How Do You Spell ARM?

Pronunciation: [ˈɑːm] (IPA)

The word "arm" is spelled with the letters a-r-m. In IPA phonetic transcription, it is written as /ɑrm/. The "a" represents the open back unrounded vowel sound, which is pronounced by opening the mouth wide while keeping the lips relaxed. The "r" sound is a voiced alveolar trill, where the tongue vibrates against the alveolar ridge. Lastly, the "m" is a voiced bilabial nasal, where the lips come together to produce the sound. Together, these sounds create the word "arm".

ARM Meaning and Definition

Arm, usually referred to as a noun, has different definitions based on its context and usage. Primarily, an arm is one of the paired upper limbs of the human body, connecting the shoulder to the hand. It is used for various activities like lifting, carrying, and manipulating objects. The arm consists of several parts, including the upper arm (humerus), forearm (radius and ulna), and the hand (including the wrist and fingers).

In a broader sense, the term "arm" can refer to similar structures found in other animals, such as the forelimbs of vertebrates. For example, birds have wings as their forelimbs and are commonly referred to as arms.

Additionally, "arm" can be used to describe a weapon, such as firearms or weaponry used in warfare, defense, or hunting. Moreover, the word may be used metaphorically to signify strength, power, or capability. For instance, "armed with knowledge" implies possessing knowledge as a resource or advantage.

In the field of technology, "ARM" stands for "Advanced RISC Machine," which refers to a type of microprocessor architecture commonly used in various devices, including smartphones, tablets, and other embedded systems.

The verb form of the word "arm" can mean to prepare oneself or others for a specific purpose or situation. It can also indicate the act of supplying weapons or militarizing a group or organization.

Overall, the term "arm" carries diverse interpretations centered around the human body, weaponry, metaphoric strength, and technology.

Top Common Misspellings for ARM *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for ARM

Etymology of ARM

The word arm originated from the Old English noun arm or earm, which can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic term armaz. This Proto-Germanic word had its roots in the Proto-Indo-European base *ar-, meaning fit, join. Additionally, the word arm is linguistically related to the Sanskrit term arma, meaning shoulder, and the Latin word armus, which means shoulder, upper arm.

Idioms with the word ARM

  • a shot in the arm The idiom "a shot in the arm" refers to an action or event that gives a boost or revitalizes something or someone's spirits, energy, or confidence. It can serve as a source of motivation, encouragement, or renewed strength.
  • cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" or "cost a small fortune" refers to something that is very expensive, requiring a significant amount of money to obtain or purchase. It implies that the cost is exorbitant or excessively high, often beyond what is considered reasonable or affordable.
  • sb could do sth with one arm/hand tied behind their back The idiom "sb could do sth with one arm/hand tied behind their back" means that someone is capable of accomplishing a task or overcoming a challenge with great ease or mastery. It implies that the person possesses exceptional skill or ability and could successfully complete the task even under difficult circumstances.
  • I would give my eye teeth/right arm, at I would give anything/a lot The idiom "I would give my eye teeth/right arm" is used to express a strong desire or willingness to give up something valuable or make a significant sacrifice in order to obtain or achieve something desired. It conveys a sense of immense importance or value placed on the desired outcome, emphasizing the extent to which one is willing to go to attain it.
  • twist sb's arm The idiom "twist someone's arm" means to use persuasive techniques or strong influence to convince or force someone to do something they may not want to do initially.
  • cost a bomb/the earth/a packet, at cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idioms "cost a bomb" or "cost the earth" or "cost a packet" all mean that something is very expensive. The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" means that something is extremely costly, often to the point of being unaffordable or requiring a significant sacrifice in order to obtain it. Similarly, "cost a small fortune" suggests that something is very expensive, usually beyond what most people would consider reasonable or affordable.
  • a list as long as your arm The idiom "a list as long as your arm" is used to describe a very long list of items or tasks. It suggests that the list is so lengthy that it could potentially extend as far as the length of one's arm.
  • chance your arm The idiom "chance your arm" means to take a risk or make an attempt, even if the likelihood of success is uncertain or low. It implies being willing to take a chance or gamble in order to achieve a desired outcome, despite the potential obstacles or dangers involved.
  • an arm and a leg The idiom "an arm and a leg" is used to describe something that is very expensive or costs a significant amount of money. It implies that the price being paid for something is extremely high, often beyond what is reasonable or expected.
  • give your right arm The idiom "give your right arm" is used to express a very strong desire or willingness to make a sacrifice for something or someone. It implies being ready to give up something extremely valuable or important, symbolized by the right arm, which is typically considered more dominant and valuable than the left arm.
  • the long arm of the law The idiom "the long arm of the law" refers to the far-reaching power and influence of the legal system or law enforcement authorities to catch, punish, or bring justice to those who have committed crimes or illegal activities, no matter how far they may try to distance themselves or escape the consequences. Essentially, it implies that the law has the ability to reach individuals no matter where they may hide or how long it takes.
  • (as) long as your arm The idiom "(as) long as your arm" means something that is extremely long or extensive. It is used to describe a list, a series of tasks, or any other element that is excessively lengthy or comprehensive.
  • would give right arm The idiom "would give right arm" is used to express extreme eagerness, willingness, or desperation to obtain or achieve something. It implies that a person is willing to sacrifice a valuable possession or endure great hardship in order to obtain or accomplish their desire.
  • give right arm The idiom "give right arm" is used to express extreme willingness or eagerness to obtain or achieve something. It suggests that someone is willing to sacrifice something valuable or significant (in this case, the right arm) in order to obtain or achieve their desired goal or object.
  • twist arm The idiom "twist an arm" means to use persuasion, manipulation, or force to get someone to do something they may not want to do. It implies applying pressure or using convincing tactics to make someone agree or comply with a particular request or demand.
  • stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach The idiom "stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach" means to not overextend oneself or take on more responsibilities, tasks, or obligations than one can handle or manage effectively. It emphasizes the importance of knowing one's limits and not exceeding them to prevent negative consequences or jeopardize one's well-being. This idiom promotes self-awareness and the idea of exercising caution and prudence in various aspects of life.
  • shot in the arm The idiom "shot in the arm" refers to something that provides a boost or revitalizes someone or something, typically in terms of energy, motivation, or encouragement. It can also imply a positive influence or stimulus that helps in overcoming obstacles or challenges.
  • put the arm on To "put the arm on" someone is an idiom that means to apply pressure or persuade someone, often forcefully, to do something, especially in the context of demanding or extorting money or favors. It implies using aggressive tactics to persuade or coerce someone into complying with one's requests.
  • pay an arm and a leg The idiom "pay an arm and a leg" means to pay a very high price or cost for something, often implying that the price is excessively expensive or unreasonable.
  • long arm of the law The idiom "long arm of the law" refers to the far-reaching power, influence, or authority of law enforcement agencies or the legal system to apprehend, investigate, and bring to justice those who break the law, regardless of their location or attempts to evade capture. It suggests that the law has the ability to reach and apprehend individuals no matter how far they try to escape or hide.
  • have a good arm The idiom "have a good arm" typically refers to someone's ability to throw or toss something with accuracy, strength, or skill. It suggests that the person is capable of making long or accurate throws, often in reference to sports or activities involving throwing objects.
  • could do with one arm tied behind back The idiom "could do with one arm tied behind back" means that someone is extremely skilled or capable, and can easily accomplish a task despite facing a significant disadvantage or challenge. It implies that the person has such confidence and ability that they can easily overcome obstacles that would hinder most others.
  • cost an arm and a leg The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" refers to something that is extremely expensive or involves a significant sacrifice or high price. It implies that the cost or price being asked is excessively high and requires the person to give up something valuable or significant.
  • chance arm
  • arm in arm The idiom "arm in arm" refers to two or more individuals walking or standing side by side with their arms linked or hooked together, symbolizing mutual support, closeness, or camaraderie between them.
  • arm The idiom "arm" can have multiple meanings, but one definition is: - To arm oneself: To prepare or equip oneself for a difficult or dangerous situation, usually involving gathering knowledge, resources, or skills to confront or handle a specific challenge.
  • a list as long as arm The idiom "a list as long as your arm" means having a list or series of items, tasks, or obligations that is very long or extensive. It implies that the list is so lengthy that it could metaphorically be compared to the length of a person's arm.
  • twist sm's arm The idiom "twist someone's arm" means to apply pressure or persuasion in order to convince or force someone to do something they may be hesitant or unwilling to do. It implies the act of using tactics or manipulation to sway someone's decision or opinion.
  • cost (sb) an arm and a leg The idiom "cost (sb) an arm and a leg" means that something is extremely expensive or costs a large amount of money. It is used to emphasize that the price of something is very high and can be seen as excessive or unreasonable.
  • give one's right arm (for sm or sth) The idiom "give one's right arm (for sm or sth)" is an exaggerated expression used to convey a strong desire or willingness to do or have something. It implies that a person is willing to sacrifice or give up something significant in order to obtain or achieve their desired outcome. The phrase is often used figuratively and does not usually imply a literal willingness to physically give up one's arm.
  • under one's arm The idiom "under one's arm" typically refers to holding or carrying something securely or close to oneself. It suggests that someone has something in their possession and is protecting it or keeping it within easy reach.
  • cost/pay an arm and a leg The idiom "cost/pay an arm and a leg" means that something is very expensive or costs a great deal, often in a figurative sense. It implies that the price or expense is extremely high, to the point of being unreasonable or exorbitant.
  • the long arm of something The idiom "the long arm of something" refers to the extensive reach or influence that a person or organization has over a situation or events, often implying their ability to exert control or enforce their authority over a wide area. It suggests that the influence or power can extend far beyond what is initially expected or perceived.
  • give your right arm for something/to do something The idiom "give your right arm for something/to do something" means to be willing to sacrifice or give up something extremely valuable or important in order to obtain or achieve the desired thing or opportunity. It conveys a strong desire, indicating that the person is ready to go to great lengths or make significant sacrifices to attain their objective.
  • twist somebody’s arm The idiom "twist somebody's arm" means to persuade or pressure someone to do something, usually through forceful or persistent means. It implies exerting indirect or subtle influence to convince or manipulate someone into a particular action or decision.
  • arm and a leg The idiom "arm and a leg" is used to describe something that is very expensive or costs a significant amount of money. It implies that the price is exceedingly high, often exaggeratedly so.
  • give an arm and a leg (for something) The idiom "give an arm and a leg (for something)" means to be willing to sacrifice a significant or extreme amount, often referring to a high monetary price or a great personal effort, for the desired thing or outcome. It implies willingness to give up something very valuable or make a substantial sacrifice in order to obtain or achieve something desired.
  • give an arm and a leg for The idiom "give an arm and a leg for" means to be willing to give up something of great value, often used to emphasize how much someone desires or is willing to sacrifice for something or someone.
  • arm (someone against someone or something) (with something) The idiom "arm (someone against someone or something) (with something)" means to provide someone with information, resources, or support in order to prepare or equip them for a confrontation or battle with someone or something. It essentially implies empowering someone by giving them the necessary tools or knowledge to counter or resist a particular threat or challenge.
  • arm candy The idiom "arm candy" refers to a person, usually attractive, who accompanies someone in public, typically as a romantic partner, solely for the purpose of enhancing the other person's image or social status. This term is often used to describe someone who is seen as a fashionable accessory or status symbol.
  • arm to the teeth The idiom "arm to the teeth" generally refers to someone being heavily armed or having many weapons. It suggests that the person is prepared for battle or conflict, with weapons covering their entire body, including their teeth.
  • arm up To "arm up" is an idiomatic expression that means to prepare oneself or others, often by gathering weapons or protective equipment, in order to defend or attack. It generally implies readiness for a conflict or confrontation.
  • arm-twister The idiom "arm-twister" refers to a person who uses aggressive or persuasive tactics to pressure or convince someone into doing something against their will or better judgment. It describes someone who employs forceful persuasion or coercion to achieve a particular outcome.
  • arm-twisting The idiom "arm-twisting" refers to the act of using pressure, manipulation, or coercion to persuade or force someone to do something against their will. It suggests a forceful or aggressive approach to influence someone's decision or outcome.
  • bang in the arm
  • chance (one's) arm The idiom "chance (one's) arm" means to take a risk or make an attempt at something, even if it seems unlikely or uncertain to succeed. It implies taking a brave or bold action, often despite the odds or potential negative outcomes.
  • could (do something) with one arm tied behind (one's) back The idiom "could (do something) with one arm tied behind (one's) back" means that someone can easily accomplish a task or achieve something with very little effort or challenge. It suggests that the person is exceptionally skilled or capable in that particular area, to the extent that even facing a hindrance would not hinder their ability to succeed.
  • give (one's) right arm The idiom "give (one's) right arm" means to be willing to sacrifice or give up something extremely valuable or important, often referring to an intense desire or willingness to obtain or achieve something. It signifies the significance and high value placed on what one is willing to sacrifice.
  • list as long as (one's) arm The idiom "list as long as (one's) arm" refers to a list that is extremely lengthy, often implying that it contains numerous tasks or items. It emphasizes the idea that the list is so extensive that it could stretch as long as one's arm when written down.
  • long arm The idiom "long arm" refers to someone's influence or power that extends far beyond their immediate reach or physical presence. It implies that the person has the ability to exert control or have an impact on events and individuals even from a distance.
  • long arm of the law, the The idiom "long arm of the law" is used to refer to the far-reaching power and authority of law enforcement agencies or the legal system to apprehend criminals or enforce the law, even over great distances or over extended periods of time. It conveys the idea that no matter how far one may try to escape, evade, or commit a crime, the jurisdiction and influence of law enforcement will eventually catch up with them.
  • long as your arm The idiom "long as your arm" is used to describe something that is very long or extensive, often referring to a list, a problem, or a set of tasks. It implies that the subject is extensive and requires a lot of time, effort, or attention to complete or deal with.
  • make a long arm for (something) The idiom "make a long arm for (something)" typically means to reach out or make an effort to obtain or achieve something that is desired or required. It can refer to both literal and figurative actions. The phrase implies stretching oneself to grasp or attain something that might otherwise be out of reach.
  • put the arm on (one) The idiom "put the arm on (one)" means to coerce, pressure, or convince someone forcefully to do something, typically by using persuasive tactics or manipulation. It can also suggest imposing a burden or demanding a favor from someone against their will.
  • put the arm on someone The idiom "put the arm on someone" means to pressure or coerce someone into doing something, usually for personal gain. It refers to using persuasion, manipulation, or forceful tactics to make someone comply with one's requests or demands.
  • put the arm/bite on somebody The idiom "put the arm/bite on somebody" typically means to exert pressure or influence on someone in order to obtain something, often in an aggressive or forceful manner. It often implies the act of pressuring or demanding money, favors, or cooperation from someone.
  • strong-arm The idiom "strong-arm" means to use physical force, intimidation, or coercion in order to achieve a desired outcome, often in a forceful or aggressive manner.
  • strong-arm man The idiom "strong-arm man" refers to a person who uses physical force or intimidation to achieve a desired outcome, often in an aggressive or ruthless manner. It typically describes someone who uses their physical strength to control or coerce others.
  • strong-arm tactics The idiom "strong-arm tactics" refers to aggressive, forceful, or coercive methods used to achieve a desired outcome, often involving intimidation, bullying, or the use of physical force.
  • talk someone's arm off The idiom "talk someone's arm off" means to talk excessively and without pause, often to the point where the other person becomes annoyed or exhausted from listening.
  • the long arm of coincidence The idiom "the long arm of coincidence" refers to the belief or concept that coincidences can have a far-reaching impact or influence on events or outcomes. It suggests that seemingly unrelated or random events can sometimes play a significant role in shaping circumstances or connecting people.
  • twist somebody's arm The definition of the idiom "twist somebody's arm" means to persuade or compel someone to do something, often by applying pressure or using strong convincing tactics.
  • twist someone’s arm The idiom "twist someone’s arm" means to put pressure on someone or persuade them strongly to do something they may be hesitant or unwilling to do. It implies using persuasion, coercion, or manipulation to convince someone to take a specific action.
  • twist someone's arm The idiom "twist someone's arm" means to persuade or pressure someone to do something they are hesitant or reluctant to do. It implies g ently applying force or influence to convince or coerce someone into agreeing or performing an action.
  • with one arm tied behind one's back The phrase "with one arm tied behind one's back" is an idiom that means to accomplish something easily or effortlessly, as if the task is so simple that even with a handicap or limitation, it can still be completed successfully. It implies that the person is highly skilled or capable, and the challenge presented is insignificant in comparison to their abilities.
  • would give your right arm for The idiom "would give your right arm for" is used to express a strong desire or willingness to sacrifice something of great value or importance in order to obtain or achieve something else. It signifies a willingness to give up something significant in exchange for another desire or goal.
  • would give your right arm for something/to do something The idiom "would give your right arm for something/to do something" is an expression used to convey intense desire or willingness to sacrifice a great deal in order to obtain or achieve something. It suggests that someone is so desperate or determined that they would be willing to give up something as significant as their right arm, which symbolizes a valuable and essential part of the body.
  • give one's right arm (for someone or something) The idiom "give one's right arm (for someone or something)" means to be willing to make great sacrifices or give up something of high personal value in order to obtain or achieve someone or something. It expresses the extent of one's desire, willingness, or the value placed upon the desired person or thing.
  • as long as (one's) arm The idiom "as long as one's arm" refers to something that is very long or extensive in size, length, or scope. It is typically used to emphasize the magnitude or extent of something, often in a figurative way. It implies that the mentioned thing is extremely long or lengthy, comparable to the length of one's arm.

Similar spelling words for ARM

Plural form of ARM is ARMS

Conjugate verb Arm

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have armed
you would have armed
he/she/it would have armed
we would have armed
they would have armed
I would have arm
you would have arm
he/she/it would have arm
we would have arm
they would have arm

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been arming
you would have been arming
he/she/it would have been arming
we would have been arming
they would have been arming

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would arm
you would arm
he/she/it would arm
we would arm
they would arm

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be arming
you would be arming
he/she/it would be arming
we would be arming
they would be arming

FUTURE

I will arm
you will arm
he/she/it will arm
we will arm
they will arm

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be arming
you will be arming
he/she/it will be arming
we will be arming
they will be arming

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have armed
you will have armed
he/she/it will have armed
we will have armed
they will have armed

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been arming
you will have been arming
he/she/it will have been arming
we will have been arming
they will have been arming

IMPERATIVE

you arm
we let´s arm

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to arm

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was arming
you were arming
he/she/it was arming
we were arming
they were arming

PAST PARTICIPLE

armed

PAST PERFECT

I had armed
you had armed
he/she/it had armed
we had armed
they had armed

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been arming
you had been arming
he/she/it had been arming
we had been arming
they had been arming

PRESENT

I arm
you arm
he/she/it arms
we arm
they arm

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am arming
you are arming
he/she/it is arming
we are arming
they are arming

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

arming

PRESENT PERFECT

I have armed
you have armed
he/she/it has armed
we have armed
they have armed

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been arming
you have been arming
he/she/it has been arming
we have been arming
they have been arming

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it arm

SIMPLE PAST

I armed
you armed
he/she/it armed
we armed
they armed

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