How Do You Spell ALL?

Pronunciation: [ˈɔːl] (IPA)

The word "all" is spelled with the letters A-L-L. In IPA phonetic transcription, it is pronounced as /ɔːl/ in British English and /ɑl/ in American English. The first sound, /ɔː/ in British and /ɑ/ in American, is an open-mid back vowel, and the second sound /l/ is a voiced alveolar lateral approximant. The word "all" is a common English word used to refer to everything, every person, or any situation.

ALL Meaning and Definition

All (pronoun/ determiner/ adverb)

1. As a pronoun, "all" refers to the total quantity or extent of something or everyone in a group. It includes every person, thing, or part without exception, demonstrating the concept of totality or completeness. For example, "All students must attend the lecture," means that every student is required to attend.

2. As a determiner, "all" is used to emphasize the entirety or every individual member of a group. It indicates that there are no exceptions or exclusions. For instance, "She ate all of the cake," implies that the entire cake was consumed.

3. As an adverb, "all" is utilized to indicate the complete degree or extent of an action or condition. It implies that nothing is omitted or left out. For instance, "He tried his best to help her all day," demonstrates continuous effort without any breaks.

4. In informal usage, "all" can function as an intensifier to emphasize a decision, sentiment, or description. For example, "I'm all for going to the concert," expresses strong support or enthusiasm towards attending.

5. "All" can also be used to mean "everything" in its entirety, indicating the whole or every aspect or item within a particular context.

Overall, "all" emphasizes the concept of entirety, totality, or completeness, encompassing everyone or everything without exception.

Top Common Misspellings for ALL *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for ALL

Etymology of ALL

The word "all" originated from the Old English word "eall" or "all" which means "the whole, entire, every", derived from the Proto-Germanic word " *alnaz". This can be traced back further to the Proto-Indo-European root "*al-" meaning "beyond, other, surpassing". It shares a common origin with words in other Germanic languages such as German "all" and Dutch "al". Over time, the word has retained a similar meaning and spelling across various languages, reflecting its ancient origin.

Idioms with the word ALL

  • go (all) round the houses The idiom "go (all) round the houses" means to take a long or indirect route to reach a destination, accomplish a task or convey a message. It suggests unnecessary or excessive elaboration or delay in getting to the point. It can also refer to someone being excessively detailed or long-winded in their explanation.
  • make (all) the running The idiom "make (all) the running" means to take the initiative or be the driving force in a situation or activity. It refers to actively leading or being in control of a particular situation, often in a competitive or proactive manner.
  • when all is said and done The idiom "when all is said and done" means that after considering everything or when everything is taken into account, or when the final outcome or conclusion is reached. It refers to the idea that despite various discussions or actions, when everything is fully considered or completed, a particular result or truth is evident.
  • it all amounts/comes to the same thing The idiom "it all amounts/comes to the same thing" means that different actions or choices may lead to the same outcome or result. It suggests that despite the appearance of variety or divergence, ultimately, the final result or consequence remains unchanged.
  • all the same The idiom "all the same" is typically used to indicate that despite a difference in circumstances or details, the ultimate outcome or result will be unchanged or unaffected. It implies that despite any perceived distinctions or variations, the situation remains consistent or equivalent in some aspect.
  • be all the same to sb The idiom "be all the same to someone" means that someone doesn't have a strong preference or doesn't care about the outcome or options being discussed. It implies that the person is indifferent and whatever choice or result occurs, it has no significant impact on them.
  • fall all over yourself, at fall over yourself The idiom "fall all over yourself" or "fall over yourself" means to be excessively eager, enthusiastic, or obsequious in expressing admiration, praise, or kindness towards someone or something. It suggests a behavior of being overly eager to please or impress someone, often leading to a lack of composure or balance in one's actions.
  • send/give out (all) the wrong signals The definition of the idiom "send/give out (all) the wrong signals" is when someone unintentionally communicates or expresses something that creates a misleading, inaccurate, or negative impression of their intentions, feelings, or thoughts. It refers to the action of conveying messages or indications that are contrary to what one intends or desires.
  • be (all) over bar the shouting The idiom "be (all) over bar the shouting" means that a situation or outcome is practically decided or certain, with only minor or inconsequential remaining actions or events before it is finalized. It implies that the outcome is so apparent and inevitable that there is little doubt or debate left.
  • be all smiles The idiom "be all smiles" means to display a cheerful and positive demeanor, typically with a wide, pleasant smile. It suggests that someone is showing their happiness or contentment outwardly.
  • be all in The idiom "be all in" means to be fully committed, dedicated, or invested in something, usually referring to putting all of one's energy, resources, or effort into a particular task, project, or endeavor. It implies giving one's maximum effort and not holding anything back.
  • be all go The idiom "be all go" means to be extremely busy or active, often referring to a fast-paced and energetic situation or task. It suggests that there is a lot of activity or movement happening, and typically conveys a sense of high intensity and enthusiasm.
  • be all eyes The idiom "be all eyes" means to be very attentive, observant, or focused on something, usually with great curiosity or interest. It implies giving one's full attention to what is happening or being said, often in anticipation or eagerness.
  • be all ears The idiom "be all ears" means to listen attentively and with great interest. It implies being fully focused on what someone is saying or eager to hear more details or information about a particular subject.
  • be all thumbs, at be all fingers and thumbs The idiom "be all thumbs" or "be all fingers and thumbs" is used to describe someone who is clumsily or awkwardly handling something, typically due to a lack of dexterity or coordination. It signifies being inept or having difficulty performing a task that requires precision or manual skill.
  • be just talk, at be all talk (and no action) The idiom "be just talk" or "be all talk (and no action)" refers to someone who makes a lot of promises or boasts about what they are going to do, but never follows through with any action or implementation. It implies that the person lacks sincerity, commitment, or the necessary effort to put their words into practice.
  • be all heart The idiom "be all heart" refers to someone who is extremely kind, compassionate, and loving. It describes a person who consistently shows genuine care and concern for others, often going out of their way to help and support them. This phrase emphasizes the deep emotional connection and selflessness of the individual.
  • be all very well The idiom "be all very well" means that something or someone may seem or appear satisfactory or acceptable, but upon closer examination, there are drawbacks or limitations that should be considered. It suggests that there may be a potential downside or an aspect that is not entirely favorable.
  • you win sm, you lose sm, at you can't win 'em all The idiom "you win some, you lose some, at you can't win 'em all" means that in life, there will be victories and defeats, and it is impossible to be successful in all situations or endeavors. It emphasizes the acceptance of varying outcomes and the understanding that not every situation will result in a favorable outcome.
  • all over smw The idiom "all over someone/something" typically means to be completely engaged, obsessed, or focused on a person or thing. It suggests that one's attention or involvement is intense and pervasive. Example: "She's been all over her new project, working on it day and night."
  • it takes all sorts (to make a world) The idiom "it takes all sorts (to make a world)" means that there is a variety of people in the world, with different opinions, characteristics, and behaviors, and this diversity is necessary or essential for the functioning and richness of society or the world. It emphasizes the idea that everyone is unique and contributes in their own way to the overall makeup of society.
  • that beats all, at that beats everything The idiom "that beats all" or "that beats everything" is used to express surprise or astonishment at something unexpected or extreme. It emphasizes that the situation or event in question goes beyond what was previously believed to be possible or normal.
  • not a bed of roses, at not all roses The idiom "not a bed of roses, at not all roses" means that a particular situation or experience is not easy or pleasant, and may involve challenges, difficulties, or hardships. It implies that there are thorny aspects or unpleasant realities to be faced along with the positive aspects. It suggests that success or happiness requires effort, perseverance, and the ability to endure hardships.
  • all of sth The idiom "all of something" generally means the entirety or complete amount of something. It suggests that there is no portion or part missing, emphasizing the fullness or completeness of the subject being discussed.
  • pull out all the stops The idiom "pull out all the stops" means to make maximum effort or take all necessary actions to achieve a desired outcome, typically used in situations where one is trying to overcome a challenge or achieve a goal. It originates from organ-playing, where pulling out all the stops unleashes the full range and power of the instrument.
  • be behind sb (all the way) The idiom "be behind someone (all the way)" means to fully support and stand by someone or their actions, often in a decision or goal. It implies being unwavering in one's support, advocating for the person in question, and being there for them throughout the process.
  • all things being equal The idiom "all things being equal" typically means that if everything is fair and equal or if there are no other influencing factors, the outcome or situation would be different. It suggests that the current situation may be influenced by certain factors, but if those factors were removed or controlled, a different result could be expected.
  • pass (all) belief The idiom "pass (all) belief" means to be too extraordinary, unbelievable, or beyond what can be imagined or comprehended. It implies that something is so incredible or astonishing that it surpasses the limits of credibility or understanding.
  • all and sundry The idiom "all and sundry" refers to every person, without exception or distinction. It is used to represent a wide or diverse group of individuals, encompassing everyone present or relevant.
  • be all talk (and no action) The idiom "be all talk (and no action)" refers to someone who frequently boasts or makes big promises but fails to follow through with any actions or personal effort to achieve what they have claimed. It describes an individual who talks about doing something or achieving a goal but rarely or never takes concrete steps to make it happen.
  • would not do sth for all the tea in China The idiom "would not do something for all the tea in China" means that one would not be willing to do something under any circumstances, no matter how tempting the offer or reward may be. It implies that the action or task is undesirable or unacceptable to the person using the idiom. The phrase originated from the immense value and significance of tea in Chinese culture and economy, emphasizing the extreme unwillingness to engage in the mentioned activity.
  • it'll (all) end in tears The idiom "it'll (all) end in tears" means that a situation or course of action is likely to result in negative or disastrous consequences. It implies that there is an expectation of failure, conflict, or disappointment in the outcome.
  • all that glitters is not gold The idiom "all that glitters is not gold" means that things may not always be as good or valuable as they appear to be. It warns against being deceived by outward appearances and emphasizes the importance of deeper understanding and analysis.
  • what's that (all) about (then)? The idiom "what's that (all) about (then)?" is often used as an informal expression to ask someone to explain or clarify the meaning or purpose of something that is unclear or puzzling. It signifies a curiosity or confusion about the subject in question and seeks further information or context.
  • be not all there The idiom "be not all there" is used to describe someone who is not mentally or psychologically sound; they may lack intelligence or coherence in their thoughts and actions. It implies that the person is somewhat irrational or eccentric.
  • all things considered The idiom "all things considered" refers to taking into account every relevant factor or considering everything that has been said or done before making a judgment or decision. It implies evaluating and weighing various aspects or perspectives to arrive at a fair or balanced conclusion.
  • all things to all men/people The idiom "all things to all men/people" refers to a person or thing that tries to please or accommodate everyone's needs or preferences. It implies the ability or intention to be versatile, adaptable, or universally appealing to a diverse group of individuals.
  • moderation in all things The idiom "moderation in all things" means that it is important to maintain a balanced and moderate approach in various aspects of life. It suggests that excessive behavior or indulgence in any particular area is not desirable, and instead, one should strive for moderation and avoid extremes. This principle applies to a wide range of situations, including personal habits, lifestyle choices, work-life balance, and even emotional reactions. By practicing moderation, one can lead a more well-rounded and sustainable life.
  • of all people/things/places The idiom "of all people/things/places" is used to express surprise, disbelief, or irony regarding a particular person, thing, or place in a given context. It emphasizes that the mentioned individual, object, or location is unexpected or unusual in the given situation.
  • all good things (must) come to an end The idiom "all good things (must) come to an end" means that positive or enjoyable experiences or situations do not last forever and eventually come to a conclusion. It emphasizes the transient nature of pleasant things in life and acknowledges the inevitability of their end or termination.
  • in/through all the years The idiom "in/through all the years" refers to a long or extended period of time, depicting a sense of continuity or endurance. It emphasizes the passage of time and the events or experiences that have occurred over the years. It suggests that something has remained constant, witnessed and persevered through the various stages or changing circumstances throughout a significant period.
  • all (fingers and) thumbs The idiom "all (fingers and) thumbs" is used to describe someone as being clumsy, awkward, or lacking coordination, particularly in manual tasks or handling objects. It implies that the person is not proficient or skilled in performing certain activities with their hands.
  • till all hours The idiom "till all hours" refers to staying awake or remaining engaged in an activity throughout the late hours of the night, often until dawn or very late at night. It implies that someone is working, partying, or otherwise occupied until the early hours of the morning.
  • all the time in the world The idiom "all the time in the world" means to have an abundance of time, indicating that you have no rush or urgency in completing something because you have a limitless amount of time available.
  • all in good time The idiom "all in good time" means that something will happen or be done at the appropriate or suitable time, without rushing or forcing it. It suggests patience and the understanding that timing is important in accomplishing or experiencing something desired.
  • time heals (all wounds), at time's a great healer The idiomatic expressions "time heals" and "time's a great healer" convey the idea that, with the passage of time, emotional or physical pain tends to diminish and eventually disappear. It suggests that over time, people become less hurt or affected by negative experiences or traumas. The proverbial saying implies that given enough time, any pain, grief, or resentment can gradually fade away and heal.
  • all the better, at so much the better The idiom "all the better" or "at so much the better" is used to express the idea that an additional advantage or improvement makes a situation even more desirable or beneficial. It suggests that something already good or positive has become even better.
  • to cap it all The idiom "to cap it all" is used to emphasize the final or worst part of a series of events or situations. It signifies the last point that makes a situation even more extreme or problematic.
  • to top it all The idiom "to top it all" means that something is added or done to make a situation even more remarkable, extraordinary, or extreme than it already was. It is used to emphasize the outrageousness or exceptional nature of something.
  • to crown it all The idiom "to crown it all" means to emphasize or highlight the final or ultimate point or event that concludes a series of actions or circumstances. It signifies that something unexpected, significant, or extraordinary has happened to top off or complete a set of circumstances, which might already be notable or surprising.
  • to top it all off, at to top it all The idiom "to top it all off" or "to top it all" is used to emphasize that something mentioned is the final or most significant factor in a series of related events or situations. It means to add a concluding remark or action that makes a situation even more remarkable, surprising, or infuriating.
  • it's all Greek to me The idiom "it's all Greek to me" means that something is completely incomprehensible or unintelligible. It is often used to express one's lack of understanding of a particular subject or language.
  • not be all it's cracked up to be The idiom "not be all it's cracked up to be" means that something is not as good, impressive, or enjoyable as it has been described or believed to be. It suggests that the actual experience or value of something does not meet expectations or live up to the hype.
  • be all mouth and no trousers, at be all mouth The idiom "be all mouth and no trousers" means that someone talks a lot or boasts about their abilities or intentions, but does not follow through with any action. It suggests that the person is all talk and lacks substance or action to back up their words.
  • all very well/fine/good The idiom "all very well/fine/good" is used to express a partial agreement with a statement or proposition. It implies that while something may have some merit or be acceptable in certain aspects or circumstances, there may be limitations or factors that need to be considered. It suggests a reservation or the need to balance the positive aspects with potential downsides or concerns.
  • all very well The idiom "all very well" is used to express agreement or acknowledgement of a statement or opinion, but with reservations or limitations. It is often used to indicate that something may be true or acceptable to a certain extent, but there are accompanying concerns or conditions.
  • be a bit of all right The idiom "be a bit of all right" is used to describe someone or something that is attractive, appealing, or impressive in some way. It can refer to physical attractiveness, talent, charm, or any other desirable quality.
  • walk all over sb The idiom "walk all over someone" means to treat someone with disrespect or disregard their feelings, opinions, or rights. It implies that one person has complete control or dominance over another and can easily manipulate or take advantage of them.
  • all the way The idiom "all the way" typically refers to completing or doing something fully, continuously, or with full commitment, without any hesitation or compromise. It suggests going the entire distance or ensuring that every step or aspect is taken into account. It can also indicate showing total support, enthusiasm, or dedication towards a person, cause, or idea.
  • all the way to The idiom "all the way to" typically means going the entire distance or continuing fully until a particular point or destination. It can also indicate complete commitment, dedication, or involvement in a task or endeavor.
  • go all the way The idiom "go all the way" generally means to fully commit to or engage in a particular course of action or achieve complete success in a venture. It can also specifically refer to engaging in sexual intercourse.
  • in all weathers The idiom "in all weathers" means in any situation or regardless of the circumstances. It implies that someone or something remains constant, consistent, or reliable even when facing challenges, difficulties, or varying conditions.
  • all is well The idiom "all is well" means that everything is going smoothly and without problems. It signifies a state of harmony, satisfaction, or contentment.
  • all well and good, at all very well The idiom "all well and good" or "all very well" is used to express that something may be acceptable, reasonable, or good in theory or in a general sense, but it may not necessarily work or be practical in reality or in specific circumstances. It implies that although there may be no immediate issue or concern with a situation or idea, it might not be sufficient or suitable when thoroughly considered or implemented.
  • all the while The idiom "all the while" means continuously or throughout a specific period of time, usually referring to something that is happening or existing concurrently with another action or event.
  • you can't win 'em all The idiom "you can't win 'em all" means that it is impossible to succeed in everything or to win every battle or competition. It acknowledges that failure or defeat is a natural part of life and that it is unrealistic to expect continuous success in every endeavor.
  • have/keep (all) your wits about you The idiom "have/keep (all) your wits about you" means to stay calm, alert, and think clearly in challenging or dangerous situations. It implies the ability to make quick and rational decisions in order to handle unexpected or difficult circumstances.
  • all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy) The idiom "all work and no play (makes Jack a dull boy)" means that if someone only focuses on work with no time for leisure or fun activities, they will become boring, uninteresting, or unhappy. It emphasizes the importance of striking a balance between one's professional obligations and personal enjoyment.
  • all in a day's work The idiom "all in a day's work" means that something, typically a task or responsibility, is considered routine, normal, or expected as part of one's job or daily activities. It implies that the task at hand is not particularly challenging or remarkable and should be handled without fuss or complaint.
  • do (all) the donkey work The idiom "do (all) the donkey work" refers to doing the majority or the most difficult part of a task or project. It implies doing the laborious or mundane aspects of a job while others may contribute less effort or avoid the more challenging aspects.
  • for all the world The idiom "for all the world" implies that something or someone appears or seems to be a certain way, often with an emphasis on the certainty, clarity, or impact of the appearance. It is used to add emphasis, certainty, or to compare to something else.
  • mean/be (all) the world to sb The idiom "mean/be (all) the world to sb" means to be extremely important, valuable, or significant to someone else. It implies that the person or thing in question holds immense emotional, sentimental, or personal value to the individual. It emphasizes the depth of one's feelings or attachment towards someone or something.
  • not for (all) the world The idiom "not for (all) the world" means that no amount of money, persuasion, or force could make someone do or change their mind about something. It implies an extreme level of resistance or refusal.
  • all/the four corners of the world/earth The idiom "all/the four corners of the world/earth" refers to every part or corner of the world, indicating a vast or widespread area. It suggests that something or someone is known or reaches every remote location across the globe. It emphasizes the notion of comprehensive coverage or influence spanning across different continents or regions.
  • have all the cares of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have all the cares of the world on your shoulders" means to feel an overwhelming sense of responsibility, burdens, or worries. It implies that one is carrying the weight of numerous problems or concerns, as if they are responsible for solving all the troubles in the world. It conveys a feeling of being overwhelmed and weighed down by the challenges and difficulties faced.
  • for all you are worth The idiom "for all you are worth" means to do or give one's maximum effort, intensity, or value in a particular situation. It implies putting forth one's utmost capability, energy, or resources into achieving a goal. It often suggests a sense of urgency or determination to make the most of a situation.
  • written all over sb's face The idiom "written all over sb's face" refers to an obvious or clear expression of emotions or thoughts that are easily discernible through a person's facial expressions and body language. It implies that the person's true thoughts, feelings, or intentions are unmistakably and visibly displayed on their face.
  • all guns blazing, at with guns blazing The idiom "all guns blazing" or "with guns blazing" refers to someone or something taking forceful and aggressive action, often with great intensity and determination. It is derived from the imagery of firing multiple guns simultaneously, indicating a strong and relentless attack or effort. The phrase can be used in various contexts, such as in sports, warfare, or intense debates, to describe a person or group pushing forward with full energy and vigor.
  • against (all) the odds/against all odds The idiom "against (all) the odds/against all odds" means to accomplish something or succeed in a situation where the chances of doing so were very low or unlikely. It refers to overcoming great difficulties, challenges, or unfavorable circumstances to achieve a particular outcome.
  • one and all The idiom "one and all" is a phrase that refers to every single person or thing in a particular group or category. It implies inclusivity, encompassing everyone without exception.
  • roots and all, at root and branch The idiom "roots and all, at root and branch" refers to a complete and thorough removal or eradication of something, often symbolized by a plant or tree. It suggests eliminating something entirely, including its deepest and most fundamental aspects. It implies going beyond surface-level changes and addressing the underlying causes and foundations of a problem or situation.
  • warts and all The idiom "warts and all" means to accept or portray someone or something completely, with all their flaws and imperfections, without trying to hide or gloss over anything negative or unattractive.
  • a good time was had by all The idiom "a good time was had by all" is used to express that everyone present at an event or gathering thoroughly enjoyed themselves and had a pleasurable experience.
  • be all mouth The idiom "be all mouth" means that someone talks a lot and boasts about what they are going to do, but fails to take any real action or follow through on their words. It implies that the person is all talk and no action.
  • be (all) downhill The idiom "be (all) downhill" typically means that something is becoming easier or more manageable. It suggests that the hardest part or the most challenging aspect has already been overcome, and from that point forward, everything will be smoother and require less effort.
  • be sb all over The idiom "be sb all over" is informal and refers to someone exhibiting characteristics or behaving in a way that is typical or characteristic of them. It suggests that the person is easily identifiable due to their recognizable traits, mannerisms, or behavior patterns. It can also imply that the person is deeply involved or completely immersed in a particular activity or situation.
  • be (all) the rage The idiom "be (all) the rage" means to be very popular or fashionable at a particular time. It refers to something that is currently in demand or the subject of widespread attention and enthusiasm.
  • be all over sb The idiom "be all over sb" typically means to constantly be giving attention or showing interest in someone, often in an intrusive or excessive manner. It can also suggest being very familiar, knowledgeable, or aware of someone's actions or behaviors.
  • be all fingers and thumbs To be all fingers and thumbs means to be clumsy, awkward, or clumsy with one's hands or actions. It describes someone who is having difficulty performing a task or handling objects skillfully.
  • be firing on all cylinders The idiom "be firing on all cylinders" means to be functioning or performing at maximum capacity and efficiency. It refers to a state where all aspects or components of a system or person are working together harmoniously and effectively.
  • not be all fun and games The idiom "not be all fun and games" means that something is not solely enjoyable or carefree, but instead involves serious or challenging aspects. It implies that a situation or activity is not just for amusement or entertainment, but also requires effort, responsibility, or potential difficulties.
  • be all (that) you can do The idiom "be all (that) you can do" means to give your maximum effort or achieve your highest potential in a particular situation or task. It encourages someone to push themselves to their limits and strive for excellence.
  • be (all) sweetness and light The idiom "be (all) sweetness and light" means to be extremely pleasant, kind, and agreeable in order to create a positive impression or avoid conflict or disagreement. It is often used sarcastically to imply that someone is being overly polite or nice in a disingenuous or insincere way.
  • be laughing all the way to the bank The idiom "be laughing all the way to the bank" means to find something extremely amusing or enjoyable, especially because it leads to financial gain or success. It refers to a situation where someone is greatly benefiting or profiting from a particular action or decision, finding it so satisfying that they are metaphorically laughing with joy as they imagine themselves going to the bank to deposit their earnings.
  • be (all) part of life's rich tapestry/pageant The idiom "be (all) part of life's rich tapestry/pageant" is a phrase that signifies the understanding and acceptance that all aspects of life, whether positive or negative, contribute to the overall beauty and richness of human existence. It emphasizes the belief that every experience, event, or person encountered on life's journey has value and significance.
  • in all my (born) days The idiom "in all my (born) days" is an expression used to emphasize that in a person's entire lifetime or experience, they have never seen or encountered something before. It highlights astonishment, disbelief, or amazement at the situation or event being referred to.
  • for all sb cares/knows The idiom "for all sb cares/knows" is used to express indifference or disregard towards someone's opinion, knowledge, or concern about a particular matter. It implies that the person in question does not have any interest or consideration for the subject being discussed.
  • that's all I/you/we need! The idiom "that's all I/you/we need!" is a phrase used to express frustration, annoyance, or exasperation with a particular situation or development. It implies that the speaker believes that the current circumstances have become even worse or more complicated as a result of something unexpected or undesirable.
  • bugger all The idiom "bugger all" means nothing or very little. It is often used to express frustration or disappointment about the lack of something or the insignificance of a situation.
  • end it all The idiom "end it all" refers to the act of committing suicide or intentionally ending one's own life.
  • in all but name The idiom "in all but name" is used to describe something or someone that is essentially or effectively the same as what is being referred to, even though it may not be officially or explicitly recognized or named as such. It suggests that the only thing lacking is formal acknowledgment or recognition.
  • by all means The idiom "by all means" means to allow or encourage someone to do something without hesitation or reservation. It expresses agreement or permission in a strong and enthusiastic manner.
  • of all people The idiom "of all people" is used to express surprise or disbelief that a particular person would be involved in a certain situation or have a particular characteristic or behavior. It implies that the person mentioned is the least expected or most unlikely to be associated with the situation or characteristic mentioned.
  • at all cost(s) The idiom "at all cost(s)" means to do something regardless of the expense, effort, or consequences involved. It implies a determination to achieve a goal or outcome regardless of any obstacles or sacrifices that may arise.
  • all told The idiom "all told" means considering everything or everyone taken into account. It is used to indicate that the total number or quantity of something or someone is being mentioned, including everything or everyone involved.
  • not all that The idiom "not all that" is used to express that something or someone is not as impressive, important, or exceptional as others may believe or claim. It implies that the subject being referenced falls short of expectations or is overhyped.
  • and all that jazz The idiom "and all that jazz" means "and other similar things," especially when used to refer to a list of unspecified or assumed additional items, topics, or activities that are related or similar to those previously mentioned. It can also be used to indicate that the speaker is referring to a general category or type without providing specific details.
  • hold all the cards The idiom "hold all the cards" means to be in a position of control or advantage in a situation. It refers to having the maximum amount of power, influence, or resources compared to others involved.
  • go all out The idiom "go all out" means to put forth maximum effort, to give something one's utmost, or to undertake a task or pursuit with great dedication and intensity. It involves going beyond the usual or expected level of effort or commitment in order to achieve a goal or achieve success.
  • after all The idiom "after all" is used to introduce a statement that may come as a surprise or contradiction to what has been previously stated or believed. It implies that, upon closer consideration or reflection, the new statement is in fact accurate or reasonable.
  • in all conscience The idiom "in all conscience" means to act in a way that is morally right or ethically acceptable. It refers to making a decision or taking a certain course of action based on one's own sense of honesty, integrity, and what is considered morally upright. It implies doing something without guilt, in accordance with one's principles, and with a clear conscience.
  • in good conscience, at in all conscience The idiom "in good conscience" or "in all conscience" describes an action or decision made with a clear and ethical mindset. It means to act or judge based on one's own sense of right and wrong, considering moral values or principles. It implies that the person believes they are acting in accordance with their own conscience and can justify their actions morally.
  • at any cost, at at all cost(s) The idiom "at any cost" or "at all cost(s)" means to do something regardless of the expense, effort, or sacrifice required. It implies a determined resolve or commitment to achieving a desired outcome, even if it involves considerable difficulties or negative consequences.
  • know all there is to know about sth The idiom "know all there is to know about something" means to have complete and comprehensive knowledge or understanding of a particular subject or topic. It suggests that the person possesses extensive information and is highly knowledgeable in a specific area.
  • in all The idiom "in all" typically means the total sum or amount of something, considering all the individual components or items. It is often used to indicate a comprehensive or complete quantity.
  • all along The idiom "all along" means from the beginning of a situation or period of time, without any interruption or change.
  • all done in, at done in The idiom "all done in" or "at done in" is used to describe someone who is physically or mentally exhausted, worn out, or completely tired. It implies that the person has exerted a lot of effort, possibly to the point of being unable to continue.
  • not at all The idiom "not at all" is a phrase used to express a polite and emphatic denial or contradiction. It is often used to indicate that someone's statement or suggestion is incorrect or untrue.
  • all at once The idiom "all at once" means suddenly or unexpectedly, often referring to the occurrence of multiple things simultaneously or simultaneously experiencing or feeling multiple emotions or sensations.
  • on all fours The idiom "on all fours" means to be on hands and knees, typically used to describe someone or something that is crawling or creeping on the ground. It can also be used figuratively to suggest being in a position of subservience or vulnerability.
  • not all roses The idiom "not all roses" means that a situation is not entirely positive or perfect, despite some positive aspects or appearances. It implies that there are challenges, drawbacks, or difficulties present that may not be immediately apparent.
  • all the more The idiom "all the more" means to emphasize or increase the degree, extent, or intensity of something.
  • all or nothing The idiom "all or nothing" refers to a mindset or approach where there is no middle ground or compromise; one must either achieve complete success or settle for complete failure. It implies that there is no room for partial efforts or partial results, and success can only be attained through absolute commitment and effort.
  • all expenses paid The idiom "all expenses paid" refers to a situation or offer where the costs and expenses related to a particular activity or travel are covered entirely or fully by someone else.
  • all of a flutter The idiom "all of a flutter" means to be in a state of nervous excitement or agitation.
  • all along the line The idiom "all along the line" means throughout a process or situation, in every aspect or at every stage. It refers to completeness, continuity, or consistency across various aspects or stages of something.
  • (all) in one piece The idiom "(all) in one piece" means to be unharmed or undamaged after a dangerous or risky situation. It can also refer to completing a journey or task without any major problems or difficulties.
  • put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "put all your eggs in one basket" means to invest or risk everything in a single venture, idea, or opportunity, rather than diversifying or spreading the risk across multiple options. It advises against relying solely on one particular thing, as the failure or loss of that one thing could result in losing everything.
  • in all honesty/seriousness/truthfulness The idiom "in all honesty/seriousness/truthfulness" is used to emphasize that what is being said is sincere, genuine, and truthful. It indicates that someone is speaking without any pretense, deception, or exaggeration. It conveys a sense of complete honesty and authenticity in the situation or statement being made.
  • all of a doodah The idiom "all of a doodah" is used to describe a state of extreme confusion, agitation, or distress. It refers to a situation or a person being overwhelmed or thrown into disarray.
  • all of a sudden The idiom "all of a sudden" means something happening unexpectedly, without any warning or prior indication. It refers to a sudden, abrupt, or surprising occurrence or change.
  • all manner of sth The idiom "all manner of something" refers to a wide variety or a range of different things or problems. It implies a diverse assortment or diverse types within a particular context.
  • the mother of all sth The idiom "the mother of all sth" is used to describe something as the biggest, largest, or most extreme of its kind. It is often used to emphasize the magnitude, intensity, or significance of a certain thing or event. For example, "the mother of all storms" would refer to an exceptionally powerful and severe storm, or "the mother of all parties" would indicate an incredibly extravagant and memorable party.
  • of every stripe/of all stripes The idiom "of every stripe" or "of all stripes" refers to a diverse or varied group or range of people or things. It indicates inclusivity and encompasses individuals or elements of different types, backgrounds, or characteristics.
  • have (all) the makings of sth The idiom "have (all) the makings of something" means to possess all the necessary qualities or components to potentially become or develop into a particular thing or outcome. It suggests that the potential for success or achievement is present based on the existing elements or attributes.
  • lord/master/mistress/king/queen of all you survey The idiom "lord/master/mistress/king/queen of all you survey" refers to having complete authority or control over a particular territory, domain, or situation. It describes a person who exercises power and influence over their surroundings or the environment they dominate. This expression emphasizes one's absolute sovereignty or reign, suggesting that they possess ultimate command or ownership of everything they can see or take charge of.
  • all over the place The idiom "all over the place" typically means disorganized, lacking focus, or inconsistent in thoughts, actions, or behavior. It describes something or someone that is scattered, haphazard, or exhibiting a lack of coherence.
  • draped all over sb The idiom "draped all over sb" typically refers to a person being physically and often affectionately clinging, leaning, or hanging on another person. It implies that the individual is in close physical proximity, possibly embracing or intertwining with the other person. This phrase usually conveys a sense of familiarity, intimacy, or possessiveness between the individuals involved.
  • (and) all the rest The idiom "(and) all the rest" is typically used to refer to the remaining or unspecified things or people in a group or category. It implies that these additional items are not individually named or mentioned, but are included collectively.
  • know all the answers "Know all the answers" is an idiom used to describe someone who has an excessive amount of knowledge or thinks they know everything. It refers to a person who always believes they have the correct answer or solution to any question or problem, often disregarding the opinions or ideas of others. They may come across as arrogant, lacking humility or open-mindedness.
  • have/hold all the aces The idiom "have/hold all the aces" means to have a significant advantage over others in a particular situation. It refers to being in a position of power or control, often having the upper hand in negotiations, competitions, or any circumstances where one has the best resources or options available.
  • for all the difference sth makes The idiom "for all the difference sth makes" is used to express that something has little or no impact or influence on a particular situation or outcome. It conveys that the mentioned thing does not change the outcome significantly, and the result would be the same regardless of its presence or absence.
  • make (all) the right, correct, etc. noises The idiom "make (all) the right, correct, etc. noises" refers to someone giving an appearance of agreement, support, or approval, often in a superficial or insincere manner. It implies that the person is merely making the expected or socially acceptable responses without truly being committed or invested in the matter.
  • let it all hang out The idiom "let it all hang out" means to completely express oneself freely and openly without holding back any emotions, thoughts, or behaviors. It suggests being authentic and uninhibited, revealing one's true self without any reservations or restrictions.
  • all hell breaks loose The idiom "all hell breaks loose" means that chaos, disorder, or intense conflict suddenly erupts, often in a situation that was previously calm or controlled. It implies a complete breakdown of order and an outburst of unruly or uncontrollable events.
  • with (all due) respect The idiom "with (all due) respect" is a polite expression used before disagreeing or criticizing someone, in an attempt to soften the impact of the statement. It acknowledges that the speaker may hold a differing opinion but aims to maintain a level of courtesy and decorum in the conversation. However, it can sometimes be used sarcastically or insincerely, emphasizing the respect while expressing disagreement.
  • all eyes are on sb/sth The idiom "all eyes are on sb/sth" means that everyone is paying attention to or watching someone or something closely. It implies that the person or thing being observed is the center of attention or focus of a particular situation.
  • (all) hot and bothered The idiom "(all) hot and bothered" refers to feeling agitated, flustered, or highly anxious about something. It is often used to describe a state of heightened emotion or distress caused by stress, frustration, or impatience.
  • all roads lead to Rome The idiom "all roads lead to Rome" means that there are many different ways to achieve a goal or reach the same outcome. Regardless of the path taken, the ultimate destination or result will be the same. It suggests that various approaches or methods can lead to a common objective.
  • to/for all intents and purposes The idiom "to/for all intents and purposes" means essentially or practically. It is used to describe a situation where the outcome or result is practically the same, even if it may not strictly meet all the technical requirements or definitions.
  • make sth (all) your own The idiom "make something (all) your own" means to personalize or customize something in a way that reflects your individuality, preferences, or style. It refers to transforming or modifying something to suit your taste or to create a sense of ownership and identity with it.
  • Abandon hope, all ye who enter here. The idiom "Abandon hope, all ye who enter here" is a phrase derived from Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy, specifically the inscription found above the gates of Hell. It is often used figuratively to warn or discourage others that once they commit to a certain course of action or enter a specific place, there will be no turning back or escaping the consequences that await them.
  • all of the above The idiom "all of the above" refers to a response or choice that includes every option presented or mentioned. It indicates that each item mentioned is applicable or accurate in a given context.
  • above all The idiom "above all" means to emphasize something as being the most important or prominent factor in a particular situation or context. It suggests that, despite other considerations, the mentioned thing or concept holds the highest priority or significance.
  • above all (else) The idiom "above all (else)" means to prioritize or emphasize something as the most important or essential above anything else. It indicates that an action, quality, or value is given the highest priority or holds the greatest significance in a particular situation.
  • according to all accounts The idiom "according to all accounts" means based on what everyone says or what multiple sources have described or reported. It indicates that the information or story being referred to is widely accepted or corroborated.
  • hold all the aces The idiom "hold all the aces" means to be in a position of advantage or superiority over others, typically with a complete control over a situation or possessing all the necessary resources or power for success.
  • Life isn't all beer and skittles. The idiom "Life isn't all beer and skittles" means that life is not always enjoyable, carefree, or easygoing. It suggests that there are hardships, challenges, and difficulties in life that cannot be avoided.
  • after all is said and done The idiom "after all is said and done" means that despite everything that has been discussed, considered, or accomplished, the final result or conclusion is what truly matters. It emphasizes the ultimate outcome or truth in a situation, beyond any additional talk or actions.
  • Let's not go through all that again The idiom "Let's not go through all that again" means to avoid revisiting or reliving a previous situation, especially one that was difficult, time-consuming, or unproductive. It implies a desire to avoid repeating past mistakes or engaging in a topic or activity that has been exhausting or futile in the past.
  • Do we have to go through all that again? The idiom "Do we have to go through all that again?" means expressing reluctance or resistance to repeat or relive a past experience, often because it was unpleasant, tedious, or unnecessary. It implies a desire to avoid rehashing the same discussion, argument, or situation that has already been dealt with in the past.
  • all agog The idiom "all agog" means to be extremely excited, eager, or enthusiastic about something. It refers to a state of anticipation and readiness for a particular event or situation.
  • be (all) part of life's rich pageant/tapestry The idiom "be (all) part of life's rich pageant/tapestry" refers to the perspective that various experiences, both positive and negative, make up the entirety of life's diverse and intricate fabric. It expresses the belief that every event, whether significant or seemingly insignificant, contributes to the overall beauty and complexity of existence. It implies acknowledging and accepting the ups and downs, joys and sorrows, as an integral part of the larger picture of life.
  • ride off in all directions The idiom "ride off in all directions" means to scatter or disperse, often without a clear purpose or direction. It implies that a group or individuals are separating and going their own separate ways, engaging in various activities without coordination or unity. The idiom can also signify chaos, confusion, or a lack of organization.
  • Everything's going to be all right The idiom "Everything's going to be all right" means that things will turn out fine or be resolved in a positive manner. It is typically used as a reassurance to someone who is worried or anxious about a situation, reminding them that there is hope and that things will work out in the end.
  • all right with The idiom "all right with" means to agree or be content with something or someone, typically indicating a state of acceptance or approval. It suggests that there are no objections or concerns regarding the situation or person in question.
  • All right for you! The idiom "All right for you!" is often used to express slight resentment or annoyance towards someone who is perceived to have an advantage or an easier situation than oneself. It implies that the person being addressed has no understanding or empathy for the difficulties or challenges faced by the speaker.
  • All right already! The idiom "All right already!" is an exclamation used to express impatience or frustration, typically when someone is annoyed by repeated requests or reminders to do something. It can also convey a sense of irritation towards excessive talking or nagging.
  • all right The idiom "all right" is used to express consent, agreement, or approval. It means that something is satisfactory, acceptable, or in order.
  • a bit of all right The idiom "a bit of all right" is used to describe someone or something that is considered attractive, pleasing, or good in quality. It implies that the person or thing being described is enjoyable, appealing, or highly regarded.
  • all but sth The idiom "all but something" typically means almost or very nearly something. It suggests that everything or everyone is included or involved except for the final aspect or detail mentioned.
  • all day long The idiom "all day long" means the entire duration of a day or an extended period of time, often implying that something happens repeatedly or continuously throughout that time.
  • all over (again) The idiom "all over (again)" means to repeat a task, process, or experience from the beginning, often implying frustration, disappointment, or a lack of progress. It refers to starting anew or going back to square one.
  • all over The idiom "all over" typically means to be in every place or area or to be scattered or spread throughout. It can also mean to be in a state of complete control or domination over someone or something, or to be finished or completed.
  • all the same (to sm) The idiom "all the same (to sm)" means that someone is indifferent or uncaring about two or more options or choices. It implies that the person does not have a preference or does not find any significant difference between the options.
  • all the time The idiom "all the time" is used to indicate that something is happening continuously or frequently without pause or interruption.
  • all eyes and ears The idiom "all eyes and ears" means to be fully attentive, alert, and focused on something or someone, typically in a keen and observant manner. It expresses the state of being completely engaged and ready to receive information or perceive any relevant details.
  • all ears The idiom "all ears" means to be fully attentive and ready to listen or pay close attention to something that is being said or discussed.
  • all around Robin Hood's barn The idiom "all around Robin Hood's barn" refers to taking a roundabout or indirect path to reach a destination or accomplish a task. It suggests unnecessarily wasting time, energy, or effort by choosing an overly complicated or circuitous route.
  • All right(y) already! The idiom "All right(y) already!" is an exclamation used to express impatience or frustration with someone or something that has been excessive, annoying, or repetitive. It indicates a desire for the situation or topic at hand to come to an end or for someone to stop what they are doing.
  • Money is the root of all evil The idiom "Money is the root of all evil" is a proverbial statement often used to convey the idea that the desire for and pursuit of wealth can lead people to act immorally or engage in unethical behavior. It suggests that money or the love of money is often the underlying cause of various negative actions or social problems. However, it is important to note that this interpretation is an adaptation of the biblical phrase "For the love of money is the root of all evil" found in the New Testament. The original phrase, as it appears in the Bible, implies that the excessive attachment or greed towards money is the root cause of many evils, rather than attributing evil to money itself.
  • 'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all The idiom "'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all" is a quote from Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "In Memoriam A.H.H." This phrase suggests that it is more preferable to experience love, even if it ultimately ends in loss or heartbreak, than to have never loved anyone at all. It conveys the idea that the joy and fulfillment that love brings outweigh the pain and sorrow that may come when it is lost.
  • (all) rolled into one The idiom "(all) rolled into one" means combining multiple qualities, characteristics, or roles within a single person or thing. It suggests that everything mentioned can be found in a singular entity or concept.
  • haven't got all day The idiom "haven't got all day" means that the person is indicating they do not have unlimited time or patience to wait or engage in a particular activity. It is often used to express impatience or to encourage others to be brief in their actions or conversations.
  • have it all together The idiom "have it all together" refers to a person who is well-organized, capable, and in control of every aspect of their life. It implies that this individual manages their personal and professional responsibilities effectively, appears composed and confident, and handles difficult situations with ease.
  • Give it all you've got! The idiom "Give it all you've got!" means to put in maximum effort, energy, and dedication in order to achieve a desired outcome or succeed at a task. It encourages individuals to give their utmost and use all their skills, abilities, and resources to accomplish a goal.
  • Idleness is the root of all evil. The idiom "Idleness is the root of all evil" means that being unoccupied or having nothing productive to do can lead one to engage in sinful or harmful activities. It suggests that boredom or lack of purpose can make individuals more susceptible to negative or immoral behaviors.
  • be as fast etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast etc. as all get out" is used to describe someone or something as being extremely fast, intense, efficient, or extreme in a particular action or quality. It emphasizes the extent or intensity of a characteristic or behavior.
  • not be all moonlight and roses The idiom "not be all moonlight and roses" means that a situation or experience is not as perfect or idyllic as it may seem or as one may expect it to be. It suggests that there are difficulties, challenges, or disappointments involved, despite initial perceptions of harmony or beauty.
  • all year round The idiom "all year round" means continuously or throughout the entire year, without any interruptions or breaks. It implies that something happens or exists consistently regardless of the season or time of year. For example, if someone says, "The resort offers activities for tourists all year round," it means the activities are available and accessible at any time, without any seasonal restrictions.
  • turn out (all right) The idiom "turn out (all right)" means that a situation or outcome is ultimately satisfactory, successful, or favorable, despite initial concerns or doubts. It implies that things have worked out well in the end.
  • run on all cylinders The idiom "run on all cylinders" means to operate or function at the highest level of efficiency, effectiveness, or capacity. It is often used to describe someone or something performing at their peak performance or optimal state. It is derived from the analogy of an engine running smoothly and powerfully when all its cylinders are in proper working order.
  • run off in all directions The idiom "run off in all directions" means to scatter or disperse in various ways or without a clear focus or direction. It implies a lack of organization or a situation where everyone is going their own way, often causing confusion or ineffectiveness.
  • do/make (all) the running The idiom "do/make (all) the running" means to take charge or assume control in a situation, often by being proactive and taking initiative. It refers to a person who is leading or directing the course of events, making decisions and influencing others. It can also imply that someone is putting in all the effort or doing a majority of the work in a particular situation or relationship.
  • fall all over yourself (to do sth) The idiom "fall all over yourself (to do something)" means to be extremely eager or enthusiastic in one's efforts to do something. It implies that someone is going out of their way and bending over backwards to accomplish a task or please someone.
  • fall all over sm The idiom "fall all over someone" refers to someone behaving overly friendly, eager, or affectionate towards another person. It implies a strong desire to please or impress that person.
  • from all corners of the world The idiom "from all corners of the world" means something or someone coming from various or diverse places across the globe. It refers to the wide range of geographical origins or locations that are represented or included.
  • know all the angles The idiom "know all the angles" means to have a thorough understanding of a situation or to be well-informed about various perspectives or aspects of a matter. It refers to being knowledgeable or shrewd in assessing and dealing with different factors or possibilities in a particular scenario.
  • have all the answers The idiom "have all the answers" means to possess all the necessary solutions or knowledge to every problem or question. It implies being knowledgeable, wise, or confident in one's ability to provide the correct response or solution.
  • It's all the same to me The idiom "It's all the same to me" means that it makes no difference or doesn't matter at all to the speaker. It implies that they have no preference or are indifferent towards the choices, options, or outcomes being discussed.
  • at all costs The idiom "at all costs" means to do something or achieve a goal regardless of the difficulties, risks, or sacrifices involved. It implies that no matter what obstacles or challenges arise, one is determined to pursue their objective relentlessly and without hesitation.
  • by all appearances The idiom "by all appearances" means according to what can be seen or observed, based on the outward or visible signs or indications.
  • That's all she wrote! The idiom "That's all she wrote!" is typically used to convey that there is nothing more to be said or done, and it signifies that a situation has reached its conclusion or end. It implies that there is nothing further to add or expect.
  • (all) at sea (about sth) The idiom "(all) at sea (about sth)" means to be confused, disoriented, or uncertain about something. It indicates a lack of understanding or knowledge, leaving someone feeling lost or unsure.
  • a man for all seasons The idiom "a man for all seasons" refers to someone who is versatile, adaptable, and able to handle various situations or roles effectively, regardless of the circumstances. This person is typically flexible, versatile, and capable of thriving in different conditions or environments. They are skillful, versatile, and well-suited to any occasion or challenge that comes their way.
  • I've never felt/heard/seen etc. sth in all my (born) days! The idiom "I've never felt/heard/seen etc. sth in all my (born) days!" is used to express extreme surprise or disbelief about something, emphasizing that the person has never experienced or encountered such a thing before in their entire life.
  • If that don't beat all! The idiom "If that don't beat all!" is an expression used to convey surprise, astonishment, or disbelief in response to an unexpected or unusual event or situation. It is often used when something is particularly remarkable or goes beyond what was expected or anticipated.
  • Don't spend it all in one place The phrase "Don't spend it all in one place" is an idiomatic expression commonly used to advise someone against using up or wasting all of their money or resources in a single location or on a single purchase. It implies that individuals should distribute their spending or investment wisely, rather than squandering everything in a single instance.
  • shame of it (all) The idiom "shame of it (all)" refers to a feeling of disappointment, regret, or sorrow over a situation or circumstances that are disgraceful, unfortunate, or could have been better. It expresses a sense of sadness or frustration regarding something that is considered shameful or pitiable.
  • all shapes and sizes The idiom "all shapes and sizes" refers to a wide variety of things or people, emphasizing the diversity or assortment of different forms or types. It implies that the range can include differences in appearance, characteristics, or dimensions.
  • get away from it all The idiom "get away from it all" means to take a break or retreat from one's usual routine, surroundings, or responsibilities in order to relax or find peace. It refers to the act of temporarily escaping or distancing oneself from the pressures, stress, or demands of daily life.
  • away from it all The idiom "away from it all" means to be in a place or situation that is far from the stresses, worries, or responsibilities of daily life. It suggests a desire for solitude, tranquility, relaxation, or escape from the demands of work, family, or routine.
  • all wool and no shoddy The idiom "all wool and no shoddy" means that something or someone is of the highest quality, genuine, and without any inferior or deceitful elements. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is authentic, reliable, and trustworthy. This expression originated from the wool processing industry, where "shoddy" refers to a low-quality replacement for wool. Therefore, "all wool and no shoddy" emphasizes the absence of any substandard or deceitful parts.
  • as bad as all that The idiom "as bad as all that" means that something is just as terrible or severe as it has been described or suggested to be. It implies that the situation or thing in question is truly as negative, difficult, or unpleasant as it appears or is believed to be.
  • be all over the shop The idiom "be all over the shop" means to be disorganized, scattered, or lacking focus. It describes a situation or a person who is in a state of confusion or disorder, either in their thoughts or actions.
  • It's all over bar the shouting. The idiom "It's all over bar the shouting" means that a situation or event is almost finished or concluded, and only minor or insignificant details or formalities remain. It suggests that the outcome is virtually certain and there is no need for further worry or effort. The phrase "bar the shouting" emphasizes that nothing significant or consequential is left to be done.
  • It's all over but the shouting. The expression "It's all over but the shouting" means that a situation or event is essentially finished or concluded, except for the final commotion or celebration that may follow. It suggests that the outcome is practically certain, and the only remaining thing to do is acknowledge or celebrate the inevitable result.
  • all show and no go The idiom "all show and no go" is used to describe someone or something that appears impressive or capable at a surface level but lacks substance or the ability to perform effectively. It implies that there is a noticeable emphasis on style or appearance, but little to no actual ability or practicality.
  • I was up all night with a sick friend. The idiom "I was up all night with a sick friend" means that the person spent the whole night taking care of or attending to a friend who was unwell. It implies that the individual sacrificed their sleep or personal time to provide assistance and support for their sick friend.
  • laugh all the way to the bank The idiom "laugh all the way to the bank" means to be extremely happy or satisfied, often in a mocking or triumphing way, when one has made a considerable amount of money or financial gain from a particular situation or endeavor.
  • cry all the way to the bank The idiom "cry all the way to the bank" means to express a feeling of unhappiness or dissatisfaction despite benefiting or gaining financially from a situation. It implies that the individual is reluctantly accepting the financial gain while still feeling upset or discontent in some way.
  • not for all the tea in China The idiom "not for all the tea in China" means that there is nothing in the world or no amount of wealth or reward that could persuade someone to do or give up something. It emphasizes the refusal or unwillingness to do something, even if offered a significant or seemingly irresistible compensation.
  • put all one's eggs in one basket The idiom "put all one's eggs in one basket" means to rely solely on one thing or option, without having any backup or alternative plans. It signifies the act of concentrating all resources, efforts, or expectations into a single venture or possibility, which can be risky and leaves no room for compensation if it fails or goes wrong.
  • all of a size The idiom "all of a size" means that things or people are all the same or equal in size, quantity, or importance, possessing no noticeable differences or variations.
  • that beats all to pieces The idiom "that beats all to pieces" means that something is exceptionally surprising, astonishing, or superior beyond expectations. It signifies that the situation or thing being referred to surpasses all others in terms of quality, magnitude, or uniqueness.
  • not be all beer and skittles The idiom "not be all beer and skittles" is used to express the idea that something is not as enjoyable or pleasant as it may initially appear. It implies that there are challenges, difficulties, or adverse aspects to a situation despite its apparent allure or excitement.
  • (all) beer and skittles The idiom "(all) beer and skittles" is a phrase used to describe a situation or period of time characterized by enjoyable, carefree, and pleasurable experiences. It refers to a life or experience that is filled with constant fun, happiness, and lack of worries. However, it can also be used sarcastically to convey the notion that things are not as easy or enjoyable as they may seem.
  • beggar (all) description The idiom "beggar (all) description" is used to describe something that is so extraordinary, unique, or remarkable that it surpasses any possible description or portrayal. It implies that words alone are insufficient to accurately convey or capture the magnitude or qualities of a particular person, event, situation, or object.
  • (all) other things being equal The idiom "(all) other things being equal" means that in a given situation, assuming that no other factors or variables have changed, the outcome or result can be predicted or compared more accurately. It implies that when all other conditions remain constant or unchanged, a particular factor or variable is the sole determinant of the outcome.
  • slobber (all) over sm or sth The idiom "slobber (all) over someone or something" refers to showing excessive admiration, affection, or enthusiasm towards someone or something. It implies expressing intense admiration or love in an exaggerated or over-the-top manner. It can also indicate behaving in a way that is overly enthusiastic or fawning.
  • slosh sth (all) over sm or sth The idiom "slosh sth (all) over sm or sth" means to spill or scatter liquid in a careless or uncontrolled manner, usually onto someone or something. It can also refer to the act of splattering or splashing liquid in a disorganized way, resulting in a messy or untidy appearance.
  • all smiles The idiom "all smiles" refers to a person appearing cheerful, happy, and friendly, often in a situation where others might feel unhappy or discouraged. It implies that someone is displaying a positive and optimistic demeanor, regardless of the circumstances or challenges they may be facing.
  • all the more reason for The idiom "all the more reason for" means that a particular circumstance or reason provides additional justification or incentive to do something or to hold a particular belief. It suggests that the existing reasons or justifications are strengthened or emphasized by the given circumstance.
  • all better The idiom "all better" means that something has been fixed or resolved, typically referring to a situation or a problem that has been resolved satisfactorily. It is often used to indicate that a person or a situation has been restored to a healthy or improved state.
  • be all fur coat and no knickers The idiom "be all fur coat and no knickers" is used to describe someone or something that may appear impressive, elegant, or sophisticated on the surface, but lacks substance, depth, or integrity beneath the surface. It suggests that the person or thing may appear to have a certain quality but actually lacks or fails to deliver on that attribute.
  • big as all outdoors The idiom "big as all outdoors" is used to describe something or someone as being exceptionally large or immense in size. It is often used figuratively to convey a sense of grandeur, magnitude, or overwhelming scale.
  • know where all the bodies are buried The idiom "know where all the bodies are buried" means to possess secret or incriminating knowledge about a particular situation, organization, or group of people, usually referring to knowledge that could cause harm or create trouble if exposed. It implies having comprehensive and confidential information about hidden or illegal activities, scandals, or unethical behavior, which can be used as leverage or for protection.
  • splash sth (all) over sm or sth To "splash (something) (all) over (someone or something)" is an idiomatic expression that means to apply or spread something, often in a haphazard or careless way. It can refer to spreading a liquid or substance physically, but it is more commonly used metaphorically to describe actions or behaviors that are done without much thought or consideration. In this sense, it implies a lack of precision or care in how something is done or shared.
  • be all brawn and no brains The idiom "be all brawn and no brains" refers to a person who is physically strong or muscular but lacks intelligence, intellectual ability, or common sense. It suggests that the person's physical strength or appearance is disproportionate to their mental capabilities or intelligence.
  • (all) in one breath The idiom "(all) in one breath" means doing or saying something quickly and without pausing. It implies performing an action swiftly or expressing something in a concise manner without taking breaks or interruptions.
  • (all) steamed up The idiom "(all) steamed up" means to be very angry, agitated, or worked up about something. It refers to a state of intense frustration or irritation.
  • bring all together The idiom "bring all together" means to unite or gather various people, ideas, or elements for a common purpose or objective. It refers to the act of consolidating or harmonizing different aspects to create a cohesive whole.
  • (but) still and all The idiom "(but) still and all" means acknowledging a particular point or argument but asserting or emphasizing another perspective or consideration. It is typically used to introduce additional thoughts or counterpoints after conceding or recognizing a previous argument.
  • play it for all it's worth The idiom "play it for all it's worth" means to take full advantage of a situation or opportunity by using all possible resources, skills, or efforts to benefit oneself. It implies making the most out of a particular circumstance, giving it the utmost importance or value.
  • all work and no play The idiom "all work and no play" is used to refer to a situation where someone is excessively focused on work and neglecting leisure or recreational activities. It implies a lack of balance or enjoyment in one's life due to an excessive dedication to work.
  • pull all the stops out The idiom "pull all the stops out" means to make a maximum effort, using all available resources and strategies to achieve a desired outcome. It implies going above and beyond, leaving no stone unturned, and doing everything possible to ensure success or accomplish a particular goal.
  • all vine and no taters The idiom "all vine and no taters" is not a common or widely recognized phrase. Therefore, there is no standard definition for it. It appears to be a play on the expression "all sizzle and no steak," which means someone or something that is all talk but lacks substance or action. In this context, "vine" may refer to the decorative or climbing part of a plant, while "taters" likely means potatoes (a common slang term for them). So, a possible interpretation could be someone or something that is all show, superficial, or ornamental without any real substance or value. However, it is important to note that this interpretation is speculative, and the idiom may have other meanings in different contexts or regions
  • strew sth (all) over sth The idiom "strew sth (all) over sth" means to scatter, spread, or disperse something randomly or haphazardly across a surface or area. It implies a lack of organization or tidiness.
  • all but The idiom "all but" is used to indicate that something or someone is very close to or almost in a particular state, condition, or position. It implies that only a small or insignificant aspect remains to complete the situation or achieve the desired outcome. It can suggest that something is virtually certain or practically accomplished.
  • call (all) the shots The idiom "call (all) the shots" means to have the authority or the power to make decisions or control a situation. It is often used to describe someone who has complete control or dominance over a particular situation or group.
  • to cap/crown/top it all The idiom "to cap/crown/top it all" means to add something that is even more surprising, significant, or remarkable to an already impressive or overwhelming situation.
  • be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out" is used to describe extreme intensity, speed, attractiveness, thinness, or any other quality in a person or object. It implies that something or someone possesses the mentioned quality to an exceptional and unparalleled extent. It emphasizes the idea of being the most extreme or superlative in a particular aspect.
  • swarm (all) over sm or sth The idiom "swarm (all) over someone or something" means to gather or converge in large numbers around a person or thing, often in an overwhelming or chaotic manner. It implies that a large group of people or things are crowded around or covering someone or something.
  • have all the cards The idiom "have all the cards" means to have complete control or power over a situation or to possess all the advantageous or influential factors necessary for achieving a desired outcome. It suggests being in a dominant position where one holds all the necessary resources or information to manipulate or control the outcome to their advantage.
  • for all I care The idiom "for all I care" is used to express a lack of concern or indifference towards something or someone. It typically indicates that the speaker does not have any interest, opinion, or emotional investment in the matter being discussed.
  • for all cares The idiom "for all cares" typically means regardless of what others may think or say, without concern for anyone's opinion or judgment. It suggests complete indifference or disregard towards others' opinions or feelings.
  • (it's) all systems go The idiom "(it's) all systems go" means that everything is ready and fully operational, and that a project, plan, or activity can proceed without any obstacles or delays.
  • all systems go The idiom "all systems go" is used to indicate that everything is ready and prepared for a particular action, plan, or event to begin or proceed. It implies that all required components are in place and functioning properly, and there are no obstacles or hindrances to progress. It signifies that it is the right time to proceed with the planned activity without any constraints or delays.
  • All systems (are) go. The idiom "All systems (are) go" means that everything is ready, prepared, or organized for a particular task or event. It often implies that all obstacles or hindrances have been resolved, and all necessary components are in place for a successful outcome.
  • put (all) your cards on the table The idiom "put (all) your cards on the table" means to be completely honest and open about your thoughts, feelings, or intentions. It refers to revealing all relevant information or sharing everything you know on a particular topic, leaving nothing hidden or undisclosed. It implies transparency and a willingness to discuss things openly without any hidden agendas or deceit.
  • All cats are gray in the dark The idiom "All cats are gray in the dark" means that in certain situations, it is difficult to discern or distinguish between different options or choices because the conditions or circumstances are unfavorable or uncertain. It suggests that when lacking clear information or when faced with limited options, things become indistinguishable or less important.
  • It takes all kinds (to make a world). The idiom "It takes all kinds (to make a world)" implies that people vary greatly in their characteristics, opinions, or behavior, and that this diversity is necessary for the world to function harmoniously. It suggests that it is essential to embrace and accept individuals with different perspectives and qualities, as they contribute to the overall richness and completeness of life.
  • all the rage The idiom "all the rage" refers to something that is currently very popular or fashionable.
  • be all talk The idiom "be all talk" means someone who talks a lot about doing something, but never actually takes action or follows through with their words. It refers to a person who makes empty promises or boasts about their abilities without any intention or ability to back it up.
  • all talk The idiom "all talk" refers to someone who frequently boasts, makes promises or claims, but never takes action or follows through on their words. They may talk confidently or with enthusiasm about their abilities or future plans, but their actions do not match their words, leading others to perceive them as insincere or unreliable.
  • all the more reason for (doing sth) The idiom "all the more reason for (doing something)" means that a given situation or circumstance provides additional justification or motivation for taking a specific action. It suggests that the existing reasons for doing something are even more compelling or valid, therefore strengthening the argument or case for that action.
  • It'll all come out in the wash The idiom "It'll all come out in the wash" means that eventually, all the facts or details about a situation will be revealed or become known, often implying that the truth or the right outcome will prevail. It suggests that any uncertainties or hidden elements will be resolved or clarified over time. It is similar to saying "the truth will come out" or "everything will be revealed eventually."
  • come one, come all The idiom "come one, come all" is an invitation or call urging people of all backgrounds or walks of life to attend or participate in an event or activity. It signifies inclusivity and encourages everyone, without any specific restrictions, to be present and take part.
  • first of all The definition of the idiom "first of all" means as the first point or in the first place when listing or discussing multiple points or reasons. It is used to emphasize that the following statement is the initial or primary consideration before moving on to other matters.
  • in (all) good conscience The idiom "in (all) good conscience" is used to express that someone cannot morally or ethically do something because it conflicts with their principles or values. It implies that one feels a sense of guilt or disapproval when considering the action in question.
  • Conscience does make cowards of us all. The idiom "Conscience does make cowards of us all" is a line from William Shakespeare's play, Hamlet. It means that our moral and ethical conscience often leads to fear or hesitation, preventing us from taking action or making choices that may conflict with our values. It suggests that the presence of a strong conscience can sometimes hinder or restrict our actions due to the concerns or guilt associated with our choices.
  • tell all The idiom "tell all" refers to the act of revealing or disclosing all the details, secrets, or information about a particular situation, event, or person. It usually implies being completely honest and open, holding nothing back.
  • all over creation The idiom "all over creation" means to be spread out or scattered in various locations or places. It implies that something or someone is in many different places, often without a specific pattern or direction.
  • all hell broke loose The idiom "all hell broke loose" means that a chaotic and uncontrollable situation or event has suddenly occurred. It implies a sudden eruption of disorder, confusion, or intense conflict, often with a sense of urgency or danger.
  • Of all things! The idiom "Of all things!" is used to express surprise or disbelief towards a particular event or occurrence, often emphasizing that it is unexpected or unlikely.
  • be all things to all men The idiom "be all things to all men" typically means trying to please or satisfy everyone, or attempting to meet everyone's expectations or needs. It implies trying to be versatile and accommodating to a wide range of people or situations, often at the expense of personal priorities or values.
  • all things to all people The idiom "all things to all people" refers to someone or something that tries to please or accommodate everyone's preferences or needs, often resulting in diluted or inconsistent actions or opinions. It implies the unrealistic or impossible task of satisfying every individual or group completely.
  • all things to all men The idiom "all things to all men" refers to someone who tries or claims to please or cater to everyone, often by adapting their behavior or opinions to fit different individuals or groups. It implies that the person is attempting to be universally liked or accepted, but may also suggest a lack of authenticity or a sense of insincerity in their actions.
  • All things must pass The idiom "All things must pass" means that everything in life is temporary and will eventually come to an end or pass away. It suggests that both the good and the bad times are transitory and will give way to new experiences and phases in life. This phrase is often used to remind oneself or others to endure difficult situations as they will eventually fade away and be replaced by better times.
  • All good things must end The idiom "All good things must end" means that enjoyable or positive experiences, situations, or periods of time cannot last forever and eventually come to an end. It emphasizes the inevitable nature of change and implies that one should appreciate and cherish good times while they last.
  • cover all the bases The idiom "cover all the bases" means to ensure that all necessary actions or precautions have been taken in order to be fully prepared or to address all possible scenarios or outcomes. It originates from the game of baseball, where players must physically touch each of the four bases in order to score a run, metaphorically signifying comprehensive completion or thoroughness. In a broader context, "covering all the bases" implies thoroughness, diligence, and attentiveness in handling a task or situation.
  • common thread (to all this) The idiom "common thread (to all this)" refers to a common element or factor that can be found in various situations or events. It implies that there is a unifying characteristic, theme, or connection that runs through different aspects of a particular context or situation. This common thread helps to establish a link or understanding between different components or occurrences.
  • jump all over sb The idiom "jump all over someone" typically means to criticize, scold, or attack someone verbally, often in an aggressive or confrontational manner. It implies that the person being "jumped all over" is being heavily reproached or reprimanded.
  • jump all over sm The idiom "jump all over someone" refers to criticizing, reprimanding, or confronting someone harshly and without hesitation. It suggests a strong and immediate negative reaction to someone's words, actions, or behavior.
  • all thumbs The idiom "all thumbs" means to be clumsy or awkward, especially with one's hands.
  • at all times The idiom "at all times" means constantly, continuously, or at every moment, without exceptions or interruptions. It implies that something is ongoing or present continually without any break or variation.
  • to all intents and purposes The idiom "to all intents and purposes" means essentially or effectively. It is used to emphasize that something is so in almost all practical aspects or in all practical senses, even if there may be some technical or minor differences.
  • all sweetness and light The idiom "all sweetness and light" means to be extremely pleasant, agreeable, and harmonious. It describes a situation or person that appears to be completely perfect and without any flaws or conflicts.
  • all over town The idiom "all over town" typically means that something is widely known, talked about, or happening in various places within a particular area or community. It suggests that information, news, or an event has spread extensively and is commonly understood or noticed among people in the area.
  • a jack of all trades The idiom "a jack of all trades" refers to a person who possesses a versatile set of skills and is competent in various tasks or activities, but may not excel or specialize in any one specific area. This person is often adept at taking on different roles and responsibilities, being adaptable and resourceful in various situations.
  • jack of all trades is a master of none The idiom "jack of all trades is a master of none" refers to someone who has knowledge or skills in many different areas but lacks expertise or exceptional proficiency in any specific field. It highlights the idea that spreading oneself too thin or not focusing on becoming an expert in a particular subject can prevent true mastery.
  • jack of all trades sm The idiom "jack of all trades" refers to a person who is skilled in a wide variety of tasks or has a wide range of abilities, but is not necessarily an expert in any specific field. The "sm" abbreviation could represent various things depending on the context, but without further information, it is difficult to determine a specific meaning in this case.
  • blow sth out of (all) proportion The idiom "blow something out of (all) proportion" means to exaggerate or magnify the significance, importance, or seriousness of something, making it seem much bigger or more significant than it actually is. It refers to a situation where someone reacts or responds in an excessive or exaggerated manner.
  • all hands on deck The idiom "all hands on deck" means that everyone is needed or involved in a particular task or situation. It originated from nautical language, where it referred to the need for all crew members to help sail a ship during challenging or critical moments. However, its usage has extended beyond sailing and is now commonly used in various contexts to emphasize the importance of collective effort and participation.
  • for all intents and purposes The idiom "for all intents and purposes" means essentially or practically, often referring to a situation that is so close to being true or complete that it can be considered as such.
  • for all practical purposes The idiom "for all practical purposes" means that in the context being discussed or considered, something is considered true or valid because it is functioning or operating effectively, even if it might not be entirely accurate or complete.
  • all dressed up and nowhere to go The idiom "all dressed up and nowhere to go" is used to describe a situation where someone is fully prepared or well-prepared for an event or activity, but then it doesn't happen or they are unable to participate. It conveys a sense of frustration or disappointment due to the lack of opportunity to utilize or showcase their preparations or appearance.
  • all gone The idiom "all gone" is often used to indicate that something has been completely used up, consumed, or no longer exists. It conveys the notion of complete absence or depletion.
  • not all it is cracked up to be The idiom "not all it is cracked up to be" means that something or someone is not as good or impressive as it was believed or reputed to be. It implies that the actual experience or quality of something falls short of the expectations or hype surrounding it.
  • not all sth is cracked up to be The phrase "not all something is cracked up to be" means that something isn't as good or impressive as it was originally portrayed or believed to be. It suggests that the actual experience or reality does not meet the high expectations or hype that surrounded it.
  • with all heart The idiom "with all heart" means to do something with complete sincerity, enthusiasm, or wholehearted dedication. It implies giving your utmost effort or commitment to a task or action.
  • until all hours The idiom "until all hours" refers to a period of time late into the night or early morning. It means staying awake or working diligently until very late hours, often well past usual bedtime or normal closing time. It implies a commitment to a task or activity that extends late into the night.
  • firing on all cylinders The idiom "firing on all cylinders" means operating or functioning at full capacity or maximum efficiency. It is often used to describe someone or something that is performing exceptionally well and making the most of their abilities.
  • daddy of them all The idiom "daddy of them all" refers to something or someone that is the biggest, most important, or most influential in a particular category or group. It is used to emphasize the significant or superior nature of something or someone compared to others.
  • be all in a day's work The idiom "be all in a day's work" means that something or an experience is considered normal, routine, or not out of the ordinary for someone's job or daily responsibilities. It implies that the mentioned task or situation is something that occurs regularly without causing surprise or disturbance.
  • all the livelong day The idiom "all the livelong day" means throughout the entire day, continuously or for a long duration, without rest or cessation. It implies a sense of tirelessness or being occupied with something for an extended period of time.
  • walk all over The idiom "walk all over" means to dominate or control someone completely, or to treat someone with disrespect and take advantage of them. It usually implies that the person being "walked all over" is passive and easily manipulated or exploited.
  • all walks of life The idiom "all walks of life" refers to people from various backgrounds, professions, social classes, or stages of life. It encompasses individuals with diverse experiences, perspectives, and characteristics.
  • That (all) depends. The idiom "That (all) depends" is a phrase used to indicate that the outcome or answer is uncertain and relies on certain conditions or circumstances. It suggests that a definitive answer cannot be given without considering additional factors.
  • go the way of all flesh The idiom "go the way of all flesh" means to die or to experience the natural process of death. It refers to the mortality and eventual end that all living beings face.
  • all the way live The idiom "all the way live" refers to a situation or performance that is filled with energy, excitement, and vitality. It usually implies that the experience is dynamic, engaging, and completely immersive.
  • I hope all goes well The idiom "I hope all goes well" expresses a sincere wish or desire for a favorable outcome or successful result in a given situation.
  • make all the difference (in the world) The idiom "make all the difference (in the world)" means that something or someone has a profound and significant impact on a situation or outcome. It suggests that this element or action is crucial and transformative, leading to a significantly better or worse outcome depending on its presence or absence.
  • make all the difference The idiom "make all the difference" means to have a significant impact or result in a crucial outcome. It implies that a particular action or factor is highly influential in determining the final outcome of a situation.
  • all wet The idiom "all wet" is typically used to describe someone who is incorrect or mistaken about something. It implies that their understanding or knowledge on a subject is completely wrong or flawed.
  • be all wet The idiom "be all wet" means to be completely wrong, mistaken, or misguided about something. It suggests that the person's understanding or belief is not based on facts or reality.
  • all wool and a yard wide The idiom "all wool and a yard wide" is used to describe someone or something that is genuine, authentic, and of the highest quality. It implies that the person or thing possesses exceptional attributes or qualities, leaving no room for doubt or deception. The phrase originates from the textile industry, where fabric made entirely of wool and stretching a yard wide was highly coveted for its excellence.
  • (all) the world and his wife The idiom "(all) the world and his wife" refers to a large number or a wide variety of people, often used to emphasize that a lot of people are present or involved in a particular situation or event. It highlights the idea of inclusivity, suggesting that almost everyone and their spouse or partner is present or involved.
  • (You) can't win them all. The idiom "(You) can't win them all" means that it is not possible to succeed or be victorious in every situation or endeavor. It acknowledges that loss or failure is a normal part of life and that one should not expect to achieve success in every single attempt. It promotes acceptance and resilience in the face of defeat.
  • winner take all The idiom "winner take all" is typically used to describe a situation or competition where only the person or entity that emerges as the ultimate victor gains all the rewards or benefits, while the remaining participants receive nothing. It signifies a system or outcome in which the winner receives everything, leaving nothing for the losers.
  • for all the world like The idiom "for all the world like" is typically used to describe something or someone that closely resembles or acts exactly like something else. It suggests a strong resemblance or similarity between two things.
  • all over the earth The idiom "all over the earth" typically means to be present or scattered in various locations or regions of the world. It implies widespread or extensive coverage across different parts of the globe.
  • for all it's worth The idiom "for all it's worth" means doing something to the fullest extent possible, putting in maximum effort or extracting the maximum value from a situation or thing. It suggests making the most out of a given opportunity or resource.
  • have sb's name written all over it The idiom "have sb's name written all over it" means that something is so perfectly suited to or characteristic of a particular person that it is as if their name is literally written on it. It suggests that the person's influence, preferences, or style are so evident in the situation or object that it couldn't belong to anyone else.
  • be written all over sb's face The idiom "be written all over sb's face" means that someone's feelings, emotions, or thoughts are easily apparent or clearly visible through their facial expressions or body language. It suggests that a person's face reveals their true emotions, even if they are trying to hide or suppress them.
  • It's written all over one's face. The idiom "It's written all over one's face" means that someone's facial expression clearly reveals their thoughts, emotions, or reactions, making it evident to others. It implies that the person's feelings or intentions are so apparent that they can be easily perceived by observing their facial expressions.
  • be all dressed up and/with nowhere to go The idiom "be all dressed up and/with nowhere to go" means to be prepared or dressed in an impressive or formal manner, but without any plans or opportunities to use or showcase it. It implies a feeling of wasted effort or anticipation.
  • drool (all) over sm or sth The idiom "drool (all) over someone or something" typically means to express intense desire or admiration for someone or something in an exaggerated and often uncontrolled manner. It usually implies strong attraction or infatuation towards the person or object mentioned.
  • have all the aces The idiom "have all the aces" means to have a strong advantage, superior position, or complete control over a situation. It originates from card games, where having all the aces is a very powerful position, as the ace is usually the highest-ranking card. Therefore, to "have all the aces" suggests having an unbeatable hand or a significant advantage. This idiom is often used metaphorically to describe individuals who have all the necessary resources, knowledge, or power to succeed or exert control in a specific situation.
  • all the marbles The idiom "all the marbles" refers to a situation where the stakes are high, and the outcome determines the ultimate success or failure in a significant endeavor. It suggests that everything is at risk and the result will decide the final outcome or possession of whatever is being pursued.
  • of all places The idiom "of all places" is used to express surprise or disbelief that a particular location or situation has been chosen. It emphasizes that the chosen place is unexpected or unusual in the given context.
  • against all odds The idiom "against all odds" means to accomplish or achieve something despite facing very difficult or unlikely circumstances. It indicates a situation where the chances of success are very slim or seemingly impossible, yet the outcome or achievement is still accomplished.
  • (all) in the family The idiom "(all) in the family" refers to a situation where everything or everyone involved is closely related or connected in some way. It typically implies that there is a sense of loyalty, cooperation, and understanding among the individuals or elements within a group or system.
  • if all else fails The idiom "if all else fails" means when every other option or attempt has been tried and did not bring the desired outcome or solution, this action or course of action will be pursued as a last resort.
  • fawn (all) over sm The idiom "fawn (all) over someone" means to flatter or excessively praise someone in a way that is insincere or obsequious, often in order to gain favor or approval from that person. It implies showing excessive admiration or behaving in an overly submissive manner.
  • all night long The idiom "all night long" means continuing or occurring throughout the entire night. It refers to an activity or event that lasts from evening until morning without interruption or rest.
  • be all in the/ mind The expression "be all in the mind" means that something is purely a mental or psychological construct, often referring to a perception or belief that may not have a tangible or objective basis in reality. It implies that the situation or issue at hand is subjective and exists solely within the thoughts or imagination of an individual.
  • (all) of a piece The idiom "(all) of a piece" means that something is consistent, uniform, or similar in nature or quality. It suggests that the various parts or aspects of something are interconnected or fit together well, thereby creating a harmonious whole.
  • (all) joking aside The idiom "(all) joking aside" is used to emphasize that one is now serious or sincere, and that they are no longer making jokes or being humorous. It is typically said after a humorous or lighthearted statement is made, to transition into a more serious topic or discussion.
  • Hang it all! The idiom "Hang it all!" is an expression of frustration or annoyance, often used when facing an irritating situation or when something has not gone as planned. It is usually used to express a mild form of anger or exasperation.
  • all my eye The idiom "all my eye" is typically used to dismiss or reject something as false or untrue. It implies that the information or statement being referred to is nothing more than nonsense or exaggeration.
  • all eyes are on The idiom "all eyes are on" means that everyone's attention or focus is directed towards someone or something. It implies a situation in which people are eagerly observing or closely monitoring someone or something important.
  • all eyes The idiom "all eyes" refers to a situation where everyone is giving their full attention and focus on a particular person, event, or situation. It means that all people present are observing or watching something closely and intently.
  • It's written all over face The correct idiom is "It's written all over your face." The phrase "It's written all over your face" means that someone's emotions, thoughts, or feelings are evident or easily observable in their facial expressions. It implies that a person's face clearly reveals their true intentions or state of mind, even if they are trying to hide it. This idiom often refers to feelings like happiness, sadness, surprise, embarrassment, guilt, or excitement that can be seen in one's facial expressions.
  • be written all over face The idiom "be written all over face" is used to describe a person's emotions, thoughts, or intentions that are clearly evident and easily noticeable through their facial expressions or body language. It implies that the person's true feelings or reactions are so obvious that they can be read or understood without any further explanation.
  • all over face The idiom "all over the face" typically refers to a person's expression or appearance that clearly reveals an emotion, intention, or reaction, often indicating embarrassment, shock, or excitement. It implies that the person cannot hide or conceal their true feelings, making them evident to others.
  • for all sm's problems
  • fall all over The idiom "fall all over" means to be excessively enthusiastic, affectionate, or admiring towards someone or something. It can imply an intense display of emotions or favoritism, often going beyond what is considered appropriate or proportional.
  • Where have you been all my life? The idiom "Where have you been all my life?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise and enthusiasm upon meeting someone who is perceived as ideal or perfect. It implies that the speaker wishes they had encountered or known the person much earlier, emphasizing their admiration or attraction towards them. The phrase is often used humorously or playfully in romantic or infatuation contexts.
  • I've never felt etc. in all my days! The idiom "I've never felt etc. in all my days!" is used to express extreme surprise or astonishment at a particular situation or event. It indicates that the speaker has never experienced such a feeling or situation in their entire life.
  • All that glistens/glitters is not gold. The idiom "All that glistens/glitters is not gold" means that not everything that appears to be good or valuable is actually good or valuable. It suggests that appearances can be deceiving, and one should not judge something solely based on its external attractiveness or promises.
  • (all) for naught The idiom "(all) for naught" refers to a situation or effort that ends up being wasted or without any positive result. It suggests that all the time, energy, or resources invested in something have ultimately been in vain or pointless.
  • in (all) sb's/sth's glory The idiom "in (all) sb's/sth's glory" refers to a situation when something or someone is at their best or most impressive state, displaying their full potential or brilliance. It is often used to describe a particular moment or occurrence that showcases the peak or excellence of a person or thing.
  • jump all over The idiom "jump all over" means to criticize, reprimand, or vocally attack someone, usually in a harsh or aggressive manner. It can also refer to seizing an opportunity or taking decisive action quickly and enthusiastically.
  • for all knows The idiom "for all knows" refers to a situation where there is uncertainty or lack of information about something or someone. It suggests that the stated possibility is unknown or cannot be disproven. It implies that there is a chance or potential for the given fact, despite the lack of tangible evidence or confirmation.
  • for all I know The idiom "for all I know" is used to acknowledge uncertainty or a lack of knowledge about a particular situation or topic. It suggests that the speaker is not fully informed about the matter being discussed and is merely speculating or expressing their limited understanding.
  • all to the good The idiom "all to the good" means that something is beneficial or advantageous. It implies that a situation or outcome is favorable and favorable consequences are expected as a result.
  • make (all) the right noises The idiom "make (all) the right noises" means to give an appearance of support, agreement, or approval in order to please or appease someone, without necessarily taking any real action or having genuine feelings about the matter. It is often used to describe insincere or superficial responses.
  • be all fun and games The idiom "be all fun and games" means to be enjoyable or entertaining, usually with a light-hearted or joyful atmosphere. However, it implies that the situation can become serious or problematic if not handled carefully or thoughtfully. It suggests that there may be underlying issues or consequences that are not immediately apparent, thus caution or consideration is necessary despite the initial appearance of fun or amusement.
  • all manner of sm or sth The idiom "all manner of sm or sth" means a wide variety or assortment of something. It suggests that there is a diverse range or a multitude of options or types of a particular thing being referred to.
  • (all) grist to the mill The idiom "(all) grist to the mill" refers to any information, activity, or situation that can be useful or beneficial. It means that everything can be used to advantage or as raw material for a particular purpose. The phrase typically suggests that even challenging, difficult, or unfavorable circumstances can serve a positive intent or objective.
  • give up (all) hope The idiom "give up (all) hope" means to lose belief or expectation in the possibility of something desired or favorable happening. It implies a feeling of resignation, acceptance, or surrender to an unfavorable outcome or situation.
  • Things will work out (all right). The idiom "Things will work out (all right)" means that a current difficult or troubling situation will ultimately resolve itself in a positive or satisfactory way. It suggests that despite present challenges or uncertainties, there is a belief or hope in a favorable outcome or solution.
  • everything an' all The definition of the idiom "everything an' all" is: It is used to emphasize that something includes everything or every possible thing related to a particular topic or situation. It means including all aspects, components, details, or additional elements without excluding anything.
  • most of all "Most of all" is an idiomatic phrase that means primarily or above all else. It emphasizes that something or someone is the most important or significant aspect among others being discussed.
  • all righty The expression "all righty" is an informal way to express agreement, approval, or understanding. It is often used to show enthusiasm or readiness to proceed with something.
  • (I) haven't got all day. The idiom "(I) haven't got all day" is used to express impatience or the need to proceed quickly. It signifies that the person speaking does not want to waste time and expects a prompt action or response.
  • at all hours (of the night) The idiom "at all hours (of the night)" refers to doing something constantly or repeatedly, typically during the late hours of the night. It indicates that a person is frequently engaged in an activity without concern for the late hour or normal schedule.
  • at all hours (of the day and night) The idiom "at all hours (of the day and night)" means at any time, without regard for normal sleeping or working hours. It suggests being active or available around the clock, possibly implying irregular or excessive behavior.
  • least of all The idiom "least of all" means particularly not or especially not. It is used to emphasize that someone or something is not expected, desired, or suitable in a specific situation or for a particular action.
  • by all means of The phrase "by all means" typically means "certainly" or "definitely" and is often used to express permission or agreement. However, the addition of "of" in the expression "by all means of" does not commonly occur in idiomatic usage. It could be a case of incorrect phrasing or an altered version of the original phrase.
  • in all likelihood The idiom "in all likelihood" means that something is very probable or likely to happen.
  • in all probability The idiom "in all probability" means that something is very likely to happen or be true. It implies a high level of likelihood or certainty.
  • in no time (at all) The idiom "in no time (at all)" means that something will be done or happen very quickly, without any delay or wasting of time. It suggests that the duration of the activity or event will be remarkably short.
  • once and for all The idiom "once and for all" means to settle a matter conclusively or irrevocably, usually after a prolonged period of uncertainty, disagreement, or delay. It often implies a final decision or action that puts an end to a situation or argument, leaving no room for further debate or doubt.
  • go all the way (with sm) The idiom "go all the way (with someone)" is typically used to describe a situation where two people become physically intimate or have sexual relations. It can also refer to fully committing to a relationship or taking a course of action to its maximum extent.
  • walk all over sb/sth The idiom "walk all over sb/sth" means to treat someone or something poorly or with disrespect, often exerting dominance or control over them without resistance. It implies taking advantage of someone's weakness or vulnerability.
  • walk all over sm or sth The idiom "walk all over someone or something" means to treat someone or something with complete disrespect, taking advantage of their vulnerability or powerlessness. It implies dominating or controlling them without any regard for their feelings, opinions, or rights.
  • That's all needs
  • not have all one's marbles The idiom "not have all one's marbles" means that someone is mentally unstable, irrational, or lacks common sense. It suggests that the person is not thinking clearly or has lost their ability to make sound judgments.
  • lose (all) one's marbles The idiom "lose (all) one's marbles" means to lose one's sanity or mental faculties, to become irrational or mentally unstable. It refers to someone who is mentally unraveling or experiencing a decline in mental capacity. The word "marbles" in this context symbolizes a person's mental functioning or stability.
  • have all one's marbles The idiom "have all one's marbles" means to have full mental capacity or to be mentally sound and rational. It implies that someone is not suffering from any mental or cognitive impairment.
  • all by one's lonesm The idiom "all by one's lonesome" means to be completely alone or solitary. It indicates that someone is without the company or assistance of others.
  • have name written all over it The idiom "have name written all over it" means that something is clearly or obviously intended for a particular person or purpose. It suggests that the characteristics, qualities, or features of the thing are a perfect match or fit for a specific individual or situation.
  • That's all need! The idiom "That's all I need!" is used to express frustration or annoyance when something unwanted or troublesome occurs, suggesting that the situation has already been difficult enough and there is no desire for further complications or inconveniences.
  • is all need
  • in all modesty The idiom "in all modesty" refers to speaking about oneself or one's accomplishments in a humble or modest manner. It is often used when someone is downplaying their abilities or achievements out of humility.
  • That's all sm needs. The idiom "That's all sm needs" typically means that someone has enough of a particular negative situation or problem. It implies that anything additional would be overwhelming or burdensome for them. The term "sm" is often used as a substitute for "someone" or "someone's," indicating a general or unspecified person.
  • Not bad (at all). The idiom "Not bad (at all)" is used to express that something is actually quite good or impressive, contrary to what may have been expected or assumed.
  • against (all) the odds The idiom "against (all) the odds" refers to a situation where something happens or is achieved despite being highly unlikely or improbable. It implies that the circumstances, conditions, or probability were all working against the desired outcome, but despite the challenges, the person or thing managed to succeed or overcome those difficulties.
  • it's all up with The idiom "it's all up with" means that something is coming to an end or about to fail irreversibly. It implies that there is no hope or chance of recovery or success for the situation or person mentioned.
  • for all someone is worth The idiom "for all someone is worth" means to put forth maximum effort or utilize all of one's abilities or resources in a particular situation or endeavor. It implies that the person is exerting themselves to the fullest extent possible.
  • for (or to) all intents and purposes The idiom "for (or to) all intents and purposes" means essentially or practically, with little or no significant difference in effect or outcome. It is used to indicate that something is viewed or treated as being true or real in almost all relevant respects, even if it may not technically or precisely meet all criteria.
  • all that The idiom "all that" is often used to refer to something or someone that is of high quality, excellence, or importance. It implies that the thing or person being described is impressive or exceptional in some way.
  • in all one's born days The idiom "in all one's born days" typically means throughout one's entire life or in all of one's existence. It is often used to emphasize that something is unlikely or unexpected, as if it has never happened before in someone's entire lifetime.
  • with all one's heart The idiom "with all one's heart" means to do something with complete sincerity, enthusiasm, or dedication. It implies that someone has wholeheartedly committed themselves to a particular action, belief, or emotion. It expresses that one's intentions or emotions are sincere and genuine, without any reservation or doubt.
  • all for the best The idiom "all for the best" means that a particular outcome or situation, even if initially undesirable, will ultimately have positive or beneficial results. It implies that things happen for a reason and that what may seem unfortunate or unfavorable at first will ultimately work out or be advantageous in the long run.
  • over all The idiom "over all" refers to considering or including everything or everyone in a particular situation or context. It implies taking a comprehensive or holistic view of a situation.
  • out of all reason The idiom "out of all reason" refers to a situation or action that is completely irrational, illogical, or unreasonable. It suggests that something is beyond what can be expected or understood based on logic or common sense.
  • all manner of The idiom "all manner of" means a wide variety or diverse range of things. It suggests that there are many different types, categories, or forms of something.
  • by all manner of means The idiom "by all manner of means" means in every possible way or by any method or way imaginable. It implies a willingness to explore various options or approaches to achieve a certain outcome.
  • go for all the marbles The idiom "go for all the marbles" means to take a big risk or make a significant effort in order to achieve a major or decisive outcome. It often refers to a situation where everything is at stake and there is no room for halfway measures or lesser ambitions.
  • all set The idiom "all set" means that everything is prepared or arranged and ready to go. It suggests that all necessary actions or preparations have been completed, indicating a state of readiness or completion.
  • still and all The idiom "still and all" is used to acknowledge a counterargument or opposing viewpoint while emphasizing the speaker's assertion or opinion. It implies that despite considering other perspectives, the speaker remains convinced of their own point.
  • all aboard! The idiom "all aboard!" is an exclamation that is commonly used to instruct or signal everyone to get on board a vehicle, typically a train or a ship, before it departs. It is often used metaphorically to encourage or invite people to join in or participate in a particular activity or endeavor.
  • be what something is all about The idiomatic expression "be what something is all about" refers to understanding or knowing the most important or essential aspects of a particular thing, topic, or situation. It implies grasping the fundamental or core characteristics that define or make up that entity. It suggests having a deep understanding or awareness of the central purpose, meaning, or nature of something.
  • for all The idiom "for all" typically means despite or regardless of a particular situation or condition. It suggests that something is true or valid even under certain circumstances.
  • all in The idiom "all in" means to be fully committed or fully devoted to a particular activity or endeavor, often at the risk of personal resources or well-being. It originated from the game of poker, where a player puts all their chips into the pot, signifying their unwavering commitment to the current hand. In a broader sense, it signifies giving one's maximum effort and leaving no reserve or hesitation in pursuing a goal or taking a significant risk.
  • all in all The idiom "all in all" means considering everything or taking everything into account. It is often used to summarize or provide a conclusion after considering various aspects or points.
  • all out The idiom "all out" means to put forth maximum effort or to do something with utmost intensity and enthusiasm. It suggests giving one's best or complete dedication in a particular task or endeavor.
  • all the
  • all the better (or worse) The idiom "all the better" or "all the worse" is used to indicate that a situation has improved or deteriorated respectively. It suggests that the situation was already good or bad, and has now become even better or worse. It highlights the extent or intensity of the change.
  • all the farther (or closer, etc.) The idiom "all the farther (or closer, etc.)" is typically used to describe a situation in which something or someone is unable to progress beyond a certain point. It implies a limitation or restriction that prevents further advancement or approach in a particular context.
  • and all The idiom "and all" is used to emphasize or exaggerate the previous statement. It is often added at the end of a sentence to suggest that everything associated with the subject is included or to confirm that the statement is true in every aspect.
  • as all get-out The idiom "as all get-out" is used to intensify something, emphasizing that it is extreme, excessive, or beyond what is expected or normal. It is often used to emphasize a particular quality or characteristic of something or someone.
  • at all The idiom "at all" is used to emphasize a negative statement or to indicate that something is completely absent or lacking. It is often used in questions, negative statements, or as a response to express disbelief, surprise, or dissatisfaction.
  • the mother of all The idiom "the mother of all" is used to describe something as the most significant, largest, or extreme example of its kind. It emphasizes the magnitude, intensity, or importance of the subject being referred to.
  • not all there The idiom "not all there" is used to describe someone who is mentally or emotionally unstable, lacking common sense, or behaving in a strange or irrational manner. It suggests that the person is missing something in their mental faculties or is not mentally complete.
  • think all the world of The idiom "think all the world of" means to have a very high opinion or esteem for someone or something. It implies that the person or thing is highly valued, respected, or admired.
  • touch all the bases The idiom "touch all the bases" is derived from the sport of baseball, and it refers to completing all the necessary steps or covering all aspects of a particular situation, project, or problem before reaching a conclusion or making a decision. Just as a baseball player must touch each base in order to score a run, figuratively touching all the bases implies thoroughness, completeness, and attention to detail in addressing a task or issue.
  • all one The idiom "all one" means that everything or everyone in a given group is the same or equal. It implies that there is no difference or distinction between the individuals or elements being referred to.
  • of all others The idiom "of all others" is typically used to emphasize or single out someone or something as the best, most important, or most significant among a group of others. It suggests that there is a strong preference or exceptional quality associated with the person or thing being referred to.
  • (not) all beer and skittles The idiom "(not) all beer and skittles" is typically used to convey that a particular situation or experience is not entirely pleasant or enjoyable. It implies that one shouldn't expect everything to be easy or fun all the time. The phrase suggests that there will be challenges, difficulties, or unenjoyable aspects despite initial expectations of a favorable or desirable outcome.
  • all Greek to me The idiom "all Greek to me" means that something is completely incomprehensible or unintelligible.
  • all bark and no bite The idiom "all bark and no bite" refers to someone who talks aggressively or threatens others, but fails to follow through with any meaningful action. It describes someone who makes empty or loud claims without the ability or intention to back them up.
  • all is fair in love and war The idiom "all is fair in love and war" means that in situations involving intense emotions or conflicts, people are often allowed to do whatever it takes to achieve their goals, regardless of how moral or ethical their actions might be.
  • all singing, all dancing The idiom "all singing, all dancing" refers to something that is highly advanced, modern, or technologically sophisticated. It is often used to describe a product, system, or technology that is equipped with many advanced features or functions, offering a comprehensive and impressive solution. It suggests that the thing being described is not only capable of performing its intended task but also includes various additional features or enhancements that contribute to its overall excellence.
  • all in a day’s work The idiom "all in a day’s work" means that something is a typical or expected part of one's job or daily routine, and is therefore not surprising or particularly difficult. It implies that the task or situation described is just another task that one is accustomed to handling.
  • all hell will let loose The idiom "all hell will let loose" means that a chaotic or extremely disruptive situation will occur, often implying that there will be a significant outburst of anger, violence, or trouble. It suggests that once the situation escalates or a certain threshold is crossed, there will be widespread mayhem or turmoil.
  • all up with The idiom "all up with" typically means all finished, ruined, or in a state of complete failure or defeat.
  • don’t put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "don't put all your eggs in one basket" means to not concentrate all your efforts or investments into a single thing or option, as it increases the risk of losing everything if that one thing fails or goes wrong. It suggests the importance of diversification and spreading one's resources or investments across multiple options to minimize risk.
  • jack of all trades The idiom "jack of all trades" refers to a person who has many skills or can do many different types of work. It suggests that the person has a wide range of abilities, but may not be an expert in any particular field.
  • not all it’s cracked up to be The idiom "not all it's cracked up to be" is used to express disappointment or the belief that something is not as good as others have portrayed or anticipated it to be. It suggests that the reality of a situation, event, or thing does not meet the high expectations or positive reputation that surrounds it.
  • uncle Tom Cobley and all The idiom "uncle Tom Cobley and all" refers to a list of numerous people or things, often used humorously or to emphasize the inclusiveness of a group. It originates from a Devonshire folk song called "Widdecombe Fair" which mentions Uncle Tom Cobley and various other individuals, conveying a sense of abundance or multitude. So, the phrase is used to represent an extensive collection or a wide range of things or people.
  • you can’t win them all "You can't win them all" is an idiomatic expression that means not every endeavor or situation will result in success. It acknowledges that sometimes, despite our best efforts or intentions, we won't always achieve the desired outcome or win every battle or contest. It reminds us to accept and learn from failure or disappointment, and move forward with resilience and a positive attitude.
  • at all cost/costs The idiom "at all cost/costs" means to do something or achieve a particular outcome regardless of the difficulties, sacrifices, or consequences involved. It implies a strong determination or commitment to achieve a goal, even if it requires great effort or risks.
  • damn all The idiom "damn all" is an expression used to convey complete rejection, disregard, or contempt for something or someone. It implies that there is no value or worth in the subject being discussed. It can also express frustration or dissatisfaction with a situation.
  • push all the (right) buttons The idiom "push all the (right) buttons" refers to skillfully manipulating or influencing someone or something by using the most effective and appropriate methods or techniques. It implies that the person is able to understand what motivates or excites others and can consistently elicit the desired responses or reactions.
  • press all the (right) buttons The idiom "press all the (right) buttons" typically refers to the ability to say or do things that elicit a positive or desired response from someone or something. It suggests having a keen understanding of how to appeal or influence a particular person or situation effectively.
  • all over the lot The idiom "all over the lot" refers to someone or something that is scattered, disorganized, or lacking focus. It typically implies a lack of coordination or coherence in actions, thoughts, or plans.
  • all hands to the pump The idiom "all hands to the pump" means that everyone is required to contribute and work together in order to address a crisis or urgent situation. It originated from the practice of using a pump to remove water from a ship, requiring all crew members to assist by operating the pump's handle simultaneously.
  • be all the same to somebody The idiom "be all the same to somebody" typically means that someone is indifferent or does not have any preference or preference towards a particular matter or choice. It implies that the outcome or option being discussed has no influence or significance to that person.
  • be all things to all men/people The phrase "be all things to all men/people" is an idiom that means to try to please everyone, accommodate all preferences or fulfill all requests. It implies attempting to meet the diverse needs and expectations of different individuals or groups, often resulting in spreading oneself too thin or compromising personal values.
  • for all (the world) to see The idiom "for all (the world) to see" means something that is highly visible or obvious to everyone, without any effort to conceal or hide it. It refers to something being public or easily observed by anyone.
  • be all in somebody’s/the mind The idiom "be all in somebody’s/the mind" refers to when someone or something occupies a person's thoughts continuously, becoming the main focus or preoccupation in their mind. It implies that the subject or idea is dominant and cannot be easily disregarded or ignored.
  • be downhill all the way The idiom "be downhill all the way" means that something is becoming progressively easier or simpler, often implying that a situation or task requires less effort, skill, or hardship as time goes on. It suggests that the path ahead is smooth and without obstacles, allowing for a smooth and effortless journey or process.
  • all over the shop The idiom "all over the shop" means being disorganized, lacking coherence or consistency, or being scattered and unpredictable in one's actions, ideas, or performance. It typically refers to situations or individuals that are chaotic, jumbled, or lacking focus.
  • on/from all sides The idiom "on/from all sides" refers to a situation where someone or something is being surrounded or approached by multiple entities, opinions, or influences. It implies that there is pressure or attention coming from every direction, often making it difficult to escape or make a decision.
  • put an end to it all The idiom "put an end to it all" typically means to stop or finish something in a decisive or final manner, often implying a sense of closure or resolution.
  • a/the something to end all sths The idiom "a/the something to end all sth" is used to refer to something that is considered the best, most extreme or ultimate example of its kind. It suggests that the thing being described is so exceptional that it surpasses all others and sets a new standard or benchmark.
  • be written all over somebody’s face The idiom "be written all over somebody’s face" means that someone's feelings, emotions, or thoughts are very apparent or evident through their facial expressions or body language. It implies that the person's true or honest reactions are easily observable and can be easily read or understood by others.
  • that’s about all The phrase "that's about all" means that there is nothing more to add or say about a particular topic or situation. It indicates that everything relevant or important has been expressed or completed.
  • by/from all accounts The idiom "by/from all accounts" means that according to what has been said or written about a particular person or situation, it is generally agreed upon or widely believed to be true. It suggests that the information or opinions received from different sources consistently support the same conclusion or understanding.
  • all found The idiom "all found" typically means that everything necessary or required has been provided or taken care of. It often refers to someone being provided with all the resources, materials, or support they need for a particular task or endeavor.
  • working/firing on all cylinders The idiom "working/firing on all cylinders" is used to describe a situation or person that is functioning at full capacity or maximum efficiency. It suggests that all aspects or components are operating effectively and harmoniously, similar to the smooth and powerful functioning of an engine running on all cylinders.
  • and all that (jazz, rubbish, stuff, etc.) The idiom "and all that (jazz, rubbish, stuff, etc.)" is used to refer to other similar or related things or concepts that are not explicitly mentioned. It can be used to convey a lack of specificity or to summarize a broader category or range.
  • not all that good, well, etc. The idiom "not all that good, well, etc." is typically used to express disappointment or a lack of enthusiasm about someone or something. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is not as impressive, exceptional, or remarkable as expected or previously thought. It suggests a lower level of quality or performance than initially perceived.
  • not as bad(ly), etc. as all that The idiom "not as bad(ly), etc. as all that" means that something or someone is not as awful, severe, or negative as it may have been initially perceived or described. It suggests that the situation or person in question is actually less negative or troublesome than implied or expected.
  • of all the…
  • of all people, things, etc. The idiom "of all people, things, etc." is used to express surprise or irony about a specific person, thing, or situation mentioned. It emphasizes the unexpectedness or unusualness of the subject in question.
  • your all
  • all in one The idiom "all in one" generally refers to something that combines or includes everything that is needed or desired in a single item or entity. It represents a comprehensive or complete solution that fulfills multiple purposes or functions.
  • all around The idiom "all around" typically means in all aspects or from every angle. It refers to a situation or person that excels in various ways or displays comprehensive qualities. It can also indicate overall ability or performance in a particular area.
  • all the better, harder, etc. The idiom "all the better, harder, etc." is used to emphasize that something is more desirable, challenging, or intense than it would otherwise be. It conveys the idea that the increased degree or quality of something is advantageous or preferable in a particular situation.
  • all of something The idiom "all of something" means the entirety or complete amount of a particular thing or idea. It emphasizes the full scope or extent of whatever is being described.
  • all round The idiom "all round" is typically used to describe something or someone that is characterized by a combination of various qualities or abilities. It suggests that the person or thing is well-rounded, versatile, and capable in multiple areas or aspects. It implies a level of proficiency, competence, or performance that covers all aspects or aspects of a particular subject or field.
  • all there The idiom "all there" typically refers to someone who is mentally alert, intelligent, or sane. It means that the person has all their mental faculties functioning properly.
  • be all about somebody/something The idiom "be all about somebody/something" means to be completely focused, obsessed, or dedicated to a particular person or thing. It describes someone's intense interest or involvement with someone or something specific, often to the exclusion of other aspects or factors.
  • be all for something/for doing something The idiom "be all for something/for doing something" means to be completely in favor of, enthusiastic about, or supportive of something or a particular action. It indicates wholehearted approval or agreement with a specific idea, decision, plan, or course of action.
  • be all over somebody The idiom "be all over somebody" typically means to be excessively affectionate, attentive, or even clingy towards someone. It implies that a person is showing an intense level of interest or involvement in another person, often to the point of being overwhelming or intrusive.
  • be all that The idiom "be all that" means to be extremely impressive or exceptional in a particular way. It is often used to describe someone who possesses extraordinary qualities or abilities and stands out among others in a specific field or area.
  • be all up (with somebody) The idiom "be all up with somebody" means to be in a state of trouble, failure, or difficulty with someone. It suggests that there is a significant issue or conflict in a relationship or situation, often resulting in negative consequences.
  • I’m all right, Jack The idiom "I'm all right, Jack" refers to a selfish or self-centered attitude where a person feels unconcerned about the problems or difficulties faced by others as long as they are personally unaffected or benefitting from a situation or circumstance. It implies a lack of empathy or willingness to help others in need.
  • it’ll be all right on the night The idiom "it’ll be all right on the night" means that despite any current issues or problems, everything will work out and be successful in the end, especially with regard to a performance or event. It is often used to express confidence that any difficulties or mistakes will be resolved or overcome during the final presentation or execution.
  • have/know all the answers The idiom "have/know all the answers" means to believe or act as if one possesses all the knowledge or solutions to a problem or situation. It implies being excessively confident or having an exaggerated sense of self-assurance in one's ability to provide correct answers or solutions.
  • all the best The idiom "all the best" is a phrase used as a friendly closing or a way to wish someone well. It is commonly used to convey good wishes, success, or luck to someone in various situations.
  • all bets are off The idiom "all bets are off" means that previous expectations or agreements no longer apply, and the situation has become unpredictable or uncertain. It suggests that any previous assumptions, plans, or bets made are now void and may need to be reconsidered due to a change in circumstances.
  • tick all the/somebody’s boxes The idiom "tick all the/somebody’s boxes" means to meet or fulfill all of someone's criteria or requirements. It suggests that something or someone meets all the desired qualities or specifications needed for a particular situation or preference.
  • to cap/top it all The idiom "to cap/top it all" means to add something, often negative or surprising, to a list of already existing problems or events, making the situation even worse or more unexpected. It signifies the final and most notable addition to an already challenging or remarkable series of occurrences.
  • for all you, I, they, etc. care The idiom "for all you, I, they, etc. care" is used to express one's feelings of indifference or lack of concern towards someone or something. It implies that the speaker believes the person being referred to doesn't care at all, suggesting a lack of empathy or consideration.
  • not have all day The idiom "not have all day" means to be in a hurry or not have a lot of time. It implies that someone cannot or does not want to spend excessive time on a particular task or activity.
  • all able-bodied people The idiom "all able-bodied people" refers to individuals who are physically capable and are not hindered by any physical disabilities or limitations. It usually emphasizes inclusivity and implies that everyone who is capable of performing a certain task or participating in a specific activity should do so.
  • by all accounts The idiom "by all accounts" refers to the general consensus or judgment based on various sources or opinions. It implies that multiple people or sources have provided similar information or opinions about a particular subject or situation.
  • all present and accounted for The idiom "all present and accounted for" means that everyone or everything that is expected or required is present and has been verified. It is commonly used in situations where a head count or inventory is taken, and there are no missing or unaccounted individuals or items. This expression is often used in military or organizational contexts to confirm that all members or resources are present and ready for action.
  • all over hell's half acre The idiom "all over hell's half acre" is used to describe something or someone that is scattered, disorganized, or spread out in a wide and chaotic manner. It implies a lack of focus, direction, or order.
  • all over the board The idiom "all over the board" refers to something or someone being disorganized, inconsistent, or scattered in their thoughts, actions, or performance. It implies a lack of focus or direction, often resulting in confusion or inefficiency.
  • all over the map The idiom "all over the map" refers to something or someone that is disorganized, inconsistent, or lacking a clear direction or focus. It implies that the person, idea, or thing in question is scattered, jumping from one concept or idea to another without a coherent plan or pattern.
  • all talk (and no action) The idiom "all talk (and no action)" refers to someone who frequently makes promises, boasts, or talks about doing something, but never takes any actual steps or actions to follow through or achieve their claims. It portrays a person who talks a lot but fails to back it up with action or accomplishment.
  • what's all this in aid of? The idiom "what's all this in aid of?" is commonly used to express confusion or frustration about the purpose or significance of something. It is often posed as a rhetorical question, suggesting that the speaker fails to see the point or benefit of the situation or actions being discussed.
  • all good things come to an end The idiom "all good things come to an end" means that pleasant, enjoyable, or positive events or experiences cannot last forever, and eventually, they will come to a conclusion or cease to exist.
  • it's all fun and games until someone loses an eye The expression "it's all fun and games until someone loses an eye" is used to caution or remind people that activities or situations initially considered harmless or enjoyable can quickly turn dangerous or serious, often resulting in unforeseen consequences or harm. It serves as a warning to exercise caution and not overlook the potential risks involved even in seemingly innocent situations.
  • all and some The idiom "all and some" typically means "everyone, without exception." It implies that every single person or thing is included, regardless of any exclusions or limitations.
  • all brawn and no brain The idiom "all brawn and no brain" is used to describe someone who is physically strong or powerful but lacks intelligence or mental capabilities. It implies that the person relies solely on their physical abilities without utilizing their intellect or making wise decisions.
  • all cry and no wool The idiom "all cry and no wool" is used to describe someone who talks or complains a lot but does not take any meaningful action or achieve any tangible results. It implies that the person's words or promises are empty and lack substance.
  • all day and every day The idiom "all day and every day" means continuously or perpetually, without any breaks or interruptions. It implies that something or someone is constantly engaged in a particular activity or behavior for an extended period of time.
  • all fur coat and no knickers The idiom "all fur coat and no knickers" refers to someone who appears wealthy, impressive, or sophisticated on the surface, but lacks substance, depth, or genuine qualities beneath their outer appearance. It suggests that their external image is merely a facade or show, masking their true nature or insufficiency.
  • all gas and gaiters The idiom "all gas and gaiters" is used to describe someone or something that is flashy, showy, or ostentatious, but lacks substance or actual results. It conveys the idea of a person or thing that is all talk and no action.
  • all hands and the cook The idiom "all hands and the cook" means that everyone available or present is actively involved in a particular task or activity. It signifies a situation where every person, regardless of their usual responsibilities or roles, is contributing or participating.
  • all hat and no cattle The idiom "all hat and no cattle" is typically used to describe someone who talks big or boasts about their abilities, achievements, or possessions, but lacks the necessary skills, knowledge, or experience to back up their claims. It implies that the person is all show and no substance.
  • all horns and rattles The idiom "all horns and rattles" typically refers to someone or something being ostentatious, showy, or flamboyant. It suggests a state of great excitement, energy, or agitation.
  • all hours The idiom "all hours" refers to doing something at irregular or unpredictable times, often implying that these times are very late at night or early in the morning. It can also mean working or being active constantly, without specific hours or limits.
  • all hours (of the day and night) The idiom "all hours (of the day and night)" refers to doing something continuously or frequently, without any specific time restrictions or limitations. It suggests that the activity or action takes place at any time, including late at night or early in the morning.
  • all meat and no potatoes The idiom "all meat and no potatoes" means that something or someone is lacking substance or depth. It refers to a situation where the main part or focus is not substantial or substantive, overshadowing the more important or relevant aspects. It implies that something is superficial, lacking in substance, or significant content.
  • all mouth and no trousers The idiom "all mouth and no trousers" refers to someone who talks boastfully or confidently about their abilities or accomplishments but fails to take any action or live up to their claims. It implies that the person is all talk and lacks the substance or ability to back it up.
  • all mouth and trousers The phrase "all mouth and trousers" is an idiomatic expression, primarily used in British English, to describe someone who talks a lot or boasts about achievements or abilities they do not possess. It implies that the person lacks substance, is all talk and no action, and fails to live up to their confident claims.
  • all my eye (and Betty Martin) The idiom "all my eye (and Betty Martin)" is an old expression that means something is completely untrue or nonsense. It is used to dismiss or discredit what someone has said, implying that it's nothing but a fabrication or fantasy.
  • all over Hell and half of Georgia The idiom "all over Hell and half of Georgia" is a colloquial expression used to convey someone or something being spread out or scattered over a wide area or a considerable distance. It suggests a state of disarray, chaos, or extensive coverage, emphasizing the vastness or randomness of the distribution.
  • all present and correct The idiom "all present and correct" typically means that everything or everyone is accounted for and in the proper or expected condition. It refers to a situation where everything is in order or as it should be.
  • all sizzle and no steak The idiom "all sizzle and no steak" refers to something or someone that promises to be impressive or impactful, but ultimately lacks substance or fails to deliver the expected results. It describes a situation where there is a lot of hype or excitement around something, but it ultimately proves to be disappointing or underwhelming.
  • all skin and bones The idiom "all skin and bones" is used to describe someone who is extremely thin or emaciated, with very little body fat. It implies that the person appears gaunt, typically due to lack of proper nutrition or a medical condition.
  • all talk and no cider The idiom "all talk and no cider" means someone who talks a lot but does not take any action or follow through with their words. It refers to someone who makes empty promises or boasts without backing them up with real accomplishments.
  • all talk and no trousers The idiom "all talk and no trousers" refers to someone who talks a lot or makes big claims but fails to take meaningful action or fulfill their promises. It implies that the person is more focused on impressing others with their words rather than backing them up with substantive actions.
  • all that and then some The idiom "all that and then some" refers to an exaggerated or intensified version of something or someone. It implies that whatever is being described possesses exceptional qualities or characteristics that go beyond expectations or normal standards. It suggests that the subject is impressive, outstanding, or worthy of extra recognition.
  • all that meat and no potatoes The idiom "all that meat and no potatoes" is used to describe someone or something that appears attractive or impressive but lacks substance, depth, or meaningful content. It means focusing on superficial qualities while neglecting the more substantial or important aspects.
  • all well and good The idiom "all well and good" is used to express that something may seem good or reasonable in theory, but may not necessarily work or be practical in reality. It implies that there are potential challenges or limitations that need to be considered despite the apparent positivity.
  • and all that The idiom "and all that" is used to indicate the continuation or inclusion of a list or description of things that are associated with a particular topic or item. It implies that the speaker does not wish to extensively enumerate or specify each detail, but instead refers to everything else related to the topic without explicitly mentioning them.
  • be (not) all beer and skittles The idiom "be (not) all beer and skittles" is used to describe a situation or experience that may initially seem pleasurable or enjoyable, but is, in reality, more challenging, difficult, or unpleasant than it appears. It suggests that there are hidden difficulties or downsides to a seemingly joyful or carefree situation. The phrase originated in British English, where "beer" refers to enjoyment or merriment, and "skittles" refers to a game similar to bowling.
  • be (not) all fun and games The idiom "be (not) all fun and games" means that a situation or activity may not be as enjoyable or as easy as it initially seems. It suggests that there may be serious or challenging aspects involved, even though it may seem lighthearted or effortless at first.
  • be (not) all moonlight and roses The idiom "be (not) all moonlight and roses" means that something is not as pleasant or enjoyable as it may seem at first. It suggests that there are difficulties, challenges, or negative aspects involved, contrasting the initial perception of a situation with a more realistic or complex reality.
  • be all brawn and no brain(s) The idiom "be all brawn and no brain(s)" refers to someone who possesses physical strength but lacks intelligence or mental abilities. It implies that the person relies solely on their physical abilities without exercising critical thinking or showing intellectual aptitude.
  • be all dressed up and nowhere to go The idiom "be all dressed up and nowhere to go" refers to a situation where someone is prepared or ready for an event or activity, but there is no such event or activity to attend or participate in. It emphasizes feeling or appearing prepared or put together, but having no purpose or opportunity to showcase it.
  • be all hat and no cattle The idiom "be all hat and no cattle" is typically used to describe someone who talks or boasts a lot about their abilities or achievements, but lacks the actual skills, knowledge, or experience to support their claims. It originates from ranching culture, where wearing a cowboy hat symbolizes being a skilled and experienced cattle rancher. Therefore, if someone is "all hat and no cattle," it means they are all show or talk, but have no substance or genuine abilities to back it up.
  • boots and all The idiom "boots and all" refers to a wholehearted and enthusiastic commitment to a particular activity, endeavor, or situation. It implies giving one's full effort, without hesitation or reservation. The phrase often conveys a willingness to embrace challenges and take risks.
  • come in all shapes and sizes The idiom "come in all shapes and sizes" means that things or people vary greatly in appearance or form. It suggests that there is a wide range of possibilities or differences within a certain category or group.
  • All options stink The idiom "All options stink" means that all available choices or alternatives are equally bad, unappealing, or undesirable. It implies that there is no favorable or satisfactory option among the available ones.
  • to all appearances The idiom "to all appearances" means based on what is observable or visible, regardless of the underlying reality or truth. It suggests that something seems or appears to be a certain way, although it may not necessarily be so.
  • to (or by) all appearances The idiom "to (or by) all appearances" means that based on external or observable factors, something seems a particular way or appears to be true. It implies that the available evidence or indications suggest a certain conclusion or assessment.
  • all (one's) geese are swans The idiom "all (one's) geese are swans" means that someone tends to perceive or describe things in an unrealistically positive or idealistic way. It suggests that the person tends to overestimate or glorify people, situations, or things, viewing them as better or more desirable than they actually are.
  • all (one's) life is worth The idiom "all (one's) life is worth" typically means that something or someone is highly valuable or important, often suggesting that it is worth risking or sacrificing everything for. It emphasizes the significance of the person or thing in question, implying that it holds great worth or importance throughout one's entire existence.
  • all cats are grey at night The idiom "all cats are grey at night" means that when it is dark or when specific differences are not easily noticeable, everything or everyone can seem equal or indistinguishable. It implies that appearances or distinctions become less important or inconsequential in certain contexts.
  • all cats are grey by night The idiom "all cats are grey by night" means that in certain circumstances or situations, it becomes difficult to differentiate between things or people because they appear similar or equally unremarkable. It suggests that when certain distinguishing characteristics or attributes are not visible or noticeable, things or people may appear indistinguishable or average.
  • all cats are grey in the dark The idiom "all cats are grey in the dark" means that when one lacks specific information or is in a situation where details are unclear or hidden, appearances become less important. It suggests that in certain situations, distinctions or differences become less relevant or noticeable.
  • all eyes are on (someone or something) The idiom "all eyes are on (someone or something)" means that everyone's attention is focused on a particular person or thing. It implies that whatever or whoever is being watched is the center of attention and scrutiny.
  • all eyes are on somebody/something The idiom "all eyes are on somebody/something" means that everyone is paying attention or closely watching a particular person or thing. It suggests that the person or thing is the center of attention or focus at that moment.
  • all eyes are on someone/something The idiom "all eyes are on someone/something" means that everyone's attention or focus is directed towards a particular person or thing. It signifies that someone or something has captured the full attention of a group, and is being closely observed or monitored.
  • all someone's geese are swans The idiom "all someone's geese are swans" is used to describe a person who tends to see or speak highly of everything or everyone they are associated with, often exaggerating their qualities or abilities. It refers to someone who is overly optimistic or prone to idealizing the people or things in their life, disregarding any flaws or shortcomings.
  • are (someone) all over The idiom "are (someone) all over" is used to describe a situation where someone is extremely knowledgeable, involved, or has a strong presence in a particular area or topic. It suggests that the person is completely immersed or highly skilled in that specific thing.
  • be all the worse for wear The idiom "be all the worse for wear" means to be in a worn-out, damaged, or deteriorated condition. It is commonly used to describe something or someone that has undergone physical, emotional, or mental strain, causing them to become exhausted or impaired in some way.
  • be as (something) as all get-out The idiom "be as (something) as all get-out" is an informal expression used to emphasize the intensity or extremeness of a particular quality or characteristic. It is often used to convey that someone or something possesses a specific trait to an exceptional or extraordinary degree.
  • be hitting on all cylinders The idiom "be hitting on all cylinders" means to be operating or functioning at full capacity, efficiency, or effectiveness. It suggests that someone or something is performing exceptionally well or at their optimal level.
  • be not all it's cracked up to be The idiom "be not all it's cracked up to be" means that something is not as good or impressive as it was described or expected to be. It suggests that the reality or actual experience of something does not live up to the high expectations or hype surrounding it.
  • armed at all points The idiom "armed at all points" typically means being prepared and ready for any situation or challenge. It refers to being fully equipped and ready to defend oneself or to face any obstacles with all necessary resources and strategies.
  • as all getout The idiom "as all getout" is an informal expression that emphasizes the degree or extent of something. It is commonly used to convey extreme or excessive intensity, or to intensify the meaning or impact of a statement.
  • as as all get out The definition of the idiom "as all get out" is an intensifier used to emphasize the extreme nature of something, usually in a positive or negative sense. It is often used to describe an action, event, or situation that is exceptionally intense, extreme, excessive, or remarkable.
  • as big as all outdoors The idiom "as big as all outdoors" means that something or someone is extremely large, vast, or expansive. It is often used to emphasize the immense size or magnitude of something.
  • all at sea The idiom "all at sea" means to be confused, disoriented, or unsure about a situation or what to do. It refers to feeling like being lost or struggling to find direction, similar to being adrift in the open sea without any landmarks or clear paths.
  • at all events The idiom "at all events" means in any case or regardless of what happens. It is usually used to indicate that something will be done or considered no matter the circumstances.
  • at all hours The idiom "at all hours" refers to doing something or being active during unconventional or unexpected times, especially during late hours or outside normal working hours. It implies irregularity or unpredictability in terms of timing or scheduling.
  • who ate all the pies The idiom "who ate all the pies?" is a rhetorical question used to jokingly criticize someone for being overweight or having a gluttonous appetite. It implies that the person in question has consumed a large amount of food, particularly pies, which are often associated with indulgence and overeating.
  • explore all avenues The idiom "explore all avenues" means to thoroughly consider all possible options or solutions in order to find the best course of action or achieve a particular goal.
  • not as bad, tall, etc. as all that The idiom "not as bad, tall, etc. as all that" is typically used to downplay or minimize the severity or exaggerated opinions about something or someone. It suggests that the situation or trait being discussed is not as extreme or negative as it may seem or as others believe it to be. It implies that the negative perception is unfounded or exaggerated.
  • all over bar the shouting The idiom "all over bar the shouting" means that a particular event or situation is almost finished or completed, with the outcome or result being almost certain or inevitable. It suggests that only minor or inconsequential details or actions remain before the conclusion is reached. The phrase often implies that there is no point in continuing to argue or debate about the outcome because it is already clear and decided.
  • all over but the shouting The idiom "all over but the shouting" is used to describe a situation where the outcome is essentially decided and only a formality or a minor detail remains. It implies that the final result is so apparent or inevitable that there is little doubt or suspense left.
  • cover all bases The idiom "cover all bases" means to take all necessary precautions, consider all possible options or outcomes, or ensure that all tasks or situations are accounted for and attended to in order to minimize risks or potential problems. It refers to being thorough and comprehensive in one's approach or preparation.
  • touch all bases The idiom "touch all bases" means to cover or address every aspect or detail of a particular matter or situation, ensuring that nothing is overlooked or omitted. It originates from the sport of baseball, where players need to physically touch each base while running around the diamond in order to score a run. Therefore, the idiom suggests thoroughness and completion, indicating a comprehensive approach towards something.
  • all (one's) eggs in one basket The idiom "all (one's) eggs in one basket" means to put all of one's resources, investments, or focus into a single thing, idea, or opportunity. It implies that by doing so, a person is taking a significant risk because if the one basket is damaged or fails, all the eggs – or everything they have – will be lost or endangered. It emphasizes the importance of diversifying investments or spreading efforts to mitigate potential losses.
  • don't put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "don't put all your eggs in one basket" means not to invest, rely, or depend solely on one thing or one course of action. It advises diversifying or spreading out your resources, efforts, or risks to minimize potential losses or failures. Similar to the literal act of not putting all your eggs in one basket to avoid breaking all of them if the basket falls, this idiom suggests the importance of having alternative options or backup plans to safeguard against potential setbacks.
  • (all) dolled up The idiom "(all) dolled up" means to be dressed or made up in a fancy or glamorous manner, often for a special occasion or event. It implies that someone has put effort into their appearance, usually with the intention of looking attractive or impressive.
  • (all) dressed up The idiom "(all) dressed up" generally means that someone is wearing formal or elaborate clothing, often for a special occasion or event. It can also imply that someone is looking their best or has made an effort to appear polished or well-presented.
  • (all) great minds run in the same channel The idiom "(all) great minds run in the same channel" refers to the notion that exceptionally intelligent or creative individuals tend to think or engage in similar ways. It suggests that brilliant minds often have similar ideas or perspectives, emphasizing the commonality and shared understanding among exceptional thinkers.
  • (all) the world over The idiom "(all) the world over" refers to something that happens or is true in every country or place around the world. It implies universality or global applicability.
  • (something) is all (one) needs The idiom "(something) is all (one) needs" refers to expressing that a particular thing or quality is the only requirement or essential element to achieve contentment, success, or fulfillment in life. It implies that no other thing or element is necessary as long as the mentioned aspect or entity is present.
  • a Jill of all trades is a master of none The idiom "a Jill of all trades is a master of none" is used to describe someone who has knowledge or skills in many different areas or tasks, but lacks expertise or mastery in any particular one. It implies that while being versatile can be beneficial, it often results in not reaching the same level of proficiency as someone who specializes or focuses on a single craft or skill.
  • a rising tide lifts all boats The idiom "a rising tide lifts all boats" means that when there is overall economic or social growth, everyone benefits or prospers, regardless of individual circumstances or differences. It emphasizes the idea that collective progress can improve the situation for everyone involved.
  • a war to end all wars The idiom "a war to end all wars" refers to the idea of a conflict (typically a major or global war) that will bring about a lasting, permanent peace and eliminate the possibility of future wars. It was most notably used to describe World War I (1914-1918), with the hope that the devastation and loss experienced during the war would serve as a deterrent for any future conflicts. However, the idiom is often used ironically or somewhat sarcastically to highlight the naivety or impossibility of achieving an end to all wars.
  • all (one's) life's worth The phrase "all (one's) life's worth" refers to the total value or importance that a person places on their life or existence. It signifies the culmination of their experiences, achievements, relationships, and overall significance of their existence. It implies that something is of utmost importance and holds immense value to one's entire life.
  • all (the) one The idiom "all (the) one" means that two or more things or people are considered as the same or equivalent in a certain context. It implies that there is no difference or distinction between them, and they can be treated as a single entity.
  • all along/down the line The idiom "all along/down the line" means throughout a particular period of time or a sequence of events. It implies that something has been consistent, constant, or happening continuously from the beginning or at every stage. It suggests that there were no deviations or changes throughout the entire process.
  • all being well The idiom "all being well" is typically used to express the condition or assumption that everything will proceed as planned or expected. It suggests that if all goes according to the current expectations, circumstances, or conditions, then the desired outcome will be achieved.
  • all better (now) The idiom "all better (now)" typically refers to a situation or condition that has improved or resolved, indicating that a problem or difficulty has been overcome or cured. It is often used figuratively to convey that a previous issue or concern has been successfully addressed.
  • all by (one's) lonesome The idiom "all by (one's) lonesome" means to be alone or without any company. It refers to someone being in a situation where there are no other people around.
  • all by lonesome The idiom "all by lonesome" refers to someone being alone or solitary, typically emphasizing a feeling of isolation or being the only one present in a particular situation.
  • all comers The idiom "all comers" refers to a situation or event where everyone is welcome or invited to participate, compete, or join, regardless of their background, skill level, or ability. It signifies an open and inclusive approach that allows anyone interested to take part without exclusion or discrimination.
  • all done with mirrors The idiom "all done with mirrors" means that something is deceptive or illusory, giving the appearance of being more complex or impressive than it truly is. It suggests that the situation or outcome is not as genuine or substantial as it seems at first glance.
  • all dressed up with nowhere to go The idiom "all dressed up with nowhere to go" refers to a situation where someone is fully prepared and ready for an event or activity, but there is no opportunity or purpose for them to engage in it. It conveys a sense of being prepared or looking impressive, yet having nothing to do or nowhere to be.
  • all duck or no dinner The idiom "all duck or no dinner" means that a task or objective must be completed fully and successfully in order to receive any reward or benefit. It implies that partial effort or incomplete execution will not be rewarded.
  • all else being equal The idiom "all else being equal" refers to a hypothetical scenario where all other factors or conditions remain the same or constant, excluding the one element being discussed or analyzed. It assumes that there are no other variables that could influence the outcome being examined.
  • all ends up The idiom "all ends up" refers to the situation where everything or everyone is involved or concerned, typically in a negative or chaotic manner. It suggests a complete or thorough involvement or impact on a particular situation or group of people.
  • all for The idiom "all for" typically means to strongly support or be in favor of something. It implies that one is completely in agreement or willing to do anything to promote or achieve a specific outcome.
  • all fours The idiom "all fours" refers to the position in which a person or animal has all four limbs touching the ground or any stance closely resembling it. It can also be used figuratively to mean being in a state of readiness or being in complete agreement or alignment.
  • all guns blazing The idiom "all guns blazing" typically means to engage in an activity with full force, enthusiasm, or intensity. It refers to giving one's all, putting in maximum effort, or approaching a situation with great energy and determination.
  • all hands The idiom "all hands" typically refers to the situation where everyone is needed or involved in a specific task or event. It means that all available individuals or participants must contribute their efforts or be present to handle a particular situation or to work collectively towards a common goal. It is often used in contexts that require a collective effort or teamwork.
  • all hands to the pumps The idiom "all hands to the pumps" means that everyone must put in maximum effort and work together to prevent a crisis, overcome a difficult situation, or deal with an emergency. It is often used metaphorically to indicate the need for collective action and cooperation in times of trouble. The phrase originated from naval contexts, referring to the urgent call for all crew members (hands) to operate the pumps in order to prevent a ship from sinking.
  • all hell breaks/is let loose The idiom "all hell breaks/is let loose" refers to a situation when chaos, disorder, or intense conflict suddenly erupts. It describes when restraints or controls are disregarded, leading to a wildly uncontrolled or uncontrollable situation.
  • all holiday
  • all hollow The idiom "all hollow" typically means completely without substance, meaning, or value. It is used to describe something that is empty, insincere, or lacking in depth or significance.
  • all in (one's) head The idiom "all in (one's) head" refers to thoughts, ideas, or concerns that are entirely psychological or imaginary and may not have any basis in reality. It suggests that someone is excessively preoccupied with these thoughts or ideas while neglecting to consider practical or realistic aspects of a situation.
  • all in (one's) mind The idiom "all in (one's) mind" typically refers to something that is purely imaginary or a product of one's thoughts and perceptions, rather than being based on reality. It suggests that the subject's perspective, beliefs, or concerns are not grounded in actual events or facts, but purely in one's own imagination or mental state.
  • all in, be The idiom "all in, be" means to be fully committed or dedicated to a particular task, venture, or situation. It stems from poker, where a player who puts all their chips into the pot is said to be "all in." In a broader sense, it signifies giving maximum effort, taking risks, and leaving no room for hesitation or doubt.
  • all is fish that comes to his net The idiom "all is fish that comes to his net" can be defined as a concept that suggests that someone is willing to accept or take advantage of any opportunity or situation that comes their way, regardless of its value or significance. It implies that the person is open to any potential gain, regardless of its quality or worth.
  • all is not lost The idiom "all is not lost" means that there is still a chance for success or a positive outcome, even in a situation that may seem hopeless or difficult. It emphasizes optimism, encouraging hope and perseverance when faced with obstacles or setbacks.
  • all it's cracked up to be The phrase "all it's cracked up to be" means that something or someone is as good or exceptional as it is claimed or believed to be. It suggests that the actual experience or qualities of the thing or person match the high expectations or reputation that preceded it.
  • all kinds of The idiom "all kinds of" is typically used to express the idea of a wide range or variety of something. It implies that there are numerous different types or sorts of a particular thing. It can be used to emphasize abundance or diversity.
  • All Lives Matter "All Lives Matter" is an idiom used to express the belief or sentiment that every human life is equally valuable and deserves equal consideration, irrespective of race, ethnicity, or any other social or cultural distinctions. It's often used as a response or alternative to the "Black Lives Matter" movement, which seeks to highlight and address systemic racism and injustices faced by black people. While some people may use the idiom with good intentions to promote equality and inclusivity, it can also be seen as dismissive or detracting from the specific issues faced by marginalized communities.
  • all Lombard Street to a China orange The idiom "all Lombard Street to a China orange" is an outdated expression that signifies an extreme imbalance or certainty in a proposition or outcome. It implies a situation where the odds are overwhelmingly favorable or unequal. It can also describe an extremely one-sided or lopsided bet or expectation. The idiom originated from comparing Lombard Street, a winding and narrow street in London, to a China orange, which suggests a valuable or rare item.
  • all manner of somebody/something The idiom "all manner of somebody/something" refers to a wide variety or a range of different types of people or things. It implies inclusivity and encompasses all possible types, without exception.
  • all mod cons "All mod cons" is an idiom that refers to modern conveniences, facilities, or amenities that make life more comfortable and convenient. It denotes the presence of up-to-date and innovative appliances, technologies, and features in a home or any other setting.
  • all nations The idiom "all nations" refers to the collective representation of all countries or peoples around the world. It signifies a universal or global scale, encompassing people from diverse backgrounds and nations.
  • all of The idiom "all of" usually refers to the entirety or full extent of something. It emphasizes that there is no part or element excluded, and everything is included. It can be used to emphasize the completeness or thoroughness of a statement or action.
  • all of a dither The idiom "all of a dither" means to be extremely nervous, anxious, or agitated about something. It refers to a state of restlessness or confusion due to heightened emotions or anticipation about a particular situation.
  • all of a piece with something The idiom "all of a piece with something" means consistent or harmonious with something else, indicating that the elements or parts being compared share the same characteristics, qualities, or style. It implies that they fit together perfectly or seamlessly, creating a cohesive whole.
  • all over (one's) face The idiom "all over (one's) face" refers to a situation where someone's expression or demeanor clearly reveals or expresses a particular emotion, thought, or quality. It suggests that the truth or a particular characteristic is easily noticeable or discernible by looking at someone's face.
  • all over (someone) The idiom "all over (someone)" typically means to be constantly attentive, closely monitoring, or having dominance or control over someone. It implies that one person is paying a lot of attention to someone else, possibly in an overpowering or suffocating manner.
  • all over one The idiom "all over one" typically means to be extremely attracted to or infatuated with someone. It implies that someone's thoughts, feelings, or focus are fully directed towards a specific person.
  • all over someone like a cheap suit The idiom "all over someone like a cheap suit" means to be excessively or persistently clingy, invasive, or demanding of someone's attention or time. It implies that the person in question is being pursued or followed closely with an intensity that is overwhelming or annoying, similar to how a poorly made and ill-fitting cheap suit may be tight, uncomfortable, and impossible to ignore.
  • all over something The idiom "all over something" typically means to be fully engaged or thoroughly involved in a particular activity, topic, or situation. It can imply having a deep understanding, control, or enthusiasm about something.
  • all over with The idiom "all over with" typically means that something has come to an end, usually with a negative or undesirable outcome. It implies that a particular situation is finished and cannot be changed or salvaged.
  • all politics is local The idiom "all politics is local" means that political decisions and actions are deeply influenced by the concerns and interests of the local community or constituency. It emphasizes the idea that politicians and political policies are most effective when they address the specific needs and desires of the people they represent at the local level. It suggests that politicians should be attentive and responsive to the issues and priorities of their constituents in order to gain their support and succeed in politics.
  • all power to your elbow The idiom "all power to your elbow" is an expression that is used to encourage someone to continue putting in effort or to praise them for their hard work and dedication. It is a way of expressing support and admiration for someone's endeavors.
  • all quiet on the Potomac The idiom "all quiet on the Potomac" refers to a situation or condition of tranquility, calmness, or lack of activity. It originally originated during the American Civil War, specifically in relation to military operations along the Potomac River, where a quiet period allowed for a temporary break or a period with no military action. Today, the phrase is used more generally to describe any situation where there is a lull or absence of activity or conflict.
  • all quiet on the Western Front The idiom "all quiet on the Western Front" means that there is silence or tranquility; it refers to a state of calm or absence of conflict or disturbance. The phrase is often used metaphorically to describe a situation or location where there is no immediate trouble, strife, or action. It originated from the title of Erich Maria Remarque's famous anti-war novel "All Quiet on the Western Front," which depicts the horrific experiences of soldiers during World War I.
  • all right with (one) The idiom "all right with (one)" means that someone is content or accepting of a situation or decision. It implies that the individual has no objections or concerns and is satisfied with how things are.
  • all rights reserved The idiom "all rights reserved" is a phrase commonly used to indicate that the creator or copyright holder of a work, such as a written text, film, or artwork, reserves all legal rights and protections pertaining to the work. It signifies that unauthorized reproduction, distribution, or usage of the work without explicit permission is prohibited and may result in legal action.
  • All righty already! The idiom "All righty already!" is a playful and emphatic way of expressing agreement, affirmation, or acceptance. It is often used to show impatience or annoyance with excessive repetition or a prolonged discussion on a particular topic.
  • all set to go The idiom "all set to go" means that someone or something is fully prepared, organized, or ready to proceed with a task, journey, or plan.
  • all sharped up
  • all shook up The idiom "all shook up" typically refers to someone feeling emotionally or physically disturbed, anxious, or unsettled.
  • all Sir Garnet The idiom "all Sir Garnet" refers to a situation in which everything is going according to plan, smoothly, or in an organized manner. It is derived from the name of General Sir Garnet Wolseley, a British military officer known for his meticulous planning and successful campaigns. Thus, when something is described as "all Sir Garnet," it means it is well-arranged, efficient, or executed with precision.
  • all spruced up The idiom "all spruced up" means to be dressed or groomed in a neat and stylish manner, often for a special occasion or to make a good impression. It can also refer to something that has been cleaned, polished, or improved to appear more attractive or presentable.
  • all that glistens is not gold The idiom "all that glistens is not gold" means that something may appear valuable or attractive at first glance, but that does not necessarily mean it is worth pursuing or possessing. It warns against making judgments solely based on superficial appearances, as they can be deceiving.
  • all that glitters/glistens/glisters is not gold The idiom "all that glitters/glistens/glisters is not gold" means that things that appear attractive, impressive, or valuable on the surface may not necessarily be genuine, reliable, or valuable. It serves as a reminder to not judge something based solely on its outward appearance.
  • all that jazz The phrase "all that jazz" is an idiom that originated in American English. It is commonly used to refer to various unspecified or additional things related to a particular topic or situation. It is often used at the end of a sentence or phrase to indicate that there are other similar things that could be included, but are not explicitly mentioned. It can also be used to express a general sentiment of agreement, affirmation, or enthusiasm.
  • all the better The idiom "all the better" is used to indicate that something has improved or become even more advantageous than before. It suggests that whatever was good has now become better or ideal in a particular situation or circumstance.
  • all the difference in the world The idiom "all the difference in the world" means a significant or profound distinction or contrast between two things or situations. It implies that the difference between them is vast, substantial, and impactful.
  • all the feels The idiom "all the feels" refers to experiencing a strong and overwhelming emotional reaction to something, often characterized by a mix of various emotions such as joy, sadness, excitement, or nostalgia. It implies that the individual is deeply affected by the situation or event, resulting in a heightened emotional response.
  • all the more reason to The idiom "all the more reason to" is used to emphasize the validity or logic of a particular action or decision, often highlighting additional justifications or motivations for taking that course of action. It suggests that the existing reasons or arguments in favor of something are further supported or reinforced by the additional factor mentioned.
  • all the tea in China The idiom "all the tea in China" refers to an exaggerated expression that indicates a vast amount or an excessive quantity of something. It implies that the quantity being mentioned is so large that it would be impossible or impractical to possess or acquire. The idiom is often used to emphasize how valuable or significant something is or to emphasize the impossibility of a particular action.
  • all the thing
  • all the way down the line The idiom "all the way down the line" typically means consistently or continuously, without exception or interruption, from the beginning to the end or from one point to another. It suggests that every step or aspect of a process or situation is being followed or adhered to without deviation or compromise.
  • all the world's a stage The idiom "all the world's a stage" is a quote from William Shakespeare's play "As You Like It." It signifies the belief that life is like a theatrical performance where each individual has their role to play. It implies that people are performers on a figurative stage, portraying different characters and facing diverse situations throughout their lives.
  • all the worse for wear The definition of the idiom "all the worse for wear" is when something or someone is in a poor or deteriorated condition, usually due to damage, aging, or overuse. This phrase is often used to describe objects, but can also be applied to people who appear tired, worn-out, or physically exhausted.
  • all things come to those who wait The idiom "all things come to those who wait" means that patience and perseverance will eventually lead to success or fulfillment. It suggests that by remaining patient and not rushing things, one will eventually achieve their desires or goals.
  • all things to all people, be The idiom "all things to all people" means trying to please or satisfy everyone, or attempting to cater to the preferences, needs, or expectations of everyone in a group or situation. It refers to the act of trying to be universally liked or accepted by various individuals or groups, often resulting in compromised positions or conflicting priorities.
  • all to smash The idiom "all to smash" typically means completely or entirely broken into pieces. It describes something or someone that has been destroyed or ruined to a great extent.
  • all too (something) The idiom "all too (something)" is used to convey the idea that something is more undesirable, frequent, extreme, or excessive than desired or anticipated. It emphasizes an excessive or negative quality of the described situation or experience.
  • all tore up The idiom "all tore up" refers to a state of emotional distress, agitation, or turmoil. It implies feeling upset, anxious, or in a state of emotional chaos.
  • all tuckered out The idiom "all tuckered out" means to feel extremely tired, exhausted, or fatigued after physical or mental exertion.
  • all up The idiom "all up" typically means that something is completed or finished, with no further steps or actions remaining. It can also signify that something is collectively accounted for or accounted for entirely.
  • all very well/fine but... The idiom "all very well/fine but..." is used to express an acknowledgment, agreement, or understanding of one point or aspect of a situation, followed by the introduction of a contrasting or opposing point or concern. It is often used to show a reservation, limitation, or disagreement with the previous statement.
  • all wound up The idiom "all wound up" typically means to be very excited, anxious, or tense about something. It refers to a state of being highly energized or emotionally charged, often with a sense of restlessness or anticipation.
  • all y'all The idiom "all y'all" is primarily used in Southern American English, particularly in the Southwestern United States. It is an exaggerated form of the word "y'all," which is a contraction of "you all" used to refer to a group of people. "All y'all" is used to specifically emphasize or address an entire group or all individuals within a group. It is similar to saying "every single one of you."
  • all y'all's The idiom "all y'all's" is a colloquial Southern slang term used in parts of the United States, particularly in the Southeast, to refer to a group of people. It is an informal way of saying "all of your (plural possessive form)." It involves combining "all y'all," which means "all of you" in Southern dialects, with the possessive "s" to indicate ownership or belonging.
  • all yours The idiom "all yours" typically means that something or someone is completely available, accessible, or under the control or possession of another person. It can also indicate that one person is giving up or relinquishing something to another.
  • all-a-mort
  • all-out war The idiom "all-out war" is used to describe a situation or conflict where there are no limitations or restraints in terms of resources, effort, or intensity. It refers to a state of complete and unrestricted warfare or conflict, suggesting that all possible measures, tactics, and resources will be employed.
  • all-over oneself The idiom "all over oneself" typically refers to someone being excessively eager, enthusiastic, or excited about something or someone. It can also describe someone being extremely anxious or nervous. Overall, it implies a lack of self-control or composure in expressing emotions or behaviors.
  • All-y all-y oxen free! The idiom "All-y all-y oxen free!" refers to a phrase commonly used in children's games, particularly hide-and-seek. It is shouted by the seeker as a signal that the game is over and everyone should come out of their hiding places. The phrase is used metaphorically to indicate the end of a situation or the release from a tense or difficult circumstance.
  • be (all) for (someone or something) The idiom "be (all) for (someone or something)" means to strongly support or advocate for someone or something. It implies being in favor of their actions or decisions, and to provide assistance or encouragement whenever needed.
  • be all
  • be all (the) one (to someone) The idiom "be all (the) one (to someone)" means to be the perfect person for someone, to fulfill all their needs and desires, or to be the ideal companion. It suggests a deep connection, compatibility, and understanding that meets all the expectations and desires of the person in question.
  • be all Greek to someone The idiom "be all Greek to someone" means that something is completely incomprehensible or difficult to understand for a particular person. It is often used to express confusion or lack of understanding in relation to a particular subject or information.
  • be all in (one's/the) mind The idiom "be all in one's mind" means that something exists solely within the imagination or thoughts of a person, without any physical or tangible basis. It refers to ideas, thoughts, or concepts that are not real or tangible in the external world, but are solely a creation of one's imagination or perception.
  • be all in somebody's/the mind The phrase "be all in somebody's/the mind" typically means that someone or something occupies a significant amount of a person's thoughts or attention. It suggests that the person is constantly thinking about or preoccupied with that particular subject or individual.
  • be all one to The idiom "be all one to" means to not have a preference or to be indifferent towards two or more options or choices. It suggests that the options do not vary in importance or significance to the person, making them equally acceptable or satisfactory.
  • be all over The idiom "be all over" means to be present or involved in all aspects of a situation, often referring to someone who is fully engaged, enthusiastic, or controlling. It can also imply being widely recognized or known for something.
  • be all over (someone) The idiom "be all over (someone)" generally means to be excessively attentive, interested, or involved with someone. It implies an intense level of focus or attention towards another person, often in a way that may be overwhelming or intrusive.
  • be all right The idiom "be all right" means to be satisfactory, acceptable, or in a good enough condition. It implies that a situation or outcome is considered favorable or at least acceptable. It can also imply that someone is feeling fine or recovering from a difficult experience.
  • be all roses The idiom "be all roses" typically means that something appears to be perfect, enjoyable, or easy, but in reality, it is not. It suggests that there may be underlying complications, difficulties, or negative aspects that are not immediately apparent.
  • be all somebody can/could do to do something The idiom "be all somebody can/could do to do something" means that someone tries extremely hard to accomplish a task or goal even though it is difficult or challenging for them. It conveys the idea that they put forth their maximum effort or ability to achieve what they set out to do.
  • be all thumbs The idiom "be all thumbs" refers to someone who is clumsy or awkward, particularly when it comes to using their hands or fingers skillfully. It implies a lack of dexterity or coordination in performing tasks that require manual skills.
  • be not all/quite there The idiom "be not all/quite there" means that a person lacks mental clarity, is not fully understanding or comprehending something, or is not mentally present or engaged in a situation. It implies that the person may have some level of cognitive or mental impairment that affects their ability to think, reason, or understand things effectively.
  • be struck all of a heap The idiom "be struck all of a heap" means to be completely surprised, shocked, or taken aback by something unexpected or astonishing. It suggests a state of being completely overwhelmed or unable to respond immediately due to the suddenness or magnitude of an event or situation.
  • be written all over (one's) face The idiom "be written all over (one's) face" means that someone's emotions or thoughts are clearly visible or evident through their facial expressions. It implies that a person's true feelings or reactions are so apparent that they cannot be concealed or hidden.
  • be written all over somebody's face The idiom "be written all over somebody's face" means that a person's emotions, reactions, or thoughts are very clearly and visibly displayed on their face, making it obvious to others how they feel or what they are thinking. In other words, their facial expressions effectively communicate their inner state or intentions.
  • be written all over your face The idiom "be written all over your face" refers to when someone's true thoughts or emotions are clearly and visibly displayed on their face, making it obvious to others what they are thinking or feeling.
  • be/take all day, morning, etc. The idiom "be/take all day, morning, etc." means that something is expected to or actually does take a very long time to complete. It suggests that the task or activity being referred to is time-consuming or excessively slow.
  • beat (someone or something) all hollow The idiom "beat (someone or something) all hollow" means to thoroughly defeat someone or something in a competition or contest, leaving no doubt about one's superiority or dominance. It is used to emphasize the complete and overwhelming victory over the opponent.
  • beat all The idiom "beat all" is typically used to express surprise or amazement at something unusual or unexpected. It suggests that the situation or action is beyond what was predicted or believed, often implying that it is the most extreme or extraordinary of its kind.
  • blow (something) out of (all) proportion The idiom "blow (something) out of (all) proportion" means to exaggerate or make something seem much more important, serious, or significant than it actually is. It refers to the act of magnifying or amplifying a situation, issue, or statement beyond its true scale or impact.
  • blown (all) out of proportion The idiom "blown (all) out of proportion" means to exaggerate or magnify something to a greater extent than it deserves or is necessary, often resulting in a distorted or exaggerated perception of the situation. It implies that something is given more importance, significance, or attention than it should be, causing unnecessary drama or confusion.
  • bring (something or someone) all together The idiom "bring (something or someone) all together" means to gather or unify various elements, people, or ideas to achieve a common goal or create harmony. It implies bringing different parts or aspects into one cohesive whole or resolving differences to create a sense of collaboration and unity.
  • by all means of (something) The idiom "by all means of (something)" typically means using every available method, resource, or opportunity to achieve a particular goal or outcome. It implies a strong determination or willingness to do whatever it takes.
  • can’t win em all The idiom "can't win 'em all" means that it is impossible to be successful or victorious in every situation or endeavor. It implies that even the most skilled or talented individuals will face occasional failures or setbacks. It encourages acceptance of the fact that not every outcome will be favorable or in one's favor.
  • can’t win them all The idiom "can't win them all" means that one cannot expect to succeed or be victorious in every single situation or endeavor. It acknowledges the fact that failure or disappointment is a natural part of life and one should not let setbacks discourage them.
  • can't win them all The idiom "can't win them all" means that it is impossible to succeed or win every time or in every situation. It acknowledges that there will be failures, losses, or instances of being unsuccessful, and serves as a reminder to accept and move on from those disappointments.
  • cap it (all) off The idiom "cap it off" or "cap it all off" means to conclude or complete something in an impressive or exceptional way. It is often used to refer to giving a final touch or finishing touch to an event, speech, or overall experience to make it even better or more memorable.
  • cap it all The idiom "cap it all" is used to emphasize a final event or action that is particularly remarkable, surprising, or frustrating, often after a series of similar events. It implies that the concluding occurrence exceeds all previous ones in terms of significance or impact.
  • carry all before you The idiom "carry all before you" means to achieve complete success or domination in a particular situation or competition. It suggests that one's confidence, ability, or strength is so overwhelming that no obstacles or opponents can prevent them from advancing or prevailing.
  • contrary to all reason The idiom "contrary to all reason" refers to something that is completely illogical, irrational, or goes against any logical or common sense reasoning. It describes a situation or action that is difficult to comprehend or understand because it goes against what is expected or logical.
  • crawl (all) over each other The idiom "crawl (all) over each other" means to compete aggressively or enthusiastically for something, typically an opportunity or an advantage. It implies a frantic or disorganized rush of people, similar to individuals crawling over one another in an attempt to get ahead. It highlights the intense level of competition or eagerness among a group of individuals.
  • dick all The idiom "dick all" is a slang phrase used to indicate or describe a negligible or minimal amount or quantity of something. It is often used to express dissatisfaction or frustration with a small or insignificant result or outcome.
  • do (all) the running The idiom "do (all) the running" refers to taking on the majority of the work or responsibility in a particular situation or task. It implies that someone is taking the lead, making the most effort, or putting in more work than others involved.
  • do something for all you are worth The idiom "do something for all you are worth" means to put in maximum effort, energy, or proficiency into doing something. It signifies giving one's utmost ability or giving it everything one has got.
  • don't that beat all! The idiom "don't that beat all!" is an expression used to convey surprise or astonishment about something unexpected or remarkable that has just occurred. It is often used when encountering an outcome that is beyond one's imagination or comprehension.
  • downhill all the way The idiom "downhill all the way" typically means that a situation is progressively worsening or deteriorating without any hope of improvement. It implies that once a negative situation has begun, it continues to worsen with no respite or positive outcome in sight.
  • drool (all) over (someone or something) The idiom "drool (all) over (someone or something)" means to express intense desire or admiration for someone or something, usually in an exaggerated or excessive manner. It implies being infatuated, obsessing, or showing excessive excitement towards a person or object. It is often used figuratively rather than literally, indicating strong temptation or attraction.
  • drool all over someone/something The idiom "drool all over someone/something" means to show excessive admiration, excitement, or enthusiasm for someone or something. It often implies that someone is excessively adoring or praising someone or something, to the point of being excessive or fawning.
  • dump all over someone/something The idiom "dump all over someone/something" means to criticize, express disapproval, or speak negatively about someone or something in a harsh or relentless manner. It implies being highly critical or condemning someone/something without holding back.
  • fall all over (one) The idiom "fall all over (one)" typically means to show an excessive amount of attention, admiration, or affection towards someone. It suggests behaving in an enthusiastic or overly eager manner towards the person in question.
  • feel all the feels The idiom "feel all the feels" refers to experiencing a wide range of emotions intensely and deeply. It implies being emotionally overwhelmed or affected by various feelings, both positive and negative, often to an extent that is hard to explain or comprehend.
  • fire on all cylinders The idiom "fire on all cylinders" means to be operating or functioning at maximum performance or efficiency. It is often used to describe someone or something that is working at their highest potential or giving their best effort.
  • firing/working on all cylinders The idiom "firing/working on all cylinders" means to be operating or functioning at full capacity or maximum efficiency. It is often used to describe someone or something performing exceptionally well or being fully engaged and productive.
  • for all (one) cares The idiom "for all (one) cares" is often used to show indifference or lack of concern about a particular situation or outcome. It essentially implies that the person does not care or have any interest in the matter.
  • for all (one) is worth The idiom "for all (one) is worth" means to put in maximum effort or to do something as intensely or energetically as possible. It denotes giving one's best or making a strong and determined effort to achieve a particular goal or outcome.
  • for all (one) knows The idiom "for all (one) knows" means that someone lacks knowledge or awareness about a certain situation, so they can only speculate or make assumptions about it. It implies that there is uncertainty or limited information available, thus leading to a speculative perspective.
  • for all I, you, etc. care The idiom "for all I, you, etc. care" is a phrase used to express complete indifference or lack of concern about someone or something. It implies that the person does not care at all and is not bothered by the outcome or situation.
  • for all I, you, etc. know The idiom "for all I, you, etc. know" is used to convey a lack of certain knowledge or awareness about a particular situation or issue. It suggests that no accurate or reliable information is available to the person saying it.
  • for all intensive purposes The correct expression is "for all intents and purposes," not "for all intensive purposes." This idiom means almost the same as "in practical terms" or "virtually." It is used to emphasize that something is true or considered as if it were true, even though it may not be technically or strictly accurate.
  • for all is worth The idiom "for all it's worth" means making the most out of a situation or exploiting something to its maximum potential. It implies using all available resources, effort, or advantages to achieve the desired outcome.
  • for all one’s trouble The idiom "for all one's trouble" means that despite putting in effort, work, or inconvenience, one does not receive any reward, benefit, or positive outcome in return. It implies the disappointment and frustration of having invested time, energy, or resources without gaining anything valuable.
  • for all problems
  • for all someone knows The idiom "for all someone knows" means that the person speaking is uncertain or has limited knowledge about a specific situation or fact. It implies that there may be information or possibilities that one is unaware of.
  • for all that The idiom "for all that" is used to express that despite a particular circumstance or situation discussed, something mentioned before still holds true or remains relevant. It implies that even though there may be an opposing or contrasting point, the initial statement still stands.
  • for all the world as if/though... The idiom "for all the world as if/though..." is used to emphasize that something or someone appears, acts, or resembles something else so convincingly that it is difficult to believe or understand. It describes a striking similarity or resemblance. It can be used to express surprise or disbelief about how something can resemble or imitate another thing.
  • for all to see The idiom "for all to see" means that something is clearly and openly visible or evident to everyone. It suggests that there is no room for doubt or hidden aspects, as it is readily apparent and observable by anyone present.
  • free-for-all A "free-for-all" is an informal idiom that describes a situation of disorder, chaos, or unrestrained behavior, where everyone is able to participate without rules, regulations, or restrictions. It typically refers to a situation where individuals engage in a wild and unruly manner without any form of control or order.
  • from/on all sides The idiom "from/on all sides" means that something or someone is being approached or approached by multiple people or entities simultaneously. It suggests that there is a surrounding or overwhelming presence, often involving criticism, opposition, or multiple perspectives.
  • fuck all The idiom "fuck all" is an informal, vulgar expression that is typically used to emphasize a lack of significance, importance, or value in a particular situation or thing. It conveys a sense of complete disregard or disregard for something.
  • Fuck it all! The idiom "Fuck it all!" is an expression of frustration, defeat, or resignation. It signifies a strong feeling of giving up or feeling overwhelmed with a situation, and simply not caring anymore about the consequences, responsibilities, or opinions of others. It can be seen as a vulgar and forceful way of expressing a desire to abandon all concerns and let go of any remaining inhibitions.
  • get (all) set The idiom "get (all) set" means to prepare or get ready for something, typically an upcoming event or activity. It suggests that the necessary arrangements or preparations have been made in order to be fully prepared and ready to go.
  • get it all together The idiom "get it all together" means to organize or arrange things in a systematic or efficient manner, often referring to the ability to manage various aspects of one's life or responsibilities effectively. It implies achieving a sense of control, preparedness, or order.
  • get the all-clear The idiom "get the all-clear" means to receive confirmation or permission to proceed after a period of uncertainty, danger, or restrictions. It originally comes from signals used during wartime to indicate that there is no immediate danger or threat.
  • give (one's) all The idiom "give (one's) all" means to put forth maximum effort, to do one's best or to give one's complete dedication and energy towards achieving a goal or completing a task. It implies giving everything one has without holding back.
  • give (something) (one's) all The idiom "give (something) (one's) all" means to put forth maximum effort or dedication in doing or achieving something. It implies giving everything one has, regardless of the challenges or difficulties faced. This phrase encourages wholehearted commitment and signifies going above and beyond to accomplish a task or pursue a goal.
  • give somebody/get the all-clear The idiom "give somebody/get the all-clear" refers to receiving confirmation or permission to proceed with a plan or activity after a situation of uncertainty, doubts, or potential obstacles. It signifies obtaining assurance that there are no risks, hazards, or concerns that would prevent someone from proceeding with their intended course of action.
  • give the all-clear The idiom "give the all-clear" means to officially declare or indicate that a situation is safe or free from danger, especially after it was previously uncertain or potentially dangerous. It is often used to convey that it is now permissible to proceed, take action, or feel reassured about a certain situation or event.
  • go all out for something The idiom "go all out for something" means to put in maximum effort, energy, or enthusiasm while pursuing or achieving a particular goal or objective. It suggests fully dedicating oneself to the task at hand, without holding back or leaving any effort unused.
  • granddaddy of them all The idiom "granddaddy of them all" refers to something or someone that is the largest, oldest, most notable, or the most significant example or version of its kind. It is used to emphasize the unparalleled greatness or superiority of something or someone within a specific context or category.
  • great minds run in the same channel, all
  • have (one's) name written all over it The idiom "have (one's) name written all over it" is used to express that something is perfectly suited or tailored to a specific person. It suggests that the thing in question seems like it was specifically made or designed for that person.
  • have all marbles The idiom "have all marbles" typically means that someone is mentally sound, rational, and mentally fit. It implies that a person possesses all their mental faculties and is not insane or crazy. The phrase refers to the game of marbles, where losing or missing marbles may symbolize a loss of sanity or mental capacity.
  • have all one’s marbles The idiom "have all one’s marbles" means to have full mental capacity, to be sane, or to be mentally sharp and sound. It suggests that a person possesses their mental faculties and is not experiencing any cognitive impairment or insanity.
  • have all one's buttons The idiom "have all one's buttons" means to be in full possession of one's mental faculties or to be mentally sound and rational. It suggests that a person is mentally stable and functioning properly.
  • have all the hallmarks of somebody/something The idiom "have all the hallmarks of somebody/something" means to have all the characteristic features or qualities that are typically associated with a particular person or thing. It suggests that the person or thing in question possesses distinctive or unique attributes, making them easily recognizable or identifiable.
  • have somebody/something written all over it The idiom "have somebody/something written all over it" means that a person, thing, or situation clearly bears the distinct characteristics or qualities of someone or something in a highly recognizable manner. It suggests that the person or thing is a perfect match for a particular purpose or role, leaving no doubt or ambiguity about their suitability or involvement.
  • all manner of someone or something The idiom "all manner of someone or something" refers to a wide variety or diverse range of people or things. It signifies that there is a multitude of different types or kinds within a particular category or group.
  • all the same (to someone) The idiom "all the same to someone" means that someone is indifferent or does not have a preference between multiple options or choices. It expresses that the person truly does not mind which option is chosen or what happens.
  • be all right (by/with somebody) The idiom "be all right (by/with somebody)" means to be acceptable, satisfactory, or suitable for someone. It refers to a situation or arrangement that someone is content or comfortable with, and in which they have no issues or objections. It indicates that the person is not bothered or negatively affected by something.
  • that beats all The idiom "that beats all" is used to express surprise or disbelief at something that is unexpected or extraordinary. It implies that what is being described is even more astonishing or extreme than anything else one has previously encountered.
  • the cards beat all the players The figurative meaning of the idiom "the cards beat all the players" is that sometimes luck or circumstances beyond one's control can determine the outcome, regardless of skill, effort, or strategy. It suggests that even the most skilled or capable individuals can be defeated by chance or external factors.
  • seen one, seen them all The idiom "seen one, seen them all" is used to express the idea that after experiencing or encountering something or someone similar or repetitive, there is no need to see or experience more, as they are all essentially the same. It implies that there is no uniqueness or novelty in further exposure.
  • it all boils down to The idiom "it all boils down to" means that the situation, issue, or matter can be simplified or understood by focusing on its most essential or fundamental elements. It implies that, after considering various factors or complexities, the ultimate or key point is a specific thing or idea.
  • I've never (done something) in all my (born) days The idiom "I've never (done something) in all my (born) days" is used to express extreme surprise or astonishment at something that has just happened or been witnessed. It indicates that the speaker has never encountered or experienced anything like it before in their entire life.
  • tick all the (right) boxes The idiom "tick all the (right) boxes" refers to meeting all the required criteria, fulfilling all the necessary conditions, or satisfying all the expectations or standards for something. It implies that all the essential elements have been addressed or achieved, leading to a positive outcome or approval.
  • not have all (one's) buttons The idiom "not have all (one's) buttons" means someone is considered mentally unstable or lacking common sense. It suggests that the person is confused, irrational, or behaves in a peculiar manner.
  • it's all (one) can do (to do something) The idiom "it's all (one) can do (to do something)" means that someone is finding it extremely difficult or struggling to accomplish a particular task. It implies that despite putting in their maximum effort, it is still a challenge to achieve the desired outcome.
  • You can’t win ’em all The idiom "You can't win 'em all" means that it is not possible to be successful or victorious in every endeavor or situation despite one's efforts. It implies that occasional failures or losses are inevitable, and it is important to accept and learn from them.
  • to cap it all (off) The idiom "to cap it all (off)" means to finish or complete something in a way that is unexpected, unbearable, or makes a situation even worse than it already was. It is often used to emphasize the negative outcome or a final unfortunate event that concludes a series of already unpleasant circumstances.
  • to top/cap/crown it all The idiom "to top/cap/crown it all" is used to emphasize that something mentioned is the final or most significant event or action in a series of events or actions. It suggests that the additional information or occurrence is the last and often the most surprising or negative outcome in a given situation.
  • with all guns blazing The idiom "with all guns blazing" refers to someone or something that is attacking or approaching a situation with great energy, enthusiasm, or force. It suggests a fierce and intense effort or approach towards achieving a goal or dealing with a problem.
  • it all comes out in the wash The idiom "it all comes out in the wash" means that over time, truth or justice will prevail, and any misunderstandings or secrets will be revealed and resolved. It implies that in the long run, everything will work out or be settled.
  • all dressed up and (or with) nowhere (or no place) to go The idiom "all dressed up and nowhere (or no place) to go" refers to a situation in which someone is fully prepared or equipped for an event or activity, but that event or activity does not end up happening or there is no suitable place or opportunity for them to participate. It typically conveys a sense of disappointment or frustration caused by being ready for an occasion that does not materialize.
  • not all it's cracked up to be The idiom "not all it's cracked up to be" means that something or someone is not as good or impressive as they are portrayed or believed to be. It suggests that the actual experience or reality does not live up to the expectations or hype surrounding it.
  • not all something is cracked up to be The idiom "not all something is cracked up to be" means that something is not as good, enjoyable, or impressive as it was described or expected to be. It implies that the reality or the actual experience of something does not meet the high expectations or hype that surrounded it.
  • the most unkindest cut of all "The most unkindest cut of all" is an idiom derived from William Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar." It refers to the act of betrayal or treachery that is deemed particularly hurtful or devastating, above all other acts of betrayal. It signifies the deepest and most painful form of betrayal from someone close or trusted, leaving a lasting emotional impact.
  • till all hours (of the day and night) The idiom "till all hours (of the day and night)" means staying awake or working very late, often well into the night, until very late hours. It implies that someone is not adhering to a regular sleep schedule or continuing an activity for an extended period, neglecting rest or sleep.
  • until all hours (of the day and night) The idiom "until all hours (of the day and night)" refers to staying awake and working or engaging in an activity late into the night or early morning, often beyond normal hours. It implies that the person is not adhering to a regular schedule and is staying awake longer than expected.
  • yap, yap, yapping all day The idiom "yap, yap, yapping all day" refers to someone talking incessantly or constantly, often without making much sense or having anything substantial to say. It implies repetitive, empty, or trivial chatter.
  • yap, yap, yapping all day long The idiom "yap, yap, yapping all day long" refers to someone who is continuously talking or complaining in a repetitive and often annoying manner. It implies that the person talks excessively, without taking into consideration others' opinions or interests.
  • hit on all cylinders The idiom "hit on all cylinders" refers to operating or functioning at peak performance or maximum efficiency. It originates from the internal combustion engine, where all cylinders firing simultaneously represents optimal power output. In a figurative sense, when someone or something is hitting on all cylinders, they are performing exceptionally well in all aspects or are giving their best effort.
  • firing on all (four) cylinders The idiom "firing on all (four) cylinders" means to be operating at one's highest level of efficiency, effectiveness, or performance. It originated from internal combustion engines that are designed to work optimally when all cylinders are firing or producing power. Therefore, when someone or something is said to be firing on all (four) cylinders, it implies that they are functioning at their best and giving their maximum effort or output.
  • the daddy of them all The idiom "the daddy of them all" means the most significant or impressive of a group of things or events. It refers to something that is considered larger, better, or more influential than anything else in its category.
  • it's all downhill The idiom "it's all downhill" means that a situation is becoming easier or less challenging. It implies that the hardest or most difficult part has been overcome and that the rest will be much smoother and effortless.
  • all downhill from here The idiom "all downhill from here" is used when referring to a situation that is becoming easier, more pleasant, or has reached a point of no return. It suggests that the hardest part or the most challenging tasks are now behind, and things will only get better or easier from that point forward.
  • I’m all ears The idiom "I'm all ears" means that someone is fully attentive and ready to listen to what someone else has to say. It expresses a willingness to listen and indicates genuine interest in hearing and understanding what the other person has to communicate.
  • put all eggs in one basket The idiom "put all eggs in one basket" means to commit all of one's resources, time, or effort into a single endeavor or investment, without any backup or diversification. It refers to a risky or potentially dangerous approach, as putting all eggs in one basket entails the risk of losing everything if that one basket fails or is compromised. It is often used as an advice against such concentration of resources, suggesting the importance of spreading one's investments, focus, or efforts across multiple opportunities or options to reduce overall risk.
  • the elevator doesn't go all the way to the top The idiom "the elevator doesn't go all the way to the top" is a colloquial expression or metaphor used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence, being mentally deficient, or having a lack of common sense. It implies that the individual's mental capacity or intellect is incomplete or insufficient, likening the situation to riding in an elevator that does not reach the highest floor.
  • someone's elevator doesn't go all the way to the top The idiom "someone's elevator doesn't go all the way to the top" is used as a figurative expression to describe a person who is not very intelligent or lacks common sense. It implies that the person's mental abilities or understanding are incomplete or insufficient, likening them to an elevator that does not reach the highest floor.
  • the something to end all sths The idiom "the something to end all something" is used to describe or emphasize that a particular thing or event is the final or ultimate one in a specific category. It implies that nothing else afterwards will match or surpass it in significance, magnitude, or impact.
  • to end all The idiom "to end all" means to be the final or ultimate example of something, typically implying superiority or excellence. It suggests that the thing being referred to is the best or most extreme of its kind.
  • when you've seen, heard, etc. one, you've seen, heard, etc. them all The idiom "when you've seen, heard, etc. one, you've seen, heard, etc. them all" means that once you have experienced or encountered a certain thing, situation, or group of things, you have essentially experienced or encountered everything similar to it. It implies that there is little or no variation in a series or category, suggesting that further exposure to similar things will not offer any new or unique experiences.
  • if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail The idiom "if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail" means that when a person only possesses one particular skill, approach, or tool, they tend to perceive every problem or situation as one that can be solved using that singular skill, approach, or tool. It implies a limited perspective or a tendency to apply a single solution to all circumstances, regardless of whether or not it is appropriate or effective.
  • written all over (one's) face The idiom "written all over (one's) face" refers to a person's facial expression or appearance that clearly reveals their emotions, thoughts, or intentions, often when they are trying to conceal them.
  • written all over your face The idiom "written all over your face" refers to the easily recognizable expression or signs of a person's emotions or thoughts that are conveyed through their facial expressions, body language, or demeanor.
  • fall all over someone The idiom "fall all over someone" means to show extreme admiration, affection, or attention towards someone, often in an exaggerated or excessive manner. It can also imply fawning or being overly eager to please someone.
  • on all fours with The idiom "on all fours with" typically means being in agreement or aligned with someone or something. It suggests that two or more entities share the same position, viewpoint, or opinion.
  • sweet fuck all The idiom "sweet fuck all" is an informal expression typically used to convey a sense of nothingness or insignificance. It suggests that a particular action or outcome has resulted in absolutely no progress, value, or significance.
  • get down (on all fours) The idiom "get down on all fours" means to lower oneself onto the hands and knees, assuming a position similar to that of a four-legged animal.
  • go all out (for someone or something) The idiom "go all out (for someone or something)" means to make a maximum or extreme effort in supporting, promoting, or showing dedication to someone or something. It suggests putting forth all possible resources, energy, and enthusiasm to achieve a desired objective or outcome.
  • go all the way (with someone) The idiom "go all the way (with someone)" typically means to engage in a sexual relationship or activity with someone, usually involving sexual intercourse. It implies going beyond just kissing or other forms of physical intimacy and proceeding to the ultimate act of sexual intercourse.
  • go all the way (or the whole way) The idiom "go all the way (or the whole way)" can have multiple meanings depending on the context, but its primary definition is: To fully commit or complete something, often referring to achieving a goal, following through on a plan, or reaching the maximum extent or intensity of an action or experience. It implies not stopping or giving up until one has achieved the desired outcome or fully experienced something.
  • work all the hours God sends The idiom "work all the hours God sends" means to work extremely long hours, often until very late at night or early in the morning, in order to complete a task or meet a deadline. It implies a strong dedication to work and willingness to put in extensive effort and time.
  • it's all good The idiom "it's all good" is a colloquial expression used to indicate that everything is fine, satisfactory, or without any problems. It conveys a sense of reassurance, acceptance, or contentment in a given situation. It suggests that there is no cause for concern or worry, and that the overall outcome is positive.
  • the granddaddy of them all "The granddaddy of them all" is an idiomatic expression used to refer to something that is the largest, biggest, most important, or most significant of its kind. It is often used to describe an event, competition, or achievement that surpasses all others in terms of scale, prestige, or historical significance.
  • have all the hallmarks of (someone or something) The idiom "have all the hallmarks of (someone or something)" refers to displaying or possessing all the characteristic qualities or features that are typically associated with a particular person, thing, or situation. It suggests that something closely resembles or embodies the distinct attributes or traits typically observed in a specific individual or entity.
  • on all hands The idiom "on all hands" typically means from all directions or from all sides. It refers to a situation or event where multiple parties or perspectives are involved or concerned. It implies a wide or comprehensive involvement or consideration.
  • be all (one) could do (not) to (do something) The idiom "be all (one) could do (not) to (do something)" means that it was extremely difficult for someone to resist or avoid doing something. It implies that the person had to make a significant effort or exercise great self-control to refrain from doing a particular action.
  • time heals all wounds The idiom "time heals all wounds" means that given enough time, emotional pain or distress will fade away or be alleviated. It suggests that the passage of time has a healing effect on emotional or psychological pain, allowing people to recover and move on from difficult experiences or situations.
  • when you've seen one (something), you've seen them all The idiom "when you've seen one (something), you've seen them all" means that after having experienced or observed one thing of a certain kind, there is no need to experience or observe more of the same kind as they are all essentially the same. It suggests that once you have seen or understood one particular thing, the rest of its kind will be similar or predictable and offer no new or unique value.
  • with all your heart/your whole heart The idiom "with all your heart" or "your whole heart" means to do something with a great amount of enthusiasm, passion, and sincerity. It implies giving complete and genuine dedication or commitment to a particular task, goal, belief, or relationship.
  • (one's) all The idiom "(one's) all" refers to the full effort, energy, or resources that a person puts into something. It means giving everything one has or doing something to the best of one's abilities.
  • be all about (oneself, someone or something) The idiom "be all about (oneself, someone or something)" refers to a person or a situation that is primarily focused on oneself, someone else, or a specific thing. It implies that the individual or the situation is entirely centered around and prioritizes the mentioned subject or interest. This idiom suggests a lack of consideration or awareness of other people or matters beyond the focused subject.
  • be all the same to (one) The idiom "be all the same to (one)" means that someone doesn't have a strong preference or opinion between different options or choices. It suggests that they are indifferent and would be content with any of the available alternatives.
  • hit on all six The idiom "hit on all six" is an expression that means to perform exceptionally well or to operate at optimum efficiency. It refers to reaching the highest level of performance or achieving perfect results in a particular task or situation.
  • in all honesty The idiom "in all honesty" is used when someone wants to emphasize that what they are about to say is sincere, truthful, and not influenced or clouded by any kind of deception, bias, or ulterior motive. It implies a genuine and straightforward expression of thoughts or opinions.
  • till/until all hours The idiom "till/until all hours" refers to staying awake or working late into the night, typically beyond the usual or expected hours.
  • for all the world as if (someone or something) The idiom "for all the world as if" is used to describe someone or something behaving or appearing in a particular way, often in a manner that is surprising or unexpected. It suggests that the person or thing resembles or acts like something that is completely different from their usual self.
  • for all the world as though (someone or something) The idiom "for all the world as though (someone or something)" means to behave or appear exactly as if someone or something is a certain way, even though it may not be true. It suggests a convincing or authentic imitation of a particular behavior or characteristic.
  • if it's all the same The idiom "if it's all the same" is used to express indifference or lack of preference towards different options or choices. It implies that the speaker has no strong preference and is willing to go along with whatever others suggest or decide. It can also be used to suggest that one option is as good as another, or that the speaker does not think there will be any significant difference regardless of the choice made.
  • in all innocence The idiom "in all innocence" refers to a situation or action done without any intention of deceit, harm, or understanding of any underlying implications. It implies that the person involved is unaware of any wrongdoing, unethical behavior, or hidden meaning associated with their words or actions.
  • it's all right The idiom "it's all right" is a phrase used to express reassurance or consolation, indicating that a situation or action is acceptable, satisfactory, or not causing any harm or concern. It can also imply forgiveness or acceptance of a mistake or apology.
  • that's all right The idiom "that's all right" is typically used to express reassurance or forgiveness, implying that there is no need for apology or concern. It is often used to acknowledge a mistake or inconvenience, while indicating that it does not cause any significant harm or offense.
  • I'm all right, Jack The idiom "I'm all right, Jack" refers to a selfish or indifferent attitude towards the plight of others. It can be used to describe someone who is only concerned about their own well-being or situation and shows little consideration or sympathy for others.
  • jack all The idiom "jack all" is used to express that there is nothing or very little of something. It is often used to convey a sense of emptiness, insignificance, or lack of value.
  • jack of all trades, master of none The idiom "jack of all trades, master of none" refers to a person who possesses superficial knowledge or skills in many different areas or tasks, but lacks expertise or mastery in any specific one.
  • jack of all trades someone The idiom "jack of all trades" typically refers to a person who possesses a wide range of skills or abilities, but may not be a specialist in any particular area. They are capable of performing various tasks competently, often being adaptable and versatile in different fields.
  • jack of all trades (and master of none) The idiom "jack of all trades (and master of none)" refers to a person who has knowledge or skills in a wide range of areas or tasks, but does not excel or achieve expertise in any specific field. It implies that while the individual may be versatile and capable of performing various tasks, they lack a deep understanding or mastery in a particular subject.
  • Jill of all trades(, master of none) The idiom "Jill of all trades, master of none" refers to a person who is skilled in or capable of doing a wide range of tasks or jobs, but is not exceptional or highly proficient in any particular one. It suggests that while someone may have a broad knowledge or ability in various areas, they lack the expertise or mastery often associated with specialization in a specific field.
  • jump all over (one) The definition of the idiom "jump all over (one)" is to harshly criticize or reprimand someone, usually with a great deal of intensity or aggression. It can also refer to quickly and eagerly responding to an opportunity or taking immediate action on something.
  • jump all over someone The idiom "jump all over someone" means to criticize, reprimand, or confront someone aggressively and forcefully. It often implies both verbal and emotional attack, expressing strong disapproval or taking someone to task for their actions or behavior.
  • keep all the plates spinning The idiom "keep all the plates spinning" means to manage or maintain multiple tasks or responsibilities simultaneously without allowing any of them to fail or be neglected. It refers to the ability to handle a variety of tasks or obligations successfully, often in a fast-paced or high-pressure environment. The comparison to spinning plates suggests the need for constant attention and balance in order to prevent any of the plates from falling or crashing.
  • It takes all kinds The idiom "It takes all kinds" means that people have different personalities, preferences, or viewpoints, and that a diverse range of individuals is necessary or beneficial for a complete or successful outcome. It acknowledges that diversity and variety in people's qualities, abilities, and perspectives are essential for a balanced and well-functioning society or situation.
  • know (or have) all the answers The idiom "know (or have) all the answers" means to have a superior or excessively confident attitude, to act as if one is knowledgeable about and has solutions to every problem or question. It refers to someone who believes they possess or claim to possess an unending wealth of knowledge or expertise.
  • look for all the world like The idiom "look for all the world like" refers to someone or something appearing or seeming very similar to something else, often used when the resemblance is striking or unexpected.
  • look for all the world like (someone or something) The idiom "look for all the world like (someone or something)" means that someone or something appears or resembles another person or thing very closely. It suggests a strong resemblance or similarity in appearance or behavior.

Similar spelling words for ALL

Plural form of ALL is ALLS

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