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How Do You Spell ALES?

Correct spelling for the English word "ales" is [ ˈe͡ɪlz] (IPA phonetic alphabet).

Common Misspellings for ALES

Below is the list of 442 misspellings for the word "ALES". Misspellings percentages are collected from over 510 000 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Usage Examples for ALES

  1. For example, the matrons looked after a certain altar; the maidens raised money for a chapel or saw to the gilding of the images; the older men collected money for church repair; and the younger men organized the church ales and the church plays. - "Our Legal Heritage, 4th Ed." by S. A. Reilly
  2. In general, the cleansing commences too soon for the strength and quality of the goods, particularly for porter, since the introduction of a greater proportion of pale malt than formerly used; a more perfect fermentation is now requisite to keep up the genuine distinction in that flavour of porter from ordinary beers and ales which, since the change of lengths, has much declined, though the only characteristic quality that gives it merit over other malt liquors- an object that deserves consideration in this great commercial branch of trade, and source of national wealth, where the loss of distinction will be the loss of trade. - "The American Practical Brewer and Tanner" by Joseph Coppinger
  3. Five ales in an hour and not a dozen words; just an ordinary Britisher who didn't know how to amuse himself in Gawd's own country. - "The Voice in the Fog" by Harold MacGrath
  4. The method employed in calculating the various beers and ales to this uniform basis was as follows: The percentage of solids in the original wort was calculated by multiplying the percentage by weight of alcohol by 2 and adding the percentage by weight of extract. - "A Study Of American Beers and Ales" by L.M. Tolman J. Garfield Riley
  5. Church ales would usually a good source of income; alehouses would be closed during the ceremonies and parishioners would contribute malt for the ale and grain, eggs, butter, cheese, and fruits. - "Our Legal Heritage, 4th Ed." by S. A. Reilly