripple effect The idiom "a ripple effect" refers to the series of consequences or impacts that result from a single event or action. It suggests that a small action or occurrence can create a chain reaction, spreading effects outward like the ripples caused by a stone being dropped into water.
  • get a rise from The idiom "get a rise from" means to provoke an emotional reaction or strong response from someone, often for one's own amusement or satisfaction. It refers to deliberately saying or doing something to elicit a specific reaction, typically to incite annoyance, anger, or frustration in someone.
  • take a chance The idiom "take a chance" means to take a risky or uncertain action or opportunity, often disregarding potential negative consequences, in order to pursue a desired outcome or experience. It implies a willingness to engage in a situation that may involve uncertainty or possible failure, but with the hope of achieving success or fulfillment.
  • run a risk (of sth) The idiom "run a risk (of sth)" means to take a chance or to be in a situation where there is a possibility of something negative or undesirable happening. It implies being exposed to potential danger, harm, or negative consequences due to a particular action or decision.
  • walk a thin line The idiom "walk a thin line" means to be in a precarious or delicate situation, where one must be cautious and careful in order to avoid causing offense, creating conflict, or facing negative consequences. It suggests the need to navigate a narrow path or delicate balance between two contrasting or opposing forces or situations.
  • there is a fine line between The idiom "there is a fine line between" refers to a situation where two things may appear similar or closely related, but there is a subtle distinction or significant difference between them. It implies that the boundary between these two things is very narrow or delicate, and crossing it can lead to unexpected consequences or misunderstandings.
  • take a hard line The idiom "take a hard line" refers to the act of adopting a strict, uncompromising, or inflexible stance or approach in dealing with a situation or making decisions. It implies refusing to make concessions or show leniency in order to assert one's position firmly and assertively.
  • spin a line The idiom "spin a line" means to tell a story or explanation, often in a deceptive or exaggerated manner, with the intention to manipulate or deceive someone. It refers to the act of weaving a narrative that may not necessarily be entirely true in order to persuade or mislead others.
  • give a line The idiom "give a line" typically refers to someone providing false or misleading information, often with the intention of deceiving or manipulating others.
  • get a line on The idiom "get a line on" means to gather information or acquire knowledge about something or someone. It often refers to finding out details or discovering important facts in order to gain an advantage or make a decision.
  • feed a line The idiom "feed a line" means to give someone a cue or prompt to say something, often used in the context of acting or performing. It refers to the act of providing another person with a line of dialogue to assist them in a conversation or onstage performance.
  • drop a line and drop a few lines drop a note The idiom "drop a line" or "drop a few lines" or "drop a note" is commonly used to mean writing a short message or letter to someone, usually to keep them informed or in touch. It refers to the act of quickly writing and sending a brief communication to someone via letter, email, or any other means of written correspondence. It implies a casual and informal way of staying connected with someone by sharing a few lines of text.
  • drop a line The idiom "drop a line" means to send a short written message or letter, usually to keep in touch or to communicate briefly with someone. It can also refer to sending a quick email or text message.
  • draw a line under The idiom "draw a line under" means to finish or conclude something, often a troublesome or difficult situation, and move forward. It implies putting an end to a particular matter or issue, and not dwelling on it any further.
  • draw a line in the sand The idiom "draw a line in the sand" means to establish a limit or boundary beyond which one is unwilling to compromise or accept any further action or behavior. It often signifies making a definitive stand or indicating the point at which one's patience, tolerance, or cooperation ends.
  • draw a line between The idiom "draw a line between" means to establish a clear separation or distinction between two things or concepts. It implies creating boundaries or recognizing a division, often to avoid confusion or conflicts.
  • allow sm or sth into a place The idiom "allow someone or something into a place" means to grant permission for someone or something to enter a specific location or area. It denotes giving authorization or consent for an individual, object, or concept to be present within a certain space.
  • a rite of passage The idiom "a rite of passage" refers to a significant event or experience that marks an important transition or milestone in a person's life. It generally signifies the crossing of a threshold from one stage to another, often accompanied by personal growth, development, or change. This idiom is often used to describe traditional or cultural ceremonies, but can also be applied to various personal or societal milestones such as getting a driver's license, graduating from school, or getting married.
  • sail up a river The idiom "sail up a river" typically means to make progress or achieve success in a challenging or opposing situation, especially when it goes against the natural or expected direction. It refers to the act of sailing or navigating against the flow of a river, which requires skill, effort, and determination. This expression is often used metaphorically to highlight overcoming obstacles, defying odds, or accomplishing something extraordinary.
  • a road hog The idiom "a road hog" refers to a person who drives recklessly or selfishly, typically by interfering with or blocking other vehicles on the road.
  • make a dash for sm or sth The idiom "make a dash for something" means to move quickly and urgently towards a specific thing or destination. It typically implies a sense of urgency or determination in reaching the desired goal or object.
  • dash a note off The idiom "dash a note off" means to quickly write and send a brief message or letter. It implies a sense of urgency and efficiency in composing and delivering the written communication.
  • a stiff upper lip The idiom "a stiff upper lip" means to display courage, self-control, and emotional resilience in the face of adversity or difficult situations, without showing any external signs of distress or vulnerability. It is often associated with the British cultural stereotype of remaining calm, composed, and unemotional, especially during times of crisis or distress.
  • There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip The idiom "There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip" means that even though something may seem certain or on the verge of completion, there are still many possibilities for things to go wrong or plans to fail before it actually happens. It emphasizes the notion that unforeseen obstacles or interruptions can occur at any point, potentially causing a desired outcome to not be realized.
  • Keep a stiff upper lip. The idiom "Keep a stiff upper lip" means to remain calm and composed in difficult or challenging situations, especially when faced with adversity or emotional distress. It implies not showing one's emotions or feelings openly, but instead maintaining a brave and resolute exterior.
  • between a rock and a hard place The idiom "between a rock and a hard place" is used to describe a difficult situation where one is faced with two equally challenging or unfavorable options, and they must make a decision or take action despite the undesirable outcomes. It signifies being caught in a dilemma with no easy solution or a situation where one is trapped and facing numerous difficulties.
  • like a shag on a rock The idiom "like a shag on a rock" is an Australian expression that means to stand out conspicuously or be in a very exposed or isolated position, often indicating a feeling of being alone or ignored. It refers to the behavior of a shag, which is a type of cormorant bird, perched on a rock, separated and away from the usual flock.
  • it doesn't take a rocket scientist to do sth The idiom "it doesn't take a rocket scientist to do something" means that a particular task or action is relatively simple, straightforward, or does not require a high level of intelligence or expertise. It implies that anyone can easily understand or accomplish it without needing exceptional skills or knowledge.
  • put a rocket under sb The idiom "put a rocket under sb" means to motivate, inspire, or urge someone to take action or work more quickly and efficiently. It implies providing a burst of energy or enthusiasm to propel someone forward in their endeavors.
  • it doesn't take a rocket scientist The idiom "it doesn't take a rocket scientist" is used to indicate that a particular task or concept is not complex or difficult to understand. It implies that the task or concept is relatively simple and does not require exceptional intelligence or expertise.
  • go like a rocket The idiom "go like a rocket" means to move or progress very quickly or with great speed. It can refer to physical movement or the rapid progress of a project or task. It suggests swift and energetic motion, often with a sense of efficiency or effectiveness.
  • bully is always a coward The idiom "bully is always a coward" means that individuals who resort to bullying tactics are often motivated by fear or insecurity, despite their attempts to appear strong and dominant. It suggests that those who bully others lack true courage and use intimidation as a means to mask their own vulnerabilities.
  • rule (sb) with a rod of iron The idiom "rule (sb) with a rod of iron" means to govern or control someone or something in a strict, authoritarian, and unyielding manner, often using harsh methods and imposing rigid rules. It implies a strong and unwavering exercise of authority or power over others.
  • a lightning rod The idiom "a lightning rod" typically refers to a person or thing that attracts or absorbs criticism, blame, or attention, often acting as a diversion or target for others to focus their frustration or anger on.
  • (as) happy as a clam The idiom "(as) happy as a clam" means to be extremely happy and content. It is often used to describe someone who is very pleased or satisfied with their current situation or state of mind. The phrase originates from the full expression "happy as a clam at high water," implying that clams are most content during high tide when they are free from the threat of being harvested.
  • shut up like a clam The idiom "shut up like a clam" means to remain silent or refuse to speak. It implies that someone is unwilling to share information or keep their thoughts and feelings to themselves, similar to how a clam keeps its shell tightly closed.
  • ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure The idiom "ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" means that it is better to take action to prevent a problem or disaster before it occurs, rather than dealing with its consequences later. It emphasizes the importance of being proactive and taking preventative measures to avoid or minimize potential issues.
  • sealed with a kiss The definition of the idiom "sealed with a kiss" is: To indicate that something is finalized, confirmed, or made official through an act of affection, usually by sealing an envelope, letter, or document with a kiss. It implies that the matter is concluded or guaranteed, often emphasizing the sincerity or importance of the action.
  • Love will find a way The idiom "Love will find a way" means that if two people truly love each other, they will overcome any obstacles or challenges that come their way in order to be together. It implies that love is powerful and tenacious, and it will ultimately conquer any difficulties.
  • Lord love a duck! The idiom "Lord love a duck!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, annoyance, or disbelief. It is a lighthearted and humorous way to convey a mix of emotions in response to something unexpected or unusual.
  • face only a mother could love The idiom "face only a mother could love" refers to someone's physical appearance being unattractive or displeasing to most people, but their mother is still able to find beauty in them due to their unconditional love. It is often used humorously to describe someone who is unappealing in terms of looks.
  • Everybody loves a lord The idiom "Everybody loves a lord" refers to the general tendency for people to be attracted to or show favoritism towards those in positions of power, status, or nobility. It implies that individuals are often predisposed to admire and support those who hold authority or enjoy privileged positions in society.
  • a lovein The idiom "a love-in" typically refers to a gathering or event characterized by a peaceful and harmonious atmosphere where people express love, affection, and social harmony towards one another. It can also imply a gathering where people freely share their positive feelings and sentiments with others. The term originated in the 1960s counterculture era and was often associated with gatherings of like-minded individuals promoting peace, love, and unity.
  • a love nest The idiom "a love nest" refers to a private or intimate place, typically a home or premises, where a couple can be alone and enjoy their romantic relationship without interference from others. It conveys the idea of a cozy and idealized setting for a couple to spend quality time together.
  • a love child The idiom "a love child" refers to a term used to describe a child born out of wedlock or conceived during a casual or illicit sexual relationship. It is typically used to convey that the child's parents were not in a committed relationship or married at the time of conception.
  • a labour of love The idiom "a labour of love" refers to a task or project that requires a lot of effort and hard work, but is done willingly and enthusiastically because one enjoys it or is deeply passionate about it.
  • a labor of love The idiom "a labor of love" refers to a task or activity that requires significant effort or hard work, but is pursued willingly and enthusiastically because of one's strong passion, dedication, or emotional attachment to it. It implies that the individual finds joy and fulfillment in the work itself, despite the challenges or lack of financial reward.
  • play a part in sth To "play a part in something" means to have a role or contribute to an event, situation, or outcome. It suggests that someone or something is involved or influential in a particular context.
  • on a roll The idiom "on a roll" means to be experiencing a period of consecutive successes or accomplishments, usually in a confident and unstoppable manner.
  • be as easy as falling off a log The idiom "be as easy as falling off a log" means that a task or activity is extremely simple or effortless. It suggests that the action is so easy that it requires minimal effort, just like the act of unintentionally falling off a log would be.
  • a roll in the hay The idiom "a roll in the hay" is used to describe a casual sexual encounter or a short-lived romantic affair. It often implies a sense of spontaneity, excitement, and physical intimacy that may not necessarily lead to a lasting relationship.
  • a roller coaster The idiom "a roller coaster" refers to a situation or experience that is characterized by unpredictable and extreme fluctuations or ups and downs, similar to the thrilling and abrupt changes in speed and direction experienced on a roller coaster ride. It symbolizes a series of intense emotions, events, or circumstances that evoke both excitement and fear, often leaving one feeling exhilarated or emotionally drained.
  • a high roller The idiom "a high roller" refers to a person who takes high risks, usually in gambling or investing, and is known for their extravagant and luxurious lifestyle. They are typically wealthy individuals who are willing to bet large sums of money and engage in expensive activities.
  • have ass in a sling The idiom "have ass in a sling" is an informal expression that means to be in a troublesome or difficult situation, often as a result of one's own actions or choices. It implies being in a predicament with little or no means of escape or relief. The phrase can also convey a sense of being vulnerable, helpless, or having consequences to face.
  • have a load on The idiom "have a load on" refers to someone being intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It implies that the person has consumed a significant amount of substances and is generally used to describe someone who is visibly impaired or behaving differently due to their intoxicated state.
  • A man's got to do what a man's got to do The idiom "A man's got to do what a man's got to do" means that a person, especially a man, is obligated or compelled to perform a certain action or duty, regardless of how difficult or unpleasant it may be. It implies a sense of taking responsibility, fulfilling obligations, or doing what is necessary, regardless of personal preferences or desires.
  • Rome was not built in a day. The idiom "Rome was not built in a day" means that significant achievements or complex tasks require time, effort, and patience to be accomplished. It emphasizes that worthwhile endeavors cannot be hastily completed and need consistent dedication.
  • be like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "be like a cat on a hot tin roof" refers to someone who is extremely restless, agitated, or nervous, unable to stay still or be at ease. It evokes an image of a cat in discomfort or distress, anxiously pacing back and forth on a hot, uncomfortable surface.
  • not room to swing a cat The idiom "not room to swing a cat" is used to describe a very small or cramped space. It implies that there is not enough room for even a small object, like swinging a cat, due to the confined area.
  • not enough room to swing a cat The idiom "not enough room to swing a cat" is used to describe a very small or cramped space with limited room for movement. It implies that the area is so tiny that even a small object like a cat cannot be swung around without hitting something.
  • have a fine/good etc. pair of lungs The idiom "have a fine/good etc. pair of lungs" refers to someone who has a strong, powerful, or impressive voice or singing ability. It typically implies that the person can produce loud or melodious sounds, often referring to their ability to sing, shout, or speak with great volume and clarity. This phrase is commonly used to compliment someone's vocal skills or to highlight their ability to project their voice effectively.
  • hot enough to burn a polar bear's butt The idiom "hot enough to burn a polar bear's butt" is an exaggerated expression used to describe extremely high temperatures or extreme heat. It implies that the heat is so intense that even an animal adapted to cold environments like a polar bear would be unable to withstand it.
  • drop like a hot potato The idiom "drop like a hot potato" means to quickly and immediately get rid of or abandon something or someone because they are difficult, problematic, or undesirable. It refers to the reflexive action of dropping a hot potato due to its heat, indicating the urgency and suddenness with which one wants to distance themselves.
  • drop like a hot brick The idiom "drop like a hot brick" means to immediately abandon or disengage from something or someone as soon as they become undesirable, problematic, or risky. It implies a swift and complete separation, similar to dropping a hot brick which would be quickly released to prevent injury.
  • busy as a beaver The idiom "busy as a beaver" means extremely busy, diligent, or industrious. It references the industrious nature of beavers, known for their constant building and maintenance of dams and lodges. This idiom suggests that someone is incredibly productive and actively engaged in various tasks or projects.
  • a hot spot The idiom "a hot spot" typically refers to a place or location that attracts significant attention, activity, or frequent incidents, often due to a particular reason or factor. It can also refer to an area that experiences intense heat or is known for being dangerous or volatile.
  • a hot potato The idiom "a hot potato" refers to a contentious or sensitive issue or topic that is difficult to handle, tackle, or manage, usually due to its controversial nature or potential for causing problems or conflicts. It suggests something that is challenging, potentially harmful, or uncomfortable to deal with and is often avoided or quickly passed on to someone else.
  • a hot button The idiom "a hot button" refers to a topic or issue that generates strong emotional reactions or triggers controversy, often leading to heated discussions or debates. It commonly implies that the subject matter is sensitive and can easily arouse passionate responses from individuals involved.
  • Go piss up a rope! "Go piss up a rope!" is a vulgar, offensive idiom used to express extreme frustration, anger, or annoyance towards someone. It essentially tells someone to go away or leave, often implying that their presence or actions are unwelcome or bothersome.
  • sth is not a bed of roses The idiom "something is not a bed of roses" means that something is not easy or enjoyable, but rather difficult or challenging. It suggests that a situation or task is arduous and involves hardships or struggles, similar to the thorny stems of roses that can cause discomfort when not handled carefully.
  • (come up) smelling like a rose The idiom "(come up) smelling like a rose" refers to someone who successfully emerges from a difficult or challenging situation, usually with their reputation intact or improved. It means to appear innocent or blameless despite adverse circumstances, often resulting in admiration or respect from others.
  • There's no rose without a thorn. The idiom "There's no rose without a thorn" means that nothing can be completely perfect or beautiful without some negative aspects or challenges. It implies that every positive or desirable situation includes some form of difficulty, struggle, or drawback.
  • smell like a rose The idiom "smell like a rose" means to appear or be perceived as innocent, free from fault, or above suspicion. It suggests that a person or situation seems to be blameless or has a favorable impression despite potential wrongdoing or questionable circumstances.
  • come out smelling like a rose The idiom "come out smelling like a rose" means to emerge from a difficult situation with a positive outcome or reputation. It suggests that despite facing challenges or potential damage, one managed to maintain a favorable impression or achieved success.
  • a bed of roses The idiom "a bed of roses" refers to a situation or experience that is extremely pleasant, easy, and devoid of difficulties or hardships. It implies a state of comfort, contentment, and luxury, often suggesting a life of ease and little to no challenges.
  • paint a bleak/rosy etc. picture of sth The idiom "paint a (bleak/rosy, etc.) picture of something" means to describe or present a situation, event, or idea in a negative, positive, or specific way, often emphasizing either the pessimistic or optimistic aspects of it. In other words, it refers to portraying something in a particular light, typically to evoke a certain emotional response or convey a certain view. For instance, "painting a bleak picture of the economy" implies emphasizing the negative aspects or potential challenges, while "painting a rosy picture of a vacation destination" means presenting it in an overly positive or idealistic manner.
  • a bad/rotten apple The idiom "a bad/rotten apple" refers to a person who is corrupt, dishonest, or morally rotten within a group or organization. It suggests that the individual's negative traits can have a detrimental influence on others around them, potentially affecting the overall integrity and reputation of the group.
  • have a rough time The idiom "have a rough time" means to experience difficulty, hardship, or a period of troubles and challenges in one's life or a specific situation. It refers to facing tough circumstances or going through a challenging phase.
  • give a rough time The idiom "give a rough time" means to cause someone difficulty or distress, often through criticism, confrontation, or challenging circumstances. It implies subjecting someone to a challenging or unpleasant experience.
  • a rough diamond The idiom "a rough diamond" refers to a person who may appear unrefined or unpolished on the surface but possesses good qualities, potential, or hidden talents. It implies that someone may have rough edges or be unconventional, yet holds inherent worth or potential for greatness.
  • a hard time The idiom "a hard time" generally refers to a period of difficulty or trouble that someone experiences or endures. It can indicate a challenging or unfavorable situation that may cause stress, hardship, or adversity.
  • a diamond in the rough The idiom "a diamond in the rough" refers to something or someone that has a great potential or talent, but currently lacks refinement or polish. It suggests that although the outward appearance or current state may be unimpressive, there is hidden value or exceptional quality waiting to be discovered or developed.
  • buy a round The idiom "buy a round" refers to the act of purchasing drinks for a group of people, usually in a social setting such as a bar or pub. It implies treating others and is commonly used to express generosity and camaraderie.
  • a whipround The idiom "a whipround" refers to a collective effort in which a group of people contribute money or resources to help someone or support a cause in a quick and informal manner. It usually involves each person giving a small amount, which is pooled together to achieve a specific goal or provide financial assistance to someone in need.
  • say sth in a roundabout way To say something in a roundabout way means to express or convey an idea or message indirectly or indirectly, often using unnecessarily complex or convoluted language. It involves beating around the bush or using a lot of words to express something that could have been said more directly or succinctly.
  • amount to a hill of beans The idiom "amount to a hill of beans" means that something is considered insignificant, of little value, or not worth much. It suggests that the significance and impact of the subject or situation being referred to is minimal or negligible.
  • not worth a hill of beans and not amount to a hill of beans not worth a plugged nickel not worth beans The idiom "not worth a hill of beans" and its variations such as "not amount to a hill of beans," "not worth a plugged nickel," and "not worth beans," are all used to imply that something or someone is of little or no value or significance. It suggests that the subject in question holds little or no worth or importance.
  • don't amount to a bucket of spit The idiom "don't amount to a bucket of spit" is an informal and derogatory expression used to indicate that someone or something is considered insignificant, worthless, or of little value or importance. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is so inconsequential that even a common bodily fluid like spit holds more significance.
  • a roving eye The idiom "a roving eye" refers to a person who has a tendency to stare at, notice, or be attracted to others, especially romantically, while already being in a committed relationship. It implies a lack of loyalty, fidelity, or a wandering attention when it comes to matters of the heart.
  • in a row The idiom "in a row" refers to consecutive or successive occurrences of something happening without interruption or break. It implies that multiple instances or events have happened sequentially, one after the other.
  • have your ducks in a row The idiom "have your ducks in a row" means to be well organized, prepared, or coordinated. It refers to having everything in order or arranged systematically, much like a row of ducks following one another.
  • a tough row to hoe The idiom "a tough row to hoe" means having a difficult task or challenge to overcome. It is often used to describe a situation that requires a lot of effort, persistence, or hard work to succeed. The phrase is derived from the agricultural practice of hoeing rows in a field, which can be physically demanding and time-consuming.
  • get your ducks in a row The idiom "get your ducks in a row" means to get organized or prepared, to have all of one's tasks, responsibilities, or plans properly arranged and ready. It suggests the need to align everything in a systematic order or to gather all the necessary resources or information prior to proceeding with an action or decision.
  • kick up a fuss The idiom "kick up a fuss" means to create a commotion, protest, or voice disagreement, often in a loud and exaggerated manner. It refers to the act of raising a disturbance or making a big fuss about something, usually to express dissatisfaction or objection to a particular situation or decision.
  • get one's ducks in a row The idiom "get one's ducks in a row" means to organize or prepare things or oneself in a systematic and orderly manner before proceeding with a task or plan. It refers to arranging or aligning everything in the correct order, similar to how ducks are often seen walking or swimming in a neat line.
  • a battle royal The idiom "a battle royal" typically refers to a fierce and intense struggle or conflict, often involving a large number of participants or organizations. It suggests a competition or fight that is marked by great turmoil, chaos, or brutality, with multiple individuals or groups vying for dominance or victory.
  • rub salt in a wound The idiom "rub salt in a wound" refers to exacerbating or intensifying someone's emotional pain or distress by reminding them of a painful or unfortunate situation.
  • make a face (at sb/sth) The idiom "make a face (at sb/sth)" means to contort or distort one's facial expressions to convey disapproval, disgust, or dislike towards someone or something. It involves using facial gestures, such as frowning, grimacing, or sticking out one's tongue, to express disapproval or dislike in a non-verbal manner. This idiom is often used to indicate rudeness, mockery, or disdain towards someone or something.
  • make/pull a face The idiom "make/pull a face" refers to the act of contorting one's facial expression in a disapproving, exaggerated, or silly manner in order to display one's emotions or reactions. It is often done to express dislike, confusion, amusement, or disagreement nonverbally.
  • make a face The idiom "make a face" refers to the act of contorting one's facial expression, typically to show disapproval, disapproval, disgust, or amusement. It involves forming different facial expressions, often involving the mouth, eyes, and eyebrows, in order to convey a specific emotion or reaction.
  • have a bun in the oven The idiom "have a bun in the oven" means that someone is pregnant. It is a lighthearted and often informal way of referring to someone's pregnancy.
  • feel like a million (dollars) The idiom "feel like a million (dollars)" means to feel extremely happy, confident, or self-assured. It implies feeling very good about oneself or the current situation. It is often used to express a great sense of satisfaction or contentment.
  • a rude awakening The idiom "a rude awakening" means to experience a sudden and often unpleasant realization or understanding of a situation, usually after being overconfident or unaware of the true facts or consequences.
  • wave a magic wand The idiom "wave a magic wand" refers to the act of suddenly and effortlessly solving a problem or achieving a desired outcome, often implying the use of supernatural or extraordinary powers. It implies a situation where a complex or difficult task is completed as if by magic, without any significant effort or struggle.
  • a magic wand The idiom "a magic wand" refers to a metaphorical tool or solution that is supposed to magically solve a problem or achieve a desired outcome effortlessly and instantly. It implies the idea of having a supernatural or extraordinary power to make things happen easily, as if by a wave of a wand.
  • a magic moment The phrase "a magic moment" refers to a specific moment or period in time that is characterized by an extraordinary or enchanting experience. It often denotes a moment of intense happiness, success, or significance that creates a lasting impression or memory. It can also describe a sudden and unexpected moment of inspiration or clarity.
  • cut a rug The idiom "cut a rug" means to dance energetically or skillfully. It refers to someone's ability to dance with enthusiasm and style, often involving quick and lively movements as if they were literally cutting a rug (dance floor) with their steps.
  • be as snug as a bug in a rug The idiom "be as snug as a bug in a rug" means to be incredibly comfortable and cozy in a specific situation or place. Similar to a bug being nestled securely in a rug, it implies a sense of warmth, safety, and contentment. It implies that someone is feeling at ease, snugly settled, and happily situated, often in a literal or metaphorical environment that provides a sense of peace and comfort.
  • lie like a rug The idiom "lie like a rug" means to tell deliberate, blatant, or outright lies in a convincing manner or to consistently deceive someone without feeling remorse or guilt. It suggests that someone is extremely skilled at deceiving others and can convincingly fabricate stories or falsehoods.
  • draw/take a bead on sb/sth The idiom "draw/take a bead on someone/something" means to aim or target someone or something with great focus or precision, typically with the intention to shoot or harm them in some way. It originated from the practice of aligning the bead (a small, round marker) on the front sight of a firearm to accurately aim at a target. In a figurative sense, it can also refer to closely monitoring or identifying a specific person or object in a determined manner.
  • draw a bead on sm or sth The idiom "draw a bead on someone or something" means to take aim or focus on someone or something with precision, typically with the intention of achieving a goal or objective. It often refers to a figurative act of targeting or directing attention, effort, or resources towards a specific target or objective.
  • drop a bomb(shell) The idiom "drop a bomb(shell)" typically means to reveal or disclose a surprising, shocking, or unexpected piece of information or news. It refers to the impact of dropping an explosive bomb, causing sudden and dramatic effects.
  • a rule of thumb The idiom "a rule of thumb" refers to a general guideline or principle used for making approximate measurements or estimates, usually in a practical or informal context. It is a broadly applicable and easily remembered rule that helps to guide actions or decisions.
  • rule with a velvet glove The idiom "rule with a velvet glove" means to govern or control a situation or people in a gentle, tactful, or diplomatic manner, while still maintaining firm authority. It suggests that someone is using a soft, gentle approach on the surface, but is still able to assert influence or power when necessary, like a ruler wearing a soft velvet glove over an iron fist.
  • as a rule The idiom "as a rule" means typically or generally. It is used to indicate something that usually happens or is true, but there may be exceptions.
  • Have a good time. The idiom "Have a good time" is an expression used to wish someone enjoyment, pleasure, or happiness during a specific event or activity. It is often said as a farewell or a parting phrase, encouraging the person to make the most of their experience and to create fond memories.
  • run into a stone wall The idiom "run into a stone wall" means to encounter an insurmountable obstacle or encounter resistance that impedes progress or success. It suggests an inability to make further progress or find a solution due to a formidable barrier.
  • run head against a brick wall The idiom "run head against a brick wall" means to continually face obstacles or difficulties in trying to accomplish something, often without making any progress or achieving the desired result. It refers to the feeling of frustration and lack of success encountered when one's efforts consistently prove futile.
  • run around like a chicken with its head cut off and run in circles The idiom "run around like a chicken with its head cut off" means to behave or act in a frenzied, disorganized, or chaotic manner. It usually implies a state of panic, confusion, or aimlessness. Similarly, "run in circles" refers to going through repetitive, unproductive, or fruitless motions without making any progress or finding a solution. These idioms depict a lack of direction or purpose in one's actions.
  • run around like a bluearsed fly The idiom "run around like a blue-arsed fly" is used to describe someone who is extremely busy or active, often in a disorganized or frenetic manner.
  • run a tight ship The idiom "run a tight ship" means to manage and control something, such as a business or organization, in a strict, efficient, and disciplined manner. It suggests maintaining order, discipline, and high standards, ensuring that everything operates smoothly and efficiently.
  • run a tab The idiom "run a tab" means to keep a record or account of expenses or bills owed at a bar, restaurant, or other establishment, allowing the customer to pay the total amount owed at a later time. It refers to the practice of tallying up the cost of various items or services consumed over a period of time and settling the payment at a later date instead of paying for each individual item or service immediately.
  • run a risk The idiom "run a risk" means to take a chance or face the possibility of something going wrong or having a negative outcome. It involves engaging in an activity or making a decision that involves uncertainty and potential danger or harm.
  • run a fever and run a temperature The idiom "run a fever and run a temperature" means to have an elevated body temperature, typically as a result of an illness or infection. It implies being sick and experiencing a feverish condition where the body temperature is higher than normal.
  • run a fever The idiom "run a fever" refers to the act of having an elevated body temperature, typically as a symptom of an illness or infection.
  • run a comb through The idiom "run a comb through" means to quickly or hastily tidy or organize something, particularly when it comes to appearance or organization. It can be used literally, referring to combing or brushing through hair, or figuratively, to describe tidying up or organizing something messy or unkempt.
  • make a run at The idiom "make a run at" typically means to attempt or try to achieve something, especially when facing challenges or obstacles. It can be used in various contexts, such as in sports, business, or everyday situations. It implies making a determined effort and giving it one's best shot, even if the outcome is uncertain.
  • hit a home run The idiom "hit a home run" means to achieve a major success or accomplish something extremely impressive. It is often used to describe a significant achievement or an act that exceeds expectations. This phrase originated from baseball, where hitting a home run means hitting the ball out of the field, resulting in the maximum score.
  • have a runin The idiom "have a run-in" means to have a confrontation or conflict with someone, often resulting in an argument or disagreement. It can refer to a brief and unpleasant encounter with another person that leads to tension or a clash of opinions.
  • have a run of The idiom "have a run of" means to experience a consecutive or sustained period of success, luck, or good fortune in a particular endeavor or situation. It implies that the person or entity is on a winning streak or fortunate streak for a specific period of time.
  • have a good run for money The expression "have a good run for money" typically means to have a successful or enjoyable period of time in which one's efforts or investments yield good results or returns. It originated from the world of horse racing, where a horse that puts up a strong performance is said to have had a good run for its owner's money. In a broader context, the idiom is often used to describe any situation where someone experiences prosperous or satisfying outcomes in relation to their investments, endeavors, or endeavors.
  • have a good run The idiom "have a good run" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two possible definitions: 1. To enjoy a period of success or prosperity: When someone has a good run, it means they have experienced a favorable sequence of events or achieved a string of positive outcomes in a particular endeavor. This can be related to business, sports, or any other pursuit where favorable circumstances lead to successful outcomes. 2. To engage in an enjoyable or satisfying period of activity: This definition is more casual and can refer to any activity or experience that is enjoyable and fulfilling. It could be going on a vacation, participating in a hobby, or even simply having a good time with friends or family. It's important to note that the meaning
  • give a run for money The idiom "give a run for money" means to provide tough competition or challenge to someone in a particular activity, often implying that the person questioned is exceptionally skilled or formidable. It suggests that the person will make others work hard or put in extra effort to match or surpass their abilities.
  • at a good clip The idiom "at a good clip" means to move or progress swiftly, quickly, or at a fast pace. It can describe the speed or rate at which something is happening or being done.
  • a run for money The idiom "a run for money" means a strong or impressive competition or challenge, particularly in a particular activity or field. It suggests that someone or something is giving a tough competition to someone else, requiring great effort or skill to surpass.
  • a dry run The idiom "a dry run" refers to a practice or rehearsal session conducted in advance of a real or important event. It involves going through the motions or procedures without any actual or significant consequences, with the purpose of familiarizing oneself or a group with the process, identifying potential issues or problems, and ensuring a successful outcome when the actual event takes place. A dry run is typically done to refine and improve performance, increase efficiency, and minimize errors or mistakes.
  • do a job on sb/sth The idiom "do a job on sb/sth" typically refers to intentionally treating someone or something poorly, usually with the intention to harm or damage them physically, emotionally, or otherwise. It suggests that someone is attempting to have a negative impact on the target, potentially through manipulation, deception, or mistreatment.
  • do a job on sm or sth The idiom "do a job on someone or something" refers to the act of causing damage, harm, or destruction to a person, object, or situation. It implies that the actions taken have a negative or detrimental effect. It can also imply manipulation, deception, or sabotage.
  • a running battle (with sb/sth) The idiom "a running battle (with sb/sth)" refers to a prolonged or ongoing disagreement, argument or conflict with someone or something. It implies a situation where the disagreement continues or intensifies over time, often without a clear resolution or conclusion in sight. The term "running" suggests that the battle is persistent, active, and ongoing.
  • a running battle The idiom "a running battle" refers to a prolonged or ongoing conflict or argument between two or more people or groups, often characterized by continuous disputes and confrontations over a specific issue or set of issues. It suggests a situation in which the conflict is difficult to resolve or put to an end, with each side continually engaging in the battle of words or actions over an extended period of time.
  • (Go) take a running jump! The idiom "(Go) take a running jump!" is an expression used to dismiss, reject, or express contempt for someone or their suggestion. It essentially means to go away or leave, often with an added sense of frustration or annoyance.
  • take a running jump (in the lake) The idiom "take a running jump (in the lake)" is a colloquial expression commonly used to dismiss or disregard someone's suggestion or request in an abrupt or somewhat rude manner. It implies someone's unwillingness to entertain or pay attention to what has been said, indicating that the speaker wants the person to go away or leave them alone.
  • off to a running start The idiom "off to a running start" refers to a situation or endeavor that begins with strong momentum, speed, or success right from the beginning. It implies a fast and smooth progression of a task, project, or activity, usually indicating that the initial stages have been completed effectively or with significant achievements.
  • strike/touch a chord The idiom "strike/touch a chord" means to resonate strongly with someone or evoke a strong emotional response or recognition in them. It refers to a situation, story, song, or idea that deeply connects with someone's personal experiences, feelings, or memories.
  • strike a chord (with sm) The idiom "strike a chord (with someone)" means to cause a strong emotional or sympathetic response in someone. It refers to an action, statement, or situation that resonates deeply with someone, often by evoking a shared feeling or experience.
  • have a fit The idiom "have a fit" generally means to become extremely angry, upset, or emotional over something. It can also refer to having an intense physical or emotional reaction to a situation.
  • blow a fuse The idiom "blow a fuse" means to become extremely angry or lose one's temper suddenly and explosively. It refers to the image of a fuse in an electrical circuit being overloaded and breaking, resulting in a sudden power outage.
  • grind to a halt The idiom "grind to a halt" refers to a situation where a process or activity comes to a complete stop or ceases to function. It usually implies a gradual and slow decrease in speed or productivity until eventually reaching a standstill.
  • a (sudden) rush of blood (to the head) The idiom "a (sudden) rush of blood (to the head)" refers to a sudden and intense surge of emotion or impulse that temporarily overwhelms a person's rational thinking or judgment. It can lead them to act hastily or impulsively without considering the potential consequences or reasoning properly.
  • run around/rush around etc. like a bluearsed fly The idiom "run around/rush around like a blue-arsed fly" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely busy or constantly moving in a hectic and frenzied manner. It implies that the person is in a state of chaos or disarray, much like a buzzing fly in constant motion.
  • in a mad rush The idiom "in a mad rush" refers to being in a frantic, hurried, or chaotic state. It signifies an intense or frenzied activity often due to time constraints or urgency.
  • be (stuck) in a rut The idiom "be (stuck) in a rut" typically refers to a situation where a person is in a repetitive and unchanging routine, lacking variety or progress. It suggests being stuck in a monotonous and unproductive pattern, without any new experiences or growth.
  • (stuck) in a rut The idiom "(stuck) in a rut" refers to being in a situation where one is stuck doing the same things repeatedly and feeling stagnant or unable to progress. It signifies being caught in a monotonous routine or being unable to break free from a pattern, resulting in a lack of growth or new experiences.
  • paint sb/yourself into a corner The idiom "paint sb/yourself into a corner" means to find oneself or someone else in a difficult, limited, or untenable position due to one's own actions, decisions, or choices. It refers to a situation where options or solutions become extremely limited or non-existent, resembling being trapped in a corner with no way out.
  • back sb into a corner The idiom "back someone into a corner" refers to putting someone in a difficult or desperate situation where they have limited options or choices available. It implies causing someone to be stuck or trapped, unable to escape or find a way out of a challenging circumstance.
  • paint yourself into a corner The idiom "paint yourself into a corner" means to create a difficult situation for yourself from which it is hard to escape, often due to ill-conceived decisions or actions. It reflects the idea of metaphorically trapping oneself, just like someone who paints themselves into a corner physically would have limited options to get out without stepping on wet paint.
  • be backed into a corner The idiom "be backed into a corner" means to be placed in a difficult situation where one is left with no options or alternatives. It implies feeling trapped or forced to make a decision or take a particular course of action due to external circumstances or pressure.
  • drive sm into a corner The idiom "drive someone into a corner" means to put someone in a difficult or challenging situation where they have limited options or are forced to confront a problem. It implies making someone feel trapped or pressured, leaving them with no way to escape or avoid dealing with a particular issue.
  • back oneself into a corner The idiom "back oneself into a corner" means to put oneself in a difficult or unfavorable situation where there are limited or no escape options available. It refers to someone's actions or decisions leading to a predicament where they are trapped or forced to face the consequences of their actions.
  • have sth burning a hole in your pocket The idiom "have something burning a hole in your pocket" means to have a strong desire to spend or use money quickly. It describes a person who cannot resist the urge to spend money as soon as they have it, often to the point that it feels like their money is literally burning a hole in their pocket. This idiom is typically used to convey impulsive or extravagant spending habits.
  • Money burns a hole in sm's pocket. The idiom "Money burns a hole in someone's pocket" means that a person cannot resist spending money as soon as they have it. They have a strong urge or temptation to spend their money quickly, without being able to save or hold onto it for long.
  • can't carry a tune The idiom "can't carry a tune" refers to a person's inability to sing in key or maintain the correct pitch while singing. It suggests that the person is tone-deaf or lacks musical aptitude.
  • a fallen angel The idiom "a fallen angel" typically refers to a person, often with great potential or virtue, who has succumbed to temptation or has made poor choices that have led to their downfall or loss of status, virtue, or innocence. It evokes the idea of someone who was once admirable or respected but has now lost their way or fallen from grace.
  • a sacred cow The idiom "a sacred cow" refers to a person, institution, belief, or custom that is considered immune to criticism or questioning due to its long-standing or revered status. It implies that such things are considered beyond reproach or inviolable, often discouraging criticism or examination.
  • look like a saddle on a sow The idiom "look like a saddle on a sow" is a colorful way of describing something that appears completely out of place or absurd. It refers to something that does not fit or belong in its current context, similar to how a saddle would look odd and impractical on a pig. It emphasizes the mismatch or incongruity between two elements that are clearly incompatible.
  • have a burr under one's saddle The idiom "have a burr under one's saddle" refers to a person feeling irritation, agitation, or restlessness. It is often used to describe someone who is persistently bothered or annoyed by something or someone. The phrase originates from the discomfort a rider experiences when there is a burr or sharp object stuck beneath their saddle, causing continuous aggravation during a horseback ride.
  • a safe bet The idiom "a safe bet" means something that is highly likely or certain to happen, or a prediction that is very likely to be correct or successful. It refers to a situation or outcome that is considered reliable, secure, or a guaranteed option.
  • Have a safe trip. The idiom "Have a safe trip" is a warm farewell phrase used to wish someone a journey that is free from harm and danger. It is often said to loved ones or friends who are departing on a voyage, indicating that the speaker hopes they reach their destination safely and without any mishaps or difficulties.
  • a safety valve The idiom "a safety valve" refers to a person or thing that provides an outlet or release for pent-up emotions, pressure, or tension. It acts as a means to prevent a potentially dangerous or explosive situation by allowing the release of built-up energy in a controlled and harmless manner.
  • a safety net The idiom "a safety net" refers to a contingency plan or a support system that provides protection, security, or help in times of difficulty or uncertainty. It is often used to describe a backup measure or a means of preventing catastrophic consequences.
  • a marriage made in heaven The idiom "a marriage made in heaven" refers to a perfect or highly compatible union between two people. It implies that the couple is exceptionally well-suited for each other, as if their relationship was predestined or ordained by a higher power.
  • a shotgun wedding A shotgun wedding refers to a marriage that is arranged or forced because the bride is pregnant. The term originated from the idea that a father or family member would use a shotgun to intimidate or threaten the groom into marrying the pregnant woman. The phrase is often used figuratively to describe any wedding that is rushed or not desired by either party.
  • a marriage/match made in heaven The idiom "a marriage/match made in heaven" refers to a perfect or well-suited union, typically between two people. It suggests that the two individuals involved are an ideal match, complementing each other perfectly with great compatibility, happiness, and love. This idiom often implies that the relationship is destined or blessed.
  • Dream of a funeral and you hear of a marriage. The idiom "Dream of a funeral and you hear of a marriage" means that sometimes unexpected and contrasting events or outcomes can occur. It suggests that what one anticipates or fears is often disproved or overshadowed by positive or completely unrelated events.
  • have a soft spot for or an animal The idiom "have a soft spot for an animal" means to have deep affection, fondness, or empathy for an animal. It implies having a particular inclination or tenderness towards animals, often leading to a strong emotional connection or willingness to care for them.
  • a party animal The idiom "a party animal" refers to a person who thoroughly enjoys and often actively seeks out social gatherings and lively events, demonstrating a high level of enthusiasm and energy for partying or attending parties.
  • a stickinthemud The idiom "a stick-in-the-mud" is used to describe a person who is regarded as old-fashioned, rigid, resistant to change, or lacking in fun or spontaneity.
  • You (really) said a mouthful. The idiom "You (really) said a mouthful" means that the person spoken to has expressed a significant or profound idea that is worthy of attention or consideration. It is often used to acknowledge that the person's statement was particularly insightful, accurate, or extensive.
  • enough sth to plague a saint The idiom "enough something to plague a saint" is used to convey that there is an excessive or overwhelming amount of something, to the point that even the most patient or resilient person would be greatly bothered or troubled by it. It suggests that the quantity or intensity of the mentioned thing is beyond what is tolerable for even the most virtuous individual.
  • at a premium The idiom "at a premium" typically means that something is scarce, in high demand, or valued highly. It refers to a situation where the availability or supply of something is limited, resulting in a higher cost or greater value being attributed to it.
  • toss a salad The idiom "toss a salad" has two different meanings: 1. Culinary meaning: This phrase refers to the action of mixing together various ingredients of a salad by lifting them with a tossing motion using utensils like forks or salad tongs. It involves thoroughly combining the components to distribute dressing and flavors evenly. 2. Slang meaning: In certain informal contexts or adult conversations, "tossing a salad" can be a euphemistic expression that refers to a specific sexual act involving the stimulation of the anus with the mouth or tongue. This meaning is considered explicit and vulgar, so it is important to approach this interpretation with caution and understanding of appropriate language use.
  • close a sale To "close a sale" is an idiomatic expression that refers to the successful completion of a business transaction, typically involving the purchase of a product or service. It signifies the moment when a salesperson convinces a potential customer to make a purchase. Closing a sale involves various techniques and skills that aim to overcome objections, negotiate terms, and secure the buyer's commitment to the transaction.
  • a cattle market The idiom "a cattle market" refers to a chaotic or disorderly situation, often used to describe a crowded and noisy environment where people are behaving in an unruly or frenzied manner. It draws its analogy from the chaotic scenes often associated with livestock markets, where numerous animals are bought and sold, creating a state of commotion and confusion.
  • like a blind dog in a meat market The idiom "like a blind dog in a meat market" refers to someone who is completely overwhelmed or clueless in a particular situation. It implies that the person is surrounded by various enticing possibilities, possibilities they are unable to appreciate or understand due to their own limitations or lack of awareness.
  • sing a different tune The idiom "sing a different tune" means to change one's opinion, attitude, or approach to something. It suggests a shift in perspective or behavior, often implying that someone has adopted a contrasting viewpoint or is expressing themselves in a dissimilar manner compared to their previous stance.
  • It's six of one, half a dozen of another The idiom "It's six of one, half a dozen of another" means that there are two choices or options that are essentially the same in outcome or result. It implies that it doesn't matter which option one chooses because the end result will be equivalent or similar.
  • a horse of another different color The idiom "a horse of another different color" means a completely different matter or situation from what has been previously discussed or considered. It implies a significant change or contrast in circumstances or perspectives.
  • have a lot to answer for The idiom "have a lot to answer for" means to be responsible for or accountable for a wrongdoing or negative consequence. It implies that someone's actions or decisions have caused harm, and they will face scrutiny or criticism as a result.
  • take sth with a grain of salt The idiom "take something with a grain of salt" means to be skeptical or doubtful about the truth or accuracy of something that is said or written. It implies not fully believing or trusting the information provided, and instead approaching it with caution, considering the possibility that it may be exaggerated or not completely reliable.
  • go through sb/sth like a dose of salts The idiom "go through somebody/something like a dose of salts" means to move or progress very quickly, causing a significant or rapid impact or effect on someone or something. The expression is often used when describing the speed or efficiency with which someone completes a task or accomplishes a goal, leaving a strong impression or result. It can also refer to something that quickly and completely resolves a problem or issue.
  • a good Samaritan The idiom "a good Samaritan" refers to a person who selflessly helps others, typically strangers, in a kind and compassionate manner, without expecting any personal gain or reward in return. This idiom originated from the biblical parable of the Good Samaritan, where a Samaritan man helps a traveler who had been attacked and left for dead, despite the cultural differences and animosity between Jews and Samaritans at the time.
  • go into a song and dance The idiom "go into a song and dance" typically means to engage in an elaborate or excessive explanation or story, often to persuade or deceive someone, especially when a simpler explanation or response would suffice. It implies that someone is being unnecessarily theatrical or dramatic in their communication, often in an attempt to manipulate or entertain others.
  • be one sandwich short of a picnic The idiom "be one sandwich short of a picnic" is a humorous way of describing someone as being mentally or intellectually deficient or a little bit crazy. It implies that the person is not quite all there or has a lack of common sense or intelligence. It suggests that they are missing something essential or are not fully equipped to understand or handle a situation.
  • a knuckle sandwich The idiom "a knuckle sandwich" refers to a physical punch or blow delivered with a closed fist, typically targeting someone's face. It is a colloquial expression used to convey the act of physical violence or aggression.
  • one sandwich short of a picnic The idiom "one sandwich short of a picnic" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived as not being very intelligent or mentally deficient. It suggests that the person lacks the basic understanding or knowledge required for a certain situation or is missing common sense. The idiom implies that if someone were to bring a picnic and forget one essential item, like a sandwich, it would indicate a lapse in their judgment or mental capacity.
  • dance/sing/talk etc. up a storm The idiom "dance/sing/talk etc. up a storm" means to do something with great enthusiasm, energy, or intensity. It suggests that the person is performing the action with great skill or vigor, often attracting attention or admiration. It is usually used to describe someone who is giving an outstanding and captivating performance.
  • any port in a storm The idiom "any port in a storm" means that in difficult or desperate situations, any solution or help available, regardless of its quality or preference, can be accepted or used. It emphasizes the willingness to accept less-than-ideal options when faced with adversity.
  • A golden key can open any door The idiom "A golden key can open any door" means that with the right resources, influence, or advantage, one can overcome any obstacle, gain access to any opportunity, or achieve success in various circumstances.
  • not a kid anymore The idiom "not a kid anymore" means that someone has grown up or matured and is no longer considered a child or someone of young age. It implies that the person has reached a stage of adulthood or has taken on a more responsible role in life.
  • tear a place apart The idiom "tear a place apart" means to cause extensive damage or destruction to a location in a fierce or violent manner. It can also imply going through an area, such as searching or examining it, with great intensity or thoroughness.
  • Pull up a chair The idiom "pull up a chair" means to invite someone to join a group or conversation, usually indicating a casual and welcoming atmosphere. It is a way of inviting someone to sit down and participate or engage in an ongoing discussion or activity.
  • Come in and sit a spell The idiom "Come in and sit a spell" is an invitation for someone to enter a place and take a seat for a little while. It implies a sense of hospitality and warmth, encouraging the person to relax and spend some time in a comfortable and leisurely manner.
  • feel a glow of happiness To "feel a glow of happiness" means to experience a warm and contented feeling. It refers to a sense of deep satisfaction and joy that radiates within oneself. It often implies a sense of inner peace and contentment that brings happiness from within.
  • appeal (to a court) (for sth) The idiom "appeal (to a court) (for sth)" refers to the action of making a formal request to a higher court for a review or reversal of a decision made by a lower court. It involves presenting arguments and evidence to support the case and to persuade the higher court to reconsider or overturn the original decision. Appeals are usually made when one party believes that there were errors in the application of the law, procedural mistakes, or violations of their rights during the previous trial or legal proceeding.
  • save for a rainy day The idiom "save for a rainy day" refers to the act of setting aside money, resources, or provisions for future needs or unexpected circumstances. It emphasizes the importance of being prepared and having a backup plan in case of any unforeseen events or difficulties.
  • save a bundle The idiom "save a bundle" means to save a significant amount of money or to avoid spending a large sum of money on something. It implies a substantial financial saving or a great deal of expense being avoided.
  • penny saved is a penny earned The idiom "a penny saved is a penny earned" means that saving even the smallest amount of money is equivalent to earning that same amount. It emphasizes the importance of frugality and highlights the notion that conserving resources and being thrifty can be just as beneficial as actively earning money.
  • a saving grace The idiom "a saving grace" refers to a positive or redeeming quality or aspect of a person, situation, or thing that brings some relief, hope, or improvement despite its overall negative or challenging nature.
  • wouldn't say boo to a goose The idiom "wouldn't say boo to a goose" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid, shy, or easily frightened. It implies that the person lacks assertiveness or the ability to stand up for themselves.
  • say in a roundabout way The idiom "say in a roundabout way" means to express something indirectly or ambiguously, often using complex or lengthy explanations instead of being direct and straightforward. It implies that the speaker avoids addressing the topic directly and instead chooses to hint or imply their intended meaning.
  • say a mouthful The idiom "say a mouthful" means to express something significant, insightful, or profound with just a few words or a single statement. It implies that what has been said carries a lot of meaning or truth and may require careful consideration or further discussion.
  • say a lot about The idiom "say a lot about" means that certain actions, behaviors, or characteristics of a person or thing provide significant insight or information about their character, beliefs, qualities, or values. It implies that these actions or traits reveal valuable details or truths about someone or something.
  • can't say boo to a goose The idiom "can't say boo to a goose" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid, shy, or reserved, especially in social settings. It implies that the person lacks the confidence or assertiveness to speak up or assert their opinions.
  • a softly, softly approach The idiom "a softly, softly approach" means taking a cautious and gentle strategy or proceeding with care and sensitivity, especially when dealing with a delicate or sensitive situation. It emphasizes the importance of being subtle, patient, and non-confrontational in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • a scandal sheet The idiom "a scandal sheet" refers to a publication, often a newspaper or magazine, that focuses on publishing scandalous, controversial, or gossip-related stories and articles, often without focusing on accuracy or reliability. It is typically associated with tabloid-style publications that sensationalize events or topics, aiming to attract readership through sensationalism, exaggeration, and speculative reporting.
  • a scarlet woman The idiom "a scarlet woman" typically refers to a derogatory way of describing a woman who is perceived as promiscuous or morally loose. It originates from the biblical mention of a woman wearing scarlet, regarded as a symbol of sin or illicit behavior. This term carries a judgmental and negative connotation about a woman's character or reputation.
  • make a scene The idiom "make a scene" means to create a public disturbance or uproar by behaving loudly, disruptively, or in an attention-seeking manner, usually in a way that attracts negative attention or embarrasses oneself or others.
  • put a dog off the scent The idiom "put a dog off the scent" refers to the act of distracting or diverting someone's attention or focus from a particular trail, clue, or objective. It implies the intention to mislead or confuse someone to prevent them from discovering or pursuing something. This expression is often used figuratively, but it derives from the practice of using dogs to track scents or trails, where the dog's ability to follow a scent is disrupted or thwarted.
  • have sth down to a science The idiom "have something down to a science" means to have mastered or perfected a process, skill, or activity to such an extent that it is executed with great precision, efficiency, and predictability. It suggests that someone has thoroughly studied and understood the subject matter, resulting in the ability to consistently achieve desired outcomes.
  • a grey area The idiom "a grey area" refers to a situation or topic that is unclear, not easily defined or categorized, and lacks clear boundaries or rules. It often represents a complex or ambiguous situation where determining what is right or wrong, legal or illegal, or acceptable or unacceptable is subjective or open to interpretation.
  • a disaster area The idiom "a disaster area" refers to a place or situation that is chaotic, disorganized, or in complete disarray, often as a result of an unfortunate event or unfavorable circumstances. It implies that things are in a state of substantial disorder and may be difficult to control or rectify.
  • couldn't act/argue/fight your way out of a paper bag The idiom "couldn't act/argue/fight your way out of a paper bag" is used to describe someone who lacks competence, skill or ability in a particular area or task. It suggests that the person is so inept that they would struggle to accomplish even the most basic or straightforward tasks, such as exiting a paper bag. It emphasizes a severe lack of capability or talent.
  • settle a score with sm To settle a score with someone means to seek revenge or retaliate against them for a previous wrongdoing or offense. It refers to the act of resolving a past dispute or grievance by inflicting harm or retribution upon the person involved.
  • score with (sm or a group) The idiom "score with (someone or a group)" typically means to have success in attracting, impressing, or seducing someone or a specific group of people, often in a romantic or sexual context. It implies achieving desired attention, recognition, or approval from the mentioned individuals.
  • have a score to settle (with sm) The idiom "have a score to settle (with someone)" means to have a past issue or dispute with someone that needs to be resolved or avenged. It implies a desire for retribution or getting even with someone who has wronged you in the past.
  • (as) sharp as a tack The idiom "(as) sharp as a tack" is used to describe someone who is highly intelligent, quick-witted, or mentally alert. It implies that the person is very astute, perceptive, and able to think or respond quickly and effectively in various situations.
  • be as sharp as a tack The idiom "be as sharp as a tack" means to be highly intelligent, perceptive, or quick-witted. It implies that someone has a keen and astute intellect, able to grasp concepts or situations swiftly and accurately.
  • a short sharp shock The idiom "a short sharp shock" refers to a sudden and intense experience or event that is intended to have a strong impact on someone or something. It suggests a brief but powerful encounter or action that serves as a wake-up call or a means of bringing about immediate change or improvement.
  • sharp as a razor The idiom "sharp as a razor" refers to someone or something that is extremely intelligent, quick-witted, or perceptive. It describes a person's mental acuity or the sharpness and precision of an object or idea.
  • have a mind as sharp as a steel trap The idiom "have a mind as sharp as a steel trap" refers to someone who possesses incredibly quick and accurate thinking abilities. It suggests that the person has a highly alert and agile mind, able to grasp information or solve problems swiftly and effectively. Similar to a steel trap that snaps shut with agility and precision, this idiom implies mental sharpness, intelligence, and keenness of perception.
  • Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. The idiom "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned" means that no one is as angry or vengeful as a woman who has been humiliated or rejected in a romantic relationship. It suggests that the wrath and fury of a woman in such a situation can be extremely intense and destructive.
  • he/she doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his/her body The idiom "he/she doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind, etc. bone in his/her body" is used to describe a person who is inherently good-natured and lacking negative qualities such as envy, cruelty, or unkindness. It implies that the person has a consistently kind and generous disposition, with no trace of negative emotions or behaviors.
  • pay an arm and a leg The idiom "pay an arm and a leg" means to pay a very high price or cost for something, often implying that the price is excessively expensive or unreasonable.
  • have a good arm The idiom "have a good arm" typically refers to someone's ability to throw or toss something with accuracy, strength, or skill. It suggests that the person is capable of making long or accurate throws, often in reference to sports or activities involving throwing objects.
  • cost an arm and a leg The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" refers to something that is extremely expensive or involves a significant sacrifice or high price. It implies that the cost or price being asked is excessively high and requires the person to give up something valuable or significant.
  • cost a pretty penny The idiom "cost a pretty penny" means that something is very expensive or costs a significant amount of money.
  • a list as long as arm The idiom "a list as long as your arm" means having a list or series of items, tasks, or obligations that is very long or extensive. It implies that the list is so lengthy that it could metaphorically be compared to the length of a person's arm.
  • have a scrape (with sm or sth) The idiom "have a scrape (with someone or something)" means to have a minor or shallow injury or damage caused by a collision, accident, or contact with someone or something. It can also refer to a minor conflict, disagreement, or altercation with someone.
  • a knight in shining armor The idiom "a knight in shining armor" refers to a person who comes to someone's rescue in a difficult situation or provides protection, support, or assistance when it is needed the most. This phrase often implies a sense of heroism, chivalry, and bravery in the manner of a medieval knight.
  • a chink in sb's armour The idiom "a chink in someone's armor" refers to a weakness or vulnerability that a person has, usually in terms of their defenses or abilities. It suggests that although someone may generally be strong or competent, they still have a specific area that can be exploited or targeted. The phrase originates from the image of a knight in armor, suggesting that even the most well-protected person can have a small opening or weak spot.
  • find a way around The idiom "find a way around" means to discover or devise an alternative approach or solution to overcome an obstacle or bypass a difficult situation. It involves creatively navigating through challenges or finding methods that allow you to overcome a problem or achieve a goal despite the difficulties or restrictions faced.
  • big around as a molasses barrel The idiom "big around as a molasses barrel" means someone or something is excessively overweight or obese. It suggests that the person or object being referred to is of substantial size, similar to the width of a barrel used to store molasses.
  • a millstone around neck The idiom "a millstone around the neck" refers to an burdensome or heavy responsibility or obligation that hinders progress or success. It originates from the idea of a heavy millstone tied around the neck of a person, causing them to be weighed down and unable to move forward.
  • arrive at a decision To "arrive at a decision" means to make a choice or reach a conclusion after careful consideration or deliberation. It implies the act of coming to a final resolution about a particular matter or problem.
  • a straight arrow The idiom "a straight arrow" refers to a person who is honest, sincere, and holds strong moral or ethical principles. This individual is often reliable, trustworthy, and always behaves in a straightforward and conscientious manner.
  • to a fine art The idiom "to a fine art" means to do something with great skill, precision, or expertise. It suggests that someone has mastered a particular activity or technique to such a high level that it is considered an art form.
  • a sea change The idiom "a sea change" refers to a significant transformation or fundamental shift in someone's attitude, behavior, or situation. It can describe a profound and often unexpected alteration that occurs, comparable to the dramatic change that the sea undergoes during a storm.
  • He that would go to sea for pleasure, would go to hell for a pastime. The idiom "He that would go to sea for pleasure, would go to hell for a pastime" means that engaging in certain activities purely for enjoyment or leisure may lead to grave consequences or sufferings. It implies that pursuits or endeavors that seem enjoyable or pleasurable on the surface may result in unexpected hardships or even disastrous outcomes.
  • seal a bargain The idiom "seal a bargain" means to finalize or secure a deal or agreement, often by signing a contract or making a firm commitment. It signifies the completion or confirmation of a negotiation process, indicating that both parties have agreed upon the terms and conditions of an arrangement.
  • a Frankenstein's monster The idiom "a Frankenstein's monster" refers to something that is created or put together haphazardly and without much thought, resulting in a disorganized, chaotic, or monstrous outcome. It implies that the creation is flawed, unnatural, or a combination of various elements that do not work well together.
  • go over sth with a finetooth comb The idiom "go over something with a fine-tooth comb" means to examine or scrutinize something in a very thorough and meticulous manner, leaving no detail unnoticed or unexamined. It implies thoroughly searching or analyzing something with great attention to detail.
  • a man for all seasons The idiom "a man for all seasons" refers to someone who is versatile, adaptable, and able to handle various situations or roles effectively, regardless of the circumstances. This person is typically flexible, versatile, and capable of thriving in different conditions or environments. They are skillful, versatile, and well-suited to any occasion or challenge that comes their way.
  • a pissartist The phrase "a piss artist" is a colloquial and potentially offensive idiomatic expression primarily used in British English. It refers to someone who frequently consumes excessive amounts of alcohol or who is known for being a heavy drinker. The term derives from the combination of "piss" (a vulgar term for urine) and "artist" (which here is used sarcastically to describe the person's supposed skill or dedication to drinking).
  • show sm to a seat The idiom "show someone to a seat" means to guide or accompany someone to their designated or preferred seating location. It is often used in formal or organized settings, such as theaters, conferences, or restaurants, where someone may require assistance in finding and situating themselves in the appropriate seating area.
  • have a seat The idiom "have a seat" is an informal way of inviting someone to sit down. It is often used to offer someone a place to rest or as a polite gesture to make them feel comfortable in a particular setting.
  • grab a chair The idiom "grab a chair" means to take a seat or to find a place to sit in a casual or informal manner.
  • a mummy's/mother's boy The idiom "a mummy's/mother's boy" refers to a man who is overly dependent on or excessively attached to his mother. It suggests that the individual relies heavily on his mother for emotional support, guidance, or decision-making, often at the expense of his independence or ability to function autonomously.
  • a mother lode of sth The idiom "a mother lode of something" refers to a large or abundant supply or source of something valuable, often metaphorically compared to a rich vein of ore or mineral deposits in a mine. It is commonly used to describe an exceptional or unexpected amount or quality of something desired or sought after.
  • swear on a stack of Bibles The idiom "swear on a stack of Bibles" means to make a solemn and binding oath or promise, often in a highly assertive or convincing manner, by invoking the authority or significance of the Bible. It implies a strong assurance or guarantee of truthfulness and honesty.
  • face (that) only a mother could love The idiom "face (that) only a mother could love" refers to someone's unattractive physical appearance that might only be appreciated or loved by their mother due to the unconditional love and acceptance mothers typically have for their children. It humorously indicates that the person's appearance may not be appealing to others.
  • table a motion The idiom "table a motion" means to propose a motion or resolution during a meeting or debate, typically in a formal setting, and hold it for future discussion or consideration. When a motion is tabled, it is temporarily set aside and not immediately voted upon, allowing for more in-depth analysis or for it to be taken up at a later time. The motion is effectively put on the table for further attention or action.
  • as a matter of fact The idiom "as a matter of fact" means that the information being relayed is true, or presents a fact that supports or adds emphasis to the previous statement. It is often used to provide further evidence, clarification, or to correct misconceptions in a conversation or discussion.
  • without a second thought The idiom "without a second thought" means to do something without any hesitation or doubt, acting quickly and decisively. When someone does something without a second thought, they do it immediately or automatically, without pausing to consider or question their actions.
  • wait a second The idiom "wait a second" is a colloquial expression that is used to ask someone to pause or hold on for a short period of time. It is often used to indicate a need for a brief delay or pause in order to address or consider something before continuing with the current activity or conversation.
  • just a second The idiom "just a second" is a common expression used to ask for a brief amount of time or to indicate a short pause or delay. It implies that the person needs a moment to attend to something or complete a task before addressing or responding to the current situation or request.
  • get a second wind The idiom "get a second wind" means to experience a sudden resurgence of energy or motivation after feeling tired or wanting to give up. It refers to an additional burst of strength or determination that allows one to continue or complete a task, often when initially feeling worn out or demotivated.
  • a secondclass citizen The idiom "a second-class citizen" refers to a person or a group of people who are treated as inferior, less important, or granted fewer rights and privileges compared to others in a particular society or community. They may face discrimination or exclusion based on their race, ethnicity, gender, religion, social status, or other factors, resulting in limited opportunities and unequal treatment.
  • in (just) a second The idiom "in (just) a second" is used to indicate that something will happen very quickly or without delay. It can also imply a sense of urgency or an immediate response or action.
  • make a secret of sth The idiom "make a secret of something" means to keep something confidential or not reveal or share information about it. It refers to intentionally not disclosing or discussing a particular matter, keeping it hidden or private.
  • keep a secret The idiom "keep a secret" means to not reveal or disclose information that was shared in confidence, ensuring that it remains confidential and not known to others.
  • Could you keep a secret? The idiom "Could you keep a secret?" is a phrase used to gauge someone's ability or willingness to keep information confidential or not reveal it to others. It often implies that the information to be shared is sensitive, personal, or potentially damaging.
  • carry a secret to the grave The idiom "carry a secret to the grave" means to never reveal or disclose information or a secret to anyone, taking it to one's own deathbed, ensuring that it remains undisclosed forever.
  • lull sb into a false sense of security The phrase "lull someone into a false sense of security" means to make someone feel safe and confident in a situation when, in reality, there may be hidden dangers, risks, or a potential threat lurking. It refers to the act of misleading or deceiving someone into believing that they are secure, often to the point where they let down their guard, unaware of the imminent danger or potential harm.
  • lull sm into a false sense of security The idiom "lull someone into a false sense of security" means to make someone feel safe or confident in a situation where there is actually potential danger or deception. It implies that someone is being deceived or tricked into believing that everything is fine, while in reality, they are not aware of the hidden risks or threats present.
  • see you in a little while The idiom "see you in a little while" is used to say goodbye to someone with the expectation of seeing them again relatively soon. It implies that the separation will not be lengthy, and that the person expects to see the other person again in a short period of time.
  • see in a new light The expression "see in a new light" means to perceive or understand something in a different way, often with a fresh perspective or newfound understanding. It implies a shift in one's perception or interpretation of a situation, idea, or person, leading to a new and possibly more insightful viewpoint.
  • go to see a man about a dog The idiom "go to see a man about a dog" is a humorous and ambiguous phrase that is often used as an excuse or a euphemism for temporarily leaving a situation or a conversation without revealing the actual reason. It is typically employed when one needs to exit discreetly to attend to an undisclosed personal matter, without providing any specific details.
  • can't see a hole in a ladder The idiom "can't see a hole in a ladder" means being oblivious to an obvious problem or flaw. It implies a lack of awareness or perceptiveness towards something that should be easily noticeable.
  • plant a seed The idiom "plant a seed" typically means to sow the initial idea or suggestion that has the potential to grow into something more significant or influential in the future. It refers to the act of initiating or beginning a process, often by introducing an idea, thought, or plan that can develop and have a profound impact over time.
  • Good seed makes a good crop. The idiom "Good seed makes a good crop" means that if you start with high-quality or advantageous qualities, resources, or inputs, you are likely to achieve or obtain favorable results or outcomes. It emphasizes the importance of laying a strong foundation or starting with the right elements in order to achieve success.
  • make sth seem like a picnic The idiom "make something seem like a picnic" means to make a task or situation appear easy, simple, or enjoyable while it may actually be difficult or challenging.
  • (I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays. The idiom "(I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays" means that one has not seen or encountered someone for a very long time, typically indicating a significant period of absence or separation. It emphasizes the prolonged duration of time since their last meeting.
  • (I) haven't seen you in a long time. The idiom "(I) haven't seen you in a long time" is used to express surprise or joy upon meeting someone after a significant period of time has passed since the last encounter. It indicates that the person expressing it has missed the other person's presence and is acknowledging the extended period of separation.
  • hide a multitude of sins The idiom "hide a multitude of sins" means that if something has one positive or redeeming quality, it can make up for or mask many flaws or shortcomings. It suggests that a single favorable aspect can serve as a distraction or cover-up for numerous negative aspects or mistakes.
  • a sin tax The idiom "a sin tax" refers to a specific type of tax that is imposed on certain products or activities that are considered morally or socially undesirable. This tax is primarily intended to discourage the consumption or participation in these particular behaviors or goods, such as cigarettes, alcohol, gambling, or fast food, while also generating revenue for the government.
  • Poverty is not a crime. The idiom "Poverty is not a crime" suggests that being poor or lacking material wealth is not morally wrong or something for which one should be punished. It emphasizes the idea that poverty should not be stigmatized or treated as a form of wrongdoing, but rather as a societal issue that needs to be addressed and remedied with empathy and support.
  • it doesn't take a rocket scientist to The idiom "it doesn't take a rocket scientist to" is used to imply that something is not difficult to understand or figure out. It suggests that the task or concept is relatively simple and can be comprehended by anyone without advanced expertise or intelligence.
  • If that don't beat a pig apecking! The idiom "If that don't beat a pig apecking!" is an informal expression used to express surprise, astonishment, or disbelief about something unusual, unexpected, or extraordinary. It conveys the idea that the situation or circumstance being described is so peculiar or remarkable that it surpasses one's expectations or comprehension.
  • I don't want to sound like a busybody, but The idiom "I don't want to sound like a busybody, but" is typically used to show concern or interest in someone else's affairs but also acknowledging that one does not want to appear nosy or intrusive. It is often a precursor to offering unsolicited advice or making an observation about someone's personal matters while trying to be respectful and considerate.
  • Don't tell a soul The idiom "Don't tell a soul" means to keep something a secret and not disclose it to anyone.
  • don't have a pot to piss in The idiom "don't have a pot to piss in" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely poor or lacking in financial resources. It conveys the idea of not having even the most basic or essential possessions, symbolized by not owning a pot to urinate in.
  • Don't have a cow! The idiom "Don't have a cow!" is an expression used to tell someone not to overreact, get upset, or become overly angry about something that is relatively minor or unimportant. It is often used to calm someone down and reassure them that there is no need to become upset or lose their composure.
  • didn't care a whit The idiom "didn't care a whit" means to not care at all or to have no concern or interest in something or someone. It emphasizes a complete lack of interest or indifference towards a particular matter.
  • a Don Juan The idiom "a Don Juan" refers to a man who is known for his seductive abilities and pursuit of multiple romantic partners. It is derived from the fictional character Don Juan, a legendary Spanish nobleman who was portrayed as a charming and debonair lover in various literary works. The idiom is often used to describe someone who is skilled in wooing others but tends to have a promiscuous or unconcerned attitude toward long-term commitments.
  • pull a muscle The idiom "pull a muscle" refers to the act of straining or injuring a muscle by stretching it too forcefully or using excessive force. It typically involves overexertion or sudden movements that result in pain and discomfort.
  • at a loss The idiom "at a loss" is used to describe a state of confusion or uncertainty when faced with a situation or problem for which one doesn't have an answer or solution. It can also refer to feeling helpless or lacking understanding in a particular situation.
  • at a loss (for words) The idiom "at a loss (for words)" means being unable to find or articulate the right words to express one's thoughts or emotions due to surprise, confusion, or bewilderment. It describes a situation where someone simply cannot respond adequately or adequately convey their feelings or thoughts.
  • at a time The idiom "at a time" typically means doing or dealing with one thing or task at a specific moment or in a particular sequence, rather than attempting multiple things simultaneously. It implies a focus on concentration, thoroughness, or step-by-step approach.
  • sell sth for a song The idiom "sell something for a song" means to sell something at an incredibly low or cheap price. It implies that the item being sold was undervalued or "priced like a song," which is typically very low compared to its actual worth.
  • sell sth for a certain price The idiom "sell something for a certain price" means to exchange or offer something in return for a fixed or specific amount of money or value. It refers to the act of setting a definite cost or selling price for a particular item or product.
  • sell sm a bill of goods The idiom "sell someone a bill of goods" means to deceive or trick someone by presenting false or exaggerated information or promises, typically to convince them to make a purchase or get involved in something. It implies that the person has been convinced through dishonest or misleading tactics.
  • be a athlete/star/writer etc. in the making The idiom "be a athlete/star/writer/etc. in the making" refers to someone who displays exceptional talent, potential, or promise in a particular field or endeavor. It suggests that the person in question has the necessary qualities and abilities to become successful and accomplished in their chosen field in the future.
  • send up a trial balloon The idiom "send up a trial balloon" means to float an idea, proposal, or suggestion in order to gauge people's reactions or test the viability of the concept before committing to it fully. It involves subtly introducing an idea to see if it gains support or acceptance among the intended audience before making a final decision or announcement.
  • send on a wildgoose chase The idiom "send on a wild goose chase" means to deliberately mislead or deceive someone by sending them on a futile or pointless quest or mission. It involves directing someone towards something that does not exist or is unattainable, leading to wasted time and effort.
  • send on a guilt trip The idiom "send on a guilt trip" means to intentionally make someone feel guilty or remorseful about something they have done or haven't done, typically to manipulate or control their behavior, by using emotional tactics or words.
  • send into a tizz The idiom "send into a tizz" means to cause someone to become extremely agitated, flustered, or anxious about a situation or event. It refers to the feeling of being overwhelmed or thrown off-balance due to unexpected or stressful circumstances.
  • send into a state or condition The idiom "send into a state or condition" refers to causing someone or something to enter or experience a particular state, condition, or emotional state. It suggests that an action or event has affected someone or something deeply, altering their state of being.
  • send a signal The idiom "send a signal" refers to the act of conveying a message or expressing a certain intention or meaning through words, actions, or non-verbal cues. It usually implies attempting to communicate or influence someone or a group of people in a particular way.
  • send a message The idiom "send a message" generally means to convey a clear and deliberate communication or display of intent or purpose. It usually implies that actions or words are used to communicate a particular message or signal a specific meaning or consequence.
  • put out a warrant The idiom "put out a warrant" refers to the act of official issuance and delivery of a legal document by a court or law enforcement agency that authorizes the arrest or detention of a specific individual, usually based on probable cause that the person has committed a crime. It means to request the authorities to initiate a legal process to apprehend and bring the individual to justice.
  • have a senior/blond etc. moment The idiom "have a senior/blond etc. moment" is used to describe a temporary lapse in memory or a momentary lapse in intelligence or understanding. It is usually used humorously to refer to a situation where someone, regardless of age or hair color, experiences a brief moment of forgetfulness, confusion, or absentmindedness. The idiom implies that the person's behavior or forgetfulness is reminiscent of a stereotype associated with seniors, blondes, or any other group commonly associated with forgetfulness or absentmindedness.
  • in a sense In a sense, an idiom used to indicate that something is partially or somewhat true, but not completely or exactly true. It suggests a certain level of justification or validity, often used to qualify or modify a statement.
  • ounce of common sense is worth a pound of theory The idiom "an ounce of common sense is worth a pound of theory" implies that practical knowledge and sound reasoning are more valuable and effective than mere theoretical or intellectual understanding. It suggests that a small amount of practical wisdom and logical thinking can be far more beneficial and productive than a large amount of theoretical knowledge alone.
  • have a bad attitude To "have a bad attitude" means to have a negative or unpleasant outlook, behavior, or demeanor. It refers to someone who displays hostility, rudeness, pessimism, or an uncooperative nature in their interactions with others. It suggests a generally negative mindset or disposition that impacts how one perceives, reacts, or interacts with the world around them.
  • Fire is a good servant but a bad master. The idiom "Fire is a good servant but a bad master" means that while fire can be beneficial and useful when controlled and utilized properly, it can become destructive and dangerous if not handled with caution and care. It serves as a metaphor warning against the potential dangers of letting things get out of control or disregarding the potential risks.
  • Serve as a guinea pig The idiom "Serve as a guinea pig" refers to someone who is used as an experimental subject or test case in a situation where the outcome or potential risks are uncertain. It implies that the person is being used to gather information or evaluate the viability or effectiveness of something new, often at the expense of their well-being or without their full understanding or consent.
  • Serve a purpose The idiom "Serve a purpose" means to have a specific use or function, to fulfill a particular need, or to be meaningful or valuable in a given situation.
  • on a silver platter The idiom "on a silver platter" means to receive or obtain something easily or without effort, usually in a very convenient or advantageous manner. It implies that the thing desired is handed to someone like a valuable item served on a silver platter, signifying a luxurious or effortless acquisition.
  • set in a type face The phrase "set in a type face" typically refers to the act of choosing a particular font or style for a written text or document. It originates from the printing industry, where individual metal or wooden types were arranged and set in a specific font for creating printed material. In a broader sense, it can also be used to indicate a specific presentation or aesthetic style for any form of written or displayed content.
  • set in a place The idiom "set in a place" typically refers to placing or fixing something in a specific location or position. It implies the act of physically settling or situating an object or item in a particular place.
  • set a trap The idiom "set a trap" means to strategically prepare a situation or take actions in order to deceive or catch someone in a hidden and often harmful or problematic way, often to obtain information or achieve personal gain.
  • Set a thief to catch a thief The idiom "set a thief to catch a thief" means to use someone who possesses the same skills, abilities, or methods as a wrongdoer to counter or apprehend them.
  • set a precedent The idiom "set a precedent" refers to establishing a rule, action, or decision that serves as a standard or example for future similar cases or situations. It means to create a model or a precedent that others are likely to follow or be influenced by.
  • have a setto The idiom "have a set-to" means to have an argument, dispute, or altercation with someone. It implies engaging in a heated exchange where both parties express their opposing views or engage in a conflict.
  • at a set time The idiom "at a set time" refers to something that is arranged or scheduled to happen at a specific predetermined time.
  • There wasn't a dry eye in the house. The idiom "There wasn't a dry eye in the house" means that everyone present in a particular place or gathering was moved to tears or deeply emotionally affected by something. It suggests that an event or situation caused such a strong emotional response that no one could remain unaffected or hold back their tears.
  • be as dry as a bone The idiom "be as dry as a bone" means to be completely devoid of moisture or liquid. It is often used to describe something that is extremely dry, arid, or lacking any trace of humidity.
  • suffer a setback The idiom "suffer a setback" means to experience a temporary or unexpected obstacle, hindrance, or failure in progress, plans, or goals. It refers to facing an adversarial situation or encountering a disappointment that hampers one's forward momentum or success.
  • a nine/one/sevenday wonder The idiom "a nine/one/sevenday wonder" refers to something or someone that gains sudden but short-lived popularity or fame. It suggests that the subject of the idiom experiences a burst of attention, typically lasting for only a very brief period, akin to nine, one, or seven days. This idiom implies that the initial fascination or interest quickly fades away, and the subject is ultimately forgotten or disregarded.
  • Keep a thing seven years and you'll (always) find a use for it. The idiom "Keep a thing seven years and you'll (always) find a use for it" means that if you hold onto something for a significant period of time, it will eventually become useful or serve a purpose. It emphasizes the idea that even if an item may not have an immediate value or function, its usefulness may arise in the future.
  • a sevenday wonder The idiom "a sevenday wonder" refers to a person or thing that gains great attention, fame, or popularity for a short period of time, typically lasting only about a week. It conveys the idea that the initial excitement or interest fades quickly, and the person or thing is soon forgotten.
  • be one card/several cards short of a full deck The idiom "be one card/several cards short of a full deck" refers to someone who is not mentally or intellectually sound, implying that they lack common sense, reasoning ability, or are generally not mentally competent or stable. It suggests that something is missing or not functioning properly in their mind, likening it to a deck of cards missing one or several cards.
  • a sex object The idiom "a sex object" refers to a person, particularly a woman, who is perceived primarily as an object of sexual desire rather than as a whole and multidimensional individual. This phrase highlights the objectification and dehumanization of individuals, reducing them solely to their perceived sexual appeal or utility, disregarding their personality, emotions, and other qualities.
  • a sex kitten The idiom "a sex kitten" is a euphemistic phrase used to describe an attractive, flirtatious, and seductive woman. It typically conveys the idea of a woman who is playful, alluring, and has an air of sexual magnetism. However, it is important to note that this idiom can be considered derogatory or objectifying towards women, reducing them to sexual objects rather than recognizing their individuality or intelligence.
  • on a slippery slope The idiom "on a slippery slope" refers to a situation where initial actions or decisions, which may seem harmless or insignificant, gradually lead to increasingly negative or dangerous consequences. It implies that engaging in certain actions or making specific choices has started a sequence of events that will likely result in unfavorable outcomes.
  • a slippery slope The idiom "a slippery slope" refers to a situation or course of action that may seem harmless or insignificant at first, but if pursued, can lead to a series of negative consequences or results that are difficult to control or reverse. It suggests that once started on this path, it becomes increasingly difficult to stop or prevent the chain of events that follow.
  • beyond the shadow of a doubt The idiom "beyond the shadow of a doubt" means that there is absolutely no uncertainty or skepticism about something, as it is completely without doubt or question.
  • a shadow of your/its former self The idiom "a shadow of your/its former self" refers to someone or something that is much less capable, strong, or successful than they used to be. It implies a significant decline in quality, power, or importance from a previous state or position. It suggests that the person or thing has lost its former attributes or qualities, such as vitality, significance, or effectiveness.
  • beyond/without a shadow of a doubt The idiom "beyond/without a shadow of a doubt" means to have absolute certainty or to be completely convinced about something without any possibility of doubt or uncertainty. It denotes an unquestionable belief or conviction in the truth, accuracy, or validity of a statement or situation.
  • a shadow of your former self The idiom "a shadow of your former self" refers to someone who is noticeably changed or weakened compared to how they used to be physically, mentally, or emotionally. It implies that the person has lost strength, vitality, or confidence, and is now just a faint resemblance or representation of their former state.
  • without a shadow of a doubt The phrase "without a shadow of a doubt" means having complete certainty or no uncertainty at all. It implies that there is no room for doubt or hesitation in a particular situation or belief.
  • a shaggy dog story The idiom "a shaggy dog story" refers to a long, rambling, and often pointless or anticlimactic narrative that initially leads the listener to expect a humorous or exciting conclusion but ends abruptly with a mundane or unsatisfying punchline. It involves multiple detours, tangents, and excessive details, ultimately wasting the listener's time or attention.
  • two shakes of a lamb's tail The idiom "two shakes of a lamb's tail" means doing something very quickly or in a short amount of time. It implies that the task or action will be completed in a swift and efficient manner, comparable to the quick movements of a lamb's tail.
  • shake like a leaf The idiom "shake like a leaf" means to tremble or shiver intensely due to fear, anxiety, or nervousness.
  • shake a disease or illness off The idiom "shake a disease or illness off" means to recover or get rid of a sickness, usually by recovering one's health or by developing a stronger immune system to fight off the illness. It implies overcoming an ailment and returning to a healthy state.
  • more than one can shake a stick at The idiom "more than one can shake a stick at" means having an excessive number or quantity of something. It implies an abundance or a surplus beyond what is necessary or easily manageable.
  • more than can shake a stick at The idiom "more than can shake a stick at" means having an overwhelming or excessive quantity or number of something. It implies that there are too many of a particular thing to easily count, control, or manage. The phrase can also convey a sense of abundance or excess.
  • kick a habit The idiom "kick a habit" means to stop engaging in a routine or behavior that has become ingrained and difficult to give up, particularly when it is detrimental or unhealthy in some way.
  • a fair shake The definition of the idiom "a fair shake" means to give someone or something a fair and unbiased opportunity or chance, often implying that the treatment received should be just and equitable.
  • a needle in a haystack The idiom "a needle in a haystack" is used to describe something that is extremely difficult or nearly impossible to find or locate due to its similarity or insignificance compared to the surrounding things or information.
  • be like looking for a needle in a haystack The idiom "be like looking for a needle in a haystack" is used to describe a situation that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to find or accomplish due to the overwhelming amount of similar or irrelevant things surrounding it. It refers to the task or search being compared to finding a small object such as a needle in a large stack of hay, which would require extensive time, effort, and luck.
  • like looking for a needle in a haystack The idiom "like looking for a needle in a haystack" is used to describe a situation or task that is extremely difficult or impossible to accomplish due to the overwhelming amount of irrelevant or unimportant information or options. It signifies the challenges of finding something small or specific in a large and cluttered environment where it is hard to locate or distinguish the desired item.
  • What a pity! The idiom "What a pity!" is an expression used to convey a feeling of disappointment or regret about a situation or an outcome. It signifies that something unfortunate or undesirable has occurred and is typically used to express sympathy or empathy towards the situation.
  • trouble shared is a trouble halved The idiom "trouble shared is a trouble halved" means that when you talk about your worries or problems with someone, it can make them seem less overwhelming and easier to deal with. Sharing your troubles with others can provide support, advice, or perspective, which can alleviate the burden and reduce the negative impact of the trouble.
  • within a stone's throw Within a stone's throw is an idiom that means a short distance away or within close proximity. It implies that the distance is so short that one could throw a stone and reach the target easily.
  • while a period of time away The idiom "while a period of time away" refers to occupying or passing the time during a specific duration. It implies engaging in various activities or pursuits to make the duration feel shorter or more enjoyable.
  • Constant dropping wears away a stone The idiom "Constant dropping wears away a stone" means that consistent effort or persistent little actions can achieve significant results over time. It emphasizes the power of small, continuous efforts in achieving a goal or making an impact.
  • a mile away The idiom "a mile away" typically means that something is easily recognizable or noticeable, often suggesting that someone can detect or predict something from a long distance or with little effort. It can also indicate that someone is easily able to see through someone's intentions or behavior.
  • a home from home The idiom "a home from home" refers to a place or situation that provides the same level of comfort, familiarity, and ease as one's own home. It suggests a sense of feeling at ease, relaxed, and comfortable, as if one were in their own familiar surroundings.
  • a home away from home The idiom "a home away from home" refers to a place or environment, typically outside of one's own residence, where a person feels comfortable, relaxed, and at ease. It suggests a sense of familiarity, warmth, and belonging, similar to the feelings one normally associates with being at home. It is often used to describe a location or setting that provides a sense of security and comfort, as if it were a second home.
  • a heartbeat away from being The idiom "a heartbeat away from being" typically means being very close or almost in a particular position or role, often indicating that someone is next in line or very likely to assume that position. It suggests that only a small or immediate change is needed for someone to achieve a desired or significant role or status.
  • a close shave The idiom "a close shave" refers to a situation where someone narrowly avoids a dangerous or risky outcome. It is often used to describe a near-miss or a narrow escape from a potentially harmful or unpleasant situation.
  • have a close shave The idiom "have a close shave" means to have a narrow escape from a dangerous or risky situation. It implies that someone barely avoided a potentially harmful or disastrous outcome.
  • not shed a tear The idiom "not shed a tear" means to not display any sadness or emotion, particularly during a situation that would typically elicit such a response. It refers to someone who remains stoic or indifferent, without showing any tears or signs of grief or sadness.
  • I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb. The idiom "I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb" is an expression that suggests that if one is already facing severe consequences for a particular action or decision, they might as well go all the way and take even greater risks or make more significant choices. It implies that since the outcome will be unfavorable regardless, there is no further harm in pursuing bigger gains or risks. In other words, if someone is going to be punished for a lesser offense, they might as well commit a more serious one, as the consequences will be similar.
  • might as well be hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb The idiom "might as well be hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb" means that if you are going to be punished for a minor offense, you might as well commit a more serious offense since the consequences will be the same. In other words, if the punishment is going to be severe regardless of the action, it is better to take the risk and do something else with potentially greater rewards.
  • be as white as a sheet The idiom "be as white as a sheet" means to be extremely pale, usually due to fear, shock, illness, or a sudden loss of color in one's face. It implies a lack of blood circulation, resulting in a ghostly or ash-like complexion.
  • a rap sheet The idiom "a rap sheet" refers to a document, typically maintained by law enforcement agencies, that lists an individual's criminal record, including any previous arrests, charges, or convictions. It can be used metaphorically to describe someone's history of criminal activity or wrongdoing.
  • a clean sheet The idiom "a clean sheet" refers to starting afresh or having a fresh start, typically in terms of a new beginning or an opportunity to succeed without any negative past experiences or mistakes. It is often used in sports, particularly in soccer, when a goalkeeper successfully prevents the opposing team from scoring any goals in a match, resulting in a clean sheet for their team.
  • a shelf life The idiom "a shelf life" refers to the length of time that a product or idea remains useful, relevant, or valuable before becoming obsolete or no longer functional. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the duration of a person's career, popularity, or influence in a particular field.
  • a shell game The idiom "a shell game" is derived from the traditional street gambling game of the same name involving small shells or cups covering a small object, typically a pea or a ball. In the game, a trickster moves the shells around rapidly, making it difficult for the players to keep track of the object's location. As an idiom, "a shell game" refers to a deceptive or manipulative activity where someone tries to confuse others by constantly shifting their focus or attention. It often implies fraud, dishonesty, or a ploy to trick someone into making a wrong decision or falling for a scam.
  • in a nut shell The idiom "in a nut shell" means to summarize or express something concisely and succinctly. It implies that the information provided is the essential or most important aspects of a larger topic or idea, similar to fitting a whole nut into a small shell.
  • sleep like a log The idiom "sleep like a log" means to sleep very deeply and soundly, without any disruptions or disturbances. It suggests that someone is in a state of restful, uninterrupted sleep resembling the stillness of a log.
  • like taking candy from a baby The idiom "like taking candy from a baby" means that something is extremely easy or effortless. It suggests that a task can be accomplished without any challenge or resistance, similar to how effortlessly one can take a piece of candy from a baby who is unaware or unable to hold on to it.
  • sleep like a log/top The idiom "sleep like a log/top" means to sleep very deeply and soundly.
  • cry like a baby The idiom "cry like a baby" means to cry or weep excessively, loudly, or uncontrollably, often exhibiting the same intensity or volume as a baby's cry. It implies that the person is showing intense emotions or distress.
  • a crybaby The idiom "a crybaby" refers to a person, typically a child or someone sensitive, who easily and frequently cries or complains about trivial things. It implies that the person is excessively emotional or prone to feeling hurt or upset over minor issues.
  • a baby boomer The idiom "a baby boomer" refers to a person who was born during the period of increased birth rates that occurred following World War II, specifically between the years 1946 and 1964. This term is commonly used to describe individuals who belong to the generation born during this period.
  • son of a gun The idiom "son of a gun" is typically used as an expression of surprise or emphasis. It can refer to a person, usually male, who is mischievous, impudent, or difficult to deal with. It is generally used in a playful or lighthearted manner.
  • take a fancy to sb/sth The idiom "take a fancy to sb/sth" means to develop a sudden strong liking or attraction towards someone or something. It implies a strong interest or preference that arises quickly and without a specific reason. It can refer to finding someone or something appealing, desirable, or interesting.
  • take a fancy to sm or sth The idiom "take a fancy to someone or something" means to develop an immediate liking or interest towards someone or something. It implies a strong attraction or admiration that is often sudden and unexplained.
  • a sinking ship The idiom "a sinking ship" refers to a situation or organization that is experiencing significant problems or is on the verge of collapsing or failing. It implies that it is futile to continue or invest in such a situation as it is inevitably heading towards failure.
  • spoil the ship for a hap'orth of tar The idiom "spoil the ship for a hap'orth of tar" is a phrase that means to ruin or jeopardize something significant or valuable due to a small or insignificant oversight or omission. It refers to neglecting an essential detail that could have prevented a larger problem or failure. In a literal sense, a hap'orth refers to a halfpenny's worth of tar (a substance used to seal the hulls of wooden ships), while the ship symbolizes something of substantial importance. Thus, the idiom implies that neglecting even a minor aspect can have dire consequences.
  • desert a sinking ship The idiom "desert a sinking ship" means to abandon a failing or deteriorating situation or organization before it completely collapses or fails, typically in order to avoid negative consequences. It refers to prioritizing one's own well-being and separating oneself from a doomed or doomed-to-fail situation.
  • a stuffed shirt The idiom "a stuffed shirt" refers to a person who is overly formal, self-important, and lacks genuine personality or flexibility. It describes someone who appears pompous and full of themselves, often adhering strictly to social conventions or rules without displaying any authentic character.
  • a hair shirt The idiom "a hair shirt" refers to a form of self-imposed suffering or penance. It is derived from the practice of wearing a garment made of rough animal hair, known as a hair shirt, in order to demonstrate one's religious devotion or to atone for sins. In a figurative sense, the idiom represents the willingness to endure discomfort or hardship voluntarily, often for moral or spiritual reasons. It implies a tendency to engage in self-criticism or self-punishment.
  • pay sm a backhanded compliment To "pay someone a backhanded compliment" means to make a seemingly positive statement about someone but with hidden criticism or insult. It involves praising someone in a way that is actually sarcastic, insincere, or undermines their confidence.
  • a backroom boy The idiom "a backroom boy" refers to a person who works behind the scenes and plays a vital, albeit often unnoticed, role in achieving a goal or success. This individual typically operates in a supporting or advisory capacity, providing knowledge, skills, or expertise to support the main actors or decision-makers in a particular situation. The term "backroom" suggests a hidden or lesser-known location, indicating that this person's contributions may not receive public recognition, but are nonetheless essential to the overall outcome.
  • be a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "be a pain in the arse/backside" refers to someone or something that causes frustration, annoyance, or inconvenience. It suggests that the person or thing is difficult to deal with, often causing trouble or additional work.
  • a culture shock The idiom "a culture shock" refers to the feeling of confusion, disorientation, or anxiety that someone experiences when encountering a new and unfamiliar culture, customs, or way of life. It can include unexpected differences in behavior, language, food, social norms, or general lifestyle, often leading to a sense of bewilderment or being out of place.
  • For want of a nail the shoe was lost for want of a shoe the horse was lost and for want of a horse the man was lost. The idiom "For want of a nail the shoe was lost for want of a shoe the horse was lost and for want of a horse the man was lost" is an ancient proverb that highlights the significance of small details and the chain of consequences that can result from neglecting or overlooking them. It suggests that an apparently insignificant or trivial action or object, if overlooked or neglected, can lead to far greater and serious consequences down the line. It emphasizes the importance of paying attention to even the smallest details in order to avoid potential disasters or failures.
  • without a backward glance The idiom "without a backward glance" means to leave or depart from a place or situation without showing any hesitation, regret, or longing for what has been left behind. It implies a sense of decisiveness, moving forward without looking back.
  • on a shoestring The idiom "on a shoestring" is used to describe doing something with very little money or on a tight budget. It implies that you are being resourceful and making the most out of limited financial resources.
  • a shooin The idiom "a shoo-in" refers to a person or thing that is considered to be certain or highly likely to win or succeed in a particular situation. It describes a situation where there is very little doubt or uncertainty about the outcome.
  • shoot a place up The idiom "shoot a place up" typically means to commit an act of violence, particularly by firing a gun or causing damage in a specific location. It implies the intentional act of causing destruction or harm to the targeted place.
  • like shooting fish in a barrel The idiom "like shooting fish in a barrel" refers to a task or situation that is extremely easy or effortless. It implies that the task is as simple as shooting fish that are confined in a barrel, where they have no means of escape and are easily targeted.
  • give a dirty look The idiom "give a dirty look" refers to the act of glaring, scowling, or giving an angry and disapproving facial expression to someone, usually as a non-verbal way of expressing annoyance, disapproval, or hostility towards them.
  • a turkey shoot The idiom "a turkey shoot" refers to a situation or event that is extremely easy or one-sided, where the outcome is predictable and greatly favors one side or participant. It implies an unfair advantage or an effortless task, often resulting in a win or success for one party while the others stand no chance. The expression originated from the practice of hunting turkeys, where the birds are easily targeted and shot due to their lack of agility.
  • turn up like a bad penny The idiom "turn up like a bad penny" refers to someone or something that reappears unexpectedly or unwantedly, often bringing trouble or inconvenience. It implies that the person or thing is unwelcome and seems to resurface repeatedly, even when one hopes or expects them to be gone.
  • Moving three times is as bad as a fire The idiom "Moving three times is as bad as a fire" typically means that moving residences multiple times can be just as stressful, chaotic, and disruptive as experiencing a destructive fire. It emphasizes the difficulties, inconvenience, and upheaval associated with frequent relocations.
  • make the best of a bad situation The idiom "make the best of a bad situation" means to accept and adapt to an unfavorable or difficult circumstance with a positive mindset, attempting to find the most positive or advantageous aspects in order to cope or improve the situation as much as possible.
  • make the best of a bad job The idiom "make the best of a bad job" means to try to find or create something positive or advantageous despite being in a difficult, unsatisfactory, or unfavorable situation. It implies making the most out of a less-than-ideal circumstance by finding ways to improve it, finding silver linings, or making the situation tolerable.
  • leave a bad taste in mouth The idiom "leave a bad taste in the mouth" refers to a negative or unpleasant feeling or impression that someone or something has left behind. It is often used to describe a negative experience, disappointment, or a lingering sense of dissatisfaction after encountering an unpleasant situation, person, or event.
  • in a bad way The idiom "in a bad way" refers to someone or something being in a poor or difficult condition, usually referring to physical or mental health, emotional state, or overall well-being. It suggests that the person or thing is struggling, distressed, or experiencing difficulties that may require assistance or intervention.
  • in a bad mood The idiom "in a bad mood" means to be in a negative or irritable emotional state, often resulting in exhibiting unhappy or grumpy behavior. It implies a temporary and unpleasant disposition that may be caused by various factors such as stress, fatigue, or personal issues.
  • Hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper The idiom "Hope is a good breakfast but a bad supper" means that having hope and optimism at the beginning of something, such as a new day or a new endeavor, can be motivating and inspiring. However, relying solely on hope without taking action or planning can lead to disappointment or failure in the long run.
  • have a bad hair day The idiom "have a bad hair day" refers to feeling or appearing not one's best, often due to a series of minor mishaps, annoyances, or unfortunate circumstances throughout the day. It symbolizes a day when everything seems to go wrong or when a person is in a negative mood.
  • have a bad effect The idiom "have a bad effect" means to cause negative consequences, outcomes, or repercussions. It refers to a situation or an action that produces unfavorable or harmful results.
  • have a bad case of the simples The idiom "have a bad case of the simples" refers to a state of being overly simplistic or lacking in intelligence, understanding, or sophistication. It implies that someone is lacking in complexity, depth, or critical thinking skills.
  • give up as a bad job The idiom "give up as a bad job" means to abandon or stop pursuing a task or endeavor because it is not going well, not worth the effort, or unlikely to succeed. It implies a sense of frustration, resignation, or realization that further attempts would be futile.
  • give a bad name The idiom "give a bad name" means to tarnish or damage someone's or something's reputation. It implies that due to a person's or thing's actions or behavior, the perception or reputation associated with them becomes negative or unfavorable.
  • come to a bad end The idiom "come to a bad end" refers to the outcome or fate of someone, often a fictional character, meeting an unfortunate or disastrous conclusion, typically due to their own actions or choices. It suggests that their story concludes in a negative or tragic manner.
  • catch at a bad time To catch someone at a bad time means to approach or contact them at a moment when they are not in a good position to give you their attention or help. It implies that the person is busy, preoccupied, or facing difficulties and may not be able to accommodate your request or give you their full attention.
  • be the best of a bad bunch The idiom "be the best of a bad bunch" means to be the least bad or the most suitable option among a group of undesirable or inadequate choices. It suggests that although none of the options are ideal, one choice stands out as comparatively better or more acceptable than the rest.
  • a bad egg The idiom "a bad egg" refers to a person who is considered dishonest, unreliable, or untrustworthy. It is used to describe someone who displays negative behavior or has a tendency to cause trouble or harm.
  • a bad apple The idiom "a bad apple" refers to a person who is disruptive, deceitful, or corrupt within a group or organization. It implies that a single individual's negative behavior or attitude can have a detrimental impact on the overall dynamics or reputation of a collective group.
  • a straight shooter A straight shooter is an idiom used to describe someone who is honest, upfront, and direct in their communication and actions. It refers to an individual who speaks and behaves openly without any deceit or ulterior motives, often giving their opinions and feedback with clarity and sincerity. A straight shooter is known for being trustworthy and transparent in their dealings, making them reliable and dependable.
  • be like a bull in a china shop The idiom "be like a bull in a china shop" refers to someone who is clumsy, loud, or destructive in their movements or actions, often causing damage or chaos in a delicate or controlled environment. It implies a lack of grace, finesse, or awareness in one's behavior.
  • a knocking shop The idiom "a knocking shop" is a slang term that refers to a brothel or a place where prostitution takes place. It conveys the notion of a location where sexual services are offered in exchange for payment.
  • be a bundle of nerves The idiom "be a bundle of nerves" means to be extremely nervous, anxious, or agitated. It is used to describe someone who is feeling a high level of stress or tension in a particular situation.
  • a mixed bag The idiom "a mixed bag" is used to describe a group or collection of things or people with a wide range of qualities, aspects, or characteristics. It implies that the items or individuals within the group are diverse in nature, with some being good, some bad, and some mediocre.
  • a grab bag The idiom "a grab bag" refers to a collection or assortment of various items or options without a specific pattern or order. It implies that the items are of different types or qualities and are chosen randomly or without much consideration. It can be used to describe a situation or a group of things that lack coherence, consistency, or a common theme.
  • a bag of bones The idiom "a bag of bones" typically refers to someone who is very thin, gaunt, or frail. It is often used to describe a person who appears extremely skinny or emaciated.
  • a bag lady The idiom "a bag lady" refers to a homeless woman, typically with limited belongings, who carries her personal belongings in bags or sacks. It can also sometimes imply a disheveled appearance or the act of hoarding various items.
  • to make a long story short The idiom "to make a long story short" means to summarize or cut a narrative short, typically when the story has become too lengthy or unnecessarily detailed. It is used to give a brief overview or concise version of a story or situation without delving into all the specific details.
  • to cut a long story short The idiom "to cut a long story short" means to summarize or give a brief version of a story or explanation, typically to save time or make a point more efficiently.
  • thick as a short plank The idiom "thick as a short plank" is used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or lacks common sense. It suggests that the person is as dense or unintelligent as a plank of wood that is shorter than usual, implying a lack of mental sharpness or wit.
  • Take a long walk off a short pier The idiom "Take a long walk off a short pier" is an expression used to suggest that someone is not wanted or is unwelcome, and that they should leave or remove themselves from a situation. It implies that the person should metaphorically walk off a short pier into the water, implying their removal or departure. It can also be used to sarcastically or humorously dismiss someone's idea or suggestion.
  • stop short of a place The idiom "stop short of a place" refers to stopping or ending an action or activity just before reaching the desired or expected outcome or goal.
  • make a long story short The idiom "make a long story short" means to summarize or give a concise version of a lengthy or detailed story or explanation.
  • keep on a tight leash The idiom "keep on a tight leash" means to closely monitor, control, or supervise someone or something, typically in a strict or restrictive manner. It implies having a strong hold over someone's actions or behavior, exerting authority, and ensuring they stay well-regulated or disciplined.
  • have on a short leash The idiom "have on a short leash" means to have strict control or tight supervision over someone or something, typically to limit their freedom of action or choices. It implies keeping someone or something under close scrutiny and not allowing much independence or autonomy.
  • few bricks short of a load The idiom "few bricks short of a load" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived to be mentally or intellectually deficient or lacking common sense. It implies that the person is missing some essential components needed for full functionality, just as a load of bricks would be incomplete without a few.
  • day late and a dollar short The idiom "day late and a dollar short" is used to describe someone who is always late or unprepared, often missing out on an opportunity or failing to meet expectations due to procrastination or lack of foresight. It means being behind or inadequate in both timing and resources to achieve the desired outcome.
  • be short of a bob or two The idiom "be short of a bob or two" refers to someone who is lacking intelligence or common sense. It suggests that the person is not mentally sharp or may be a bit foolish. The term "bob" was a slang term for a British shilling, so being "short of a bob or two" metaphorically implies a deficiency in logical reasoning or intellect.
  • be one card cards short of a full deck The idiom "be one card short of a full deck" is used to describe someone who is considered mentally or intellectually deficient or lacking sound judgment. It suggests that the person is missing something vital (one card) from a complete set of cards, similar to how a full deck of cards is necessary for most card games.
  • a shortarse The idiom "a shortarse" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is significantly shorter in height than average or shorter than expected. It generally carries a negative or derogatory connotation, implying that the person's short stature is a source of ridicule or inferiority. However, it is important to note that this term could be considered offensive, as it targets a person based on their physical appearance.
  • a short fuse The idiom "a short fuse" refers to a person who tends to get angry or lose their temper quickly and easily, often without much provocation. They have a low tolerance for frustration or annoyance and can become explosively angry in a short amount of time.
  • a few fries short of a Happy Meal The idiom "a few fries short of a Happy Meal" is a humorous way of describing someone who is not very intelligent or mentally lacking. It suggests that the person is missing a few key components or lacks the full package, just like a Happy Meal (a meal for children that usually includes a burger, fries, and a toy) that is missing some fries.
  • a day late and a dollar short The idiom "a day late and a dollar short" refers to someone or something that is too late or too little to be of any use or to have any impact, usually in regards to solving a problem or meeting a goal. It implies that the person or thing missed the opportunity to make a difference or provide a timely solution.
  • a baker's dozen A "baker's dozen" is an idiomatic phrase that means thirteen instead of the usual dozen, which is twelve. It originated from the practice of bakers in medieval England adding an extra loaf of bread to ensure they were not accused of shortchanging customers.
  • take a shot at The idiom "take a shot at" means to attempt or try something, often to engage in an activity or take a chance at achieving success. It can also refer to making an attempt to hit a target or accomplish a specific goal.
  • take a pot shot The idiom "take a pot shot" is defined as making a random or reckless attempt or attack, often without much thought or planning. It originates from the term "potshot" which refers to a crude or aimless shot taken at a target. figuratively, "take a pot shot" means to take a hasty or careless action without much consideration for its potential consequences.
  • off like a shot The idiom "off like a shot" means to quickly or rapidly leave a location or start a task or activity. It implies moving or acting with great speed or urgency.
  • not by a long shot The idiom "not by a long shot" means that something is not even close or nowhere near achieving a desired outcome or result. It implies a significant difference or distance from the expected or desired outcome.
  • have a shot at The idiom "have a shot at" means to attempt or try one's luck at something, usually implying a challenge or opportunity. It suggests taking a chance or making an effort to achieve a specific goal or desired outcome.
  • give it a shot The idiom "give it a shot" means to try or make an attempt at something, especially when the outcome is uncertain or chances of success are low.
  • give a try The idiom "give a try" means to attempt something, often for the first time, in order to see if it is possible or successful. It implies taking a chance or making an effort to achieve a desired outcome.
  • give a shot The idiom "give a shot" means to attempt or try something, usually referring to giving it one's best effort. It implies giving something a chance or opportunity, often in the face of uncertainty or difficulty.
  • a parting shot The idiom "a parting shot" refers to a final remark, often critical or cutting, made before leaving or concluding an interaction, usually intended to have a lasting impact or deliver one last blow.
  • a long shot The idiom "a long shot" typically refers to something that is unlikely to happen or succeed. It is often used to describe a possibility or outcome that has a very low probability of occurring.
  • a big shot The idiom "a big shot" is commonly used to describe someone who is influential, powerful, or successful. It refers to a person who holds a high position of authority, possesses great importance, or has achieved great prominence in a specific field or industry. This phrase typically implies that the person being referred to holds a significant amount of influence or control over others.
  • He who sups with the devil should have a long spoon. The idiom "He who sups with the devil should have a long spoon" essentially means that if someone associates or has dealings with a dangerous or immoral person or group, they should take precautions and be extremely cautious. It suggests that engaging with negative influences can have harmful consequences, so it's important to protect oneself from the potential harm.
  • have a good head on shoulders The idiom "have a good head on your shoulders" means to be intelligent, level-headed, and wise in making decisions or solving problems. It refers to someone who is rational and possesses good judgment.
  • have a chip on shoulder The idiomatic expression "have a chip on one's shoulder" means to harbor a grudge or a feeling of resentment, usually due to a perceived unfair treatment or past grievances. It refers to someone who is easily provoked, always ready for an argument or confrontation, and constantly looking for opportunities to express their anger or discontent. Such individuals may feel a sense of victimization, which often leads to an aggressive or confrontational attitude.
  • be a weight off shoulders The idiom "be a weight off shoulders" means to relieve one of a burden or worry, making them feel lighter and more at ease.
  • a chip on shoulder The idiom "a chip on the shoulder" is used to describe someone who holds a grudge or feels a sense of resentment or inferiority, often due to a perceived wrong or injustice done to them in the past. It refers to someone who is easily provoked or always ready to take offense. The chip refers to the imagined weight carried on one's shoulder, symbolizing a readiness to engage in conflict or argument.
  • a balancing/juggling act The idiom "a balancing/juggling act" refers to a situation in which someone must carefully manage and maintain equilibrium between multiple demands, responsibilities, or priorities. It implies that the person must skillfully and continuously keep various aspects in proportion and functioning harmoniously, similar to a juggler or tightrope walker.
  • strike a balance (between two things) The idiom "strike a balance (between two things)" means to find a middle ground or an equilibrium between two opposing ideas, actions, or perspectives. It refers to the act of creating harmony or compromise, rather than favoring one extreme over the other. This idiom is often used when there are conflicting interests or demands that need to be reconciled.
  • a shouting match A "shouting match" refers to a heated argument or dispute where individuals engage in loud and aggressive verbal exchanges. It involves raising voices and exchanging hostile or angry words, often with intense emotions on both sides.
  • show to a seat The idiom "show to a seat" generally means to guide or direct someone to their assigned place or seat, typically in a formal setting such as a theater, conference, or event. It implies the act of providing assistance and ensuring that the person reaches their designated seating area.
  • Show a leg! The idiom "Show a leg!" is a phrase often used in a military or naval context to rouse or wake up soldiers or sailors. It can be interpreted as a command to get out of bed or start the day. It originated from the practice of military drill sergeants or officers commanding their subordinates to show one leg from under their blankets as a means of getting them up and ready for duty.
  • show a clean pair of heels The idiom "show a clean pair of heels" means to run away or escape swiftly from someone or something, usually with a sense of outmaneuvering or eluding them. It can also imply leaving one's opponent far behind in a competition or race.
  • make a great show of The idiom "make a great show of" means to purposely and noticeably display or demonstrate something, often in an exaggerated or ostentatious manner, with the intention of garnering attention, impressing others, or emphasizing a particular aspect.
  • by a show of hands The idiom "by a show of hands" refers to a method of determining something, usually through a vote or a collective decision, where people physically raise their hands to express their opinion or support for a particular option or proposition.
  • a showstopper The idiom "a showstopper" refers to something or someone that is exceptionally impressive or captivating, often to the extent of halting or overshadowing a performance or event. It typically describes an element, such as a performance, song, act, or appearance, that garners the most attention or applause, leaving a lasting impact on the audience. Additionally, it can be used metaphorically to describe a striking or remarkable object, idea, or person that captures immediate attention and admiration.
  • a noshow The idiom "a no-show" refers to a person who fails to appear or attend a scheduled event, appointment, or commitment without giving any prior notice or explanation. It can also be used to describe something that was expected or planned but did not materialize or arrive.
  • a dog and pony show The idiom "a dog and pony show" refers to an elaborate or ostentatious presentation, often characterized by exaggerated performances or empty spectacle. It describes a situation in which someone or something is being showcased or presented with great showmanship, often to impress or entertain, but lacking substantial substance or meaningful content.
  • be as bald as a coot The idiom "be as bald as a coot" means to be completely, or almost completely, bald. It is often used to describe someone who has little to no hair on their head.
  • take a cold shower The idiom "take a cold shower" typically means to engage in a deliberate action or tactic to calm down, regain composure, or control one's desires or emotions, especially when experiencing excessive excitement, arousal, anger, or anticipation. It suggests taking a step back, reflecting, or finding a way to cool off in order to think more rationally or avoid impulsive actions.
  • take a shower The idiom "take a shower" means to cleanse oneself by standing under a spray of water in order to wash the body.
  • a whole new ball game The idiom "a whole new ball game" means that a situation has changed dramatically or drastically, often implying that previous assumptions or strategies are no longer valid or applicable.
  • a slime ball The idiom "a slime ball" refers to a person who is deceitful, dishonest, and manipulative. It portrays someone who lacks moral principles and acts in a slimy or unpleasant manner to achieve their goals.
  • a different ball of wax The idiom "a different ball of wax" refers to a completely different matter or situation from what was previously mentioned or discussed. It means something distinct or unrelated, often used when comparing two or more things that are not comparable or have different characteristics.
  • a ballsup The idiom "a ballsup" is a colloquial expression that refers to a situation or task that has been mishandled or messed up, resulting in confusion, disorder, or a failure to achieve the desired outcome. It typically denotes a situation in which things have gone wrong or become disorganized.
  • a ballbreaker The idiom "a ballbreaker" refers to a person, typically a woman, who is perceived to be extremely demanding, strict, or difficult to work with. It can also imply someone who is relentless, determined, and exerts a lot of effort to achieve a goal, often at the expense of others.
  • a ball and chain The idiom "a ball and chain" refers to a burden or responsibility that limits one's freedom or hinders their enjoyment of life. It often implies a heavy and restrictive commitment, typically used in the context of a relationship or marriage.
  • a shrinking violet The idiom "a shrinking violet" refers to a person who is extremely timid, shy, or introverted. It suggests someone who tends to withdraw from social interactions, often avoiding attention or confrontation. It is typically used to describe individuals who are excessively modest or lacking in self-confidence.
  • go over like a lead balloon The idiom "go over like a lead balloon" means that something, such as a joke, idea, or suggestion, is poorly received or completely unsuccessful. It implies that the response or reaction is extremely negative or unenthusiastic, similar to a heavy lead balloon that falls quickly and fails to float.
  • a ballpark estimate/figure A ballpark estimate/figure refers to an approximate or rough calculation or guess, often used when trying to provide an estimate without having all the necessary details or precise information. It indicates a general idea or a broad range rather than an exact or specific number. The term originates from the estimation of the size of a crowd in a ballpark, where the actual number is difficult to determine precisely.
  • have a shufti The idiom "have a shufti" is a British slang phrase that means to take a look or have a glance at something. It is often used when someone wants to examine or inspect something quickly or casually. It can also imply a sense of curiosity or interest in seeing what someone is doing or observing something.
  • a banana skin The idiom "a banana skin" refers to a situation or object that is seemingly harmless or simple but holds the potential to cause embarrassment, difficulties, or failure. It suggests that something seemingly insignificant can lead to unexpected and unfortunate consequences.
  • three bricks shy of a load The idiom "three bricks shy of a load" is used to describe someone who is considered unintelligent or mentally deficient. It implies that the person is lacking in understanding or awareness, as if they are missing a few necessary components to complete a task or comprehend a situation fully.
  • one brick shy of a load The idiom "one brick shy of a load" is used to describe someone who is lacking intelligence, common sense, or mental capacity. It implies that the person is incomplete or missing something essential, similar to a load of bricks missing one.
  • a oneman band The idiom "a one-man band" refers to a person who independently takes on multiple roles or responsibilities in a particular situation or activity. It implies that the individual is performing tasks that would normally require a group of people or specialized expertise.
  • make out like a bandit The idiom "make out like a bandit" means to achieve or experience great success or benefit, often by gaining more than expected or by getting an unfair advantage. It is commonly used to describe someone who makes a significant profit or advantage in a particular situation.
  • as sick as a dog The idiom "as sick as a dog" means to be extremely ill or unwell, often characterized by symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, or intense body aches. It implies a state of severe sickness or illness, comparable to how dogs are commonly associated with being unwell when they are sick.
  • be as sick as a parrot The idiom "be as sick as a parrot" means to feel extremely disappointed, upset, or devastated about something.
  • be as sick as a dog The idiom "be as sick as a dog" means to be extremely ill, often characterized by vomiting, weakness, and overall discomfort. It denotes a state of severe illness or sickness.
  • I was up all night with a sick friend. The idiom "I was up all night with a sick friend" means that the person spent the whole night taking care of or attending to a friend who was unwell. It implies that the individual sacrificed their sleep or personal time to provide assistance and support for their sick friend.
  • with a bang but with a whimper The idiom "with a bang but with a whimper" is derived from a line in T.S. Eliot's poem "The Hollow Men." It refers to a dramatic or grand finale followed by a quiet or underwhelming conclusion. It suggests that an event or situation initially starts with excitement, intensity, or promise, but ultimately ends in disappointment, anticlimax, or insignificance.
  • start with a bang The idiom "start with a bang" means to begin something, such as a project or an event, in an impressive, exciting, or successful manner that captures immediate attention and generates a strong impact or positive response. It implies a dynamic and attention-grabbing beginning.
  • go over with a bang The idiom "go over with a bang" means to end or conclude something in a spectacular or impressive manner. It suggests that the event or activity had a memorable and impactful ending that leaves a lasting impression on those who experienced it.
  • get a charge out of The idiom "get a charge out of" means to derive excitement, pleasure, or amusement from something. It implies finding something highly enjoyable or thrilling.
  • be banging head against a brick wall The idiom "be banging head against a brick wall" means to be persistently trying to achieve something or resolve a problem, but without making any progress or success. It implies a frustration or feeling of futility in one's efforts.
  • a bang up job The idiom "a bang-up job" is commonly used to describe a completed task or undertaking that has been exceptionally well done or executed. It suggests that the job has been performed with great skill, thoroughness, or success, often exceeding expectations.
  • hit the side of a barn The idiom "hit the side of a barn" means to have exceptionally poor aim or accuracy when trying to hit a target. It is often used to humorously describe someone's inability to hit even the largest or easiest target.
  • can't hit the side of a barn The idiom "can't hit the side of a barn" typically refers to someone's poor aim or lack of accuracy. It is used to describe a person's inability to hit or target something even when it is easily within reach.
  • be a thorn in flesh The idiom "be a thorn in flesh" refers to a person or thing that is a constant source of annoyance, irritation, or trouble for someone. It is often used to describe someone who persistently causes discomfort or difficulty for another person.
  • a thorn in side The idiom "a thorn in one's side" refers to a person, situation, or problem that causes persistent annoyance, frustration, or difficulty for someone. It implies an ongoing source of discomfort or constant irritation.
  • emptier than a banker's heart The idiom "emptier than a banker's heart" is a figurative expression used to describe something or someone that is extremely lacking in emotions, compassion, or empathy. It implies that a banker's heart, often associated with the stereotype of being cold and focused solely on financial gains, is completely void of any warmth or understanding.
  • a siege mentality The idiom "a siege mentality" refers to a mindset or attitude characterized by a feeling of being under constant attack or threat, and the subsequent response of adopting a defensive and combative stance. It often involves perceiving others, especially external forces or opponents, as enemies or obstacles, and adopting an us-versus-them mentality. This idiom is derived from the historical concept of a siege, where a fortified location is surrounded by enemies, creating a sense of isolation, vulnerability, and the need to take defensive measures. In a broader context, "a siege mentality" can describe situations where individuals, organizations, or groups feel besieged and respond with a defensive or aggressive approach.
  • a baptism by/of fire The idiom "a baptism by/of fire" typically refers to a challenging or difficult initiation or introduction to a new experience or situation. It implies a trial or test that one must undergo, often unexpectedly, which can be intense and demanding. The phrase originates from the literal religious rite of baptism by fire, representing a purification or transformation through a difficult ordeal.
  • Stuff a sock in it! The idiom "Stuff a sock in it!" is an informal and somewhat rude way of telling someone to be quiet or stop talking. It implies the need for the person to literally put a sock in their mouth to prevent them from speaking.
  • have a memory/mind like a sieve The idiom "have a memory/mind like a sieve" refers to a person who has a poor or unreliable memory. It suggests that information or experiences easily slip out of their mind, similar to how objects easily pass through the holes of a sieve.
  • not a pretty sight The idiom "not a pretty sight" is used to describe something or someone that is visually unpleasant, unattractive, or disturbing to witness. It signifies that the person, object, or situation being referred to is not pleasing or aesthetically pleasing to look at.
  • be a sight for sore eyes The idiom "be a sight for sore eyes" means to be a pleasant or welcome sight to see, especially after a long and tiring separation. It often refers to the joy and relief felt upon encountering someone or something that is dearly missed or brings comfort.
  • be a pretty sight The idiom "be a pretty sight" is used to describe something or someone that is visually appealing, pleasing, or impressive to see. It suggests that the subject is attractive or admirable in appearance, actions, or circumstances.
  • a sign of the times The idiom "a sign of the times" refers to a specific event, situation, or cultural shift that symbolizes or represents the prevailing characteristics or values of a particular era or period. It signifies that the mentioned element or occurrence is indicative of the current social, political, or cultural climate and is reflective of the prevailing attitudes, trends, or issues at that moment in time.
  • be a sign of the times The idiom "be a sign of the times" means that something is indicative of the current prevailing attitudes, trends, or circumstances of a particular era or period. It suggests that the mentioned thing or event is a reflection or representation of the prevalent societal, cultural, or political climate at that specific moment in history.
  • take on a new significance The idiom "take on a new significance" refers to the situation when something acquires or assumes a different or deeper meaning or importance, often due to a change in the context, perception, or understanding of it.
  • a significant other The idiom "a significant other" refers to a person who is romantically involved with another person and holds great importance, value, or significance in their life. It commonly refers to a partner, spouse, or someone with whom one shares a committed and intimate relationship.
  • a bargaining chip The idiom "a bargaining chip" refers to something that can be used as a means of negotiation or compromise in a situation, typically to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome. It represents an asset or resource that can be traded or offered in order to influence or persuade others during discussions or negotiations.
  • strike a bargain The idiom "strike a bargain" means to negotiate and come to an agreement or make a deal with someone, typically involving the exchange of goods, services, or terms that both parties find acceptable. It signifies reaching an agreement through mutual concessions and compromise.
  • It takes two to make a bargain. The idiom "It takes two to make a bargain" means that both parties involved in a negotiation or agreement are necessary for it to be successfully and mutually beneficial. It emphasizes that cooperation and collaboration are essential for reaching a satisfactory outcome in any deal or arrangement.
  • I wouldn't touch sb/sth with a barge pole. The idiom "I wouldn't touch sb/sth with a barge pole" is used to express extreme aversion or unwillingness to have any association or involvement with a person or thing. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is considered undesirable, dangerous, or simply not worth the effort. It can also convey a sense of wanting to maintain a significant distance from the subject, indicating a strong negative attitude or perception.
  • Were you born in a barn? The idiom "Were you born in a barn?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise or frustration at someone's lack of manners or awareness of their surroundings. It implies that the person being addressed has behaved or left a door open in a manner usually associated with someone who was raised in a barn, which is typically seen as a place devoid of proper etiquette or social graces.
  • raised in a barn The idiom "raised in a barn" is often used to express that someone has a lack of manners or social graces. It suggests that the person in question is behaving in a rude or uncivilized manner, as if they were not properly taught or raised with basic courtesy and etiquette, as one might expect from someone who grew up in a barn instead of a more refined or formal environment.
  • hit the (broad) side of a barn The idiom "hit the (broad) side of a barn" refers to an inability to hit or target something accurately, suggesting extremely poor aim or coordination. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone's lack of precision or skill in accomplishing a task or achieving a goal.
  • can't hit the (broad) side of a barn The idiom "can't hit the (broad) side of a barn" is used to describe someone who has very poor aim or is unable to hit a target, regardless of its size or proximity. It implies a complete lack of skill or accuracy in shooting or any other action requiring precision.
  • be born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "be born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to being born into a wealthy or privileged family, where one enjoys advantages and opportunities that others do not have access to. It implies that from birth, an individual has inherited wealth and a life of comfort and luxury.
  • born with a silver spoon in one's mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in one's mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family, often characterized by inheriting or having access to great wealth and advantages from birth. It implies that the person has had a luxurious and comfortable upbringing, with many opportunities and resources readily available to them.
  • over a barrel The idiom "over a barrel" typically means to be in a difficult or disadvantageous position, often due to having little or no control over a situation. It implies a sense of helplessness or vulnerability, as if one is at the mercy of others or circumstances beyond their control.
  • be more fun than a barrel of monkeys The idiom "be more fun than a barrel of monkeys" means that something or someone is extremely entertaining, joyful, or amusing. It suggests that the experience or person being referred to brings boundless fun, excitement, and laughter in abundance, similar to the lively nature of a barrel filled with playful monkeys frolicking together.
  • not be a barrel of laughs The idiom "not be a barrel of laughs" means that someone or something is not entertaining, amusing, or enjoyable. It implies that a person or situation lacks humor, light-heartedness, or fun, often suggesting a dull or uninteresting experience.
  • more fun than a barrel of monkeys The idiom "more fun than a barrel of monkeys" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely enjoyable, entertaining, or amusing. It implies that the experience or person is so full of fun and excitement that it exceeds the level of enjoyment one would expect from a literal barrel filled with monkeys.
  • steal a base The idiom "steal a base" refers to a baseball term where a baserunner attempts to advance to the next base without the ball being hit. In a broader sense, the idiom can also be used to describe someone achieving an advantage or gaining something without permission, often through cunning or stealth.
  • win by a nose The idiom "win by a nose" is commonly used in horse racing or any competitive situation to describe a very narrow victory. It means to win by a small margin or just by a very short distance, similar to a horse winning a race by only a fraction of its nose.
  • have nose in a book The idiom "have one's nose in a book" refers to someone who is deeply engrossed in reading or utterly absorbed in a book, often implying that the person is focused on reading to the exclusion of their surroundings or other activities. It highlights a person's intense interest in reading and their tendency to be absorbed in their literary world.
  • have a nose for The idiom "have a nose for" is used to describe someone's ability to instinctively detect or recognize something, often referring to their knack for finding or identifying something. It suggests that the person possesses a keen sense or intuition about a particular matter or situation.
  • have a nose The idiom "have a nose" typically means to have a keen sense of smell or the ability to detect and recognize scents easily. It can also refer to being good at finding or recognizing something, similar to having an intuition or a knack for it.
  • give a bloody nose The idiom "give a bloody nose" means to physically harm or attack someone, typically resulting in the person receiving a nosebleed. It can also be used metaphorically to describe defeating or overthrowing someone or something in a confrontation or conflict.
  • a nose for The idiom "a nose for" refers to someone having a natural ability or intuition for something, particularly when it comes to perceiving or detecting something not easily noticeable or understanding something accurately. It implies having a keen sense or instinct in a particular area or skill.
  • have a bash The idiom "have a bash" means to try or attempt something, usually in an enthusiastic or energetic manner, without worrying too much about the outcome. It implies a willingness to give it a go and see what happens, regardless of the possibility of success or failure.
  • a sine qua non The idiom "a sine qua non" refers to something that is absolutely essential or indispensable, without which something else would not be possible or complete. It signifies a crucial condition or requirement that cannot be overlooked or omitted.
  • a basket case The idiom "a basket case" typically refers to a person or thing that is in a completely hopeless or dysfunctional condition. It implies that the individual or object is incapable of functioning properly and is usually associated with being overwhelmed, mentally or physically unstable, or unable to cope with a specific situation. The expression "a basket case" is commonly used to describe someone or something that is severely damaged or deteriorated and is beyond repair or normal functioning.
  • couldn't hit a bull in the ass with a bass fiddle The idiom "couldn't hit a bull in the ass with a bass fiddle" is an exaggerated way of saying that someone has very poor aim or lacks basic coordination. It suggests that the person is so inept that they couldn't even hit a large target like a bull, using an instrument as big as a bass fiddle, which is difficult to miss. It emphasizes someone's inability or incompetence in a humorous or sarcastic manner.
  • sink like a stone The idiom "sink like a stone" means to descend or plummet rapidly or with little chance of recovery. It often refers to a situation or an object that quickly loses value, popularity, or success.
  • a sinking feeling The idiom "a sinking feeling" refers to a feeling of dread, apprehension, or disappointment that arises suddenly and overwhelms a person, often accompanied by a sensation in the stomach comparable to descending or sinking.
  • like a bat out of hell The idiom "like a bat out of hell" refers to acting or moving very quickly, often in a reckless or frenzied manner. It implies great speed and urgency, typically indicating a sense of intense and sudden departure or activity.
  • play a straight bat The idiom "play a straight bat" originates from the sport of cricket and refers to an approach or behavior characterized by honesty, fairness, and adherence to the rules. In cricket, playing a straight bat means hitting the ball with the middle part of the bat, which is considered to be the correct and proper technique. Consequently, the idiom has evolved to imply conducting oneself ethically and with integrity, without resorting to deceit, dishonesty, or bending the rules. It can be used in various contexts to encourage individuals to act honestly and straightforwardly.
  • be as blind as a bat The idiom "be as blind as a bat" means to have extremely poor vision or to be visually impaired. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone who cannot see or understand something clearly.
  • take a (financial) bath The idiom "take a (financial) bath" means incurring a significant financial loss or experiencing a substantial decline in one's financial investments or ventures. It suggests that someone has suffered a major setback or a substantial decrease in their financial well-being.
  • take a bath The idiom "take a bath" can have different meanings depending on the context, but generally, it means to suffer a financial loss or experience a failure, often in a business or investment. It can also refer to experiencing a significant defeat or failure in a competition or endeavor.
  • take a bath (on sth) When someone "takes a bath (on something)", it means that they have experienced a significant financial loss or have suffered a financial setback. It can refer to losing a large amount of money in a business venture, investment, or gamble. This idiom is often used to describe situations where someone has suffered a substantial financial defeat.
  • be batting a thousand The idiom "be batting a thousand" means to be extremely successful or having a perfect record in a particular endeavor or situation. It originates from baseball, where a player who is batting a thousand has successfully hit the ball in every at-bat and achieved a perfect batting average. In general usage, it implies consistent and flawless performance.
  • a pitched battle The idiom "a pitched battle" refers to a fierce and intense confrontation between opposing forces or individuals, often characterized by strong resistance, determined fighting, and a high level of aggression. It implies a hard-fought and decisive conflict where both sides are fully engaged and committed to achieving victory.
  • a battle/war of nerves A battle/war of nerves refers to a situation or conflict characterized by intense psychological pressure, tension, and stress. It implies a psychological struggle or contest where opposing parties try to break the mental resilience and endurance of each other to gain an advantage. It typically involves strategies aimed at causing fear, anxiety, or mental exhaustion in order to weaken the opponent's resolve or decision-making ability.
  • a battle of wits The idiom "a battle of wits" refers to a situation or competition in which two intelligent or cunning individuals confront each other in a contest of mental ability or cleverness, typically through verbal exchange or strategic reasoning. It emphasizes the intellectual challenge and the effort to outsmart or outwit the opponent.
  • a battle of wills The idiom "a battle of wills" refers to a conflict or confrontation where two or more individuals are stubbornly asserting their own beliefs, desires, or decisions, often leading to a struggle or competition to determine whose willpower or determination will prevail in the situation. It implies a clash between strong personalities who are unwilling to compromise or back down, resulting in a power struggle or contest to determine the final outcome.
  • nurse a grudge (against sm) The idiom "nurse a grudge (against someone)" means to hold onto feelings of anger, resentment, or ill-will towards someone over a long period of time. It suggests that the person is nurturing or maintaining the grudge rather than letting it go.
  • give sm a (good) bawling out To give someone a (good) bawling out means to scold or reprimand someone severely, often in a loud and angry manner. It is an idiom used to convey strong criticism or reproof towards someone's actions or behavior.
  • be sitting on a goldmine The idiom "be sitting on a goldmine" means that someone or something possesses a valuable resource or opportunity that could lead to great financial or personal gain. It implies that the person or thing in question is unaware of or underestimating the true worth and potential of their situation.
  • a sitting duck The idiom "a sitting duck" refers to a person or thing that is an easy target or in a vulnerable position, making it effortless for others to attack or take advantage of. The term comes from the practice of hunting ducks, as they are defenseless and vulnerable while sitting on the water.
  • sitting on a powder keg The idiom "sitting on a powder keg" refers to being in a highly volatile or dangerous situation, where even a small spark or trigger could cause a catastrophic or explosive outcome. It implies that the situation is extremely tense, unstable, and potentially explosive, with the potential for chaos or disaster at any moment.
  • sitting on a gold mine The idiom "sitting on a gold mine" refers to a situation where someone possesses something extremely valuable or has access to a great opportunity but is unaware or not taking advantage of it. It typically implies that one is overlooking or neglecting their potential for significant success or wealth.
  • at a sitting The idiom "at a sitting" means to complete a task or consume something in one continuous period of time, without taking a break or interruption. It refers to accomplishing or experiencing something without pausing or getting up.
  • be like a spare prick at a wedding The idiom "be like a spare prick at a wedding" is a vulgar and slang expression that is not appropriate for formal or polite conversations. Its meaning is to feel awkward, out of place, or useless in a particular situation or gathering where one's presence seems unnecessary or irrelevant. The idiom conveys a sense of being unwanted or surplus, comparable to a superfluous body part in a social event where everyone else has a significant role or purpose.
  • not a moment to spare The idiom "not a moment to spare" means that there is no extra time remaining, indicating that something is happening or should be completed urgently or right on time without any delay.
  • a nowin situation The idiom "a no-win situation" refers to a scenario or dilemma where there are no favorable outcomes or satisfactory solutions regardless of the actions taken. It implies that any choice or action will result in a negative or undesirable outcome.
  • If it was a snake it woulda bit you. The idiom "If it was a snake it woulda bit you" is used to express exasperation or mild frustration when someone fails to notice or find something that is extremely obvious or easily accessible. It implies that the object or solution being sought after is right in front of the person, just like a snake that could potentially bite them.
  • all of a size The idiom "all of a size" means that things or people are all the same or equal in size, quantity, or importance, possessing no noticeable differences or variations.
  • a skeleton in the/sb's closet The idiom "a skeleton in the/somebody's closet" refers to a secret or embarrassing fact about a person or an organization that, if revealed, could be damaging or cause shame or embarrassment. It implies that there is something hidden or unknown about someone's past that they would prefer not to be made public.
  • a skeleton in the/your cupboard The idiom "a skeleton in the/your cupboard" refers to a well-kept secret or a hidden embarrassment that someone wants to keep hidden from others. It represents undisclosed information or a confidential issue that could potentially damage a person's reputation or relationships if revealed.
  • a thumbnail sketch The idiom "a thumbnail sketch" is used to describe a brief and concise summary or description of something, usually presented in a visual or metaphorical way. It refers to a quick outline or overview that provides just enough information to grasp the main points, similar to a small thumbnail image that provides a small preview of a larger picture.
  • a bean counter The idiom "a bean counter" is a colloquial term that refers to someone who is overly focused on accounting, numbers, and financial details, often to the point of being perceived as boring, tedious, or lacking creativity. It typically describes accountants, financial analysts, or individuals who prioritize financial accuracy and regulations over other aspects of a business or organization.
  • not be worth a hill of beans The idiom "not be worth a hill of beans" means that something or someone is considered to have little or no value or importance.
  • hungry as a bear The idiom "hungry as a bear" is used to describe someone who is extremely hungry or has a voracious appetite. It implies that the person's hunger is comparable to that of a bear, known for their ravenous appetite.
  • gruff as a bear The idiom "gruff as a bear" refers to someone who is rough, rude, or curt in their demeanor, speech, or behavior. It suggests that the person is brusque and often displays unfriendly or grumpy characteristics, much like the perceived temperament of a bear.
  • bear a resemblance to The idiom "bear a resemblance to" means to have a similar or noticeable likeness or similarity to someone or something; to share common features or characteristics with another person or thing.
  • bear a grudge The idiom "bear a grudge" means to harbor or hold onto feelings of resentment, anger, or animosity towards someone or something for a prolonged period of time. It implies that the person has not forgiven or forgotten a past wrongdoing or offense, and continues to feel negatively towards the person or situation involved.
  • a cross to bear The idiom "a cross to bear" refers to a burdensome or difficult situation or problem that one must endure or deal with. It originated from the Christian tradition where carrying a cross symbolizes the struggle and suffering one must face. In a broader sense, it is used to describe any personal challenge, hardship, or responsibility that one must accept and manage.
  • a bear hug The idiom "a bear hug" refers to a tight and strong embrace, usually characterized by a powerful and suffocating grip similar to that of a bear. It can also be used metaphorically to describe an enthusiastic and fervent embrace, either physically or figuratively, often expressing great affection, support, or dominance.
  • a standardbearer The idiom "a standardbearer" refers to a person or thing that represents or symbolizes a particular cause, movement, or belief. It can also refer to someone who sets the bar or serves as an example for others to follow in terms of behavior, values, or accomplishments.
  • There's more than one way to skin a cat The idiom "There's more than one way to skin a cat" means that there are multiple ways to achieve the same goal or solve a problem. It suggests that there are various alternative methods or approaches to accomplish a task, emphasizing the importance of flexibility and creativity.
  • a thick skin The idiom "a thick skin" refers to someone having the ability to remain unaffected by criticism, insults, or negative feedback. It implies being resilient and unbothered by negative comments or situations. Having a thick skin means not taking things personally and being able to disassociate oneself from criticism or negative opinions.
  • a beast of burden The idiom "a beast of burden" refers to a living creature, typically a domesticated work animal such as a horse or a donkey, that is used to carry heavy loads or perform laborious tasks. However, metaphorically, it can also describe a person who is burdened with a constant and demanding workload or responsibilities.
  • without missing a beat The idiom "without missing a beat" means to continue something smoothly or without interruption, especially in speech or action, regardless of any unexpected or difficult circumstances.
  • pound a beat The idiom "pound a beat" refers to the act of patrolling or frequently walking a specific area, typically done by police officers or security personnel to maintain order and keep a watchful eye on the surroundings.
  • one's heart misses a beat The idiom "one's heart misses a beat" refers to the feeling of a sudden, strong emotion or intense anticipation that causes a temporary pause or irregularity in the normal rhythm of one's heartbeat. It typically implies being momentarily startled, surprised, or overwhelmed by something unexpected or emotionally impactful.
  • not miss a beat The idiom "not miss a beat" means to react quickly and seamlessly, without hesitation or showing any signs of confusion or surprise. It refers to being able to continue or follow along with a task, conversation, or situation without any disruption or delay.
  • heart skips a beat The idiom "heart skips a beat" means to experience a sudden and brief feeling of excitement, surprise, fear, or nervousness. It refers to a momentary disruption or irregularity in the normal rhythm of one's heartbeat, which can be caused by various intense emotions or sudden events.
  • heart misses a beat The idiom "heart misses a beat" refers to a sudden moment of surprise, shock, excitement, or fear that causes one's heart to momentarily feel like it has skipped a beat or stopped momentarily. It is often used to describe an intense emotional response or a significant event that catches someone off guard.
  • beat to a pulp The idiom "beat to a pulp" refers to severely beating someone or something with great intensity or force, to the point of causing serious injury or damage. It implies a thorough and brutal beating, often leaving the recipient physically or metaphorically crushed and incapacitated.
  • beat a path to door The idiom "beat a path to (someone's) door" is used to describe a situation where many people frequently come to visit or seek something from a particular person or place. It implies that numerous individuals are eager or desperate to approach or request something from someone.
  • beat a dead horse The idiom "beat a dead horse" means to continue to pursue a particular course of action, argument, or opinion that is no longer productive or relevant. It refers to the futile and unnecessary effort of trying to accomplish something that has already been decided or resolved.
  • a stick to beat with "A stick to beat with" is an idiom used to describe an argument or accusation that is used as a tool to criticize or attack someone, often for personal or political reasons. It refers to a situation where a person is provided with an opportunity or reason to criticize or condemn someone else. The "stick" refers to the argument or accusation itself, which is used as a weapon to criticize or punish someone, often unjustly or excessively.
  • skinny as a beanpole The idiom "skinny as a beanpole" is used to describe someone who is extremely thin or narrow in build, typically suggesting that they have a very slim physique or are underweight.
  • your heart skips a beat The idiom "your heart skips a beat" refers to the intense and sudden feeling of excitement, surprise, fear, or anxiety that causes one's heart to momentarily pause or flutter. It often describes a profound emotional response to a surprising or thrilling event or being overtaken by strong emotions.
  • sb's heart misses/skips a beat The idiom "sb's heart misses/skips a beat" is used to describe a sudden feeling of excitement, surprise, or nervousness that causes a momentary flutter or acceleration of one's heartbeat. It typically signifies a strong emotional response to a surprising or thrilling event.
  • a hop, skip, and a jump The idiomatic expression "a hop, skip, and a jump" is used to describe a very short distance or a close proximity between two places. It implies that the distance being referred to is easily and swiftly traversed, typically with minimal effort.
  • a bit of fluff/skirt The idiom "a bit of fluff/skirt" is a colloquial expression used to refer to a generally attractive, young woman who may be seen as a temporary romantic or sexual interest or a superficial companion. It suggests that the person being referred to is perceived as lacking depth or substance and is merely a source of momentary amusement or entertainment.
  • A thing of beauty is a joy forever. The idiom "A thing of beauty is a joy forever" means that anything that possesses beauty will bring happiness and pleasure that lasts for a lifetime. It emphasizes the idea that beauty has a timeless quality and can have a profound and everlasting impact on one's life.
  • work like a beaver The idiom "work like a beaver" means to work very industriously and diligently, often used to describe someone who is extremely hardworking and productive. It refers to the tireless work ethic and productivity of beavers, known for their constant construction of dams and lodges.
  • as drunk as a lord/skunk The idiom "as drunk as a lord/skunk" is used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or heavily under the influence of alcohol. The phrase humorously implies that the person's level of drunkenness is on par with that of a lord or skunk, emphasizing the extent to which they are intoxicated.
  • out of a clear blue sky The idiom "out of a clear blue sky" means that something unexpected or surprising happens suddenly and without warning. It refers to an event or occurrence that seems to come from nowhere, catching the person unprepared or unaware.
  • come out of a clear blue sky The idiom "come out of a clear blue sky" means that something unexpected or surprising happens suddenly and without warning. It is used to describe a situation or event that occurs out of nowhere, unexpectedly and without any prior signs or indications.
  • is not a bed of roses The idiom "is not a bed of roses" means that something is not easy or enjoyable but rather challenging, difficult, or full of hardships. It suggests that a particular situation or experience requires determination, effort, and perseverance to overcome obstacles and achieve success.
  • be a bed of nails The idiom "be a bed of nails" typically means that a situation or circumstance is extremely difficult, uncomfortable, or unpleasant to deal with. It suggests a challenging or troublesome experience that can be mentally, physically, or emotionally draining.
  • cut sm a break The idiom "cut someone a break" means to give someone a chance or opportunity, or to show them mercy or forgiveness. It implies offering them some leniency or understanding in a difficult situation or when they have made a mistake.
  • a slap on the wrist The idiom "a slap on the wrist" refers to a mild or lenient punishment or reprimand for someone who has done something wrong or committed a minor offense. It implies that the consequence is not severe enough to deter the person from repeating the behavior.
  • a slap on the back The idiom "a slap on the back" typically refers to a gesture of congratulations or praise that is informal and enthusiastic. It implies showing appreciation or approval towards someone's achievements or actions by giving a figurative or literal friendly pat on their back.
  • a slap in the face The idiom "a slap in the face" refers to an action or event that is disrespectful, demeaning, or hurtful, often unexpected, that undermines or challenges someone's beliefs, desires, or self-esteem. It can be both a literal action of physically slapping someone's face or a metaphorical description of a figurative action or situation that causes a similar emotional response.
  • a clean slate The idiom "a clean slate" refers to starting fresh or beginning anew without any previous mistakes, burdens, or prejudices. It suggests having a new opportunity or a chance to start over with no preconceived notions or negative circumstances.
  • start (off) with a clean slate The idiom "start (off) with a clean slate" means to begin again with no pre-existing biases, conflicts, or mistakes from the past. It suggests a fresh start or a reset, often after resolving or letting go of previous issues.
  • put a bee in sm's bonnet (about sm or sth) The idiom "put a bee in someone's bonnet (about someone or something)" means to suggest an idea or cause someone to become obsessed or preoccupied with a particular topic, person, or issue. It can imply that the person has a strong interest, concern, or desire to take action related to that topic or person.
  • a fly in the ointment The idiom "a fly in the ointment" refers to a small but significant issue or problem that spoils an otherwise pleasant or satisfactory situation. It represents an unexpected or undesirable factor that hinders or detracts from an overall positive experience or outcome.
  • have a beef with sb/sth The idiom "have a beef with sb/sth" means to have a complaint, grudge, or grievance against someone or something. It implies a feeling of dissatisfaction or annoyance towards a particular person or situation.
  • use a sledgehammer to crack a nut The idiom "use a sledgehammer to crack a nut" refers to employing an excessive or unnecessary amount of force or effort to solve a simple or minor problem. It implies that the approach taken is disproportionate to the magnitude or complexity of the task at hand, suggesting a lack of precision or subtlety.
  • sleep a wink The idiom "sleep a wink" means to sleep for a very short period of time, often used to express the inability to sleep well or not being able to sleep at all. It implies that despite attempting to sleep, one is unable to achieve a restful sleep.
  • make a beeline for sb/sth The idiom "make a beeline for sb/sth" means to move quickly and directly towards someone or something, without any distraction or hesitation. It implies a determined or urgent movement towards a specific person or object.
  • make a beeline for sm or sth The idiom "make a beeline for someone or something" means to quickly and directly move towards someone or something without any distractions or detours. It implies a sense of purpose and determination in reaching the desired person or thing.
  • You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die The idiom "You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die" means that everyone will inevitably face difficulties, setbacks, or endure unpleasant experiences throughout their life. It suggests that life is not always easy, and one must go through hardships before reaching the end. Essentially, it emphasizes the notion that challenges and adversity are an inseparable part of the human experience.
  • Pride goes before a fall The idiom "Pride goes before a fall" means being overly confident or arrogant often leads to a person's downfall or failure. It implies that excessive pride or hubris can blind someone to their weaknesses or make them underestimate the challenges they may face, resulting in a negative outcome or setback.
  • Pride comes before a fall The idiom "Pride comes before a fall" means that when someone becomes too arrogant or excessively self-confident, they are likely to experience a sudden and significant failure or downfall. It warns against the dangers of excessive pride or overestimating one's abilities and serves as a reminder to remain humble and grounded.
  • cross a bridge before one comes to it The idiom "cross a bridge before one comes to it" means worrying or thinking about problems or difficulties that may never happen or anticipating and preparing for a problem or situation in advance before it occurs. It implies unnecessarily burdening oneself with future concerns that may not actually materialize.
  • a slice of the cake The idiom "a slice of the cake" refers to receiving or obtaining a share or portion of something, typically in a fair or equitable manner. It often relates to the division or distribution of resources, benefits, opportunities, or profits among individuals or groups.
  • It's been a slice! The idiom "It's been a slice!" is an informal expression used to convey a sense of enjoyment, appreciation, or satisfaction at the end of an experience or gathering. It means that the person had a great time and enjoyed the experience or event. It is often said when parting ways with friends or at the conclusion of a pleasant encounter.
  • have one's ass in a sling The idiom "have one's ass in a sling" is a colloquial and vulgar expression that refers to a situation where someone is in trouble, facing difficulties, or feeling extremely anxious or worried about something. It implies a state of vulnerability, predicament, or potential negative consequences.
  • slip a Mickey "Slip a Mickey" is an idiom that originated in the United States in the early 20th century. It refers to the act of secretly adding a drug or poisonous substance, typically a sedative or tranquilizer, to someone's drink without their knowledge or consent. The intention behind slipping a Mickey is usually to render the person unconscious or incapacitated. The term "Mickey" is believed to have originated from the name of a drugged beverage once advertised as "Mickey Finn" in Chicago during the late 19th century.
  • a slip of the tongue The idiom "a slip of the tongue" refers to an unintentional mistake or error in speech, particularly when someone says something they did not mean or did not intend to say. It describes a situation where someone misspeaks due to a momentary lapse in concentration or accidentally reveals something they were trying to withhold or keep secret.
  • a pink slip The idiom "a pink slip" is typically used to refer to a notice of termination or dismissal from one's job. It originated from the practice of companies providing employees with a pink-colored paper as a formal notification of their job termination.
  • a heartbeat away from being (sth) The idiom "a heartbeat away from being (something)" means being very close or near to becoming something or achieving a certain position or status. It implies that a person or thing is just one step or moment away from reaching a particular state or goal.
  • believe a word of it The idiom "believe a word of it" means to not trust or have faith in what someone is saying. It suggests doubting the veracity or truthfulness of their statement or claim.
  • do a slow burn The idiom "do a slow burn" typically refers to someone getting gradually angry, frustrated, or irritated over a period of time. It suggests that the individual is trying to control their emotions or avoid expressing their anger openly, but it is still steadily building up inside them.
  • a belly laugh The idiom "a belly laugh" refers to a deep and hearty laughter that originates from the gut, signifying genuine amusement or extreme hilarity. It often involves audible and uncontrolled laughter.
  • have a yellow belly The idiom "have a yellow belly" refers to someone who is considered cowardly, lacking courage or bravery in the face of danger or adversity.
  • A growing youth has a wolf in his belly. The idiom "A growing youth has a wolf in his belly" refers to the idea that young people have a strong appetite or hunger due to their rapid growth and development. It implies that youngsters often have a voracious appetite, similar to a wolf's, as they require a significant amount of food to fuel their growth.
  • a notch below sb/sth The idiom "a notch below sb/sth" means to be slightly lower in rank, quality, or importance compared to someone or something else. It implies being just a little bit inferior or below someone or something in a particular aspect.
  • belt a drink down The idiom "belt a drink down" means to swallow or consume a beverage quickly and voraciously. It implies drinking with haste or enthusiasm.
  • a big fish in a small pond The idiom "a big fish in a small pond" refers to a person who is successful, influential, or important within a limited or restricted environment or group, but may not have the same level of recognition or significance in a larger or more competitive context. It implies that in a smaller or less significant setting, an individual's abilities or accomplishments may be more noticeable or impressive compared to their performance on a broader scale.
  • big frog in a small pond The idiom "big frog in a small pond" refers to a person who holds a position of importance or superiority in a small or limited environment. It implies that this individual might appear impressive or influential, but only because they are surrounded by people of lesser ability or competence.
  • a fender bender The idiom "a fender bender" refers to a minor car accident or collision, typically characterized by minimal damage and no major injuries. It implies that the impact is slight and does not result in significant harm or extensive damage to the vehicles involved.
  • a smartarse The idiom "a smartarse" refers to a person who consistently and arrogantly displays a clever or witty attitude with the intention of being sarcastic, disrespectful, or showing superiority over others. These individuals often use their intelligence or quick thinking to mock others or undermine their opinions.
  • a smart cookie The idiom "a smart cookie" refers to a person who is intelligent, clever, or shrewd. It suggests that the individual possesses a high level of smarts or is able to quickly understand or solve complex problems.
  • a smart bomb The idiom "a smart bomb" refers to a highly intelligent, accurately targeted weapon that can autonomously locate and strike its intended target with precision. It is often used metaphorically to describe a person, plan, or strategy that is exceptionally well-planned, efficient, and effective.
  • a smart alec/aleck The idiom "a smart alec/aleck" refers to someone who is clever, witty, and often sarcastic or cocky in a way that can be irritating or condescending to others. It describes a person who consistently tries to show off their intelligence or outsmart others in a smug or boastful manner.
  • crack a smile The idiom "crack a smile" means to briefly show or flash a smile. It refers to the act of smiling, albeit momentarily, to express happiness or amusement.
  • smiling like a Cheshire cat The idiom "smiling like a Cheshire cat" means to have a wide, mysterious, or mischievous smile that often suggests hidden knowledge or amusement. It originates from Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, where the Cheshire Cat character is described as having a grinning smile that remains even after its body disappears.
  • put a smile on sm's face The idiom "put a smile on someone's face" means to bring enjoyment, happiness, or pleasure to someone, often by doing or saying something that brings them joy or by acting in a way that brightens their mood.
  • flash a smile (at sm) The idiom "flash a smile (at someone)" means to give a quick, bright, or brief smile to someone. It implies a friendly or pleasant gesture, often used to greet or acknowledge someone in a positive way.
  • smoke like a chimney The idiom "smoke like a chimney" refers to someone who smokes excessively or constantly. It implies that the person smokes large amounts of cigarettes, cigars, or other smoking substances, often resulting in a constant stream of smoke resembling the emissions from a chimney.
  • a smoking gun The idiom "a smoking gun" refers to a conclusive evidence or proof that unequivocally shows someone's guilt or involvement in a certain situation, often in