How Do You Spell ABLE?

Pronunciation: [ˈe͡ɪbə͡l] (IPA)

The word "able" in English is spelled with the letters A-B-L-E, but the pronunciation may be a bit tricky. The IPA phonetic transcription for "able" is /ˈeɪ.bəl/, which indicates that it has two syllables and the vowel sound in the first syllable is a long "a" as in "hay". The second syllable has a schwa sound, which is an unstressed and neutral vowel sound. The spelling of "able" may look simple, but proper pronunciation requires careful attention to the vowel sounds.

ABLE Meaning and Definition

Able is an adjective that describes someone's capability or competence to perform a particular action or task. It refers to having the necessary skill, qualities, or aptitude to accomplish or succeed in a given endeavor. It denotes the presence of intellectual or physical capacities required to carry out a specific function.

Being able implies that an individual possesses the knowledge, expertise, or dexterity needed for the successful completion of a task. It encompasses the idea of being skilled, proficient, or talented in a particular area or field. The term suggests that an individual is capable of fulfilling their responsibilities, meeting expectations, or delivering desired outcomes.

In addition to proficiency, the term able also implies willingness or readiness to take on a task or responsibility. It implies that a person is equipped with the necessary resources, qualities, or abilities to perform a task effectively or efficiently.

Furthermore, being able can also connote general qualities of strength, perseverance, or adaptability in the face of challenges or difficulties. It suggests the capacity to cope with adversity, solve problems, or overcome obstacles.

Overall, the term able encompasses both the mental and physical attributes required to achieve success or accomplish a specific objective, indicating a person's capacity and potential to perform a given task or duty.

Top Common Misspellings for ABLE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for ABLE

Etymology of ABLE

The word "able" originated from the Latin word "habilis", which means "easily handled" or "fit for" a particular purpose. It ultimately comes from the Latin verb "habere", meaning "to have" or "to hold". Over time, the meaning of "habilis" evolved in Old French to mean "capable" or "skilled", and it eventually entered Middle English as "able" with a similar meaning.

Idioms with the word ABLE

  • ready, willing, and able The phrase "ready, willing, and able" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who is fully prepared, eager, and capable of taking action or carrying out a task. It has a connotation of being enthusiastic, competent, and available to do something.
  • not able to wait The idiom "not able to wait" refers to a state of impatience or eagerness in which one finds it difficult to delay or postpone something, often due to excitement or anticipation. It implies a strong desire for immediate action or satisfaction, lacking the ability to remain patient.
  • not able to stomach sm or sth The idiom "not able to stomach someone or something" means to not be able to tolerate or accept someone or something due to strong dislike, disagreement, or disapproval. It implies that the person or thing in question is difficult to bear or endure.
  • not able to see the forest for the trees The idiom "not able to see the forest for the trees" means being too focused on small details or individual components, and as a result, failing to understand or appreciate the overall situation or bigger picture. It implies being overly concerned with minor issues rather than recognizing the larger context or implications.
  • not able to make head or tail of sth The idiom "not able to make head or tail of something" means that someone cannot understand or comprehend something. It implies confusion or a lack of clarity about a particular situation, task, or information.
  • not able to make anything out (of sm or sth) The idiom "not able to make anything out (of sm or sth)" means being unable to understand or comprehend something clearly. It implies that the subject is struggling to find meaning or make sense of what they are observing, hearing, or reading.
  • not able to help sth The idiom "not able to help" refers to a situation where someone lacks the ability or means to offer assistance or provide a solution to a particular problem or issue. It implies a state of powerlessness or inability to be of help.
  • not able to go on The idiom "not able to go on" generally refers to a situation where someone is unable to continue or proceed due to exhaustion, physical limitations, emotional distress, or significant challenges. It indicates that someone has reached their breaking point or is unable to continue with a particular task, journey, or endeavor.
  • not able to get sth for love or money The idiom "not able to get something for love or money" means that no efforts or resources, whether through persuasion (love) or payment (money), can enable a person to obtain or achieve what they desire. It conveys the idea that something is unavailable or unattainable regardless of the methods or means employed.
  • not able to call one's time one's own The definition of the idiom "not able to call one's time one's own" is when someone does not have control over their own time or schedule. It implies being constantly occupied or busy with various obligations, responsibilities, or demands, which prevent them from having free or leisurely moments.
  • not able
  • able to take just so much The idiom "able to take just so much" means that a person has a limited tolerance or capacity for enduring a particular situation or treatment. It suggests that there is a limit to how much someone can endure before reaching their breaking point or being unable to handle any more.
  • able to take a joke The idiom "able to take a joke" refers to someone's ability to handle or accept light-hearted or humorous comments or teasing without becoming offended or defensive. It implies that the person has a good sense of humor and is not easily offended by others' playful remarks.
  • able to make an event The idiom "able to make an event" generally means possessing the capability or availability to attend or participate in a particular event. It implies having the necessary time, resources, or ability to be present and actively take part in an occasion or gathering.
  • able to fog a mirror The idiom "able to fog a mirror" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is barely alive or extremely unresponsive. It implies that a person's level of consciousness or activity is so minimal that the only evidence of their existence is their ability to faintly fog or create condensation on a mirror with their breath. This phrase is often used humorously or sarcastically to convey the notion that an individual lacks vitality, awareness, or enthusiasm.
  • able to do sth with one's eyes closed The idiom "able to do something with one's eyes closed" means being able to perform a task or activity effortlessly, without requiring any effort, concentration, or difficulty. It implies that the person is highly skilled, experienced, or familiar with the task to the extent that they could complete it even without visual focus or effort.
  • able to do sth blindfolded The idiom "able to do something blindfolded" means to be capable of performing a task or activity with great ease, skill, or expertise, to the point where one can do it without any effort or need for visualization. It suggests a level of proficiency so high that even if one were blindfolded, they would still have no difficulty completing the task successfully.
  • able to do sth The idiom "able to do something" means possessing the necessary skills, knowledge, or physical capability to successfully perform a particular action or task. It suggests having the capacity or competence to accomplish something successfully.
  • able to cut sth The idiom "able to cut something" typically refers to someone who possesses the skills, ability, or capacity to effectively address or resolve a particular issue, problem, or situation. It implies being capable of dealing with a task or challenge successfully.
  • able to breathe (easily) again The idiom "able to breathe (easily) again" means feeling relieved, relaxed, or free from stress or pressure after a challenging or suffocating situation. It implies a sense of liberation and a return to a state of comfort or tranquility.
  • able to breathe again The idiom "able to breathe again" typically means feeling relieved or experiencing a sense of ease after a period of stress, worry, or intense emotions. It conveys a sensation of freedom or liberation, similar to taking a deep breath or sigh of relief.
  • not able to get for love or money The idiom "not able to get for love or money" means that something is extremely difficult or impossible to obtain or achieve, regardless of the effort, resources, or methods employed.
  • not able to call time own The idiom "not able to call time own" means being too busy or preoccupied to have control over one's own time or schedule. It implies a lack of independence or freedom to manage one's time or make personal choices.
  • not able to make head or tail of The idiom "not able to make head or tail of" refers to being unable to understand or comprehend something. It implies confusion or difficulty in making sense of a situation, information, or a piece of writing.
  • able to cut The idiom "able to cut" typically refers to someone who possesses the skill or ability to swiftly and effectively criticize or insult others, often in a clever or biting manner. The person is skilled at delivering cutting remarks that can be sharp, pointed, and incisive.
  • able to do blindfolded The idiom "able to do blindfolded" means having such a high level of skill or knowledge in a particular task that one can perform it easily and effortlessly, almost as if it could be done without even looking or paying attention.
  • not able to help The idiom "not able to help" means that someone is unable to assist or provide support in a particular situation or solve a problem. It signifies a lack of capability or capacity to offer aid or contribute effectively.
  • able to do with eyes closed The idiom "able to do with eyes closed" means being able to perform a task effortlessly or flawlessly due to familiarity or extensive practice. It implies that the action or skill has become so natural and automatic that it can be accomplished without any effort or conscious thought.
  • not able to stomach The idiom "not able to stomach" refers to being unable to tolerate or accept something, usually due to feeling disgust, revulsion, or strong disagreement with it. It conveys the idea of finding something extremely distasteful or difficult to bear.
  • be able to count somebody/something on (the fingers of) one hand The idiom "be able to count somebody/something on (the fingers of) one hand" refers to a situation where the number of people or things being referred to is extremely small or limited. It implies that there are very few instances or options available, to the point where one can easily enumerate them using only the fingers on one hand.
  • not be able to do something to save your life The idiom "not be able to do something to save your life" means that someone is completely incapable or incompetent in performing a specific task or activity, even in a life-threatening situation. It emphasizes the extreme difficulty or lack of skill someone possesses in a particular area, suggesting a complete inability to succeed or accomplish the task under any circumstances.
  • be able to do something in your sleep The idiom "be able to do something in your sleep" means being extremely skilled or proficient at a particular task or activity, to the point that one can do it effortlessly and without conscious effort or concentration. It implies that the person has mastered the task to such a degree that they could accomplish it even while sleeping.
  • not (be able to) take your eyes off somebody/something The idiom "not (be able to) take your eyes off somebody/something" means to be unable to stop looking at someone or something because they are so interesting, captivating, or captivating. It implies a strong fascination or fascination that keeps one's attention completely fixated and unable to divert.
  • able to (do something) blindfolded The idiom "able to (do something) blindfolded" means to be extremely skilled or knowledgeable about something to the point where one can perform the task easily, effortlessly, and without any hesitation or doubt. It implies mastering a task or activity to such a degree that it can be done without needing to see or observe what one is doing.
  • able to (do something) with (one's) eyes closed The idiom "able to (do something) with (one's) eyes closed" refers to having a high level of proficiency or mastery in a particular task that it can be accomplished effortlessly, without needing to pay much attention or exert much effort. It implies that the individual is so familiar or skilled with the task that they could do it effortlessly, even if their eyes were closed.
  • able to cut it The idiom "able to cut it" means having the necessary skills, abilities, or qualities to meet the demands or expectations of a particular task or situation. It refers to someone's ability to perform well or be successful in a given context.
  • able to cut something The idiom "able to cut something" typically refers to someone's ability to handle or deal with a difficult or challenging situation effectively and successfully. It implies having the necessary skills, expertise, or resilience to overcome obstacles or accomplish a task without difficulty.
  • able to do The idiom "able to do" refers to having the capability or skill to accomplish or complete a certain task or action. It signifies being competent, proficient, or experienced enough to perform a particular activity successfully.
  • able to do (something) standing on (one's) head The idiom "able to do (something) standing on (one's) head" means that someone can do something very easily or without any effort or difficulty. It implies that the person is so skilled or experienced in a particular task that they can accomplish it effortlessly, even in a seemingly challenging or unconventional way.
  • able to do it The idiom "able to do it" refers to someone's capability or competence to successfully accomplish a task or objective. It indicates that the person possesses the necessary skills, resources, or qualities required for achieving a particular goal or completing a specific action.
  • able to get a word in edgewise The idiom "able to get a word in edgewise" means to have an opportunity to speak or express one's opinion, especially in a conversation where another person is dominating or talking excessively. It implies that one is finally able to interject or contribute to the ongoing discussion despite the other person's monopolization of the conversation.
  • able to make (something) The idiom "able to make (something)" typically means having the skills, knowledge, or capability to create or accomplish something. It emphasizes the person's competence or proficiency in achieving a particular task or objective.
  • able to take only so much The idiom "able to take only so much" means having reached the limit of one's patience, tolerance, or endurance. It refers to having a limited capacity to handle or withstand a particular situation or behavior before becoming overwhelmed or unable to bear it any longer.
  • all able-bodied people The idiom "all able-bodied people" refers to individuals who are physically capable and are not hindered by any physical disabilities or limitations. It usually emphasizes inclusivity and implies that everyone who is capable of performing a certain task or participating in a specific activity should do so.
  • be able to count somebody/something on one hand The idiom "be able to count somebody/something on one hand" means that there are very few or only a small number of people or things being referred to. It implies rarity, scarcity, or insignificance. Typically, it suggests that the subject being counted is so limited that it can be counted using the fingers of just one hand.
  • not able to make anything out The idiom "not able to make anything out" means to be unable to understand or decipher something, typically due to unclear or confusing information. It implies confusion or lack of comprehension regarding a specific situation, text, or object.
  • not be able to do something for toffee The idiom "not be able to do something for toffee" is used to describe a person's complete lack of skill or ability in doing a particular task. It suggests that the person is incapable of performing the task properly, as if they were unable to do it even if given the incentive of toffee (a type of candy).
  • not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other The idiom "not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other" means to lack knowledge, understanding, or familiarity with a particular topic, task, or object. It implies a complete lack of awareness or inability to distinguish or differentiate between two similar or related things. It is often used humorously or sarcastically to highlight someone's ignorance or incompetence in a particular area.
  • willing and able The idiom "willing and able" means someone is both eager and capable of doing something or fulfilling a task or responsibility. It implies a person's readiness and competence to take on a given task or situation.
  • be able to count (someone or something) on one hand The idiom "be able to count (someone or something) on one hand" means that there are very few or limited instances of someone or something. It suggests that the number is so small that you can easily determine or recollect the exact count by using only your five fingers. It implies rarity, scarcity, or a lack of abundance.
  • be able to count (someone or something) on the fingers of one hand The idiom "be able to count (someone or something) on the fingers of one hand" means that there are very few of a particular person or thing. It implies that the number is so small that you could easily count them on just one hand, using your fingers.
  • be able to (do something) in (one's) sleep The idiom "be able to (do something) in (one's) sleep" means to possess such a high level of proficiency or familiarity with a particular task that one could perform it easily and without conscious effort or thought. It implies a deep knowledge and expertise that allows someone to accomplish the task effortlessly, even if they were asleep.
  • not be able to tell one end (of something) from the other The idiom "not be able to tell one end (of something) from the other" means to be completely unfamiliar or inexperienced with something, to an extent that one cannot distinguish or understand the basic aspects or components of it. It refers to a state of confusion or ignorance, where one is unable to discern where something begins or ends.

Similar spelling words for ABLE

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