How Do You Spell AS?

Pronunciation: [ˈaz] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "as" in English is quite straightforward. IPA phonetic transcription for this word is /æz/. The letter "a" is pronounced as a short vowel sound /æ/ and the letter "s" gives the /z/ sound. "As" is a commonly used conjunction and preposition, usually denoting comparison or similarity between two things. Its spelling does not change when used in different tenses or forms, making it a versatile word in English grammar.

AS Meaning and Definition

As is a versatile adverb and conjunction used in both formal and informal contexts, primarily to indicate the manner or way in which something occurs. It often functions as a coordinating conjunction, joining two clauses or phrases together. Additionally, as can function as a preposition, introducing a comparison between two entities.

When used as a conjunction, as signifies the way in which an action or event is accomplished. For example, "She ran as fast as she could" implies that she ran with maximum speed or effort. It can also introduce a reason or cause, such as "As it was raining, they decided to stay indoors."

As a preposition, as is used to compare two things or individuals, typically showing similarity, equality, or proportion. For instance, "He is as tall as his brother" indicates that their heights are similar. Furthermore, as can be employed to introduce examples or instances, as in "There are several benefits to exercise, such as improved cardiovascular health and increased stamina."

In certain cases, as can be employed as an adverb to emphasize a comparison or extent. For instance, "This car is expensive, as in really expensive!" Here, as adds emphasis to the degree of costliness.

Overall, the word as possesses various functions, ranging from expressing manner, reason, or comparison to introducing examples or providing emphasis. Its versatility and frequent usage make it an essential component of the English language.

Top Common Misspellings for AS *

  • asd 11.3548387%
  • asa 8.3870967%
  • ast 4.3870967%
  • ias 2.1935483%
  • las 1.6774193%
  • asn 1.548387%
  • nas 1.032258%
  • aso 0.9032258%
  • ahs 0.9032258%
  • asw 0.9032258%
  • tas 0.7741935%
  • sas 0.7741935%
  • ase 0.7741935%
  • asi 0.7741935%
  • ae 0.7741935%
  • af 0.7741935%
  • uas 0.6451612%
  • fas 0.3870967%
  • qas 0.3870967%
  • ws 0.2580645%
  • ars 0.2580645%
  • hs 0.2580645%
  • cas 0.2580645%
  • aqs 0.2580645%
  • mas 0.2580645%
  • ais 0.1290322%
  • yas 0.1290322%
  • aswe 0.1290322%
  • ats 0.1290322%
  • asr 0.1290322%
  • asz 0.1290322%
  • aws 0.1290322%
  • aw 0.516129%
  • asf 0.516129%
  • asu 0.516129%
  • eas 0.516129%

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for AS

Etymology of AS

The word "as" has a rich etymology with various origins.

1. Old English: The word "as" comes from the Old English word "æs", which means "so, as, or like".

2. Proto-Germanic: The Old English word "æs" has its roots in the Proto-Germanic word "*ase" or "*asi", which also means "so" or "like".

3. Proto-Indo-European: The Proto-Germanic word "*ase" is derived from the Proto-Indo-European root "*h₂eso-", meaning "so" or "this". This root is also the origin of other related words in different languages, such as "que" in Latin and "sá" in Sanskrit.

Idioms with the word AS

  • as a (general) rule The idiom "as a (general) rule" refers to a standard or principle that usually applies or is commonly followed. It indicates that something is typically true or widely accepted but acknowledges that there may be exceptions or instances where the rule does not apply.
  • as safe as houses The idiom "as safe as houses" means to be extremely secure and protected. It suggests that something is very stable, reliable, and unlikely to be harmed or affected by any negative circumstances.
  • as the actress said to the bishop "As the actress said to the bishop" is a humorously suggestive or double entendre expression that is often used after a remark or a statement that could be interpreted in a risqué or sexual manner. It is meant to highlight an unintended innuendo or to make a situation funny and awkward.
  • as every schoolboy/schoolchild knows The idiom "as every schoolboy/schoolchild knows" means that the information or fact being referred to is common knowledge, particularly among students at a certain level of education. It implies that the information is widely known and understood, similar to what would be taught to schoolchildren in their basic education.
  • as far as the eye can/could see The idiom "as far as the eye can/could see" is used to describe an expansive and limitless view or distance. It implies that there is no visible endpoint or boundary, emphasizing vastness or endlessness.
  • look like/as though you've seen a ghost The idiom "look like/as though you've seen a ghost" means to appear extremely scared, shocked, or startled. It is used to describe someone's facial expression or overall demeanor when they appear pale, wide-eyed, and showing clear signs of distress or fear. It suggests that the individual's reaction is comparable to encountering something incredibly terrifying, as if they had come face to face with a supernatural entity.
  • as ye sow, so shall ye reap The idiom "as ye sow, so shall ye reap" means that the consequences of one's actions or behavior will eventually catch up to them. It suggests that the results or outcomes of one's actions will be in direct accordance with the nature of those actions. In other words, if you do good, you will receive good in return; if you do bad, you will face negative consequences. It implies that individuals are responsible for their own actions and will ultimately bear the fruits of their deeds.
  • (as) blind as a bat The idiom "(as) blind as a bat" refers to someone who has very poor eyesight or is completely unable to see.
  • you might as well be hung for a sheep as for a lamb The idiom "you might as well be hung for a sheep as for a lamb" means that if you are going to get in trouble or face severe consequences for doing something, you might as well do something even more significant or daring. It implies that the risk or punishment is already significant, so there is no point in holding back or being cautious.
  • (as) white as a sheet The idiom "(as) white as a sheet" is typically used to describe someone's face or complexion when they appear extremely pale or frightened. It suggests that the person's skin has lost all color and turned as white as a plain sheet of paper.
  • (as) tough as shoe leather, at (as) tough as old boots The idiom "(as) tough as shoe leather" or "(as) tough as old boots" refers to someone or something that is extremely resilient, durable, or unyielding in the face of challenges or difficulties. It implies that the person or thing possesses a strong and unbreakable character or physical strength, capable of enduring harsh conditions or hardship.
  • (as) thick as two short planks The idiom "(as) thick as two short planks" refers to a person who is not intelligent or lacks common sense. It suggests that the person is incredibly stupid or unintelligent, equating their mental capacity to that of two very thick and short wooden planks.
  • sick as a dog The idiom "sick as a dog" refers to being extremely ill or feeling very unwell, usually experiencing symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or severe physical discomfort.
  • sick as a parrot The idiom "sick as a parrot" refers to a feeling of extreme disappointment, dejection, or sadness, often when something expected or desired does not happen or goes awry. It signifies a state of deep unhappiness or frustration.
  • as smooth as silk/a baby's bottom The phrase "as smooth as silk" or "as smooth as a baby's bottom" is an idiom used to describe something that is exceptionally smooth, without any roughness or imperfections. It refers to the incredibly soft and velvety texture of silk fabric or a baby's skin, implying a high level of smoothness and flawlessness.
  • as guilty/miserable/ugly as sin The idiom "as guilty/miserable/ugly as sin" refers to someone who is extremely guilty, miserable, or ugly. It emphasizes the severity of the feeling or condition, comparing it to the concept of sin, which is often associated with wrongdoing or evilness. It implies that the person's guilt, misery, or ugliness is intense and undeniable.
  • be as one, at be at one The idiom "be as one" or "be at one" refers to a state of unity or harmony between individuals or groups. It suggests that people are in agreement, have a shared understanding, or are in complete harmony with each other. It can also refer to being in a state of peace or inner harmony with oneself.
  • be as well, at be just as well The idiom "be as well" or "be just as well" means that an action or decision would be beneficial or advantageous in a given situation. It suggests that something should be done or a particular outcome should occur, as it would ultimately be advantageous or appropriate.
  • be just as well The idiom "be just as well" means that a particular action or outcome would be equally acceptable, satisfactory, or beneficial, possibly even preferable, compared to another option or situation. It implies that there is no significant difference in the potential results or consequences.
  • be as pure as the driven snow The idiom "be as pure as the driven snow" means to be completely innocent, virtuous, or morally pure. It implies that the person or thing being described is free from any wrongdoing, corruption, or immorality.
  • not so much sth as sth The idiom "not so much sth as sth" is used to compare or contrast two things, usually to emphasize that one thing is more accurate or true than the other. It implies that the first thing mentioned is not as relevant or significant as the second thing mentioned.
  • there's nowt so queer as folk The idiom "there's nowt so queer as folk" is a colloquial expression commonly used in Northern England and Scotland. It means that people behave in strange, unpredictable, or eccentric ways, emphasizing the diversity and peculiarity of human behavior. "Nowt" is a Northern English dialect word for "nothing," and "queer" is used in its original sense of odd or peculiar. Therefore, the idiom implies that nothing is as strange as people themselves.
  • if I may be/make so bold (as to) The idiom "if I may be/make so bold (as to)" is a polite way of requesting permission or expressing an opinion that may be seen as forward or audacious. It is often used to introduce a statement or question that the speaker considers to be possibly impertinent or presumptuous.
  • without (so much as) a backward glance The idiom "without (so much as) a backward glance" means to leave or depart from a place or situation without expressing any regret, hesitation, or attachment to what is left behind. It implies that the person is completely unconcerned or indifferent about what they are leaving behind or the consequences of their departure.
  • without so much as a byyourleave The idiom "without so much as a by-your-leave" means to do something or take action without seeking permission or informing someone beforehand. It refers to a situation where someone acts or makes a decision abruptly or rudely without any courtesy or consideration for others.
  • there's none so deaf as those who will not hear The idiom "there's none so deaf as those who will not hear" means that some people refuse to listen or understand something, even if they are fully capable of doing so. It implies that some individuals deliberately choose to ignore or deny information or advice, regardless of how clear or convincing it may be.
  • would (just) as soon The idiom "would (just) as soon" means to prefer or be equally willing or inclined to do something. It expresses preference or a lack of preference between two or more options.
  • would sooner, at would (just) as soon The idiom "would sooner, would (just) as soon" is used to indicate a strong preference or desire for something. It implies that someone would prefer or choose to do one thing instead of another.
  • be as sound as a bell The idiom "be as sound as a bell" means to be in excellent condition or health, with no faults, issues, or weaknesses. It refers to something or someone that is sturdy, reliable, and functioning well.
  • as, if, when, etc. the spirit moves sb The idiom "as, if, when, etc. the spirit moves sb" refers to someone doing something when they feel inspired, motivated, or in the mood to do it. It suggests that the individual only takes action when they are genuinely moved or compelled to do so by their internal drive or motivation.
  • be (as) busy as a bee The idiom "be (as) busy as a bee" means to be very industrious, hardworking, or occupied with various tasks and activities. It is derived from the observation that bees are known for their constant activity and diligence when it comes to building their hives, gathering nectar, and producing honey.
  • as for sb/sth The idiom "as for sb/sth" is used to introduce a new topic or to talk about a specific person or thing separately from what has been previously discussed. It indicates a shift in focus or direction of a conversation or discussion.
  • (as) stiff/straight as a ramrod The idiom "(as) stiff/straight as a ramrod" is used to describe someone who is very rigid, disciplined, or upright in posture and demeanor. It implies a person who maintains a perfectly straight and rigid posture, resembling the stiffness of a ramrod—a metal or wooden bar used to clean and load firearms, which needs to remain straight for efficient use. The idiom can also convey a sense of strictness or inflexibility in someone's behavior or mannerisms.
  • go as red as a beet, at go/turn beetroot (red) The idiom "go as red as a beet" or "go/turn beetroot (red)" refers to a situation when someone becomes noticeably embarrassed or blushes extensively, resulting in their face turning red, similar to the color of a beet vegetable. It signifies extreme embarrassment or heightened emotional response, often triggered by an embarrassing or uncomfortable event or situation.
  • go as red as a beetroot, at go/turn beetroot (red) The idiom "go as red as a beetroot" or "go/turn beetroot (red)" means to become intensely embarrassed or ashamed, causing one's face to noticeably redden, resembling the color of a beetroot, a deep red vegetable. It signifies a sudden and obvious display of embarrassment or humiliation.
  • as never before The idiom "as never before" means that something is unprecedented or unparalleled in terms of its intensity, scale, or magnitude. It implies that the current situation or event surpasses anything that has occurred in the past.
  • (as) straight as a die The idiom "(as) straight as a die" means to be completely honest, trustworthy, and reliable. It implies that someone or something is very straightforward and has a strong moral or ethical character. The phrase originates from the idea of a perfectly shaped and accurate die used in gambling, implying that there is no chance of deception or unfairness.
  • as if it is going out of style The idiom "as if it is going out of style" means doing something excessively, quickly, or in large quantities. It implies that the action is being done to such an extent that it may not be sustainable or fashionable in the future.
  • such as it is The idiom "such as it is" is used to indicate that something is not ideal or impressive, but it is the only or existing option available. Example sentence: "I managed to fix the old car, such as it is, and it should get us to the next town."
  • there's no such thing/person (as) The idiom "there's no such thing/person (as)" is used to convey the idea that something or someone does not exist or is not possible. It is often used to refute statements or claims that are believed to be false or imaginary.
  • not half such a, at not half as The idiom "not half such a, at not half as" is typically used to emphasize the extent or quality of something, often by comparing it to a lesser or inferior alternative. It implies that the described thing is much better, greater, or more intense than what is being compared to. It is often used to express admiration, surprise, or satisfaction.
  • there's no such thing as a free lunch The idiom "there's no such thing as a free lunch" means that nothing comes without a cost or consequence. It suggests that every opportunity or benefit usually has a hidden price or drawback.
  • there's no such thing as bad publicity, at any publicity is good publicity The idiom "there's no such thing as bad publicity, any publicity is good publicity" suggests that even negative attention or criticism can still have a positive impact. It implies that any kind of exposure or attention, regardless of whether it is positive or negative, can still generate awareness and interest. The belief behind this idiom is that it can increase visibility, stir up curiosity, or create controversy, ultimately benefitting whatever or whoever is being discussed. However, it is essential to note that this idiom is not always universally true and is often used in a more satirical or ironic sense. Negative publicity can indeed harm reputations and have adverse consequences, particularly in personal or professional contexts.
  • (as) clear as a bell The idiom "(as) clear as a bell" means that something is very clear, distinct, and easily understood. It refers to a sound produced by a bell, which is sharp, pure, and easily heard.
  • (as) sure as eggs is eggs The idiom "(as) sure as eggs is eggs" means something that is unquestionably certain or guaranteed to happen. It emphasizes a strong level of certainty or inevitability, comparing it to the undeniable fact that eggs are, indeed, eggs.
  • (as) sure as hell The idiom "(as) sure as hell" is an intensifier used to emphasize the certainty or inevitability of something happening or being true. It is often used to add emphasis or conviction to a statement, indicating a high level of confidence or certainty about the outcome.
  • take sth as it comes The idiom "take something as it comes" means to deal with a situation or event calmly and without excessive planning or worry, accepting it as it unfolds naturally, without trying to control or change it. It suggests being flexible and adaptable, embracing uncertainty and unexpected circumstances.
  • take sth as read The idiom "take something as read" means to accept or assume something as true, valid, or established without requiring additional evidence or proof. It suggests trusting or believing in something without questioning its validity.
  • be as easy as taking candy from a baby, at be like taking candy from a baby The idiom "be as easy as taking candy from a baby" or "be like taking candy from a baby" is a simile used to describe a task or activity that is considered extremely simple, effortless, or requiring no skill or effort at all. It implies that the task is so easy that even a child, who is easily tricked or manipulated, could accomplish it without any challenge or resistance.
  • like you owned the place, at as if you owned the place The idiom "like you owned the place" or "as if you owned the place" is used to describe someone who acts with an air of confidence, authority, or entitlement, as if they were the owner or in control of a particular location or situation. It implies that the person is behaving in a way that suggests they have complete control or ownership, even if they do not actually possess such privileges.
  • be (as) thick as thieves The idiom "be (as) thick as thieves" means to be very close or friendly with someone, often implying a secretive or conspiratorial relationship. It suggests a strong bond characterized by trust, confidentiality, and shared interests, similar to the camaraderie between accomplices in a criminal act (thieves).
  • I thought as much The idiom "I thought as much" means that one's previous suspicion or assumption about something has been confirmed or proven to be true.
  • do as you think best The idiom "do as you think best" means to act or make a decision based on one's own judgment or opinion, without being influenced by others. It suggests that the person has the autonomy to make choices and should trust their instincts or beliefs in determining the most appropriate course of action.
  • as if/though The idiom "as if/though" is used to express disbelief, doubt, or skepticism about something, suggesting that a situation or event seems highly improbable or contrary to reality. It suggests that the outcome or scenario being described is unlikely or imaginary.
  • I wouldn't trust sb as far as I could throw them The idiom "I wouldn't trust someone as far as I could throw them" means that you have very little trust or confidence in someone. It implies that you have a low opinion of that person's integrity, honesty, or reliability. The phrase suggests that you have no faith in their ability to fulfill their promises or to be trustworthy.
  • make as if to do sth The idiom "make as if to do something" means to pretend or act as if one is going to do a particular action, usually for a specific purpose, such as creating a false impression or deceiving someone.
  • (as) tough as old boots The idiom "(as) tough as old boots" means that someone or something is very strong, resilient, or able to withstand hardship or difficult situations. It implies that the person or thing is not easily affected or harmed, much like a pair of old boots that have been worn and used extensively but remain durable.
  • hard/tough as nails The idiom "hard/tough as nails" means to be extremely tough, resilient, or strong in character or physical endurance. It refers to someone who is unyielding, relentless, and able to withstand hardships or difficult situations without displaying weakness or vulnerability.
  • (as) free as a bird The idiom "(as) free as a bird" means to be completely unrestricted and unrestrained, feeling a sense of liberation and independence. It is often used to describe a person or a feeling of being unburdened or unconstrained.
  • as per usual/normal The idiom "as per usual/normal" is used to describe something that is happening or done in the same way it usually does or is expected to. It implies that the situation is typical, consistent, or predictable.
  • (it's) business as usual The idiom "business as usual" means that things are continuing in the same routine or normal way, without any disruptions or changes. It refers to maintaining the regular operations or activities without any major disruptions or deviations.
  • not be as black as you are painted The idiom "not be as black as you are painted" means that someone's reputation or character may not be as bad or negative as it is portrayed or rumored to be. It suggests that there may be more positive aspects to their personality or behavior than what is commonly believed.
  • may/might as well The idiom "may/might as well" is used to suggest that if there is no better alternative or option available, then it would be logical or reasonable to do something. It implies that the situation or circumstances make it virtually the same or equivalent to choose a particular action or decision.
  • might just as well The idiom "might just as well" means that there is little difference or significance between different options or choices. It implies that any of the options would be equally acceptable or have a similar outcome.
  • (it's) just as well (that) The idiom "(it's) just as well (that)" is used to express that a particular outcome or situation is fortunate or advantageous. It implies that things turned out for the best, even if it may not have been the initially desired result.
  • as and when The idiom "as and when" refers to performing a task or taking action whenever it is necessary or required, depending on the specific circumstances. It implies flexibility and the absence of a fixed schedule or time frame.
  • if and when, at as and when The idiom "if and when, at as and when" is used to express uncertainty and contingency. It implies that something will only happen or be done if and when certain conditions are met or specific circumstances arise. It suggests a conditional or dependent action, indicating that the occurrence of an event is unpredictable or contingent on a particular situation.
  • when in Rome (do as the Romans do) The idiom "when in Rome (do as the Romans do)" means that when you are in a different place or culture, you should adapt and behave according to the customs and practices of that place, rather than imposing your own customs. It suggests that one should respect and blend in with the local culture when visiting a foreign country or community.
  • (as) clean as a whistle, at (as) clean as a (new) pin The idioms "as clean as a whistle" and "as clean as a (new) pin" both refer to something being extremely clean or pristine. "(As) clean as a whistle" implies that something is completely free from dirt, stains, or any signs of dirtiness. The origin of this phrase is not entirely clear, but it is believed to come from the fact that whistles need to be clean in order to produce a clear sound. "(As) clean as a (new) pin" suggests that something is not only clean but also neat and orderly. Originally, this phrase referred to a pin that is shiny and new, without any signs of rust or damage. Over time, it has come to imply the overall cleanliness and
  • as a whole The definition of the idiom "as a whole" refers to considering or treating something in its entirety, without focusing on individual parts or aspects. It emphasizes looking at the complete or overall picture rather than analyzing specific details.
  • as husband and wife The idiom "as husband and wife" refers to the state or condition of being legally married and committed to one another in a marital relationship. It signifies the partnership, commitment, and responsibilities that come with being married.
  • a nod is as good as a wink The expression "a nod is as good as a wink" is an idiomatic phrase that implies that a subtle or indirect hint or suggestion is easily understood and equally effective as a more obvious or direct communication. It suggests that when someone gives a nod (a slight inclination of the head), it can convey the same message or understanding as a wink (a quick closing and opening of one eye). It signifies the idea that a small gesture or subtle hint is sufficient to establish mutual understanding or agreement.
  • as you wish/like The idiom "as you wish/like" means to express agreement or compliance with someone's desires or requests. It signifies giving the other person the freedom to make their own choices or decisions, emphasizing a willingness to abide by their preferences or instructions.
  • be as good as your word The idiom "be as good as your word" means to be trustworthy, reliable, and true to one's promises or commitments. It emphasizes the importance of honoring one's word and following through on what has been said or agreed upon.
  • as luck would have it The idiom "as luck would have it" means that something happened by chance or happened in an unexpected or fortunate way.
  • do as you would be done by The idiom "do as you would be done by" can be defined as a moral principle that suggests treating others as you would like to be treated in return. It emphasizes the importance of empathy, fairness, and practicing benevolent actions towards others, as one would desire to receive the same treatment from them.
  • as fast as your legs would carry you The idiom "as fast as your legs would carry you" means to run or move as quickly as one is physically capable of in order to escape danger or reach a destination as quickly as possible. It implies a sense of urgency and maximum effort in fleeing or pursuing something.
  • as against The idiom "as against" is typically used to compare two or more things or concepts, highlighting a contrast or difference between them. It is often used to express a preference or choice in favor of one option over another.
  • as... as anything The idiom "as... as anything" is used to emphasize the intensity or extent of something. It is often employed to describe a particular quality or characteristic of a person, thing, or action. The phrase can be used in various contexts to highlight the extreme nature or significant degree of a certain attribute, surpassing the normal or expected level.
  • (as) easy as pie/ABC/anything/falling off a log The idiom "(as) easy as pie/ABC/anything/falling off a log" means that something is extremely simple, effortless, or easy to accomplish. It implies that the task at hand requires no significant effort or skill, just like the act of eating a pie, reciting the alphabet, or effortlessly stepping off a log.
  • take each day as it comes/take it one day at a time The idiom "take each day as it comes" or "take it one day at a time" means to focus on managing and dealing with events or problems on a daily basis, without worrying too much about the future or making long-term plans. It emphasizes living in the present moment, tackling each day's challenges as they arise, and not getting overwhelmed by the uncertainties of the future.
  • (as) bold as brass The idiom "(as) bold as brass" refers to someone who is extremely confident, audacious, or fearless in their actions, without any sense of shame or guilt. It is often used to describe individuals who display unwavering self-assurance or who act with a noticeable lack of modesty or reserve.
  • bone dry, at as dry as a bone The idiom "bone dry" or "as dry as a bone" refers to something that is completely devoid of moisture or liquid. It suggests that an object or an area is extremely dry, thoroughly lacking any moisture content.
  • as dry as a bone The idiom "as dry as a bone" means completely devoid of moisture or wetness. It typically describes something that is extremely dry or arid.
  • as (if) to the manner born The idiom "as (if) to the manner born" means to behave or perform a specific task with natural ease, confidence, or familiarity, as if one was born or raised to do so. It implies that the person in question possesses an inherent quality or skill that allows them to excel in a particular situation without any difficulty or training.
  • pissed out of your brain/head/mind, at pissed as a newt/fart The idiom "pissed out of your brain/head/mind" is slang and informal, typically used in British English, to describe a state of extreme intoxication or drunkenness. It implies that someone is heavily under the influence of alcohol to the point of impaired cognitive function. On the other hand, the idiom "pissed as a newt/fart" is a variation of the aforementioned phrase and has a similar meaning. It is used to convey that someone is extremely drunk, drawing an exaggerated comparison to the degree of intoxication with that of a newt or fart. Both idioms emphasize excessive drinking and being completely inebriated, highlighting the loss of control, impaired judgment, or general behavioral changes associated with heavy alcohol
  • as to/for The idiom "as to/for" is used to introduce or specify a particular aspect or topic within a broader context. It indicates that the speaker is about to provide information, explanation, or opinion regarding the subject mentioned. It is commonly used to indicate that a specific matter will be addressed or discussed within a conversation or written piece.
  • as of/from The idiom "as of/from" typically indicates the starting point or the time from which something is measured or evaluated. It is often used to refer to a specified date or time, signifying the beginning of a particular reference period.
  • as if! The idiom "as if!" is a colloquial expression used to convey disbelief, skepticism, or a sarcastic reaction to a statement or situation. It implies that something is highly unlikely or absurd, often used as a dismissive response.
  • as if you owned the place The idiom "as if you owned the place" refers to acting or behaving with a sense of authority, confidence, and familiarity, as if one had ownership or complete control over a particular situation, location, or scenario. It implies behaving in a way that displays a high level of self-assurance and dominance, disregarding any limitations or boundaries that are typically expected for someone who does not own or have control over the place.
  • be (as) daft as a brush The idiom "be (as) daft as a brush" means to be foolish, silly, or unintelligent. It is used to describe someone who lacks common sense or acts in a foolish manner. The comparison to a brush, an inanimate object incapable of rationality, underscores the extent of someone's foolishness or lack of intelligence.
  • as is The idiom "as is" refers to the current state or condition of something or someone, without any changes or improvements. It implies that no alterations, modifications, or fixes will be made, and that it will be accepted just as it is, flaws and all. It often indicates that there are no warranties or guarantees provided on the item or situation.
  • as it is The idiom "as it is" means in its current state or condition, without any changes or improvements. It is often used to emphasize that something is already difficult or problematic and should not be made worse.
  • as it comes The idiom "as it comes" typically means to accept or deal with something without trying to control or change it, and to handle situations or events in a spontaneous or impromptu manner.
  • as it were The idiom "as it were" is used to indicate that what is being said or described is not to be taken literally or precisely, but rather figuratively or in a somewhat indirect manner. It implies that the speaker is trying to emphasize or explain something using an analogy or a less exact wording.
  • be as poor as church mice The idiom "be as poor as church mice" means to be extremely poor, having little or no money or possessions. It draws a comparison to the perceived poverty of church mice, who would not find much to sustain themselves in a place like a church.
  • as per instructions The idiom "as per instructions" means to comply or act in accordance with the given or specified instructions. It indicates following directions precisely and carefully without deviation.
  • as much as you can do The idiom "as much as you can do" means to exert the maximum effort or accomplish something to the best of one's ability. It suggests that even though a task may be challenging or difficult, one should put in their utmost effort to achieve the desired outcome.
  • more often than not, at as often as not The idiom "more often than not" or "as often as not" is used to describe something that happens more frequently or commonly than not. It implies that a particular outcome or behavior is likely to occur most of the time, but not necessarily always.
  • be that as it may The phrase "be that as it may" is an idiomatic expression used to acknowledge or concede a point despite any objections or conflicting opinions. It means that regardless of the current circumstances or arguments presented, the fact or situation remains the same. It is often used to indicate that although there might be disagreement or uncertainty, the speaker will proceed with their point or argument anyway.
  • be as crazy, rich, etc. as they come The idiom "be as crazy, rich, etc. as they come" is used to describe someone who possesses an extreme level of a particular quality or characteristic, such as being extremely crazy, rich, etc. It implies that there is no one who surpasses or exceeds their level of that particular trait.
  • as to The idiom "as to" means in regard to something, concerning something, or with respect to something. It is often used to introduce or transition to a specific topic or to address a particular aspect.
  • a list as long as your arm The idiom "a list as long as your arm" is used to describe a very long list of items or tasks. It suggests that the list is so lengthy that it could potentially extend as far as the length of one's arm.
  • make sth up as you go along The idiom "make something up as you go along" means to improvise or create something without a plan or preparation, often relying on one's instinct or creativity to deal with unexpected situations. It refers to the act of making decisions or developing something in an ad hoc manner without a predetermined course of action.
  • a change is as good as a rest The idiom "a change is as good as a rest" means that doing something different or taking a break from one's usual routine can have a rejuvenating or refreshing effect, similar to the rest gained from simply resting or doing nothing. It suggests that variety or a change in activities can be just as beneficial as taking time off or relaxing.
  • as much again The idiom "as much again" means an amount that is equal to, or approximately equal to, the original amount added to itself. It denotes a quantity that is twice as much or a similar proportion larger than the original amount.
  • (as) clean as a (new) pin The idiom "clean as a (new) pin" means very clean or neat and tidy. It refers to something that is impeccably clean, just like a brand new pin.
  • (as) clear as day The idiom "(as) clear as day" means something that is very obvious or easy to understand. It emphasizes the clarity and lack of ambiguity in a situation or statement.
  • (as) clear as mud The idiom "(as) clear as mud" is used to describe something that is very confusing, unclear, or not easily understood. It implies that the information or situation is ambiguous, making it difficult to comprehend or make sense of.
  • (as) regular as clockwork, at like clockwork The idiom "(as) regular as clockwork" or "at like clockwork" means to occur or happen with extreme regularity or consistency, just like the consistent and predictable functioning of a clock. It implies that something happens at the same time, in the same manner, or with the same frequency without fail.
  • (as) regular as clockwork The idiom "(as) regular as clockwork" means that something occurs or happens with extreme regularity and predictability, just like the movement of a clock's hands. It implies that the occurrence is consistent, precise, and never deviates from its usual timing or pattern.
  • be (as) cold as ice The idiom "be (as) cold as ice" means to be emotionally detached, aloof, or unfeeling. It describes someone who is not responsive or sympathetic towards others, typically showing a lack of empathy or warmth in their demeanor or actions.
  • (as) cool as a cucumber The idiom "as cool as a cucumber" means to remain calm, composed, and unruffled, especially in stressful or tense situations. It implies that someone can maintain a calm demeanor even when others might be agitated or panicking.
  • as a matter of course The idiom "as a matter of course" means something that is considered normal, customary, or expected; an action or event that is done or happens routinely or naturally.
  • as the crow flies The idiom "as the crow flies" means the shortest or most direct path between two points, disregarding any obstacles like hills, rivers, or winding roads.
  • be (as) dead as a/the dodo The idiom "be (as) dead as a/the dodo" means to be completely extinct or no longer existent. It refers to the dodo, a flightless bird species that became extinct in the late 17th century. Thus, when something is described as dead as a dodo, it implies that there is no life or vitality left in it.
  • be as dead as a doornail The idiom "be as dead as a doornail" means to be completely lifeless, no longer functional, or beyond any hope of revival or use.
  • (as) deaf as a post The idiom "(as) deaf as a post" means to be completely or extremely deaf, unable to hear even the loudest sounds or noises. The phrase suggests that the person's hearing is as ineffective as a post, which does not possess the ability to hear at all.
  • as far as it goes The idiom "as far as it goes" means to the extent or limit of something, implying that although a statement or action may be true or valid, it has certain limitations or does not fully encompass the entirety of the subject matter. It suggests that there is more to be considered or additional factors that need to be taken into account beyond what has been previously stated or done.
  • as one man The idiom "as one man" means unanimously or in complete agreement. It refers to a group of people acting or speaking with a single voice or a unified purpose, all sharing the same opinion or goal.
  • mutton dressed as lamb The idiom "mutton dressed as lamb" refers to an older person trying to appear younger by dressing or behaving in a way that is more appropriate for someone much younger. It implies that the person is trying to deceive others about their true age or, more generally, their true nature.
  • be (as) dull as ditchwater The idiom "be (as) dull as ditchwater" refers to something or someone that is extremely boring, uninteresting, and lacking in excitement or liveliness. The term "dull as ditchwater" originates from the association of ditchwater with stagnant, muddy water found in ditches, which is generally perceived as uninteresting and unattractive.
  • be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" means that something is extremely obvious or evident, to the point that it cannot be ignored or disputed. It refers to something that is so clearly and undeniably visible, just like the nose on a person's face, that no further explanation or analysis is necessary.
  • be (as) light as a feather The idiom "be (as) light as a feather" means to feel very light or weightless, either physically or emotionally. It indicates a lack of heaviness or burden, often referring to a sense of carefree or buoyant attitude. It can be used to describe someone who is happy, carefree, or untroubled.
  • (as) light as a feather The idiom "as light as a feather" refers to something or someone that weighs very little or is very easy to handle or carry. It can also be used figuratively to describe a situation or feeling that is carefree, effortless, or lacking in difficulty.
  • be (as) fit as a fiddle The idiom "be (as) fit as a fiddle" means to be in excellent health or physical condition. It implies that someone is very fit, strong, and well-functioning, similar to how a well-tuned fiddle produces beautiful music.
  • be (as) fit as a flea, at be (as) fit as a fiddle The idiom "be (as) fit as a flea" or "be (as) fit as a fiddle" means to be in excellent health or physical condition. It implies that someone is energetic, strong, and robust, similar to a flea or a fiddle that is in perfect working order.
  • quick as a flash, at in a flash The idiom "quick as a flash" or "in a flash" is used to describe something that happens very quickly or without delay. It implies that the action is done swiftly, as if it were instant or almost instantaneous.
  • be (as) flat as a pancake The idiom "be (as) flat as a pancake" refers to something that is extremely flat or lacking any significant elevation or unevenness. It is often used to describe landscapes, surfaces, or objects that have no bumps, hills, or curvature at all.
  • be as fresh as a daisy The idiom "be as fresh as a daisy" means to feel or appear refreshed, energetic, and lively, typically after a good night's sleep or a period of rest. It implies a sense of rejuvenation and vitality, similar to the way a freshly bloomed daisy appears bright and lively.
  • as much The idiom "as much" is typically used to indicate an equal or equivalent amount or degree of something. It implies a comparison or similarity between two items or actions.
  • much as The idiom "much as" means to a large extent, or in a similar way. It is often used to express a comparison or similarity between two things or situations.
  • as good as The idiom "as good as" means that something or someone is essentially or almost equivalent to or on par with something else. It implies that they are just about as good, reliable, skilled, or effective as the specified thing or person.
  • as much as The idiom "as much as" is typically used to indicate a degree, quantity, or extent that is comparable or equivalent to another. It can suggest a strong correlation or close similarity between two things or ideas.
  • not half as The idiom "not half as" is used to express that something or someone is not nearly as good, skilled, important, or impressive as another person or thing. It intensifies the comparison by suggesting that the mentioned subject is only half or less than half as good as the other.
  • (as) ... as hell The idiom "(as) ... as hell" is used to emphasize the extreme quality or characteristics of something. It is often used to describe something in an exaggerated manner, emphasizing its intensity, magnitude, or extreme nature. The word "hell" adds a sense of intensity or extremity to the adjective or adverb it is paired with.
  • as often as not The idiom "as often as not" means that something is equally likely to occur as it is not to occur, or it happens frequently and unpredictably.
  • (as) large as life The idiom "(as) large as life" refers to someone or something appearing unexpectedly in real life, often in a surprising or significant way. It can be used to emphasize the scale, impact, or vividness of a person or situation.
  • (as) pleased as Punch The idiom "(as) pleased as Punch" means to be extremely happy or satisfied with a situation or outcome. It originated from the character Punch in traditional Punch and Judy shows, who always felt extremely pleased with himself after defeating his opponents or escaping tricky situations.
  • be as right as rain The idiom "be as right as rain" means to be well, healthy, or in perfect condition. It implies that everything is going well and there are no problems or issues.
  • be (as) good as new The idiom "be (as) good as new" means to be in excellent condition or fully repaired after damage or wear, making something appear or function as if it were completely new.
  • (as) keen as mustard The idiom "(as) keen as mustard" means to be extremely enthusiastic, eager, or passionate about something. It is often used to describe someone who is very excited and motivated. The phrase originates from the condiment mustard, which is known for its strong and intense flavor, symbolizing the intensity and strong desire of the person being described.
  • (as) proud as Lucifer The idiom "(as) proud as Lucifer" means being extremely confident, conceited, or arrogant. It alludes to the biblical figure of Lucifer, who is often associated with pride and rebellion in religious lore.
  • as old as Methuselah The idiom "as old as Methuselah" means extremely old or ancient. It refers to Methuselah, a biblical figure described as having lived for 969 years, making him one of the longest-lived humans. Therefore, when something or someone is described as "as old as Methuselah," it implies that they have been around for an exceptionally long time.
  • drunk as a lord The idiom "drunk as a lord" refers to someone who is heavily intoxicated, typically used to describe a person who is extremely drunk. The comparison to a lord suggests excessiveness, luxury, and an indulgent lifestyle often associated with nobility.
  • drunk as a skunk, at drunk as a lord The idiom "drunk as a skunk" refers to someone who is extremely intoxicated, typically beyond the point of being able to control their actions or speech. The phrase "drunk as a lord" also means the same thing, depicting someone who is excessively drunk. Both idioms emphasize the state of being heavily intoxicated.
  • as a last resort The idiom "as a last resort" refers to an action or decision that is considered only after all other options have been exhausted or when there are no alternatives available. It implies that this particular choice is a final option, typically taken in desperate or extreme situations when all else fails.
  • be as high as a kite The idiom "be as high as a kite" means to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, resulting in a state of being euphoric, intoxicated, or excessively energized.
  • pissed as a newt/fart
  • be as stubborn as a mule The idiom "be as stubborn as a mule" means to be very obstinate or resistant to change. It refers to someone who is unyielding, often refusing to listen to reason or follow instructions. It suggests a comparison with the stubborn nature of a mule, which is known for its inflexibility and reluctance to move or change direction.
  • be (as) solid as a rock The idiom "be (as) solid as a rock" means to be extremely stable, dependable, or reliable. It suggests that something or someone is steadfast, strong, and unwavering, just like a solid and immovable rock.
  • be (as) plain as a pikestaff, at be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as a pikestaff" or "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is extremely obvious or clear. It describes a situation or fact that is easily noticeable without any effort, just like the plainness of a pikestaff (a long, thick, and unadorned wooden staff) or the nose on someone's face, which is a prominent and unmistakable feature.
  • be (as) nutty as a fruitcake The idiom "be (as) nutty as a fruitcake" is used to describe someone as eccentric, odd, or crazy. It implies that the person's behavior or thoughts are unusual or irrational. The comparison to a fruitcake, which traditionally contains various types of nuts, suggests that the person's level of madness or peculiarity is particularly high.
  • (as) mad as a hatter/March hare The idiom "(as) mad as a hatter/March hare" is used to describe someone who is completely irrational, insane, or behaving in a very eccentric manner. The idiom originated from Lewis Carroll's stories, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass," where the characters the Mad Hatter and the March Hare exhibit nonsensical and bizarre behavior. The phrase implies that the person being referred to is extremely mentally unstable.
  • give sth up as a bad job The idiom "give something up as a bad job" means to abandon or stop pursuing something that is not being successful or productive. It implies accepting the fact that further efforts would be futile or unfruitful.
  • give as good as you get The idiom "give as good as you get" is used to encourage someone to respond in a similar manner to the way they are being treated, especially in terms of verbal exchanges or confrontations. It suggests responding with equal force, skill, or intensity, refusing to be intimidated or outmatched. The idiom emphasizes the idea of reciprocity and not allowing oneself to be taken advantage of.
  • be (as) good as gold The idiom "be (as) good as gold" means to be very well-behaved, obedient, or well-mannered. It is often used to describe children who are behaving exceptionally well and following all the rules.
  • your guess is as good as mine The idiom "your guess is as good as mine" is a phrase used to convey that the speaker has no better knowledge or speculation about a particular topic or question than the person they are addressing. It suggests that both individuals have an equal level of uncertainty or lack of information.
  • as American as apple pie The idiom "as American as apple pie" refers to something that embodies or represents the quintessential American values, traditions, or culture. It emphasizes the image of apple pie as a symbol of American heritage, simplicity, and wholesome goodness.
  • in the last resort, at as a last resort The idiom "in the last resort" or "as a last resort" refers to something done or considered only after all other options or alternatives have been exhausted. It is a final course of action taken when all other attempts have failed, or when there are no better options available.
  • (as) long as your arm The idiom "(as) long as your arm" means something that is extremely long or extensive. It is used to describe a list, a series of tasks, or any other element that is excessively lengthy or comprehensive.
  • (as) man to man The idiom "(as) man to man" refers to a direct and straightforward conversation or interaction between two individuals, typically men. It conveys an honest and sincere dialogue, usually addressing a sensitive or important matter. It implies that the individuals involved are speaking openly and honestly without any pretense or hidden agenda.
  • as much as the next person The idiom "as much as the next person" means to have the same level of liking, preference, or desire for something as most other people do. It implies that one shares a common or average level of interest or enthusiasm in a particular subject or activity like anyone else.
  • be marked out as sth The idiom "be marked out as something" means to be identified or recognized as a certain type of person or to possess certain qualities or characteristics that distinguish one from others. It implies standing out or being distinct in a particular way that sets one apart.
  • be marked as sth, at be marked out as sth To be marked as something or to be marked out as something means to be identified or recognized as a particular thing or category based on certain characteristics or qualities. It implies that something or someone stands out or is singled out due to distinct features, abilities, or attributes that distinguish them from others.
  • be (as) old as the hills The idiom "be (as) old as the hills" means to be very old or ancient. It implies that something has existed for a long time and has been unchanged or has remained constant throughout history.
  • be as easy as abc The idiom "be as easy as ABC" means that something is very simple or easy to do. It implies that the task at hand requires minimal effort or skill, likening it to the simplicity of reciting the alphabet or basic knowledge.
  • take sth as gospel The idiom "take sth as gospel" means to believe or accept something as being completely true or accurate without questioning or doubting it. It implies unquestioning faith or acceptance in the information or statement being referred to. The phrase often emphasizes a blind or unquestioning reliance on the information without considering its potential flaws or inaccuracies.
  • accept/take sth as gospel (truth) To take something as gospel (truth) means to believe or accept it completely and without questioning, often without any evidence or proof. It implies an unquestioning acceptance of information or a statement as being entirely true or reliable.
  • accept sth as sth To "accept something as something" means to acknowledge or agree that something is true, accurate, or valid without arguing or questioning it. It implies a willingness to believe or embrace something without doubts or reservations.
  • accept sm as sth The idiom "accept someone/something as something" means to acknowledge and recognize someone or something as a particular role or quality, often involving a change of opinions or beliefs towards them/it. It implies a willingness to embrace or approve of the person or thing in question in the stated capacity.
  • red as a cherry The idiom "red as a cherry" is used to describe someone's face turning bright red, typically due to embarrassment, shame, or anger.
  • acknowledge sth as sth The idiom "acknowledge something as something" means to publicly or formally recognize or accept something as a certain way or for a certain purpose. It implies giving credit, admitting, or admitting the existence of something in a sincere and formal manner.
  • acknowledge sm as sth To "acknowledge someone as something" means to recognize or accept someone's role, status, or achievement in a particular capacity or position. It implies giving credit or admitting their qualities, abilities, or achievements. It can also involve publicly showing appreciation or gratitude for their contributions to a certain field or domain.
  • refer to sb/sth as sb/sth The idiom "refer to sb/sth as sb/sth" means to call or label someone or something with a certain name or term. It is typically used when talking about how someone addresses or describes another person or thing.
  • act as The idiom "act as" means to behave or perform in a certain way or to take on a specific role or responsibility temporarily or temporarily assume the position of someone/something else. It implies that the person is pretending or imitating the expected behavior or function.
  • act as sm
  • as regards sth The idiom "as regards sth" means in terms of or concerning something. It is used to introduce or transition to a specific topic or aspect of a subject that is being discussed.
  • regard sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "regard someone or something as someone or something" means to consider, view, or treat someone or something in a specific way or category. It refers to the perception or judgment a person has about someone or something.
  • register sm as sth The idiom "register someone as something" means to officially record or recognize someone as a specific thing or in a certain capacity. It could refer to registering a person's name or identity for a particular role, title, or category.
  • be as regular as clockwork The idiom "be as regular as clockwork" means to be extremely punctual, consistent, or reliable in performing a task or event at the expected or scheduled time. It implies that something happens with great precision and predictability, similar to the regularity and accuracy of a clock's functioning.
  • address sm as The idiom "address someone as" means to refer to or speak to someone using a particular title, name, or form of address, usually out of respect or courtesy. It implies addressing someone in a manner that acknowledges their position, status, or importance.
  • reinstate sm as sth The idiom "reinstate someone as something" means to restore or return someone to a previous position, role, title, or status that they had held before. It often implies that the person had lost or been removed from that position and is now being reinstated or put back in charge.
  • adopt sth as sth The idiom "adopt something as something" means to accept, embrace, or take on something new, often a belief, idea, or practice, and make it one's own, treating it as though it is an official or established part of oneself or one's life.
  • adopt sm as sth The idiom "adopt someone as something" refers to the act of formally taking someone on as a particular role or position, often involving legal or official processes. It generally implies a sense of commitment and responsibility towards the person being adopted.
  • remember sm as sth The idiom "remember someone as something" means to have a lasting impression or perception of someone based on a particular quality, characteristic, or action. It implies that the memory of that person is associated with that specific aspect.
  • Nothing is given so freely as advice. The idiom "Nothing is given so freely as advice" means that people often offer their opinions or suggestions freely and without being asked for them. It implies that people tend to give advice without considering whether it is wanted or helpful, as if it costs them nothing to offer it.
  • represent sm or sth as sth The idiom "represent someone or something as something" means to describe or portray someone or something in a specific way, often emphasizing certain qualities or characteristics. This could involve presenting a person or thing in a particular light, whether positive or negative, to create a specific perception or understanding. It can also involve distorting the true nature or facts about someone or something to manipulate people's opinions or beliefs.
  • respect sm as sth The idiom "respect someone as something" means to hold someone in high regard or esteem due to their character, abilities, or achievements in a particular field or role. It implies acknowledging and valuing someone's qualities or skills in a specific context or area.
  • as a result (of sth) The idiom "as a result (of sth)" means that something happens or exists because of a particular action, event, or circumstance. It indicates that something is an outcome or consequence of a previous action or situation.
  • light as a feather The idiom "light as a feather" is used to describe something or someone that feels very light in weight. It usually implies a sense of weightlessness or having little mass. It can be used both in the literal sense, referring to objects that are physically lightweight, and in a figurative sense, suggesting something that is not burdensome or difficult to handle.
  • free as a bird The idiom "free as a bird" means to be unrestricted, independent, and having the ability to do as one wishes, without any obligations, limitations, or responsibilities. It suggests a sense of liberation and freedom similar to that of a bird flying effortlessly in the open sky without any bounds or restraints.
  • right as rain The idiom "right as rain" means to be in perfect health or working condition. It implies that everything is going well and smoothly.
  • cute as a bug's ear
  • cold as a welldigger's ass The idiom "cold as a welldigger's ass" is a humorous and colloquial expression used to describe extremely cold weather or a very low temperature. It suggests that the coldness is comparable to the extremities experienced by a welldigger working in icy conditions.
  • (as) happy as a clam The idiom "(as) happy as a clam" means to be extremely happy and content. It is often used to describe someone who is very pleased or satisfied with their current situation or state of mind. The phrase originates from the full expression "happy as a clam at high water," implying that clams are most content during high tide when they are free from the threat of being harvested.
  • be as happy as Larry/a sandboy The idiom "be as happy as Larry/a sandboy" means to be extremely happy or content. The expression implies that someone is enjoying complete contentment or bliss, often unaware or unaffected by any negative circumstances or problems. It is usually used to describe a state of great joy or satisfaction in a specific situation.
  • easy as A, B, C The idiom "easy as A, B, C" means that something is very simple or straightforward, similar to the ease of learning or understanding the alphabet.
  • be as easy as falling off a log The idiom "be as easy as falling off a log" means that a task or activity is extremely simple or effortless. It suggests that the action is so easy that it requires minimal effort, just like the act of unintentionally falling off a log would be.
  • be as American as apple pie The idiom "be as American as apple pie" means to embody or represent the core values, traditions, or quintessential characteristics associated with American culture or identity. It suggests something or someone that is typical, traditional, or deeply rooted in American customs, values, or ideals.
  • hot as fire The idiom "hot as fire" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely hot or passionate. It can refer to intense heat or fervor in a literal or figurative sense.
  • busy as a beaver The idiom "busy as a beaver" means extremely busy, diligent, or industrious. It references the industrious nature of beavers, known for their constant building and maintenance of dams and lodges. This idiom suggests that someone is incredibly productive and actively engaged in various tasks or projects.
  • be as fast etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast etc. as all get out" is used to describe someone or something as being extremely fast, intense, efficient, or extreme in a particular action or quality. It emphasizes the extent or intensity of a characteristic or behavior.
  • rose by any other name would smell as sweet The idiom "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet" means that the name of something does not affect its true nature or qualities. It suggests that the essence or inherent qualities of a person or thing remain unchanged, regardless of what they are called. This phrase is derived from the famous quote by William Shakespeare's character Juliet in the play Romeo and Juliet.
  • wind up (as) sth The idiom "wind up as (something)" is used to describe how someone ends up in a particular situation or becomes a certain thing, often unexpectedly or unintentionally. It implies that the outcome may not have been planned or anticipated.
  • be as snug as a bug in a rug The idiom "be as snug as a bug in a rug" means to be incredibly comfortable and cozy in a specific situation or place. Similar to a bug being nestled securely in a rug, it implies a sense of warmth, safety, and contentment. It implies that someone is feeling at ease, snugly settled, and happily situated, often in a literal or metaphorical environment that provides a sense of peace and comfort.
  • as a rule The idiom "as a rule" means typically or generally. It is used to indicate something that usually happens or is true, but there may be exceptions.
  • run as
  • be as safe as houses The idiom "be as safe as houses" means to be extremely secure or certain. It suggests that a particular situation or object is highly protected, reliable, or guaranteed to be safe.
  • be as clear as mud The idiom "be as clear as mud" means that something is confusing, unclear, or difficult to understand.
  • same as The definition of the idiom "same as" is: having the same characteristics, qualities, or situation as someone or something else. It is used to express similarity or equality between two or more things or individuals.
  • appear as sth The idiom "appear as something" means to give the impression or semblance of being a particular thing or having a certain quality. It refers to the outward or visible manifestation of something, rather than its actual nature or true character.
  • go so far as to say The idiom "go so far as to say" is used to emphasize a strong or extreme statement. It suggests that the speaker is expressing a belief or opinion that may be considered controversial or surprising.
  • Do as I say, not as I do The idiom "Do as I say, not as I do" refers to a situation where someone gives instructions or advice to others, but does not follow it themselves. It implies a contradiction in behavior, meaning that the speaker may be aware of the correct course of action but fails to act accordingly.
  • can't say as I do The idiom "can't say as I do" means that the speaker is unable to give a personal example or endorsement of something because they themselves do not engage in that particular behavior or action. It implies that the speaker cannot speak from personal experience or provide a positive affirmation in regard to a certain topic or situation.
  • as I was saying The idiom "as I was saying" is used to draw attention back to a point or topic that was interrupted or sidetracked, indicating the speaker's intention to resume the previous discussion.
  • be as scarce as hen's teeth The idiom "be as scarce as hen's teeth" means something is extremely rare or hard to find. It emphasizes the notion that hens do not have teeth, therefore indicating that finding something as rare as hen's teeth would be nearly impossible.
  • (as) sharp as a tack The idiom "(as) sharp as a tack" is used to describe someone who is highly intelligent, quick-witted, or mentally alert. It implies that the person is very astute, perceptive, and able to think or respond quickly and effectively in various situations.
  • be as sharp as a tack The idiom "be as sharp as a tack" means to be highly intelligent, perceptive, or quick-witted. It implies that someone has a keen and astute intellect, able to grasp concepts or situations swiftly and accurately.
  • sharp as a razor The idiom "sharp as a razor" refers to someone or something that is extremely intelligent, quick-witted, or perceptive. It describes a person's mental acuity or the sharpness and precision of an object or idea.
  • have a mind as sharp as a steel trap The idiom "have a mind as sharp as a steel trap" refers to someone who possesses incredibly quick and accurate thinking abilities. It suggests that the person has a highly alert and agile mind, able to grasp information or solve problems swiftly and effectively. Similar to a steel trap that snaps shut with agility and precision, this idiom implies mental sharpness, intelligence, and keenness of perception.
  • a list as long as arm The idiom "a list as long as your arm" means having a list or series of items, tasks, or obligations that is very long or extensive. It implies that the list is so lengthy that it could metaphorically be compared to the length of a person's arm.
  • big around as a molasses barrel The idiom "big around as a molasses barrel" means someone or something is excessively overweight or obese. It suggests that the person or object being referred to is of substantial size, similar to the width of a barrel used to store molasses.
  • as a matter of fact The idiom "as a matter of fact" means that the information being relayed is true, or presents a fact that supports or adds emphasis to the previous statement. It is often used to provide further evidence, clarification, or to correct misconceptions in a conversation or discussion.
  • as far as possible The idiom "as far as possible" is typically used to describe the extent to which a certain action or goal can be achieved or carried out, suggesting that one should make every effort or attempt to reach or accomplish it.
  • as follows The idiom "as follows" is used to introduce or present a list, description, or explanation of something in a structured or organized manner.
  • as such The idiom "as such" is used to clarify or emphasize the exact meaning or nature of something. It indicates that the specific thing being referred to possesses the qualities or characteristics mentioned or stated. It is often used to avoid confusion or misunderstanding.
  • as for The idiom "as for" is used to introduce or transition into a new topic or separate something from what has been previously discussed, often indicating a shift in focus or a change of subject. It is commonly used to express something that is unrelated or unconnected to what was previously mentioned.
  • as for sm or sth The idiom "as for someone or something" is used to introduce or transition to a related topic or discuss someone or something in particular. It is often used to provide additional information or opinions about a subject after discussing something else.
  • as usual The idiom "as usual" is used to indicate that something is happening in the same way it typically does or that a person is behaving in their regular or expected manner.
  • as well The idiom "as well" means in addition to something or besides what has just been mentioned. It implies another item, action, or circumstance that accompanies or supplements the main subject.
  • as yet The idiom "as yet" refers to something that has not happened or is still in progress up to a particular point in time. It expresses the idea that something has not yet occurred, but there is a possibility or indication that it might in the future.
  • as an aside The idiom "as an aside" refers to a comment or remark thrown in to a conversation or speech, typically not directly related to the main topic being discussed. It serves as additional information, often sharing a personal opinion, a side note, or a digression from the primary subject matter.
  • There's none so blind as those who will not see The idiom "There's none so blind as those who will not see" means that some individuals choose to ignore or remain oblivious to the truth or reality, even when it is evident or presented to them. These people purposefully disregard facts or refuse to acknowledge the truth because it conflicts with their beliefs or opinions. It suggests that willful ignorance can be more profound than physical or literal blindness.
  • see as The idiom "see as" means to consider or perceive someone or something in a particular way, often based on one's own viewpoint, understanding, or judgment. It implies the interpretation or understanding of a situation, person, or concept.
  • as I see it The idiom "as I see it" means to express one's personal opinion or viewpoint on a certain matter. It implies that the following statement is the speaker's subjective interpretation or understanding of the situation.
  • as far as I can see The idiom "as far as I can see" means expressing one's opinion or understanding based on the available information or what is immediately evident. It indicates that the speaker's perspective or viewpoint is limited but still provides a sense of clarity or understanding within those limitations.
  • select sm or sth as sth The definition of the idiom "select someone or something as something" means to choose or pick someone or something for a particular role, position, or purpose. It indicates the act of designating or electing someone or something to fulfill a specific role, function, or status.
  • be as ugly as sin The idiom "be as ugly as sin" means to be extremely unattractive or aesthetically displeasing. It is often used to describe someone or something that is particularly hideous or repulsive in appearance. The phrase "ugly as sin" implies that the level of unattractiveness is comparable to something morally reprehensible or evil, reinforcing the intensity of the ugliness being described.
  • sell sm or sth as sth The idiom "sell something as something" means to promote or present something in a way that it is portrayed as being a different, usually more favorable or attractive, thing than it actually is. It implies misleading or manipulating others in order to make a sale or gain an advantage.
  • Serve as a guinea pig The idiom "Serve as a guinea pig" refers to someone who is used as an experimental subject or test case in a situation where the outcome or potential risks are uncertain. It implies that the person is being used to gather information or evaluate the viability or effectiveness of something new, often at the expense of their well-being or without their full understanding or consent.
  • serve as The idiom "serve as" means to act or function as; to fulfill a particular role, purpose, or duty. It implies that something or someone is being used in a specific capacity or to perform a certain function.
  • set up as The idiom "set up as" means to establish or create someone or something in a specific role, position, or situation. It often refers to positioning or presenting someone in a particular way.
  • set down as The idiom "set down as" means to classify or categorize someone or something in a particular way, usually based on assumptions or initial impressions. It refers to forming an opinion or judgment without solid evidence or sufficient knowledge.
  • be as dry as a bone The idiom "be as dry as a bone" means to be completely devoid of moisture or liquid. It is often used to describe something that is extremely dry, arid, or lacking any trace of humidity.
  • As you sow, so shall you reap,
  • I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb. The idiom "I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb" is an expression that suggests that if one is already facing severe consequences for a particular action or decision, they might as well go all the way and take even greater risks or make more significant choices. It implies that since the outcome will be unfavorable regardless, there is no further harm in pursuing bigger gains or risks. In other words, if someone is going to be punished for a lesser offense, they might as well commit a more serious one, as the consequences will be similar.
  • might as well be hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb The idiom "might as well be hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb" means that if you are going to be punished for a minor offense, you might as well commit a more serious offense since the consequences will be the same. In other words, if the punishment is going to be severe regardless of the action, it is better to take the risk and do something else with potentially greater rewards.
  • be as white as a sheet The idiom "be as white as a sheet" means to be extremely pale, usually due to fear, shock, illness, or a sudden loss of color in one's face. It implies a lack of blood circulation, resulting in a ghostly or ash-like complexion.
  • be as tough as old boots The idiom "be as tough as old boots" means to be very strong, resilient, or durable, both physically and mentally. It describes someone or something that can withstand hardship, difficulty, or adversity with ease.
  • Sure as shooting! The idiom "Sure as shooting!" means that something is certain or guaranteed to happen. It is used to express confidence in the outcome of a situation or event.
  • put down as bad The idiom "put down as bad" means to criticize, condemn, or portray something or someone in a negative or unfavorable way. It implies forming a negative opinion or judgment about something or someone based on limited information or without giving them a fair chance.
  • Moving three times is as bad as a fire The idiom "Moving three times is as bad as a fire" typically means that moving residences multiple times can be just as stressful, chaotic, and disruptive as experiencing a destructive fire. It emphasizes the difficulties, inconvenience, and upheaval associated with frequent relocations.
  • give up as a bad job The idiom "give up as a bad job" means to abandon or stop pursuing a task or endeavor because it is not going well, not worth the effort, or unlikely to succeed. It implies a sense of frustration, resignation, or realization that further attempts would be futile.
  • as bad as all that The idiom "as bad as all that" means that something is just as terrible or severe as it has been described or suggested to be. It implies that the situation or thing in question is truly as negative, difficult, or unpleasant as it appears or is believed to be.
  • thick as a short plank The idiom "thick as a short plank" is used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or lacks common sense. It suggests that the person is as dense or unintelligent as a plank of wood that is shorter than usual, implying a lack of mental sharpness or wit.
  • be as thick as two short planks The idiom "be as thick as two short planks" is a colloquial expression that is used to describe someone as being exceptionally unintelligent or lacking in common sense. It implies that the person in question is as dense or dim-witted as two short planks of wood stacked together.
  • show up as The idiom "show up as" means to appear or be perceived as something, usually in terms of one's character, qualities, or behavior, especially when it is unexpected or contrary to one's usual demeanor or expectations. It refers to the way a person or thing is revealed or manifests itself.
  • be as bald as a coot The idiom "be as bald as a coot" means to be completely, or almost completely, bald. It is often used to describe someone who has little to no hair on their head.
  • shrug sth off (as sth) The idiom "shrug something off (as something)" means to dismiss or disregard something as unimportant or insignificant. It refers to responding to a situation or comment with indifference or a lack of concern. It suggests that the person is not affected or bothered by whatever is being discussed or encountered.
  • as sick as a dog The idiom "as sick as a dog" means to be extremely ill or unwell, often characterized by symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, or intense body aches. It implies a state of severe sickness or illness, comparable to how dogs are commonly associated with being unwell when they are sick.
  • be as sick as a parrot The idiom "be as sick as a parrot" means to feel extremely disappointed, upset, or devastated about something.
  • be as sick as a dog The idiom "be as sick as a dog" means to be extremely ill, often characterized by vomiting, weakness, and overall discomfort. It denotes a state of severe illness or sickness.
  • sign on (with sm or sth) (as sth) The idiom "sign on (with someone or something) (as something)" refers to when a person formally commits, agrees, or registers to be a part of someone or something as a specific role or position. It often implies joining a company, organization, team, or project by signing a contract or agreement.
  • take each day as it comes The idiom "take each day as it comes" means to live in the present moment and deal with each day's challenges and circumstances as they arise, without worrying excessively about the future or dwelling on the past. It emphasizes the importance of embracing the present and not prematurely anticipating or overthinking what may or may not happen in the future.
  • be as silent as the grave The idiom "be as silent as the grave" means to be completely silent, without making any noise or speaking at all. It implies a level of quietness or silence that is comparable to the stillness and silence associated with a grave or cemetery.
  • be as blind as a bat The idiom "be as blind as a bat" means to have extremely poor vision or to be visually impaired. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone who cannot see or understand something clearly.
  • hungry as a bear The idiom "hungry as a bear" is used to describe someone who is extremely hungry or has a voracious appetite. It implies that the person's hunger is comparable to that of a bear, known for their ravenous appetite.
  • gruff as a bear The idiom "gruff as a bear" refers to someone who is rough, rude, or curt in their demeanor, speech, or behavior. It suggests that the person is brusque and often displays unfriendly or grumpy characteristics, much like the perceived temperament of a bear.
  • busy as a hibernating bear
  • skinny as a beanpole The idiom "skinny as a beanpole" is used to describe someone who is extremely thin or narrow in build, typically suggesting that they have a very slim physique or are underweight.
  • as drunk as a lord/skunk The idiom "as drunk as a lord/skunk" is used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or heavily under the influence of alcohol. The phrase humorously implies that the person's level of drunkenness is on par with that of a lord or skunk, emphasizing the extent to which they are intoxicated.
  • end up (as)( sth ) to become sth The idiom "end up (as)( sth ) to become sth" refers to the final result or outcome of a situation or decision, often unexpected. It means to reach or arrive at a particular state or condition, usually after a series of events or actions.
  • As you make your bed, so you must lie on it The idiom "As you make your bed, so you must lie on it" means that one must face the consequences of their own actions or decisions. It suggests that once a choice is made or a situation is created, one is responsible for dealing with the outcomes, whether positive or negative.
  • be as slippery as an eel The idiom "be as slippery as an eel" refers to someone who is extremely evasive, cunning, or difficult to pin down. It likens the person's behavior or actions to the elusive nature of an eel, which is known for its sliminess and ability to escape quickly from capture.
  • As the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined. The idiom "As the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined" means that a person's behavior and tendencies in adulthood are influenced by their upbringing and early experiences. It implies that early character development has a lasting impact on an individual's future actions and choices.
  • be as brown as a berry The idiom "be as brown as a berry" means to have a deep, rich tan or sun-kissed complexion, usually as a result of spending time outdoors in the sun. It implies that the person's skin has become darkened or browned, resembling the color of a berry that has ripened fully.
  • as far as anyone knows The idiom "as far as anyone knows" is used to indicate that the information or knowledge being discussed is based on the available evidence or understanding up to that point, but there may be unknown factors or information that could potentially change the situation.
  • as best can The idiom "as best can" refers to doing something as well or as skillfully as one possibly can, given the circumstances or limitations. It implies making the most effort or attempting to achieve the highest level of performance despite challenges or constraints.
  • might as well The idiom "might as well" is used to express the idea that since a particular action or situation cannot be avoided or changed, it is best or more logical to do or accept it. It implies that there is no better alternative or option available, so one should proceed with the best course of action given the circumstances.
  • be as white as snow The idiom "be as white as snow" means to be extremely pure, innocent, or free from guilt or wrongdoings. It refers to someone or something that embodies a high level of moral integrity or righteousness. The phrase often conveys the idea of pristine goodness or an absence of any blemishes or impurities.
  • be as sober as a judge The idiom "be as sober as a judge" means to be completely clear-headed, serious, and in control of one's actions, behavior, or decisions. It implies a state of complete sobriety and rationality, often used to describe someone who appears calm, composed, and unaffected by emotions or distractions.
  • big as life The expression "big as life" is an idiom used to emphasize the presence or appearance of someone or something in a grand or noticeable way. It suggests that someone or something is unmistakably present, often in a surprising or unexpected manner.
  • big as all outdoors The idiom "big as all outdoors" is used to describe something or someone as being exceptionally large or immense in size. It is often used figuratively to convey a sense of grandeur, magnitude, or overwhelming scale.
  • every bit as The idiom "every bit as" means to be equally or completely. It is used to emphasize that something has the same level, extent, or quality as another thing.
  • as soon as possible The idiom "as soon as possible" means to do or finish something without unnecessary delay or as quickly as one can manage. It implies urgency and the need for prompt action.
  • as soon as sth The idiom "as soon as something" typically refers to an immediate action or event that occurs right after a specific condition is fulfilled or a particular situation arises. It signifies a quick response or a swift course of action following a specific trigger or occurrence.
  • as soon as The idiom "as soon as" is used to indicate that something will happen or be done immediately after a particular event, action, or condition. It suggests that there will be no delay between the mentioned event and the subsequent action.
  • would as soon do sth as look at you The idiom "would as soon do something as look at you" means that someone has a strong preference for doing a particular action rather than interacting or dealing with a specific person. It implies that the speaker finds the person so unpleasant or undesirable that they would rather perform the stated action (often something negative or undesirable) than engage with them. It conveys a strong sense of aversion or disdain towards the individual.
  • I'd (just) as soon (as) do sth The idiom "I'd (just) as soon (as) do sth" means that you would prefer or be equally willing to do one thing as you are to do another thing. It implies that both options are of equal importance or desirability to you.
  • had (just) as soon do sth The idiom "had (just) as soon do sth" means that someone would prefer to do something else rather than the suggested action. It expresses a strong preference or inclination towards an alternative option.
  • not be as black as you are/it is painted The idiom "not be as black as you are/it is painted" means that something or someone is not as negative or bad as they are portrayed to be. It suggests that the reality is less severe or unfavorable than what is described or believed. It implies that a situation, person, or thing is misunderstood or misrepresented, and under closer examination, it is found to be less negative, dishonest, or harmful than initially thought.
  • devil is not so black as he is painted The idiom "devil is not so black as he is painted" means that a person's reputation or appearance may make them seem much worse or more evil than they actually are. It suggests that one should not judge someone solely based on hearsay or preconceived notions.
  • be as sound as a dollar The idiom "be as sound as a dollar" refers to something that is reliable, trustworthy, and of good quality. It signifies a strong and sturdy state, similar to the dependability and strength associated with the value of a dollar.
  • sound as if The idiom "sound as if" is used to describe the way something is expressed or appears, giving the impression or suggestion of a certain situation or condition. It is often used when conveying assumptions or speculation about someone's intentions, feelings, or actions based on the way they speak or behave.
  • (as) easy as A, B, C The definition of the idiom "(as) easy as A, B, C" is used to describe a task or concept that is extremely simple or easy to understand. It implies that something is as straightforward as learning the alphabet, which is typically one of the simplest tasks taught to children.
  • nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse The idiom "a nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse" means that subtle or indirect communication or hints are unnecessary when dealing with someone who is oblivious or unlikely to understand. It implies that additional efforts to convey a message or instructions would be pointless because the person or situation being referred to is unaware or incapable of perceiving the intended meaning.
  • as we speak The idiom "as we speak" means at this very moment or at the present time. It is used to emphasize that something is currently happening or being done.
  • speaking as sb The idiom "speaking as sb" means expressing one's opinion or giving a statement from the perspective and viewpoint of a specific person. It is often used to indicate personal experience, authority, or expertise on a matter.
  • be as stiff as a board The idiom "be as stiff as a board" refers to someone or something that is completely rigid, inflexible, or lacking in any form of movement or flexibility. It conveys the idea of someone or something being unyielding, rigid, or immovable.
  • as/when the spirit moves you The idiom "as/when the spirit moves you" refers to doing something only when one feels inclined or inspired to do so. It implies that the action is done based on one's personal motivation or inner desire, rather than external influence or pressure.
  • be so bold as to do sth The idiom "be so bold as to do something" means to have the confidence or audacity to do something that may be considered impolite, daring, or unconventional. It suggests a willingness to take a risk or challenge conventions without hesitation.
  • dry as dust The idiom "dry as dust" means something that is extremely boring, dull, or lacking in interest or excitement. It is often used to describe information, lectures, or writing that lacks liveliness or fails to engage and captivate the audience.
  • spot sm as sth The idiom "spot someone as something" means to recognize or identify someone as a specific type or category of person. It implies being perceptive or discerning enough to accurately assess someone's qualities, characteristics, or affiliations.
  • be as full as a boot/tick
  • (as) to the manner born The idiom "(as) to the manner born" means to possess or display innate or natural ability or skill in a particular area/activity without requiring any additional training or experience. It implies that the person is born with a talent for something or has been raised with the knowledge or experience necessary to excel in a certain task or role.
  • soft as a baby's bottom The idiom "soft as a baby's bottom" is used to describe something that is very smooth, tender, and soft. It is often used to emphasize the extreme level of softness and smoothness, drawing a comparison to the delicate skin of a baby's bottom.
  • mutton dressed (up) as lamb The idiom "mutton dressed (up) as lamb" refers to a situation where someone who is older or of advanced age tries to appear younger or more youthful by dressing in styles or fashion typically associated with younger individuals. However, this attempt is often seen as inappropriate or not suitable for their age. It implies that the person is trying to deceive or misrepresent themselves by pretending to be younger than they actually are.
  • be as gentle as a lamb The idiom "be as gentle as a lamb" means to be very kind, calm, and gentle in demeanor or behavior, similar to the nature of a lamb which is known to be gentle and docile.
  • stamp sm or sth as sth The idiom "stamp sm or sth as sth" means to officially designate or categorize someone or something as a particular type, quality, or status. It implies providing an authoritative endorsement or confirmation of a specific attribute or classification.
  • sure as God made little green apples The idiom "sure as God made little green apples" is an expression used to emphasize absolute certainty or to assert that something is undeniably true. It means that the outcome or statement being discussed is a definite reality, as certain as the fact that God, in this case, has created little green apples, which serves as a metaphor for something unquestionable.
  • as things stand The idiom "as things stand" means the current situation or state of affairs at a particular moment. It indicates that the information or circumstances being discussed are based on the present status or facts, without considering possible future changes or developments.
  • as it stands The idiom "as it stands" is typically used to refer to the current or existing situation or state of something. It means that the information or circumstances being discussed are based on what is currently known or understood, without any assumptions or changes.
  • star as sm or sth The idiom "star as someone or something" refers to the act of performing as a prominent or leading role in a particular production, whether it be in a movie, play, television show, or any other form of entertainment. It signifies that the person in question has been given a significant part and is the main focus of attention or attraction.
  • start out as The idiom "start out as" means to begin or initiate something, often referring to an individual's initial role or position in a certain situation or career. It implies the idea of starting at a particular point and subsequently developing or evolving into something else over time.
  • start off as The idiom "start off as" means to begin or commence something in a certain state, role, or condition, but which may evolve or change over time. It suggests that the initial stage or beginning is not indicative of the final outcome or result.
  • start as The idiom "start as" typically refers to the beginning or initial stage of a process or journey. It implies the commencement of something, often implying the first step or the earliest point in time from which progress or development is made.
  • As I live and breathe! The idiom "As I live and breathe!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, disbelief, or astonishment upon seeing or encountering someone or something unexpected. It is typically used when the speaker is genuinely amazed or in disbelief at what they are witnessing.
  • be as bright as a button The idiom "be as bright as a button" means to be intelligent, clever, or quick-witted. It is used to describe someone who is sharp or mentally agile.
  • be as thin as a stick The idiom "be as thin as a stick" means to be extremely thin or skinny, with a physical appearance that lacks fullness or substance.
  • be as stiff/straight as a ramrod The idiom "be as stiff/straight as a ramrod" means to be very straight or rigid, typically referring to someone's posture or physical stance. It suggests that the person is standing or sitting upright with great stiffness and discipline, often in a formal or military manner. This expression is commonly used to describe someone's demeanor or appearance, emphasizing their strictness or formality.
  • stigmatize sm as sth The idiom "stigmatize someone as something" means to label or brand someone as something negative or derogatory, often leading to social rejection or discrimination. It refers to the act of attaching a negative stereotype, bias, or misconception to an individual or group, often resulting in their exclusion or mistreatment based on the given label.
  • play as The idiom "play as" refers to the act of taking on a particular role or character in a game, sport, or performance. It can also imply assuming a certain identity or behaving in a specific manner in a situation.
  • hard as a rock The idiom "hard as a rock" refers to something that is extremely solid, firm, or unyielding. It describes objects or substances that have a substantial hardness or lack of softness, making them difficult to break or penetrate.
  • (as) strong as a bull The idiom "(as) strong as a bull" is used to describe someone or something that is exceptionally physically strong or robust. It implies a level of immense strength and power, comparable to that of a bull, which is often seen as one of the strongest and most powerful animals.
  • straight as an arrow The idiom "straight as an arrow" means to be extremely accurate, precise, or honest in one's actions, behaviors, or intentions. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is unwavering, reliable, and has a clear and focused path without deviation.
  • be as straight as a die The idiom "be as straight as a die" means to be completely honest, trustworthy, and reliable. It refers to someone who always tells the truth and can be relied upon without any doubt or suspicion. The phrase is derived from the idea that dice are perfectly straight and symmetrical, representing fairness and integrity.
  • be as stiff as a ramrod The idiom "be as stiff as a ramrod" refers to someone who is extremely rigid, uptight, or inflexible in their behavior, posture, or demeanor. It suggests that the person in question lacks relaxation or shows a lack of ease in their actions. The phrase draws a comparison to the stiff and unbending nature of a ramrod, a long metal rod used historically to push ammunition down the barrel of a firearm.
  • strike as The idiomatic expression "strike as" means to give a particular impression or appear to be a certain way to someone. It refers to the immediate impact or perception someone has about something or someone.
  • business as usual "Business as usual" is an idiom used to describe a situation or activity that is continuing or resuming in its normal manner, without any disruption or change. It implies that things are proceeding as they typically do, without any deviation or interruption from the regular routine or functioning.
  • (as) strong as an ox The idiom "(as) strong as an ox" is used to describe someone who is exceptionally physically strong and powerful. It implies that the person possesses great strength and robustness, often surpassing the average level of strength.
  • be as strong as an ox The idiom "be as strong as an ox" means to have an exceptionally powerful or robust physical strength. It refers to someone who possesses great endurance and vigor.
  • look as if butter wouldn't melt in one's mouth The idiom "look as if butter wouldn't melt in one's mouth" refers to someone who appears innocent, sweet, or demure, despite potentially hiding deceitful intentions, mischief, or a mischievous nature. It emphasizes the contrast between a person's innocent outward appearance and their true character or behavior.
  • be as cute as a button The idiom "be as cute as a button" is used to describe someone or something that is incredibly adorable, charming, or attractive in a small and endearing way. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to has a pleasing or delightful appearance or personality.
  • succeed as sth The idiom "succeed as sth" refers to being successful or achieving a desired outcome in a particular role, profession, or endeavor. It implies that someone is able to accomplish their goals and perform effectively in a specific field, position, or area of expertise.
  • succeed sm as sth The idiom "succeed someone as something" means to take over a position, role, or responsibility that someone else previously held. It often implies that the person who comes after will continue the work or carry on the duties of the individual they are succeeding.
  • such as... The idiom "such as..." is used to introduce specific examples or instances that help to clarify or illustrate something. It suggests that the examples mentioned are representative of a larger category or group.
  • I wouldn't trust as far as I could throw The idiom "I wouldn't trust as far as I could throw" means that the person or thing in question is not reliable or trustworthy at all. It expresses a lack of confidence or faith in a particular individual or situation. The comparison to how far one could physically throw something reinforces the idea that there is minimal trust or belief in that person or thing.
  • know as much about sth as a hog knows about Sunday The idiom "know as much about something as a hog knows about Sunday" refers to a complete and utter lack of knowledge or understanding of a particular subject. It suggests that the person being referred to has no knowledge, interest, or awareness of the topic, similar to how a hog would not possess any knowledge about the concept of a specific day, such as Sunday.
  • as pissed as a fart The idiom "as pissed as a fart" is a colloquial expression that means being extremely intoxicated or drunk. It refers to a state of being very drunk, similar to the uncontrollable release of a fart, which can be unpredictable and out of control when one is intoxicated.
  • sure as hell The idiom "sure as hell" is an expression used to emphasize absolute certainty or conviction about something. It means being absolutely sure or confident about a particular statement or belief. The phrase "sure as hell" often implies a strong, unwavering conviction.
  • (as) sure as eggs (are/is eggs) The idiom "(as) sure as eggs (are/is eggs)" means something is extremely certain or inevitable. It expresses absolute assurance or confidence in the outcome or truth of a situation.
  • be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out" is used to describe extreme intensity, speed, attractiveness, thinness, or any other quality in a person or object. It implies that something or someone possesses the mentioned quality to an exceptional and unparalleled extent. It emphasizes the idea of being the most extreme or superlative in a particular aspect.
  • come as no surprise The idiom "come as no surprise" means that something is not unexpected or unexpectedly known in advance. It implies that the particular information, event, or outcome is easily anticipated or foreseen.
  • swear sm in (as sth) The idiom "swear someone in (as something)" means to administer an official oath or affirmation to someone, formally or legally appointing them to a particular position or role. It often involves making a solemn promise or commitment to fulfill the duties and responsibilities associated with the designated position.
  • cast as The idiom "cast as" refers to the act of selecting or assigning someone to play a particular role or character in a play, film, or other form of entertainment. It usually involves matching an actor or actress to a specific role based on their suitability, acting abilities, appearance, or other relevant factors.
  • conceited as a barber's cat The idiom "conceited as a barber's cat" refers to a person who is extremely self-centered, arrogant, or vain. It implies that the person has an exaggerated sense of their own importance or superiority. The phrase may have originated from the idea that barbers' cats were often pampered and indulged, leading them to develop an air of arrogance.
  • black as a skillet
  • use sm or sth as an excuse The idiom "use someone or something as an excuse" refers to the act of attributing blame or justifying one's actions by placing the responsibility on someone or something else. It implies that the person is avoiding taking personal accountability by using another person or thing as a reason or justification for their behavior or choices.
  • as a duck takes to water The idiom "as a duck takes to water" means to adapt or become comfortable with something very quickly and naturally. It refers to how ducks effortlessly and naturally move in water, indicating a person's natural affinity or ease in a particular situation or activity.
  • catch as catch can The idiom "catch as catch can" can be defined as an unrestricted or disorganized approach to doing something, often implying a haphazard or opportunistic method. It suggests a situation where one has to make do with whatever is available or seize the opportunity whenever it arises, without a planned or systematic approach.
  • target sm or sth as sth The idiom "target someone or something as something" means to focus one's efforts or actions on a specific person or thing for a particular purpose or intention. It implies directing attention, criticism, or aggression toward someone or something with a specific aim or objective in mind.
  • take as it comes The idiom "take as it comes" means to deal with or accept a situation or event as it happens, without worrying about or trying to control the future outcomes. It signifies a flexible and adaptable approach to encountering various circumstances, accepting them as they unfold without making excessive plans or expectations. It involves being open-minded and ready to face whatever happens without resistance or undue concern.
  • come on as The idiom "come on as" refers to someone assuming a particular role, position, or demeanor. It implies that a person presents or presents themselves in a specific way, typically with the intention of influencing or impressing others. This expression often implies a deliberate act of adopting a particular attitude, appearance, or behavior for a specific purpose.
  • be as crazy etc. as they come The idiom "be as crazy etc. as they come" refers to someone exhibiting extreme, eccentric, or unusual behavior. It implies that the person in question is among the most unconventional, erratic, or outlandish individuals. It suggests that their behavior or actions are beyond what is considered normal or socially acceptable.
  • as as they come The idiom "as as they come" means that someone or something possesses a particular quality or characteristic to the highest degree, without any exceptions or variations. It signifies that the person or thing is a true example of that quality, without comparison or equal.
  • conceive of sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "conceive of something as something" means to imagine or think of something in a particular way or as being a certain thing. It refers to the act of creating a mental image or understanding of something in a specific context or perspective.
  • scarce as hen's teeth The idiom "scarce as hen's teeth" is used to describe something that is extremely rare or hard to find. Just as hens do not have teeth, the idiom emphasizes the rarity or non-existence of the mentioned thing or item.
  • condemn sm as sth The idiom "condemn someone as something" means to strongly disapprove or criticize someone, often publicly, implying that they possess undesirable qualities or have engaged in objectionable behavior. It suggests passing a judgment or expressing a negative opinion about someone, typically leading to their censure or rejection.
  • consider sm (as) sth The idiom "consider someone or something as something" means to think of or evaluate someone or something in a particular way, often based on their characteristics, qualities, or role. It involves forming an opinion or belief about someone or something and treating them accordingly.
  • charge sth off as sth The idiom "charge something off as something" typically refers to the act of considering or treating something as a particular category or type, often with a negative connotation. It can imply dismissing or disregarding something by categorizing it as something less significant or inconsequential.
  • be as cool as a cucumber The idiom "be as cool as a cucumber" means to remain calm and composed in a challenging or stressful situation. It refers to someone who maintains their cool demeanor despite potential pressures or difficulties.
  • mad as a hornet The idiom "mad as a hornet" means to be extremely angry or furious. It is often used to describe someone who is very irate or enraged.
  • as hell The idiom "as hell" is used to emphasize or intensify a particular quality or characteristic, often indicating an extreme level. It is often used as a colloquial expression to express a strong or extreme version of something.
  • count as The idiom "count as" means to be considered or treated as something, to have the same effect or significance as something, or to be included in a particular category or group.
  • be as thin as a rake The expression "be as thin as a rake" is an idiomatic phrase used to describe someone who is extremely thin or skinny. The comparison to a rake emphasizes their lean and gaunt physical appearance, as rakes typically have very thin and narrow tines.
  • choose sm as sth The idiom "choose someone as something" means to select or designate someone to assume a specific role, position, or responsibility. It implies a conscious decision and usually involves recognizing the person's qualifications or suitability for the chosen role.
  • swift as an arrow The idiom "swift as an arrow" means to be very fast or speedy. It refers to the speed and swiftness with which an arrow travels through the air when shot from a bow.
  • try as I may The idiom "try as I may" means making persistent and strenuous efforts to achieve something, even if success seems difficult or unlikely.
  • clean as a hound's tooth The idiom "clean as a hound's tooth" means extremely clean or spotless. It refers to the notion that a hound's tooth, specifically that of a dog breed known for its cleanliness like a Greyhound or Whippet, is always impeccably clean and free of any dirt or stains. The phrase is often used to describe someone or something that has been thoroughly cleaned and is in pristine condition.
  • be as clean as a whistle The idiom "be as clean as a whistle" means to be completely clean, spotless, or without any blemish. It can also imply being pure, free from guilt, or having a clear conscience.
  • as a token (of sth) The idiom "as a token (of sth)" refers to an action or object that is given or done to represent or symbolize something else, often used to express gratitude, appreciation, or acknowledgement. It is a gesture, small gift, or symbolic act that serves as an expression of a larger sentiment or intention.
  • clear as mud The idiom "clear as mud" is used to describe something that is very unclear, confusing, or difficult to understand. It implies that the information or situation in question is as unclear as mud, which makes it hard to decipher or comprehend.
  • clear as crystal The idiom "clear as crystal" means something that is very clear, easily understood, or transparently obvious, similar to how a crystal's clarity allows one to see through it without any obstruction or confusion.
  • clear as a bell The idiom "clear as a bell" means something that is extremely clear, distinct, and easy to understand or perceive, often referring to sounds or thinkings, evoking a vivid and crystal-clear perception.
  • be as clear as day The idiom "be as clear as day" means that something is very obvious, evident, or easy to understand. It refers to a situation, statement, or fact that is so clearly apparent that it requires no further explanation.
  • be as clear as crystal The idiom "be as clear as crystal" means to be very clear, transparent, and easily understandable, leaving no room for confusion or uncertainty. It implies a high level of clarity that is comparable to the pristine transparency of a crystal.
  • close as two coats of paint The idiom "close as two coats of paint" means that something or someone is very similar or nearly identical to another thing or person. It implies that there is a minimal difference or distance between them.
  • tough as nails The idiom "tough as nails" refers to someone or something that is extremely strong, determined, and resilient. It typically describes a person who is fearless, physically and emotionally durable, and able to endure difficult situations or hardships without giving up or breaking down.
  • tough as an old boot The idiom "tough as an old boot" refers to someone or something that is extremely resilient, strong, or durable. It implies that the person or object can withstand difficult conditions or adversity without being affected.
  • tout sm or sth as sth The idiom "tout someone or something as something" means to advertise, promote, or praise someone or something emphatically, often exaggerating their qualities or abilities.
  • train (sm or an animal) as sth The idiom "train (someone or an animal) as something" means to educate, teach, or prepare someone or something to fulfill a specific role, skill, or function. It often implies a deliberate and systematic process of instruction and practice to acquire desired abilities or behavior.
  • treat sm or sth as sth The idiom "treat someone or something as something" means to regard or consider someone or something in a particular way, typically with a specific level of respect, importance, or significance. It implies acknowledging the designated role, status, or nature of the person or thing involved, and acting accordingly.
  • come across (as) The idiom "come across (as)" means to give a particular impression or appear in a certain way to others. It refers to the way someone's personality, characteristics, or behavior are perceived by others during an interaction or communication.
  • come off (as) The idiom "come off (as)" refers to how someone or something is perceived or understood by others. It describes the impression or image that a person or situation portrays to others, often highlighting a particular quality, characteristic, or intention.
  • prove oneself as sth The idiom "prove oneself as something" refers to the act of demonstrating or showing one's abilities, skills, or qualities in a particular role or field. It means to provide evidence or establish one's worth, competence, or success in a specific capacity.
  • as common as muck The idiom "as common as muck" is used to describe someone or something that is ordinary, unrefined, or lacking in sophistication.
  • be as pleased as Punch The idiom "be as pleased as Punch" means to be extremely delighted, satisfied, or proud about something. It refers to the character Punch from traditional puppet shows, who was known for his excessive joy and delight.
  • so far as sth is concerned The idiom "so far as sth is concerned" means to be related to or in reference to a particular thing or topic. It is used to specify or emphasize the aspect or area under discussion.
  • as far as you are concerned The idiom "as far as you are concerned" means from your point of view or regarding your opinion or involvement. It expresses that the following statement or situation applies only to the person being referred to and may not be the case for others involved.
  • as far as sth is concerned The idiom "as far as something is concerned" means to discuss, consider, or focus solely on a particular thing or topic. It is often used to specify an area of interest or relevance within a broader context. It is similar in meaning to "regarding," "with regards to," or "when it comes to."
  • as far as sm is concerned The idiom "as far as someone is concerned" is used to express someone's opinion, viewpoint, or perspective on a particular matter. It indicates that the following statement or information is related to or based on that person's perspective or beliefs. It emphasizes the subjectivity of the speaker and highlights that their opinion is being presented.
  • construe sth as sth The idiom "construe something as something" means to interpret or understand something in a particular way or perspective. It refers to the act of analyzing or comprehending the meaning or intention behind something, often in a specific context or viewpoint.
  • double as sm or sth The idiom "double as sm or sth" means to have two different roles or purposes simultaneously. It refers to a person or thing that can serve in two capacities or perform two functions at the same time.
  • be as mad as a March hare The idiom "be as mad as a March hare" means to be completely insane or crazed, often used to describe someone who is behaving in a highly irrational or erratic manner. The phrase originates from the observation that hares, during the month of March, go through a period of frenzied behavior, often leaping around or boxing with other hares. The idiom implies that someone's behavior is comparable to that of a March hare during this crazy period.
  • be as mad as a hornet The idiom "be as mad as a hornet" means to be extremely angry or furious.
  • be as mad as a hatter The idiom "be as mad as a hatter" means to be eccentric, insane, or mentally unstable. The phrase originates from the character of the Mad Hatter in Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," who exhibits bizarre and irrational behavior due to the effects of mercury poisoning, a common phenomenon among hat makers in the past. Thus, this idiom suggests someone's level of craziness or erratic behavior.
  • use as an excuse The idiom "use as an excuse" means to offer a justification or explanation for one's actions, behavior, or inaction, which may not be entirely truthful or valid. It implies that someone is using a particular reason or pretext as a means to avoid criticism, responsibility, or consequences for their actions.
  • use as The idiom "use as" means to employ something or someone for a specific purpose. It refers to the act of utilizing or making use of a person, thing, or resource for a particular intention or function.
  • not as young as one used to be The idiom "not as young as one used to be" is often used to suggest that someone is aging or getting older. It implies that the person may not have the same level of stamina, energy, or physical ability as they did in their youth. It highlights the natural process of aging and the changes that come with it.
  • value sm or sth as sth The idiom "value someone or something as something" means to consider someone or something to be important or highly regarded for a particular quality or characteristic. It implies showing appreciation, respect, or recognition for the value or worthiness of someone or something in a specific context.
  • Them as has, gits The idiom "Them as has, gits" is a colloquial expression that means those who already possess something or have an advantage are more likely to acquire even more. It indicates that people who are already wealthy, privileged, or lucky tend to have more opportunities and further successes compared to those who have less.
  • plain as day The idiom "plain as day" typically means something that is extremely clear, obvious, or easily understandable, without any complexity or confusion. It refers to a situation or fact that is so evident or perceivable that it cannot be overlooked or misinterpreted.
  • merry as a cricket The idiom "merry as a cricket" means to be exceedingly happy, joyful, or in high spirits. It implies a state of cheerfulness or exuberance similar to the joyous chirping sound of crickets during warm summer evenings.
  • different as night and day The idiom "different as night and day" means that two things or people are extremely dissimilar or contrasting in nature or characteristics. It emphasizes the stark contrast between two entities, highlighting how distinctly different they are from each other.
  • be as honest as the day The idiom "be as honest as the day" means to be completely honest and trustworthy, without any deceit or dishonesty. It implies that the person being referred to has a high moral character and can be relied upon to tell the truth in all situations.
  • silent as the dead The idiom "silent as the dead" means extremely quiet or completely silent. It implies a stillness or quietness similar to that of a grave or cemetery, where there is no sound or movement.
  • dead as a doornail The idiom "dead as a doornail" means that something or someone is completely lifeless or inert, beyond the possibility of being revived or restored.
  • dead as a dodo The idiom "dead as a dodo" means completely extinct or no longer existing. It refers to the dodo, a flightless bird that was native to the island of Mauritius but became extinct in the late 17th century due to hunting and habitat destruction. Thus, being "dead as a dodo" implies that something is irretrievably gone or obsolete.
  • be as dead as a dodo The idiom "be as dead as a dodo" means to be completely extinct or no longer existing. It refers to the dodo bird, a flightless bird species that became extinct in the late 17th century, and is used metaphorically to describe anything or anyone that is obsolete, forgotten, or has no chance of revival.
  • be as deaf as a post The idiom "be as deaf as a post" refers to someone who is completely unable to hear or someone who is intentionally ignoring what is being said to them. It implies that the person's inability or unwillingness to hear is comparable to the deafness of a post, which is completely void of auditory perception.
  • still as death The idiom "still as death" typically means utter stillness or complete silence, resembling the stillness and quietness associated with death. It refers to a situation or atmosphere where there is no movement, sound, or activity, creating a sense of eerie calmness or profound silence.
  • pale as a ghost The idiom "pale as a ghost" refers to someone's extremely pale or white complexion, resembling the complexion of a ghost. It is used to describe a person who appears highly frightened, shocked, or sick, their face lacking color.
  • baleful as death The idiom "baleful as death" means extremely harmful, dangerous, or menacing, similar to the destructive power and inevitability often associated with death. It suggests a sense of impending doom or grave consequences, emphasizing the severe nature or potential outcome of something.
  • visualize sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "visualize someone or something as someone or something" means to create a mental image or perception of someone or something in a specific way. It refers to the act of imagining or picturing someone or something to have certain characteristics or qualities.
  • define sth as sth The idiom "define something as something" means to describe or explain something by stating its qualities, characteristics, or features that make it belong to a particular category or be considered a certain thing. It is a way of providing a clear definition or understanding of something, often based on specific criteria or conditions.
  • volunteer as sth The idiom "volunteer as something" means to offer oneself willingly and without being asked to fulfill a specific role or perform a particular task or duty. It typically implies a choice to contribute one's time, skills, or services for a cause or organization, without expecting compensation or reward.
  • may as well The idiom "may as well" means that there is no harm or loss in doing something because there are no better options available. It implies that the action being taken is not the ideal choice, but it is the most logical or reasonable one under the circumstances.
  • A miss is as good as a mile. The idiom "A miss is as good as a mile" means that a failure or a mistake, regardless of its magnitude, has the same outcome as a complete failure. It implies that even a small error can have significant consequences or lead to the same result as a much bigger mistake.
  • miss is as good as a mile The idiom "miss is as good as a mile" means that regardless of how close one may have come to achieving a goal or a desired outcome, if they have ultimately fallen short, the result is the same as if they had missed by a significant margin. It emphasizes that the actual degree of failure or success may not matter much if the desired outcome is not achieved.
  • denounce sm as sth The idiom "denounce someone or something as something" means to publicly criticize or condemn someone or something for a particular reason or characteristic. It implies an act of openly disapproving or speaking out against a person or thing, often for moral, ethical, or political reasons.
  • depict sm as sth The idiom "depict sm as sth" means to portray or represent someone or something in a particular way, often through art, descriptions, or expressions. It involves showing or illustrating a specific aspect or characteristic of someone or something in a clear or vivid manner.
  • (as) right as rain The idiom "(as) right as rain" means to be completely fine, healthy, or in good condition. It is used to describe someone or something that is functioning or feeling perfectly well.
  • exciting as watching paint dry The idiom "exciting as watching paint dry" is a figurative expression used to describe something as extremely dull, uninteresting, or boring. It implies that the activity or event being referred to lacks excitement or any form of stimulation, much like the process of observing paint as it dries, which is often considered monotonous and uneventful.
  • deputize sm as sth The idiom "deputize someone as something" refers to the act of giving someone temporary authority or power to act as a substitute or representative for a specific role or position. It means to grant someone the responsibilities and functions usually associated with a particular position or status, enabling them to perform duties on behalf of someone else.
  • dull as dishwater The idiom "dull as dishwater" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely boring, uninteresting, or lacking in excitement or liveliness. It implies that the subject in question is as unappealing and unstimulating as the water used for washing dishes, which is typically plain, bland, and devoid of any noteworthy characteristics.
  • describe sm or sth as sth The idiom "describe someone or something as something" means to provide an explanation or portrayal of a person or object in a particular way, emphasizing certain qualities or characteristics. It involves expressing an opinion or perception about someone or something by attributing specific traits or categorizing them in a particular manner.
  • designate sm or sth as sth The idiom "designate someone or something as something" means to officially or formally assign or identify a person or thing with a specific role, title, or status. It implies that a deliberate decision has been made to label or categorize someone or something according to a certain designation or purpose.
  • might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is already facing severe consequences for a certain action, they may as well take a risk and commit a more significant action. It implies that the potential outcomes or punishments are already severe, so there is no significant difference in the additional risks taken.
  • I might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "I might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is going to be punished or face consequences for a certain action, it would be better to go all out and commit a bigger offense with potentially greater rewards or benefits rather than settling for something smaller. It implies an attitude of taking risks or embracing the possibility of severe consequences while pursuing an objective.
  • as well as The idiom "as well as" is used to indicate that something is in addition to or along with something else. It implies that multiple things are being considered or included.
  • disguise sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "disguise someone or something as someone or something" means to conceal the true identity or nature of someone or something by giving them a false appearance or pretending that they are someone or something else. It involves deliberately altering or modifying the external features, behavior, or presentation of someone or something in order to deceive or mislead others.
  • be as dull as dishwater/ditchwater The idiom "be as dull as dishwater/ditchwater" means to be extremely boring, lacking in interest, unexciting, or tedious in nature. It is often used to describe a person, situation, or event that fails to captivate or engage others. The comparison to dishwater or ditchwater emphasizes the complete absence of excitement or stimulation.
  • dismiss sth as sth The idiom "dismiss sth as sth" means to reject or disregard something as being unimportant, not worthy of consideration, or without merit. It implies not taking something seriously or considering it to be insignificant or irrelevant.
  • as quick as a flash/wink The idiom "as quick as a flash/wink" means to do something very fast or without delay. It implies that a person or action is exceptionally swift or speedy, comparable to the speed at which a flash of lightning or a wink of an eye occurs.
  • A nod's as good as a wink. The idiom "A nod's as good as a wink" means that a subtle hint or suggestion is enough to convey an understanding or agreement, and there is no need for further explanation or clarification. It implies that the intention or message is clearly understood without explicitly stating it aloud. It often refers to a shared understanding between two people without needing to openly discuss or communicate it.
  • crooked as a barrel of fish hooks The idiom "crooked as a barrel of fish hooks" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely dishonest, deceitful, or not straightforward. It implies a high level of corruption or trickery. The idiom suggests that just as a barrel full of fish hooks tangled up together would be twisted and distorted, so is the person or situation being referred to.
  • without so much as doing The idiom "without so much as doing" is a phrase used to indicate something that is done or achieved effortlessly or without any significant effort or action. It suggests that the outcome or result was attained without even the slightest attempt or noticeable activity.
  • be as good as word The idiom "be as good as one's word" means to be reliable and fully committed to fulfilling a promise or agreement. It implies that the person can be trusted to do what they say they will do.
  • as good as word The idiom "as good as one's word" means that someone consistently keeps their promises or fulfills their commitments. It suggests that a person's word can be relied upon and is trustworthy.
  • good as done The idiom "good as done" means that something is extremely likely or certain to happen or be completed successfully. It implies a high level of confidence in the outcome or the expectation that all necessary actions have been taken to ensure success.
  • work as The idiom "work as" refers to someone performing a specific job or role temporarily, usually until a permanent replacement or alternative arrangement is found.
  • broad as a barn door The idiom "broad as a barn door" means something or someone that is significantly wide or large, often used to describe a person's physique, an object, or an opening. It emphasizes the magnitude or size of the subject being referred to.
  • (as) dead as a doornail The idiom "(as) dead as a doornail" means to be completely dead or lifeless. It is often used to emphasize the lack of vitality or inanimate nature of something or someone. The phrase "dead as a doornail" is believed to have originated from the use of large iron nails on doors that became permanently fixed and unyielding once hammered in, likening it to the irreversibility of death.
  • worship sm as sth The idiom "worship someone or something as something" refers to having a deep admiration, respect, or reverence for someone or something to the extent that they are considered as highly valuable, remarkable, or important. It implies a strong devotion or idolization towards the person or thing being worshipped.
  • write sm down as sth To "write someone/something down as something" means to categorize or classify them in a specific way based on certain characteristics or qualities they possess. It implies making a judgment or forming an opinion about someone or something and assigning them to a specific category based on that judgment.
  • dress sm up (as sm or sth ) The idiom "dress sm up (as sm or sth)" means to outfit or adorn someone or something in elaborate or fancy clothing or accessories in order to enhance their appearance or make them appear as something they are not. It involves putting extra effort or embellishing in order to make someone or something look more formal, elegant, or impressive.
  • dress (up) as sm or sth The idiom "dress (up) as someone or something" means to wear clothing or costumes to resemble a specific person or thing, often for entertainment or amusement purposes. It can be used to describe wearing a costume for a party, event, or as part of a performance, typically involving portraying a fictional or historical character.
  • as far as goes
  • be as quiet as a mouse The idiom "be as quiet as a mouse" means to be extremely silent or making little to no noise. It is often used to describe someone who is being very careful not to make any sound or disturbance. Mice are generally associated with being inconspicuous and making minimal noise, hence the comparison.
  • give as good as one gets The idiom "give as good as one gets" means to respond or retaliate with equal force, skill, or aggression when faced with a challenge or attack. It implies that a person can hold their own and defend themselves effectively regardless of the circumstances.
  • zone sth as sth The idiom "zone something as something" refers to the act of designating a specific area or categorizing something according to a particular purpose or use. It can involve creating distinct zones or areas for specific activities, such as zoning a building, a city, or even one's own personal space.
  • do (double) duty as/for sth The idiom "do (double) duty as/for something" means to serve multiple purposes or fulfill multiple roles simultaneously. It implies that someone or something is performing two or more functions or tasks simultaneously.
  • see the glass (as) half empty The idiom "see the glass (as) half empty" refers to having a pessimistic or negative outlook on a situation, focusing on the disadvantages or shortcomings rather than the positives or possibilities. It suggests perceiving a situation as being less hopeful or promising than it actually is.
  • take it as read The idiom "take it as read" means to accept or assume something as true or accurate without requiring any further evidence or proof. It is often used to indicate that the information or statement being referred to is widely known, well-established, or generally accepted as a fact.
  • read as The idiom "read as" means to interpret or understand something in a particular way based on the information presented or the context given. It refers to comprehending an expression, text, situation, or behavior in a certain manner, often based on one's own perspective or critical analysis.
  • receive sm as sm or sth The idiom "receive someone as someone or something" means to accept or treat someone in a particular way or under a specific identity or role. It suggests acknowledging or addressing the person or thing based on their true nature, status, or characteristic.
  • palm sm or sth off (on sm) (as sm or sth) The idiom "palm someone or something off (on someone) (as someone or something)" means to deceive or pass someone or something onto another person, often in a dishonest or careless manner. It typically involves convincing someone to accept or take responsibility for something that is unwanted or of inferior quality.
  • easy as pie The idiom "easy as pie" means that something is very easy to do or accomplish.
  • easy as falling off a log The idiom "easy as falling off a log" means that something is extremely simple or effortless to accomplish.
  • be as easy as pie The idiom "be as easy as pie" means that something is very easy or simple to accomplish or understand. It implies that the task at hand can be completed effortlessly, similar to how eating a pie is generally considered to be a simple and enjoyable task.
  • hold up as an example The idiom "hold up as an example" means to present someone or something as a model or standard to be emulated or admired. It involves showcasing a person or thing as a positive example to inspire others or as a warning to discourage certain behavior.
  • hail sm as sth The idiom "hail someone as something" means to acclaim or praise someone as a particular thing or attribute. It implies that the person is recognized or acknowledged for possessing a specific quality, skill, or achievement. It often involves expressing admiration or respect towards someone for their notable characteristics or accomplishments.
  • honor sm as sth The idiom "honor someone as something" means to treat or regard someone with high respect or esteem for their qualities, accomplishments, or status. It implies giving recognition, admiration, or acknowledgement to someone's notable achievements or characteristics.
  • recommend sm as sth The idiom "recommend someone as something" means to suggest or endorse someone for a specific role, position, or quality. It implies that the person being recommended is deemed suitable, skilled, or qualified for the mentioned purpose or characteristic.
  • Enough is as good as a feast. The idiom "Enough is as good as a feast" means that having just enough of something is often preferable or satisfactory, similar to having an extravagant amount. It highlights the idea that moderation and contentment are more valuable than excessive or unnecessary abundance.
  • figure sm as sth The idiom "figure someone as something" refers to forming a perception or judgment about someone based on certain characteristics, qualities, or actions they display. It implies making an assumption or reaching a conclusion about someone's personality, abilities, behavior, or role.
  • rank as sth The idiom "rank as sth" refers to someone or something being considered or classified as a particular status, position, or level. It implies that the person or thing is acknowledged or evaluated to have a certain level of importance, worth, or performance in comparison to others.
  • rank sm or sth as sth The idiom "rank sm or sth as sth" means to evaluate or categorize something or someone in a particular way based on their quality, importance, or level of achievement. It expresses the act of assigning a specific position or status to someone or something within a given context or set of criteria.
  • reckon sm as sm or sth The idiom "reckon sm as sm or sth" generally means to consider or regard someone as someone or something specific. It implies forming an opinion or judgment about someone, typically based on their qualities, characteristics, or actions.
  • (as) easy as falling off a log The idiom "(as) easy as falling off a log" means that something is extremely easy or simple to do. It denotes a task or activity that requires minimal effort, skill, or thought. Just as falling off a log requires no effort or challenge, this idiom implies that the mentioned task is similarly straightforward.
  • list sm as sth The idiom "list someone as something" means to identify, categorize, or classify someone as a particular thing or attribute. It implies placing someone in a specific role or characterizing them according to certain qualities or characteristics.
  • as if own the place The idiom "as if own the place" means behaving or acting with extreme confidence, authority, or familiarity, as if one is the owner or in complete control of the surroundings or situation. It implies a sense of entitlement and a lack of regard for others' opinions or rules.
  • elect sm (as) sth The idiom "elect someone (as) something" means to choose or select someone for a particular role, position, or title through a formal voting process. It often implies that the person is being chosen by a group or organization, rather than independently deciding for themselves.
  • as the spirit moves The idiom "as the spirit moves" refers to doing something impulsively or without premeditation, based on a sudden inspiration or a spontaneous decision. It implies acting or behaving in the moment, guided by one's inner desire or motivation rather than following a pre-determined plan or schedule.
  • officiate (as sth) (at sth) The idiom "officiate (as sth) (at sth)" refers to the act of performing a formal duty or function, typically in a professional or authoritative capacity, at a specific event or occasion. This can include presiding over a ceremony, conducting a service, or supervising a particular activity. The individual who officiates assumes responsibility for facilitating and ensuring the proper execution of the event or task.
  • envision as else
  • engage sm as sth The idiom "engage someone as something" refers to the act of hiring or appointing someone for a specific role or position, typically in a professional or official capacity. It implies the establishment of a formal agreement or contract with the individual to fulfill a particular role or function.
  • pass off as The idiom "pass off as" means to present oneself or something as someone or something else, usually with the intention to deceive or mislead others. It suggests the act of making something or someone appear legitimate, acceptable, or genuine, despite it not being true or accurate. It involves successfully convincing others of a false or misleading representation.
  • pass as The idiom "pass as" means to be accepted or mistaken for something or someone else, often by closely resembling or imitating it. It implies that something or someone is able to successfully fulfill a role or criteria despite not necessarily being a perfect match.
  • you might as well (do sth) The idiom "you might as well (do sth)" is used to suggest that there is no significant difference between certain options or actions, implying that it would be better to choose or do a particular thing due to lack of alternatives or similar benefits. It conveys the idea that the suggested action is the most logical or reasonable course of action, given the circumstances.
  • as well as sm or sth The idiom "as well as sm or sth" is used to include someone or something in addition to another person or thing. It implies that the mentioned person or thing is also involved or considered alongside the main subject or choice.
  • emerge (from sth) (as sth) The idiom "emerge (from sth) (as sth)" is used to describe the process of coming out of a situation or experience and appearing or becoming recognized as a particular thing or having a specific quality or characteristic. It implies a transformation or development that results in someone or something being seen or considered in a different light.
  • establish sm or sth as sm or sth To establish something or someone as something is to officially recognize, declare, or designate them as such. It means to set up or create a specific identity, reputation, position, or status for something or someone. It often involves gaining acceptance or acknowledgement from others.
  • employ sm as sth The idiom "employ someone as something" means to hire or engage someone in a specific role or position for a particular purpose or job.
  • issue sth as sth The idiom "issue sth as sth" typically means to release or distribute something, such as a document, publication, or official statement, in a particular format or medium. It implies the act of making something available or presenting it to the public or a specific audience in a specific manner.
  • offer sth to sm (as sth) The idiom "offer something to someone as something" means to present or provide something to someone in the capacity or role of something specific. It implies offering a particular role, position, opportunity, or status to someone.
  • pose as sm The idiom "pose as someone" means to pretend or falsely present oneself as another person, often for deceptive or deceitful purposes. It involves assuming the identity, characteristics, or role of someone else in order to mislead or manipulate others.
  • pose as sm or sth The idiom "pose as someone or something" means to pretend to be someone or something that you are not, usually in order to deceive or mislead others. It implies assuming a false identity or role for deceptive purposes.
  • envisage sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "envisage someone or something as someone or something" means to imagine or conceive someone or something in a particular way or in a specific role. It implies visualizing or perceiving someone or something as having a certain identity, quality, or purpose. It often involves envisioning a possible future state or potential transformation.
  • envision sm as sm else The idiom "envision sm as sm else" means to imagine or picture someone or something in a different form, role, or situation than what currently exists. It involves visualizing or perceiving a person or thing in an alternative or transformed state.
  • hard as nails The idiom "hard as nails" means to be tough, physically or emotionally, with a tendency to resist or endure difficult situations or challenges.
  • be as hard as nails The idiom "be as hard as nails" means to be very tough, physically or mentally, lacking empathy or ability to be affected by emotions or pain.
  • as long as The idiom "as long as" is commonly used to express a condition or a requirement that must be met in order for something to happen or be true. It implies that if the specified condition is fulfilled, then whatever follows will occur or remain in effect.
  • (just) as I expected The idiom "(just) as I expected" means that the result or outcome of a situation matches exactly what the speaker had predicted or anticipated. It often implies a sense of certainty or foresight regarding the expected outcome.
  • intend sth as sth The idiom "intend something as something" means to have the purpose, aim, or design for something to be interpreted or understood in a particular way. It implies that the person or entity has a clear intention or objective in mind while communicating or expressing something.
  • as much as anything (else) The idiom "as much as anything (else)" is used to suggest that something is one of the most important factors or considerations in a particular situation, equally important as other possible factors. It emphasizes the significance or impact of something alongside other elements that may be relevant.
  • label sm or sth as sth The idiom "label someone or something as something" means to categorize or classify someone or something in a specific way or with a specific descriptor. It implies assigning a certain trait, characteristic, or identity to someone or something based on perception or judgment.
  • point to as The idiom "point to as" means to indicate or suggest that someone or something is a specific thing or has a particular quality. It is often used when presenting evidence or examples to support a claim or argument.
  • as far as is concerned The idiom "as far as is concerned" is used to specify or discuss a particular aspect or perspective related to a topic or person. It indicates focusing on a specific area or element when discussing or considering something.
  • in the same league (as sb/sth) The idiom "in the same league (as sb/sth)" means to be on a similar level of skill, ability, or quality as someone or something else. It implies a comparison between two entities that are considered comparable or of a similar standard.
  • pay as you go The idiom "pay as you go" typically refers to a method of payment where one pays for goods or services immediately at the time of purchase, rather than incurring debt or making delayed payments. It emphasizes the idea of paying for something in real-time or as it happens, without relying on credit or financing options.
  • qualify as sth The idiom "qualify as sth" means to meet the necessary requirements or criteria to be considered as a specific thing or to be eligible for a particular designation, status, or role. It is typically used to describe someone or something that possesses the necessary qualifications, skills, attributes, or characteristics to be classified or identified as a certain thing.
  • qualify sm as sth The idiom "qualify someone as something" means to categorize or designate someone as a specific thing or someone possessing a particular quality or attribute. It implies that the person being discussed possesses the necessary qualities or meets the qualifications to be considered as the stated thing or possess the stated attribute.
  • as old as the hills The idiom "as old as the hills" means something or someone that is extremely old or ancient, often referring to things that have existed for a very long time, suggesting that they are outdated or have been around since the beginning of time.
  • flop as sth When referring to "flop as something," it means to fail or perform poorly in a specific role, task, or endeavor. This idiom suggests a lack of success or effectiveness in the intended capacity.
  • evaluate sm as sth The idiom "evaluate someone as something" means to assess or judge a person's abilities, skills, or qualities in a particular role, position, or characteristic. It involves examining and forming an opinion about someone's suitability, worthiness, or performance in a specific capacity or context.
  • pleased as Punch The idiom "pleased as Punch" means to be extremely delighted or happy about something. It refers to the character Punch from the traditional puppet show Punch and Judy, who often expresses great satisfaction or delight.
  • picture sm as sm or sth The idiom "picture someone as someone or something" means forming a mental image or representation of someone in a particular way or as a specific type of person or thing. It implies envisioning someone fitting a certain role, attitude, or characteristic based on one's perception or understanding of them.
  • hold sm or sth up as an example The idiom "hold someone or something up as an example" means to showcase or present someone or something as a model or demonstration of a particular behavior, quality, or achievement. It refers to using someone or something to illustrate an ideal or standard for others to follow or be inspired by.
  • interpret sth as sth The idiom "interpret something as something" means to understand or explain something in a particular way, often based on personal perspective or subjective analysis. It implies the act of assigning meaning or significance to something based on one's own understanding or interpretation.
  • imagine sm or sth as sm or sth The idiom "imagine someone or something as someone or something" refers to the act of picturing or perceiving someone or something in a specific way, even if it may not reflect reality. It involves using one's imagination to envision or view someone or something in a particular role, quality, or state, disregarding the actual characteristics or circumstances.
  • as opposed to sth The idiom "as opposed to something" refers to contrasting or comparing two opposite or different things or ideas. It is often used to introduce or highlight the difference between two choices, options, or viewpoints. It emphasizes a distinction, presenting an alternative perspective or contrasting element.
  • feature sm as sth The idiom "feature someone or something as something" means to present or highlight someone or something in a particular role or capacity. It refers to showcasing someone or something in a prominent or significant way, often in a public or media setting.
  • nominate sm as sth The idiom "nominate someone as something" means to propose or suggest someone as a candidate for a specific position, role, or award. It refers to formally putting forward a person's name for consideration in order to fulfill a particular role or receive recognition in a specific capacity.
  • extol sm or sth as sth The idiom "extol someone or something as something" means to highly praise or speak in great admiration about someone or something, emphasizing their positive qualities or attributes. It involves giving genuine and enthusiastic recognition or acclaim to someone or something for their exceptional qualities or achievements.
  • fit as a fiddle The idiom "fit as a fiddle" means to be in very good health or physical condition.
  • finger as
  • fancy sm as sm or sth The idiom "fancy someone or something as someone or something" means to have a particular preference, attraction, or liking for someone or something. It implies a feeling of fondness, often involving romantic or infatuated feelings towards a person. It can also be used when expressing a strong liking or preference for something in various contexts.
  • so far as is concerned The idiom "so far as (something) is concerned" means to consider or discuss a particular aspect or perspective of a situation. It is often used to clarify the relevance or focus of a topic being discussed.
  • go so far as to The idiom "go so far as to" means to do or say something extreme or unexpected, beyond what is considered normal or acceptable. It implies that the action or statement being mentioned is uncommon or goes to great lengths in the given context.
  • as far as are concerned The idiom "as far as [pronoun] are concerned" is used to express someone's personal opinion or perspective on a specific matter. It indicates that the following statement represents an individual's point of view, without necessarily implying it is universally accepted or true.
  • as far as The idiom "as far as" means to the extent or degree that something is true or relevant. It is often used to indicate a limit or boundary, and can also express a condition or qualification.
  • (as) nutty as a fruitcake The idiom "(as) nutty as a fruitcake" means that someone or something is extremely eccentric, strange, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person's behavior or ideas might be irrational or unpredictable. The phrase is often used humorously to describe someone who exhibits unconventional or odd behavior.
  • would as soon do as look at you The idiom "would as soon do as look at you" refers to a strong aversion or dislike towards someone or something to the point that the mere act of looking at them is as unpleasant as engaging in an undesirable action. It conveys the idea that the person would prefer to avoid any interaction or association with the mentioned person or thing due to a negative sentiment.
  • look upon as "Look upon as" is an idiom that means to consider someone or something in a certain way, to regard them or it in a particular manner. It implies a perception or opinion about someone or something.
  • look on as The idiom "look on as" means to regard or consider someone or something in a particular way, usually with a specific sentiment or judgment.
  • look as if butter wouldn't melt in mouth The idiom "look as if butter wouldn't melt in mouth" refers to someone who appears innocent, modest, or harmless on the surface despite potentially having mischievous or deceitful intentions. It describes someone who gives the impression of being pure and gentle, as exemplified by the smoothness and coolness of butter, but may actually be quite cunning or manipulative.
  • groom sm as sth The idiom "groom someone as something" means to prepare or train someone for a specific role or position, usually one of authority or leadership. It involves developing someone's skills, knowledge, or attributes to make them suitable or qualified for a particular role or position.
  • install sm as sth The idiom "install someone as something" means to formally or officially place someone in a position or role. It suggests that someone is being appointed or assigned to a particular position with authority or responsibility.
  • identify sm as sm To "identify sm as sm" means to recognize or acknowledge someone or something as a particular person or thing, usually based on certain distinctive characteristics or qualities. It refers to the act of assigning or attributing a specific identity or designation to an individual or object.
  • know as much about as a hog knows about Sunday The definition for the idiom "know as much about as a hog knows about Sunday" is that someone is completely ignorant or clueless about a particular topic or subject matter. It implies that the person has absolutely no knowledge or understanding about it, just as a hog (pig) would have no concept or awareness of what Sunday is.
  • know as The idiom "known as" refers to the action of being recognized or referred to by a specific name or title.
  • recognize sm as sm or sth The idiom "recognize someone as someone or something" means to acknowledge or accept someone's identity, position, or qualities as described. It signifies understanding and accepting the true nature of a person or thing.
  • (as) plain as day The definition of the idiom "(as) plain as day" is something that is extremely clear, obvious, or easily understood.
  • be as clear/plain as day The idiom "be as clear/plain as day" means that something is extremely obvious, apparent, or easy to understand without any ambiguity. It implies that there is no room for confusion or doubt, as the situation or information is transparent and easily comprehensible.
  • full as a tick The idiom "full as a tick" typically means to be completely or excessively full, similar to how a tick becomes engorged with blood after feeding on its host. It is often used to describe someone or something that is completely satisfied, filled to capacity, or bloated.
  • be as full as a boot The idiom "be as full as a boot" means to be very full or completely filled, often referring to feeling satisfied or satiated after eating or drinking excessively. It implies a sense of being unable to consume anything more due to already being completely filled up, just like a boot being filled to its maximum capacity.
  • be as keen as mustard The idiom "be as keen as mustard" means to be very enthusiastic, eager, or excited about something. It refers to someone who is highly motivated and enthusiastic in their pursuit of a particular goal or activity.
  • Pretty is as pretty does. The idiom "Pretty is as pretty does" means that a person's true beauty is based on their actions and behavior, rather than their physical appearance. It suggests that attractive looks alone are not enough to make someone truly beautiful; their actions and character determine their actual beauty.
  • Handsm is as handsm does. The idiom "Handsome is as handsome does" means that a person's true character and worth should be judged based on their actions and behavior, rather than solely on their physical appearance. It suggests that beauty or attractiveness alone does not necessarily make someone good, kind, or admirable. It emphasizes the importance of evaluating a person's qualities and actions rather than being swayed by surface-level appearances.
  • see the glass (as) half full The idiom "see the glass (as) half full" means to have an optimistic or positive outlook on a situation, focusing on the positive aspects rather than dwelling on the negative. It suggests maintaining a hopeful and confident attitude rather than being pessimistic or discouraged.
  • be as old as Methuselah The idiom "be as old as Methuselah" means to be extremely old or to have lived for a remarkably long time. It refers to Methuselah, a biblical figure who was said to have lived for 969 years, making him one of the longest-lived individuals in history. Thus, when someone or something is described as being as old as Methuselah, it implies that they have been around for a significantly long period.
  • make good as The idiom "make good as" has multiple interpretations depending on the context. Here are two possible definitions: 1. To fulfill or carry out a promise or commitment: This meaning suggests that one is actively taking action to meet their obligations. For example, if someone says, "I'll make good as promised," it means they will ensure their promise is fulfilled. 2. To prove oneself or succeed: In this sense, "make good as" implies achieving success or demonstrating one's abilities. It signifies accomplishing something or proving oneself to be competent. For instance, if someone states, "I'll make good as a chef," they are expressing their determination to become a successful chef.
  • good as new The idiom "good as new" means that something is in excellent condition or has been restored to its original state, typically after being repaired or renovated. It suggests that the item or person is indistinguishable from brand new and functions perfectly without any visible signs of damage or wear.
  • good as gold The idiom "good as gold" is typically used to describe someone or something that is extremely well-behaved, reliable, trustworthy, or deserving of praise. It implies that the person or thing in question is of high quality and exhibits admirable characteristics.
  • give as good as get The idiom "give as good as get" means to respond or retaliate in the same manner or degree as one has been treated. It implies that if someone treats you poorly or deals with you harshly, you have the ability and willingness to respond in kind and give them a taste of their own medicine.
  • as likely as not The idiom "as likely as not" means something is equally likely to happen as not happen, with uncertain or indeterminate odds.
  • peg sm as sth The idiom "peg someone as something" means to classify or categorize someone in a particular way based on their appearance, behavior, or other noticeable characteristics. It involves making a quick judgment or assumption about someone's personality, abilities, or qualities.
  • large as life The idiom "large as life" refers to something or someone being present or visible in an exaggerated or surprising manner, usually with a sense of excitement or astonishment. It implies that the subject appears vividly and unmistakably, often beyond expectations.
  • high as a kite The idiom "high as a kite" is used to describe someone who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol and feeling euphoric or intoxicated. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone who is extremely happy, excited, or elated.
  • be as honest as the day (is long) The idiom "be as honest as the day (is long)" means to be completely honest and trustworthy. It implies that a person's integrity and truthfulness are constant, just like the length of a day.
  • strong as a horse The idiom "strong as a horse" means having great physical strength or power. It refers to the exceptional strength and endurance possessed by horses, implying that someone or something compared to a horse is exceptionally strong or sturdy.
  • had as soon do The idiom "had as soon do" means to prefer doing something else instead of a particular action or task. It implies a strong dislike or lack of desire towards the mentioned action.
  • be as nice as pie The idiom "be as nice as pie" means to be very kind, friendly, or pleasant in demeanor or behavior.
  • mean as
  • idolize sm or sth as sth The idiom "idolize someone or something as something" refers to excessively revering, admiring, or worshipping someone or something, treating them as an ideal or supreme. It suggests a strong and often unconditional admiration or adoration towards a particular person or object, raising them to an extraordinary level of respect, reverence, or importance.
  • impress sm as sth The idiom "impress someone as something" means to make a particular impression on someone or to come across as a certain type of person or having a particular quality. It refers to the way someone or something appears or is perceived by someone else.
  • inaugurate sm as sth The idiom "inaugurate someone as something" means to formally or officially install or establish someone in a particular role, position, or status. It typically implies a ceremony or event marking the beginning of someone's new role or a significant milestone in their professional or personal life.
  • start sm in (as sth) The idiom "start someone in (as something)" means to begin someone's journey or progress in a particular role or position. It refers to providing someone with their initial opportunity to work or train in a specific job or field.
  • patient as Job The idiom "patient as Job" refers to someone who is exceptionally calm, tolerant, and enduring in the face of adversity or suffering, similar to the characteristics exhibited by the biblical figure Job. It implies that the person remains composed and steadfast, regardless of the challenges or difficulties they may be facing.
  • bright as a new pin The idiom "bright as a new pin" means to be very clean, shiny, or neat in appearance. It is often used to describe someone or something that looks fresh, well-groomed, or well-maintained.
  • mark sth as sth The idiom "mark something as something" typically means to label or distinguish something as a specific thing. It could refer to physically marking an item or mentally categorizing it in a certain way.
  • I'd as leave do The phrase "I'd as leave do" is actually a variation or corruption of the original idiom "I'd as soon do." It means that one would prefer or be just as willing to do a particular action. It implies that there is no strong preference or aversion towards the suggested action, and the person is indifferent or neutral about it.
  • name as
  • prove oneself as The definition of the idiom "prove oneself as" means to demonstrate or establish one's abilities, skills, or worth through action or achievement. It refers to showcasing capabilities to gain recognition, acceptance, or validation in a specific area or situation.
  • mark as The definition of the idiom "mark as" is to indicate or designate something to be a certain way or of a certain category. It can also imply making a distinction or taking note of something.
  • masquerade as sm or sth The idiom "masquerade as someone or something" means to pretend to be someone or something that you are not. It involves adopting a false identity or role in order to deceive others.
  • (as) easy as pie The idiom "(as) easy as pie" means that something is very simple, easy, or effortless to do or understand. It expresses that a task or situation requires minimal effort or skill.
  • so much as The idiom "so much as" is used to indicate a minimal or slightest action or involvement. It typically introduces a hypothetical or hypothetical situation that implies that even the smallest action or event would result in a specific outcome.
  • as much as anything The idiom "as much as anything" is typically used to convey that something is one possible reason or explanation among others. It implies that the mentioned reason might hold significance or play a role in a particular situation, but it is not the sole determining factor. It suggests that multiple factors contribute to the outcome or conclusion being discussed, with the mentioned reason being emphasized as one of equal importance.
  • rate sm or sth as sth The idiom "rate someone or something as something" means to evaluate or judge someone or something and assign them a specific rank or rating based on their quality, importance, or worth. It is often used when giving an opinion or assessment about a person, product, service, or any other entity.
  • reappoint sm as sth The idiom "reappoint someone as something" means to appoint or designate someone for a specific position, role, or duty again. It refers to the act of giving someone another term or period of service in the same role or position they previously held.
  • old as the hills The idiom "old as the hills" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely old or ancient, suggesting that it has existed for a very long time. It implies that the subject in question has been around for so long that it predates the memories or knowledge of most people.
  • old as Methuselah The idiom "old as Methuselah" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely old or ancient. It refers to Methuselah, a biblical figure known for being the longest-lived person, who supposedly lived for 969 years.
  • common as an old shoe The idiom "common as an old shoe" means that something or someone is very familiar or commonplace. It implies that the subject is not unique or extraordinary, but rather ordinary and widely known or encountered. It suggests a lack of novelty or specialness.
  • comfortable as an old shoe The idiom "comfortable as an old shoe" means feeling at ease and content in a familiar and comfortable situation or with someone you know well. It conveys a sense of comfort, familiarity, and relaxation.
  • pass sth off (on sm) (as sth) The idiom "pass something off (on someone) (as something)" means to present or portray something as genuine, authentic, or true to someone else, usually with the intention to deceive or mislead them. It involves convincing someone that something is what it claims to be, even though it may be false, counterfeit, or of lesser value.
  • perceive sm or sth as sth The idiom "perceive someone or something as something" means to have a particular understanding, belief, or impression of someone or something, often based on one's own subjective perspective or limited knowledge. It refers to how an individual interprets and sees a person or thing in a specific way, regardless of whether it accurately reflects reality or not.
  • look upon sb/sth as sth The idiom "look upon sb/sth as sth" means to view or consider someone or something in a particular way or category. It implies seeing someone or something as possessing certain qualities, characteristics, or roles.
  • portray sm as sm or sth The definition of the idiom "portray someone or something as someone or something" means to depict or represent someone or something in a particular way, often emphasizing or highlighting specific traits, characteristics, or qualities. It involves presenting a specific image or viewpoint about someone or something, which may not necessarily reflect the complete or accurate reality.
  • portray sm or sth as sm The idiom "portray someone or something as something" refers to representing or depicting someone or something in a particular manner, often by emphasizing or highlighting certain characteristics or qualities. It involves presenting an image or perception of someone or something that may not necessarily reflect reality or the true nature of the person or object in question.
  • posture as sm or sth The idiom "posture as someone or something" refers to the act of presenting oneself in a particular way to create a certain impression or to gain advantage. It involves deliberately adopting a specific appearance, attitude, or behavior to project a desired image or to misrepresent oneself. This idiom implies that the person is not truly what they are pretending to be, but rather using a false façade for personal or strategic reasons.
  • pull together (as a team) The definition of the idiom "pull together (as a team)" is to collaborate and work collectively towards a common goal or objective, often in a situation where unity, cooperation, and coordination are required to achieve success.
  • as per usual The idiom "as per usual" means according to the usual or typical situation or pattern. It is often used to express a sense of predictability or regularity in someone's actions or in a particular situation.
  • as good as they come The idiom "as good as they come" means that someone or something is of the highest quality or excellence. It refers to the notion that the person or thing being described could not be surpassed or improved upon.
  • be as good as one's word To be as good as one's word means to fulfill or honor one's promises or commitments. It refers to someone who consistently follows through on their word and can be trusted to do what they say they will.
  • as who should say The idiom "as who should say" means to express something indirectly or hesitantly, suggesting that one is trying to convey a particular meaning without stating it explicitly. This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is implying or insinuating something, rather than directly stating it.
  • clean as a whistle The idiom "clean as a whistle" typically means something or someone is very clean or pristine, with no dirt, blemishes, or faults. It emphasizes a high level of cleanliness, neatness, or purity.
  • look as if butter would not melt in one's mouth The idiom "look as if butter would not melt in one's mouth" is used to describe someone who appears innocent, sweet, or well-behaved on the surface, despite possibly having a mischievous or deceitful nature underneath. It suggests that the person's demeanor conceals their true character or intentions.
  • make so bold as The idiomatic expression "make so bold as" is used to politely or hesitantly ask or suggest something. It implies a certain level of humility or courtesy when making a request or inquiry.
  • as best one can The idiom "as best one can" means doing something to the best of one's ability or to the highest level possible, even if the circumstances are challenging or less than ideal. It implies putting forth maximum effort or making the best possible attempt under the given circumstances.
  • as it so happens The idiom "as it so happens" means that something is occurring or unfolding in a way that is coincidental or unexpected, often used when providing surprising or fortuitous information or events.
  • cool as a cucumber The idiom "cool as a cucumber" refers to someone who remains calm and composed in a situation that may cause stress or panic.
  • as regards The idiom "as regards" means in regard or concerning. It is used to indicate the topic or subject being discussed or considered.
  • as ... as The idiom "as ... as" is used to make a comparison between two things, indicating that they are similar in a particular aspect or degree. It is often used to emphasize the extent or intensity of a particular quality or characteristic.
  • as of The idiom "as of" is used to indicate a specific point in time from which something is measured or considered. It suggests the starting or reference point for a particular situation or condition.
  • as though The idiom "as though" means in a manner that suggests or implies a particular situation, feeling, or appearance. It is used to describe a situation or action that is not necessarily true or real but is used as a way of illustrating a point or describing something in a certain way.
  • mad as a hatter The idiom "mad as a hatter" means extremely mad or insane. It originated from the late 18th and early 19th centuries when hatters used to use mercury in the hat-making process, resulting in mercury poisoning. The symptoms of this condition included behavioral changes, tremors, and mental instability, which led to the association of madness with hatters.
  • make as if The idiom "make as if" means to pretend or feign a particular action or behavior, often to deceive or mislead others. It involves acting or behaving in a way that suggests that something is true or happening when it is not.
  • as a man The idiom "as a man" typically means to act or behave in a strong, courageous, or determined manner, often implying that one is facing adversity or taking responsibility. It is often associated with masculine qualities such as bravery, resilience, or assertiveness.
  • as many The idiom "as many" typically means a large or unspecified number of something. It implies that there are a considerable or abundant amount of items, people, or things being referred to.
  • so as to The idiom "so as to" means in order to, with the purpose or intention of doing something. It is used to express the reason or goal behind an action or to describe the intended outcome of an action.
  • in so far as The idiom "in so far as" means to the extent or degree that something is true or applicable. It is used to introduce or qualify a condition, limitation, or exception related to a statement or a claim.
  • so far as The idiom "so far as" is used to express a limit or extent, indicating that something only applies or is relevant to a certain point or up to a certain extent. It suggests that there may be limitations or exceptions beyond that point.
  • according as The idiom "according as" means depending on, or in accordance with, different circumstances or factors. It implies that something will be done or determined based on the specific condition or situation at hand.
  • blind as a bat The idiom "blind as a bat" refers to someone who has extremely poor eyesight or is completely unable to see.
  • such as it is (or was, etc.) The idiom "such as it is" (or was, etc.) is often used to convey the idea that something is not ideal or of high quality, but it is the only option available or the best that can be found under the circumstances. It suggests a sense of resignation or acceptance of a less than satisfactory situation.
  • as all get-out The idiom "as all get-out" is used to intensify something, emphasizing that it is extreme, excessive, or beyond what is expected or normal. It is often used to emphasize a particular quality or characteristic of something or someone.
  • as people (or things) go The idiom "as people (or things) go" is used to compare someone or something to others of their kind, indicating that they possess average or typical characteristics for that group. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is not exceptional or unique in any way.
  • thick as thieves The idiom "thick as thieves" means to have a very close and strong relationship or friendship, often implying that the individuals involved are involved in mischievous or secretive activities together.
  • being as The idiom "being as" is typically used as a conjunction in casual or informal speech. It means "since" or "because" and is often used to introduce a reason or explanation for something.
  • (as) like as not The idiom "(as) like as not" means very likely, probably, or it is just as likely to happen as not.
  • as different as chalk and cheese The idiom "as different as chalk and cheese" refers to two things or people that are extremely dissimilar or have nothing in common. It highlights the stark contrast or complete lack of similarities between two entities.
  • as nice as ninepence The idiom "as nice as ninepence" means to be very neat, tidy, or well-presented. It refers to someone or something that appears immaculate and pristine in appearance, behavior, or surroundings.
  • as bald as a coot The idiom "as bald as a coot" is used to describe someone who is completely bald or has a very noticeable lack of hair on their head. It implies that the person's head is as smooth and bald as that of a coot, which is a bird known for its bald or featherless patch on its head.
  • as calm as a toad in the sun The idiom "as calm as a toad in the sun" typically means extremely calm, relaxed, and unperturbed. It implies a state of tranquility and contentment, likening one's composure to that of a toad basking peacefully in the warmth of the sun.
  • a chain is only as strong as its weakest link The idiom "a chain is only as strong as its weakest link" means that the overall strength or effectiveness of a system or group is limited by its weakest or most vulnerable component or member. This implies that no matter how strong or well-functioning the majority of the elements are, the weakest one can undermine the entire system.
  • as mad as a hatter The idiom "as mad as a hatter" is used to describe someone who is extremely crazy, eccentric, or irrational. It originates from the belief that hatters (hat-makers) in the 18th and 19th centuries often suffered from mercury poisoning, which caused neurological symptoms leading to mental instability.
  • like or as a duck to water The idiom "like a duck to water" means that someone quickly and easily adapts to a new situation or task, just as a duck naturally and effortlessly navigates in water.
  • as busy as a bee The idiom "as busy as a bee" refers to someone who is very industrious, active, or constantly occupied with tasks and responsibilities. This expression originates from the behavior of bees in a hive, where they are commonly observed working tirelessly and efficiently.
  • as broad as long The idiom "as broad as long" means that two or more alternatives yield similar or equal results, outcomes, or consequences, regardless of the choice made. It suggests that the options or choices under consideration are ultimately equivalent in their overall impact or result.
  • cool as cucumber The idiom "cool as a cucumber" means to remain calm, composed, and unruffled even in a challenging or stressful situation. It refers to someone who can maintain their composure and not show any signs of nervousness, anxiety, or stress.
  • happy as a clam The idiom "happy as a clam" means to be extremely happy and content. The phrase originates from the full version "happy as a clam at high water," as clams are thought to be particularly content and protected during high tide when they are safe from being harvested.
  • keen as mustard The idiom "keen as mustard" is used to describe someone who is extremely enthusiastic, eager, or passionate about something. It often emphasizes a person's intense willingness to participate, excel, or achieve in a particular activity or task.
  • there’s no such thing as a free lunch The idiom "there’s no such thing as a free lunch" means that everything has a cost, either monetary or otherwise. It implies that nothing is truly free, and if something appears to be free, there is often a hidden or indirect cost associated with it.
  • when in Rome, do as the Romans The idiom "when in Rome, do as the Romans" means that when visiting or residing in a foreign place, it is advisable to adopt the customs, behavior, or practices of the locals in order to blend in or act appropriately. It emphasizes the importance of adapting to the culture and traditions of the place one is in.
  • (you, etc.) may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb The idiom "(you, etc.) may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb" means that since the consequences or punishment will be severe regardless of the action taken, it is better to go for a bigger risk or advantage rather than settling for a smaller one. It suggests that if punishment is inevitable, one might as well commit a more significant offense to make it worthwhile.
  • as regards somebody/something The idiom "as regards somebody/something" means in relation to or concerning a particular person or thing. It is a way of directing attention to a specific subject or topic.
  • as to something The idiom "as to something" is typically used to introduce or refer to a specific topic, issue, or matter that is being discussed or considered. It is often used to provide or seek information, understanding, or clarification about the subject at hand.
  • as regards something The idiom "as regards something" is used to introduce or discuss a particular topic or aspect of something. It is typically used to indicate that the following statement or information is related to or concerning the specific matter being mentioned.
  • take it/something as read "Take it/something as read" is an idiom used to convey the idea of accepting or assuming something to be true or factual without needing further explanation or proof. It implies that the information or statement is widely acknowledged, commonly understood, or has already been discussed or agreed upon.
  • without a by your leave; without so much as a by your leave The idiom "without a by your leave" or "without so much as a by your leave" refers to doing something without seeking permission or without asking for consent. It implies acting or making decisions independently, disregarding social norms or the opinions of others.
  • as fast as your legs can carry you The idiom "as fast as your legs can carry you" means to run or move as quickly as one possibly can.
  • as near as damn it/dammit The idiom "as near as damn it/dammit" is used to emphasize that something is extremely close or almost identical to something else. It is often used when there is a slight variation or difference between two things, but the overall similarity is emphasized.
  • as easy as anything/as pie/as ABC/as falling off a log The idiom "as easy as anything/as pie/as ABC/as falling off a log" all refer to something that is very simple or effortless to accomplish.
  • it’s as broad as it’s long The idiom "it’s as broad as it’s long" means that one alternative or option does not present a significant advantage or disadvantage over another. It suggests that the outcome or result will essentially be the same regardless of which option is chosen. It implies that there is little to no difference between the choices being considered.
  • as/so long as The definition of the idiom "as/so long as" is to indicate that something is true or allowed only if a certain condition is satisfied. In other words, it implies that a particular result or action will occur or be acceptable if a specific requirement or condition is met.
  • (as) drunk as a lord The idiom "(as) drunk as a lord" refers to someone who is extremely intoxicated, often to the point of stumbling and slurring their speech. It emphasizes the excessive and boisterous behavior associated with heavy drinking, comparing it to the indulgent lifestyle historically associated with members of the nobility or aristocracy.
  • (as) drunk as a skunk The idiom "as drunk as a skunk" is used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or heavily under the influence of alcohol. Skunks are often associated with a strong, unpleasant odor, so this expression humorously highlights the intensity of someone's drunkenness.
  • (as) dead as a/the dodo The idiom "(as) dead as a/the dodo" refers to something or someone that is completely or definitively extinct, obsolete, or no longer relevant. It originates from the dodo, a flightless bird native to Mauritius, which became extinct in the late 17th century due to hunting and habitat destruction.
  • (as) steady as a rock The idiom "(as) steady as a rock" means to be extremely stable, dependable, and strong, especially in difficult or challenging situations. It refers to someone or something that does not waver, falter, or show any signs of distress or instability.
  • a rose by any other name would smell as sweet "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" is an idiom derived from a famous quote by William Shakespeare in his play Romeo and Juliet. The idiom means that the name or label of something does not change its inherent qualities or nature. In other words, the true essence or characteristics of something remain the same regardless of what it is called.
  • make as if to do something The phrase "make as if to do something" means to give the appearance or gesture of preparing or intending to do a specific action, without actually following through with it. It is a way of pretending to engage in an action or giving the impression of starting to do something, often with an underlying intention of deception or trickery.
  • as clean, pure, etc. as the driven snow The idiom "as clean, pure, etc. as the driven snow" is used to describe someone or something that is exceptionally pure, innocent, or virtuous. It implies that the person or thing being described is untainted, morally upright, or without any flaws or impurities. The phrase draws its comparison from the literal notion of freshly fallen, untouched snow that is free from any dirt, blemishes, or marks.
  • (as) sick as a parrot The idiom "(as) sick as a parrot" is used to describe a feeling of extreme disappointment or distress. It is often used when someone is deeply unhappy or upset about a certain situation, outcome, or loss. The phrase suggests that one is feeling as miserable as a parrot with an illness or disease.
  • (as) dull as ditchwater The phrase "dull as ditchwater" is an expression used to describe something or someone as extremely boring, uninteresting, or lacking excitement. It implies that the subject being referred to is as dreary and monotonous as stagnant water found in ditches, which typically lacks liveliness or appeal.
  • (as) dull as dishwater The idiom "(as) dull as dishwater" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely boring, uninteresting, or lacking in excitement or personality. It conveys the idea that an experience or individual lacks any form of liveliness, excitement, or engaging qualities, just like dishwater, which is typically deemed mundane and uneventful.
  • (as) miserable/ugly as sin The idiom "(as) miserable/ugly as sin" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely unhappy or unsightly. It implies that the subject is exceptionally miserable or unattractive, often to an exaggerated degree.
  • (as) sound as a bell The idiom "sound as a bell" is used to describe something or someone that is in perfect condition, functioning without any flaws or issues. It indicates that the person or thing is healthy, strong, and reliable. The phrase originates from the clear, resonant sound that a well-made bell produces when struck.
  • even as The idiomatic expression "even as" means at the same time or simultaneously, usually used to compare two events or actions happening concurrently or despite other circumstances.
  • (as) plain as a pikestaff The idiom "(as) plain as a pikestaff" is used to describe something that is extremely obvious or clear, leaving no room for doubt or confusion. It refers to the pikestaff, which is a long, straight staff or pole that is easily seen and recognized due to its simplicity.
  • (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "(as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is completely obvious or easily understandable, usually referring to a fact or situation that is clearly visible or apparent to anyone. It emphasizes the clarity and unmistakable nature of the subject or situation, similar to how one's nose is prominently visible on their face.
  • as/so far as I am concerned The idiom "as/so far as I am concerned" is used to express one's personal opinion or perspective on a matter. It indicates that the following statement represents the speaker's point of view or belief, regardless of others' opinions or facts.
  • as far as I know The idiom "as far as I know" means to the best of one's understanding or knowledge at a given moment. It indicates that the information being shared is based solely on the speaker's current knowledge and may not be entirely accurate or complete.
  • as far as I can remember, see, tell, etc. The idiom "as far as I can remember, see, tell, etc." is used to indicate that the speaker is recalling information or expressing their opinion based on their memory, observations, or understanding up to the current moment. It suggests that the information being shared might not be completely accurate or comprehensive, as it is limited to the speaker's personal recollection, perception, or knowledge.
  • as/so far as somebody/something is concerned The idiom "as/so far as somebody/something is concerned" is used to indicate the perspective or viewpoint that one is referring to or considering. It is often used to emphasize the specific person or thing being discussed or focus on their particular opinions, interests, or involvement in a situation.
  • as/so far as somebody/something goes The idiom "as/so far as somebody/something goes" means to the extent or degree that someone or something is concerned or involved in a particular situation. It indicates limits or inclusion, emphasizing a specific aspect or perspective within a larger context.
  • as/so far as it goes The idiom "as/so far as it goes" means to acknowledge or accept something to a certain extent or within a limited scope. It implies that while a particular statement or action may be true or correct within its boundaries, there may be additional factors or considerations that need to be taken into account for a more comprehensive understanding.
  • in so/as far as The idiom "in so/as far as" means to the extent that or to the degree that something is relevant or applicable. It is used to indicate the specific limits or boundaries within which a statement, action, or situation is valid or true.
  • behave/act as if you own the place The idiom "behave/act as if you own the place" means acting with a sense of entitlement or confidence, often disregarding rules or norms that others would typically follow. It implies behaving in a way that suggests you have the authority or ownership of a particular location or situation, even though you may not actually possess such authority or ownership.
  • (as) fit as a fiddle The idiom "(as) fit as a fiddle" means to be in excellent physical health or condition. It implies that someone is exceptionally fit, energetic, and strong, much like a finely tuned musical instrument that is ready to perform.
  • (as) straight as a ramrod The idiom "(as) straight as a ramrod" is used to describe someone or something that is very upright and rigid in posture or behavior. It suggests a strong, disciplined, and unwavering stance or demeanor, often used to portray an individual's strict adherence to rules, principles, or moral values.
  • take somebody as you find them The idiom "take somebody as you find them" means to accept someone for who they are, without expecting them to change or conform to your expectations. It suggests not making any judgments or assumptions about a person based on appearance or initial encounters, but rather embracing them with all their characteristics and quirks.
  • not as bad(ly), etc. as all that The idiom "not as bad(ly), etc. as all that" means that something or someone is not as awful, severe, or negative as it may have been initially perceived or described. It suggests that the situation or person in question is actually less negative or troublesome than implied or expected.
  • (as) quick as a flash The idiom "(as) quick as a flash" means to move or react swiftly or rapidly, often indicating that someone or something responds immediately or without delay. It implies acting or happening in a sudden, rapid, or instant manner.
  • as flat as a pancake The idiom "as flat as a pancake" means completely flat or lacking any unevenness or elevation. It is used to describe something that is notably and uniformly level, smooth, or devoid of curves or bumps.
  • as always The idiom "as always" is used to indicate that something is consistent, habitual, or typical, highlighting the fact that it happens in the same way or pattern repeatedly. It suggests that the outcome or behavior is not surprising or unexpected because it aligns with what has been observed or experienced before.
  • as best you can The idiom "as best you can" means to do something to the best of your ability or to the fullest extent possible considering the circumstances or limitations. It implies giving one's utmost effort or attempting to accomplish something with the available resources and capabilities, regardless of any constraints or difficulties.
  • every bit as good, bad, etc. (as somebody/something) The idiom "every bit as good, bad, etc. (as somebody/something)" means that someone or something is equally good, bad, or of the same quality as someone or something else. It emphasizes that there is no significant difference or distinction between the two, highlighting their similarities in terms of a specific attribute or quality.
  • not as black as he/she/it is painted The idiom "not as black as he/she/it is painted" means that someone or something is not as bad or guilty as they are portrayed or described. It suggests that the negative opinions or perceptions about a person or situation are exaggerated or unfair.
  • (as) tough as nails The idiom "(as) tough as nails" means someone or something that is extremely strong, resilient, and unyielding, both physically and mentally. It refers to someone who is able to endure and overcome difficult situations or challenges without showing weakness or giving up easily.
  • as chance would have it The idiom "as chance would have it" is used to describe a situation that occurs unexpectedly or by coincidence. It suggests that the outcome is due to luck or the workings of fate rather than deliberate planning or intention.
  • as against something The idiom "as against something" means in comparison to something else or in contrast to something. It is typically used when comparing two different viewpoints, options, or pieces of information, highlighting the differences or contrasting aspects between them.
  • as for somebody/something The idiom "as for somebody/something" is used to introduce a separate or different topic, often indicating a shift in focus or attention. It is typically used to express one's thoughts, opinions, or actions regarding a specific person or thing after discussing or mentioning another topic.
  • as from…/as of…
  • as if/as though The idiom "as if/as though" is used to convey a comparison or resemblance between two things or situations, suggesting that something is not true or real but is presented in a way that creates a particular impression. It indicates a hypothetical or unreal scenario that is being described or imagined.
  • as you do The idiom "as you do" is a colloquial expression used to acknowledge or express sarcasm or surprise at someone's unusual or unexpected behavior. It is often used to emphasize the absurdity or unorthodox nature of a particular action or situation.
  • (as) bright as a button The idiom "(as) bright as a button" means someone or something is very intelligent, smart, or quick-witted. It suggests that the person or thing is sharp, clever, and quick to understand or grasp things.
  • daft as a brush The idiom "daft as a brush" means someone or something that is very silly, foolish, or lacking in common sense.
  • as the case may be The idiom "as the case may be" means depending on the specific situation or circumstances. It is used to indicate that something may vary or differ based on particular conditions or factors.
  • as clean as a whistle The idiom "as clean as a whistle" means to be completely clean, without any dirt, stains, or impurities. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone's innocence or lack of involvement in any wrongdoing.
  • be as clever, stupid, etc. as they come The idiom "be as clever, stupid, etc. as they come" is used to describe someone as being exceptionally clever, stupid, or any other quality that is being emphasized. It implies that the person in question possesses that particular quality to the highest degree or extent. For example, if someone says, "He's as clever as they come," it means that he is extremely clever, possibly one of the cleverest people ever encountered.
  • easy as ABC The idiom "easy as ABC" means that something is very simple or easy to understand or do. It implies that a task or concept is straightforward and can be accomplished without any significant effort or complication.
  • as easy (or simple) as ABC The idiom "as easy (or simple) as ABC" means that something is straightforward, uncomplicated, or very easy to understand or accomplish.
  • need (something) (about) as much a fish needs a bicycle The idiom "need (something) (about) as much as a fish needs a bicycle" is used to express that someone or something has absolutely no need for a specific thing. It implies that the thing mentioned is completely unnecessary or irrelevant in a particular situation. The phrase often conveys a sense of humor or sarcasm when emphasizing the lack of requirement for the mentioned item.
  • need (something) (about) as much as (one) needs a hole in the head The idiom "need (something) (about) as much as (one) needs a hole in the head" is an expression used to convey that someone has absolutely no desire or requirement for something. It implies that the mentioned thing is completely unnecessary, unwanted, or burdensome, similar to having an unnecessary hole in the head which would be quite undesirable.
  • accept (something) as The idiom "accept (something) as" means to acknowledge or agree to a particular situation, fact, or circumstance without questioning or resisting it. It implies taking something as it is without trying to change or challenge it.
  • accept (something) as gospel To "accept (something) as gospel" means to completely believe or unquestioningly accept the information or statement as true, without doubting or questioning its accuracy or validity. It implies a blind trust or faith in the information or source, similar to the belief in religious teachings.
  • accept someone as something The idiom "accept someone as something" means to recognize or acknowledge a person's inherent qualities, characteristics, or attributes, typically in a positive manner. It implies embracing and approving someone for who they truly are, without judgement or prejudice.
  • accept something as something To "accept something as something" means to acknowledge, take, or perceive something in a particular way or with a specific understanding. It implies that one has come to terms with a situation, idea, or fact, and has decided to treat it or view it from a specific perspective.
  • as accommodating as a hog on ice The idiom "as accommodating as a hog on ice" means someone or something that is highly uncooperative, clumsy, or impractical. It often suggests a lack of gracefulness or adaptability in performing a task or fulfilling a request.
  • (as) black as the ace of spades The idiom "black as the ace of spades" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely dark in color or complexion. It often implies a sense of complete darkness or blackness, emphasizing the darkest possible shade.
  • acknowledge (one) as The idiom "acknowledge (one) as" means to recognize or accept someone's status, position, or authority. It implies giving someone deserved recognition or formal acceptance of their importance or achievements.
  • acknowledge someone as something The idiom "acknowledge someone as something" means to publicly or officially recognize or accept someone's status, title, position, or identity. It implies granting recognition, respect, or validation to someone in a particular role or capacity.
  • acknowledge something as something To acknowledge something as something means to recognize or accept it as a particular thing or fact. It implies an admission or acknowledgment of the truth or validity of something.
  • come across as (someone or something) The idiom "come across as (someone or something)" means to be perceived or regarded in a certain way by others based on one's behavior, appearance, or communication style. It refers to the impression or image that someone or something gives off.
  • act as someone The idiom "act as someone" refers to the behavior or portrayal of a person in a certain role or capacity, typically in a temporary or substitute position. It involves assuming the characteristics, responsibilities, or mannerisms of someone else in order to fulfill a particular role or function.
  • as the actress said to the pope The idiom "as the actress said to the pope" is a humorous phrase used to draw attention to an unintended sexual innuendo or double entendre in a conversation. It suggests a flirtatious or suggestive remark, usually made by a female, to a male authority figure, often in a lighthearted or tongue-in-cheek manner.
  • old as Adam The idiom "old as Adam" refers to something or someone being extremely or exceptionally old. It implies a great age or antiquity.
  • deaf as an adder The idiom "deaf as an adder" typically refers to someone who is completely unresponsive or oblivious to what is being said or happening around them. It implies that the person is incredibly stubborn or intentionally choosing not to listen or pay attention.
  • deaf as an adder (or a post) The idiom "deaf as an adder (or a post)" refers to someone who is completely oblivious or unresponsive to what others are saying. It implies that the person is unwilling or unable to listen or pay attention to conversations or suggestions, just like an adder (a venomous snake) or a post (a stationary object) would be unable to hear any sounds.
  • address (one) as The idiom "address (one) as" means to refer to or call someone by a specific title or name. It implies using a particular form of address or designation when speaking or writing to someone in a formal or respectful manner.
  • address someone as The expression "address someone as" refers to the act of using a particular title or name when speaking or referring to someone. It implies acknowledging a person by a specific designation or term.
  • adopt (someone/something) as The idiom "adopt (someone/something) as" means to choose or accept someone or something as your own, often implying a strong emotional or personal connection. It suggests a sense of bonding or embracing a person or an idea as a part of your life, family, or identity.
  • adopt someone as something The idiom "adopt someone as something" means to formally or unofficially recognize someone as a particular role, position, or relationship, typically in a nurturing or supportive way. It implies that the person is accepted, embraced, or treated as though they belong in the designated position or role.
  • adopt something as something The idiom "adopt something as something" means to officially accept, embrace, or take on something new as a characteristic, belief, practice, or identity. It refers to the act of consciously choosing and assuming a particular thing or idea as one's own.
  • half again as The idiom "half again as" means to increase something by 50% or to add half of its current amount to itself. It is a way to describe an increase that is 1.5 times greater than the original quantity.
  • half again as many The idiom "half again as many" means an increase of 50% more than the original amount. It refers to adding half of the original number to itself, resulting in a total amount that is one and a half times the original quantity.
  • half again as much The idiom "half again as much" means to increase the quantity by an additional half of what it currently is. It suggests a 50% increase from the original or current amount.
  • As if I care! The idiom "As if I care!" is an expression used to convey complete indifference, disinterest, or lack of concern about a particular person, situation, or topic. It is often said sarcastically to demonstrate that the speaker doesn't care at all.
  • There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch The idiom "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch" means that there is never truly anything given or obtained for free. It implies that everything has a cost or consequence, and even if something appears to be free, there are usually hidden or indirect expenses associated with it.
  • free as air/as a bird The idiom "free as air/as a bird" means to feel unrestricted, liberated, or unconstrained, as if one has no inhibitions or responsibilities. It conveys a sense of complete freedom and lightness.
  • light as air/a feather The idiom "light as air/a feather" refers to something that is extremely light or weightless. It suggests that the object, person, or feeling being described has little to no weight, making it easy to be carried or moved effortlessly. It can also be used figuratively to describe emotions or situations that are delicate, gentle, or transient.
  • American as apple pie The idiom "American as apple pie" refers to something that is considered quintessentially American, embodying the traditional values, culture, or spirit of the United States. It implies a sense of nostalgia, wholesomeness, and iconic Americana.
  • (as) comfortable as an old shoe The idiom "(as) comfortable as an old shoe" is used to describe someone or something that feels familiar, cozy, and easy to be around. It implies a sense of comfort, security, and contentment, often referring to long-lasting relationships or situations.
  • (as) common as an old shoe The expression "(as) common as an old shoe" is an idiom used to describe something or someone that is unexceptional, ordinary, or familiar to the point of being unremarkable. It implies that the subject lacks any sense of uniqueness or novelty, akin to an old, worn-out shoe that is readily found and lacks any special characteristic or value.
  • comfortable as an old shoe, as The idiom "comfortable as an old shoe" means feeling relaxed, at ease, or familiar in a particular situation or with a certain person/group. It implies a sense of comfort and contentment, similar to the feeling of wearing an old shoe that perfectly fits and has been worn in over time, ensuring maximum comfort.
  • ancient (or old) as the hills The idiom "ancient (or old) as the hills" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely old or has been around for a very long time. It implies a great sense of age, wisdom, and enduring presence, comparing the object or person to the agelessness and permanence of hills or mountains.
  • (as) certain as death and taxes The idiom "(as) certain as death and taxes" means something that is absolutely guaranteed or certain to happen, just like death and taxes are inevitable and unavoidable aspects of life.
  • (as) different as night and day The idiom "(as) different as night and day" is used to describe two things or people that are extremely contrasting or dissimilar in nature or appearance. It emphasizes the stark contrast between two situations or individuals, highlighting the obvious differences between them.
  • (as) sure as death and taxes The idiom "(as) sure as death and taxes" means that something is absolutely certain or unavoidable. It suggests that just like death and taxes, which are unavoidable and certain in life, the thing being referred to is also guaranteed to happen.
  • as clear as black and white The idiom "as clear as black and white" means something that is very easy to understand, with no room for confusion or doubt. It implies that there is a stark contrast between two opposing options or perspectives, making the situation or information extremely clear and unambiguous.
  • as one door closes, another one opens The idiom "as one door closes, another one opens" means that when a certain opportunity or situation ends or fails, another opportunity or situation will soon present itself. It suggests that when one door of opportunity closes, there are always new possibilities or chances waiting to be discovered or pursued.
  • death and taxes, certain as The idiom "death and taxes, certain as..." refers to two inevitable aspects of life that are universally unavoidable or certain to happen. It implies that just as everyone is bound to experience death, they are also bound to pay taxes. The phrase emphasizes the certainty of these two events.
  • as one door closes, another opens The idiom "as one door closes, another opens" means that when one opportunity or situation ends or fails, another one arises or becomes available.
  • as far as the eye can see The idiom "as far as the eye can see" means that something extends or stretches for a vast or indefinite distance, usually implying a wide or unobstructed view. It describes a situation or landscape where there are no visible boundaries or limits in sight.
  • easy, clear, quick, etc. as anything The idiom "easy, clear, quick, etc. as anything" is used to emphasize the simplicity or speed at which a particular task or action is carried out. It implies that something is extremely easy, clear, quick, etc. without any complications or difficulties. It denotes a high level of efficiency or effectiveness in completing the given task or action.
  • appear as The idiom "appear as" means to seem or be seen in a particular way or role, often in a public or formal context. It denotes presenting oneself in a certain manner, either physically or in terms of behavior or position.
  • appear as something When someone or something appears as something else, it means that they give the impression or take on the form or characteristics of that particular thing. It can also imply a temporary transformation or assumption of a role or identity.
  • (as) mad as a hornet The idiom "(as) mad as a hornet" means to be extremely angry, furious, or enraged. It refers to the aggressive and unpredictable behavior of a hornet when provoked.
  • (as) mad as hops The idiom "(as) mad as hops" means to be extremely angry or furious. It denotes a state of intense rage or agitation.
  • as far as (someone/something) is concerned The idiom "as far as (someone/something) is concerned" is used to express an individual's or an entity's viewpoint or opinion on a particular matter. It indicates that the following statement or perspective is specific to the person or thing mentioned, and may not necessarily apply universally.
  • as much as (one's) life is worth The idiom "as much as (one's) life is worth" usually means that someone is doing something with great effort or determination, often in order to avoid negative consequences or achieve a favorable outcome. It implies that the action being taken is crucial or extremely important, to the point where one's life might be at stake if they don't give it their all.
  • be (as) easy as falling off (of) a log The idiom "be (as) easy as falling off (of) a log" means that something is extremely simple or effortless to accomplish or understand. It suggests that an action or task is as easy as unintentionally falling off a log, as it requires minimal effort or skill.
  • be (as) easy as one-two-three The idiom "be (as) easy as one-two-three" means that something is extremely simple or straightforward, requiring very little effort or thought. It implies that a task or action can be completed easily and quickly, without any complications or challenges.
  • be (as) easy as rolling off (of) a log The idiom "be (as) easy as rolling off (of) a log" means that something is extremely easy or effortless to do. Just like rolling off a log requires no effort or thought, the task or action being referred to in this idiom is similarly simple and requires very little skill or difficulty.
  • be (as) thick as a brick The idiom "be (as) thick as a brick" is a metaphorical expression used to describe someone who is very stupid or lacking intelligence. It implies that the person is incredibly dense or dull-witted, similar to the density and lack of malleability of a brick.
  • be (as) thick as a short plank The idiom "be (as) thick as a short plank" is used to describe someone as extremely unintelligent or lacking in mental ability. It implies that they are as dense or thick-headed as a short piece of wood, emphasizing their lack of sharpness or intellect.
  • be (as) thick as shit The idiom "be (as) thick as shit" is a colloquial and informal expression used to describe someone who is extremely unintelligent or lacking in common sense. It implies that the person is mentally slow or dense. The idiom uses the word "thick" as a metaphor for stupidity, emphasizing the intensity of the person's lack of intelligence.
  • be (as) thin as a rail The idiom "be (as) thin as a rail" means to be extremely thin or skinny. It is used to describe someone or something that lacks sufficient body fat or has a very slender physique.
  • be (as) tough as shoe leather The idiom "be (as) tough as shoe leather" means to be extremely resilient, durable, or strong in character and endurance. It implies being capable of withstanding and enduring difficult or challenging situations or circumstances without faltering.
  • be (not) as black as (someone/something) is painted The idiom "be (not) as black as (someone/something) is painted" means that someone or something is (not) as bad or evil as they are portrayed or believed to be. It suggests that there may be positive qualities or redeeming factors that are overlooked or not well known.
  • be as (something) as all get-out The idiom "be as (something) as all get-out" is an informal expression used to emphasize the intensity or extremeness of a particular quality or characteristic. It is often used to convey that someone or something possesses a specific trait to an exceptional or extraordinary degree.
  • be as (something) as they come The idiom "be as (something) as they come" is used to describe someone who possesses a particular trait or quality to an extreme or exceptional degree. It implies that the person is the epitome of that characteristic, exhibiting it more than anyone else. It can be used in a positive or negative sense, depending on the adjective used. For example, "He is as smart as they come" means that he is exceptionally intelligent, while "She is as stubborn as they come" indicates an extreme level of stubbornness.
  • be as dull as dishwater The idiom "be as dull as dishwater" means to be extremely boring, uninteresting, or lacking in excitement or liveliness. It suggests that something or someone is utterly dull or monotonous, similar to the unremarkable nature of dishwater that lacks any sparkle or appeal.
  • be as good as gone The idiom "be as good as gone" means that something or someone is very likely to leave, be lost, or become unavailable soon. It implies a high probability or certainty of an imminent departure or disappearance.
  • be as happy as a sandboy The idiom "be as happy as a sandboy" means to be extremely content, joyful, or carefree. It implies a state of blissful happiness or perfect satisfaction, often attributed to a person who is completely at ease or delighted with their current circumstances. The phrase originates from the notion that a sandboy, who used to sell sand to pubs in old England, would be cheerful and merry due to the profits made from his business.
  • be as happy as Larry The idiom "be as happy as Larry" means to be extremely happy or contented. It is often used to describe someone who is incredibly pleased or satisfied with their current situation or state of mind. The origin of this phrase is uncertain, with several theories being proposed. One prevailing theory suggests that it may be derived from a New Zealand boxer named Larry Foley, who was known for his upbeat demeanor and jovial nature.
  • list as long as (one's) arm The idiom "list as long as (one's) arm" refers to a list that is extremely lengthy, often implying that it contains numerous tasks or items. It emphasizes the idea that the list is so extensive that it could stretch as long as one's arm when written down.
  • long as your arm The idiom "long as your arm" is used to describe something that is very long or extensive, often referring to a list, a problem, or a set of tasks. It implies that the subject is extensive and requires a lot of time, effort, or attention to complete or deal with.
  • as if the sun shines out (someone's) backside The idiom "as if the sun shines out (someone's) backside" is used to express that someone behaves or is treated as if they are extraordinary or exceptional, often in an exaggerated or excessive manner. It implies that the person is considered to be overly important or held in high regard beyond what is reasonable.
  • as artful (or clever) as a wagonload (or cartload) of monkeys The idiom "as artful (or clever) as a wagonload (or cartload) of monkeys" is a figurative expression used to describe someone or something that is very sly, mischievous, or misbehaved. It implies that the person or thing possesses a high degree of cunning or trickery, often in a chaotic or unpredictable manner, similar to a large group of monkeys causing havoc in a wagon or cart.
  • (as) (a)like as (two) peas in a pod The idiom "(as) (a)like as (two) peas in a pod" is used to describe two or more people who look very similar or share extremely similar characteristics, habits, or interests. It implies that the individuals in question are almost indistinguishable from each other, just like peas that are found in the same pod, which are nearly identical in size, color, and shape.
  • (as) awkward as a cow on a crutch The idiom "(as) awkward as a cow on a crutch" is an exaggerated way of describing someone or something that is incredibly clumsy, uncoordinated, or inept in their actions or movements. It implies a lack of grace or ability, comparing the exaggerated awkwardness to the image of a cow trying to walk on a crutch, which is inherently unstable and unnatural for them.
  • (as) baleful as death The idiom "(as) baleful as death" refers to someone or something that is extremely threatening, harmful, or causing feelings of dread or foreboding, similar to the way death itself is often seen as an ominous and feared concept.
  • (as) black as (one) is painted The idiom "(as) black as (one) is painted" is used to describe someone who is portrayed or regarded as thoroughly evil, wicked, or malicious. It implies that the person's actions or character are perceived as extremely negative or morally corrupt. The idiom often emphasizes the perception or reputation rather than the actual behavior of the individual.
  • (as) black as (one's) hat The idiom "(as) black as (one's) hat" means having a very dark complexion or color. It is often used to describe something or someone that is extremely dark or evil in nature or appearance.
  • (as) black as a raven The idiom "(as) black as a raven" refers to something that is very dark or completely black in color. It implies the absence of light or brightness, comparing the darkness to the black feathers of a raven, a bird known for its sleek black plumage.
  • (as) black as a raven's feather The idiom "(as) black as a raven's feather" means extremely black, referring to the dark and glossy color of a raven's plumage.
  • (as) black as a raven's wing The idiom "(as) black as a raven's wing" refers to something that is exceptionally dark or black in color. It evokes the image of a raven's feathers, which are commonly associated with being shiny and pitch black, emphasizing the intensity of the darkness being described.
  • (as) black as a skillet The idiom "as black as a skillet" means extremely dark or pitch black, often used to describe a very dark color or a place or object lacking in light. It draws a comparison between the deep black color of a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet and something being very dark or lacking brightness.
  • (as) black as ink The idiom "(as) black as ink" is used to describe something or someone that is very dark in color or appearance. It references the intense darkness and richness of black ink, which is often associated with opacity, depth, or gloom.
  • (as) black as Newgate's knocker The idiom "(as) black as Newgate's knocker" means extremely dark or pitch black in color. It is often used to describe something that lacks light or is devoid of brightness. The term "Newgate's knocker" refers to the door knocker on the infamous Newgate Prison in London, which was known for its association with darkness, gloom, and criminal activities. Therefore, the idiom implies a deep level of darkness or opacity.
  • (as) black as the devil The idiom "(as) black as the devil" refers to something or someone that is extremely dark or gloomy in color. It can also imply a sense of wickedness, evil, or malevolence.
  • (as) black as the minister's coat The idiom "(as) black as the minister's coat" is used to describe something that is extremely black or dark in color. It implies that the object being referred to is very dark, similar to the blackness of a minister's (or a clergyman's) coat, which is traditionally black.
  • (as) black as thunder The idiom "(as) black as thunder" is used to describe something that is very dark or gloomy in appearance. It often refers to a person's mood or demeanor, suggesting that they are angry, brooding, or in a state of intense displeasure.
  • (as) bright as a new pin The idiom "bright as a new pin" means someone or something is extremely clean, tidy, or well-presented. It refers to the appearance of a newly manufactured pin, which is shiny and free from any faults or imperfections. It can be used to describe a person's appearance or the condition of an object.
  • (as) broad as a barn door The idiom "(as) broad as a barn door" is used to describe something or someone that is excessively wide or spacious. It implies that the subject being referred to has a significant or exaggerated size, often conveyed in a figurative sense.
  • (as) brown as a berry The idiom "(as) brown as a berry" refers to a person's or an object's deep tan or dark complexion, usually resulting from spending a significant amount of time under the sun. It indicates that the individual or item has a rich, intense, and attractive brown color.
  • (as) busy as a beaver (building a new dam) The idiom "(as) busy as a beaver (building a new dam)" means to be very busy, diligent, or industrious, often used to describe someone who is working tirelessly and energetically. It references the behavior of beavers, known for their tireless efforts in constructing dams, showcasing their industriousness and continuous hard work.
  • (as) busy as a hibernating bear
  • (as) clean as a hound's tooth The idiom "(as) clean as a hound's tooth" means extremely clean or spotless. It refers to the sharp, white teeth of a hound or hunting dog, which are typically clean and free of stains or dirt. The phrase is used to describe something that is perfectly clean.
  • (as) clear as crystal The idiom "clear as crystal" means something that is extremely clear, obvious, and easily understandable. It suggests that the subject or situation is transparent and free from any ambiguity or confusion.
  • (as) close as two coats of paint The idiom "(as) close as two coats of paint" means something or someone being very similar or almost identical in appearance, often used to describe physical resemblance. It implies that the difference between the two is minimal, just like the difference in appearance between two layers of paint applied on a surface.
  • (as) cocky as the king of spades The idiom "(as) cocky as the king of spades" refers to someone who is excessively confident, self-assured, or arrogant. It implies that the person in question has an inflated sense of their own importance or abilities, similar to how a king of spades, as the highest-ranking card in a deck of playing cards, may exhibit an overly confident demeanor.
  • (as) cold as a welldigger's ass (in January) The idiom "(as) cold as a welldigger's ass (in January)" is a colorful way of describing extremely cold weather or a very low temperature. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to is so cold that it compares to the frigid conditions a welldigger would experience during the winter month of January.
  • (as) conceited as a barber's cat The idiom "(as) conceited as a barber's cat" is used to describe someone who is excessively proud, self-centered, or arrogant. It refers to a barber's cat, which is believed to be so pampered and spoiled that it becomes overly proud and haughty. The idiom highlights the idea of someone being conceited and having an inflated ego.
  • (as) crooked as a barrel of fish hooks The idiom "(as) crooked as a barrel of fish hooks" is used to describe someone or something that is very deceitful, dishonest, or corrupt. It suggests that the subject being referred to is extremely crooked, much like a barrel full of fish hooks that are all tangled and twisted together.
  • (as) cross as a bear The idiom "(as) cross as a bear" is used to describe someone who is very angry, irritated, or in a bad mood. It suggests a level of frustration or annoyance similar to that of an angry bear.
  • (as) cross as a bear with a sore head The idiom "(as) cross as a bear with a sore head" means to be extremely angry, irritated, or in a bad mood. It suggests a level of irritability and grumpiness similar to that of a bear with a headache.
  • (as) cute as a bug's ear The idiom "(as) cute as a bug's ear" is used to describe something or someone as extremely cute or endearing. It implies that the object of description is incredibly adorable, charming, or appealing, just like a bug's ear might be considered tiny and adorable.
  • (as) dead as a dodo The idiom "(as) dead as a dodo" means to be completely and irrevocably extinct or obsolete. The dodo was a flightless bird that lived on the island of Mauritius but became extinct in the late 17th century due to human intervention, making it a symbol of extinction and obsolescence.
  • (as) dry as dust The idiom "(as) dry as dust" is used to describe something that is extremely dull, boring, or lacking any interesting or engaging qualities. It refers to a situation, person, or topic that is uninteresting, lackluster, and devoid of any liveliness or excitement. The phrase "dry as dust" emphasizes the idea of being devoid of moisture and therefore unstimulating or uninspiring.
  • (as) exciting as watching paint dry The idiom "(as) exciting as watching paint dry" refers to something that is extremely dull, boring, or uninteresting. It implies that the activity or event being referred to lacks any form of excitement, entertainment, or stimulation.
  • (as) fast as lightning The idiom "(as) fast as lightning" is used to describe something or someone that moves or acts extremely quickly. It implies high speed and immediacy, comparing the speed to that of lightning, which is known for its incredible swiftness.
  • (as) flat as a strap The idiom "(as) flat as a strap" typically refers to something that is completely flat or lacking shape, form, or depth. It suggests that there are no curves, bulges, or unevenness, likening the object or surface to a strap that is stretched out and devoid of any protrusion or irregularity.
  • (as) good as new The idiom "(as) good as new" means that something has been restored, repaired, or rejuvenated to its original state or condition, usually after being damaged or worn out. It implies that the item or person is now in excellent or near-perfect condition.
  • (as) mad as a wet hen The idiom "mad as a wet hen" is used to describe someone who is extremely angry or upset. The phrase derives from the behavior of a hen that has been drenched with water, as it tends to become extremely agitated and distressed.
  • (as) neat as ninepence The idiom "(as) neat as ninepence" means to be extremely tidy, well-organized, or in perfect order. It suggests that something or someone is very neat and presentable, leaving no room for messiness or disarray.
  • (as) plain as the nose on (one's) face The idiom "(as) plain as the nose on (one's) face" means that something is very obvious or easily observable, just like the nose on a person's face is distinctive and cannot be easily overlooked. It implies that the situation or fact is so clear and evident that it cannot be denied or ignored.
  • (as) quick as a bunny The idiom "quick as a bunny" is used to describe someone or something that is very fast, agile, or responsive. It implies that the action being performed is done swiftly and without delay, just like the rapid movements of a bunny.
  • (as) quick as a wink The idiom "(as) quick as a wink" means to do something very fast or to happen suddenly and rapidly. It refers to the speed and swiftness with which an action or event occurs.
  • (as) quick as lightning The idiom "(as) quick as lightning" is used to describe someone or something that moves or acts very rapidly or abruptly. It signifies exceptional speed and agility, comparing the speed of lightning, which is known to be incredibly fast and swift.
  • (as) quiet as the grave The idiom "(as) quiet as the grave" means to be extremely silent or completely quiet. It is often used to describe a setting or situation where there is no noise or disturbance whatsoever, resembling the silence and stillness of a graveyard or burial site.
  • (as) rare as hens' teeth The idiom "(as) rare as hens' teeth" is used to describe something that is exceedingly rare or scarce, emphasizing the rarity by comparing it to the fact that hens do not have teeth. It suggests that something is extremely hard to find or almost never occurs.
  • (as) rare as rocking horse crap The idiom "(as) rare as rocking horse crap" is a humorous and exaggerated expression used to describe something extremely uncommon or non-existent. It indicates that the object or situation referred to is exceedingly rare, akin to an imaginary occurrence as rocking horses do not produce feces.
  • (as) rare as rocking horse poo
  • (as) rare as rocking horse shit "(As) rare as rocking horse shit" is an idiomatic expression used to emphasize the extreme scarcity or rarity of something. It implies that the thing being referred to is exceptionally uncommon or almost non-existent. The idiom draws humor from the absurdity of the comparison, as rocking horse feces (similar to unicorn droppings) do not exist in reality.
  • (as) right as a trivet The idiom "(as) right as a trivet" is an expression used to describe someone or something that is in perfect condition or functioning perfectly. It implies that everything is alright or satisfactory, without any issues or faults. The term "trivet" refers to a metal stand traditionally used for placing hot pots or pans so that they do not damage the surface underneath. As trivets are often sturdy, stable, and designed to withstand high temperatures, being "as right as a trivet" suggests being robust and free of any problems.
  • (as) right as ninepence The idiom "(as) right as ninepence" is used to describe someone or something that is in perfect order or condition. It suggests that everything is tidy, proper, or well-organized. The origin of this phrase is unclear, but it is believed to have originated in British English.
  • (as) round as Giotto's O The idiom "(as) round as Giotto's O" means being perfectly spherical or round-shaped. It refers to Giotto di Bondone, an Italian painter known for his accurate and naturalistic portrayal of forms, particularly his ability to create perfectly round circles. So, when something is described as "(as) round as Giotto's O," it implies that it is flawlessly circular.
  • (as) scarce as hens' teeth The idiom "(as) scarce as hens' teeth" means something that is extremely rare or hard to find, almost nonexistent.
  • (as) silent as the dead The expression "(as) silent as the dead" is an idiom that refers to absolute silence or complete stillness. It suggests that something or someone is extremely quiet, to the point of being comparable to the silence of the deceased.
  • (as) silent as the grave The idiom "(as) silent as the grave" means extremely quiet or completely silent, like the absence of sound or noise. It suggests a state of complete stillness and silence, often used to describe a place or situation where there is no activity or sound whatsoever. The phrase draws upon the notion that a grave is a silent place where there is no noise or commotion.
  • (as) slow as molasses The idiom "(as) slow as molasses" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely slow or sluggish. It is often used to emphasize how slow a person or thing is in comparison to others, emphasizing a lack of speed or efficiency.
  • (as) slow as molasses in January The idiom "slow as molasses in January" means extremely slow or sluggish. It refers to the slow movement of molasses during the cold months of January, as it thickens and moves at a significantly slower pace than usual.
  • (as) smooth as a baby's bottom The idiom "(as) smooth as a baby's bottom" is used to describe something that is exceptionally smooth, without any roughness or imperfections. It implies a high level of smoothness and softness, similar to the delicate and flawless skin of a baby's bottom.
  • (as) smooth as silk The idiom "(as) smooth as silk" means that something is extremely smooth, sleek, or polished, often referring to movements, surfaces, textures, or processes that are devoid of any effort, obstacles, or roughness. It is commonly used to describe things that are exceptionally well-executed, efficient, or flawless in nature.
  • (as) sure as a gun The idiom "(as) sure as a gun" means that something is absolutely certain or guaranteed to happen. It emphasizes the unwavering or undeniable nature of a situation or event, similar to the reliability and power of a firearm.
  • (as) sure as shooting The idiom "(as) sure as shooting" means that something is absolutely certain, guaranteed, or bound to happen. It is often used when expressing confidence or certainty about a situation or outcome. The phrase originates from the reliance and inevitability of shooting, which was traditionally associated with accuracy and predictability.
  • (as) thick as a brick The idiom "(as) thick as a brick" is used to describe someone who is very unintelligent or dense. It suggests that the person lacks basic understanding or reasoning skills, similar to a brick being thick and lacking cognitive abilities.
  • (as) thick as a shit The idiom "(as) thick as a shit" is a vulgar expression typically used to describe someone who is extremely unintelligent, dense, or lacking in common sense. It implies that the person is as intellectually dense as fecal matter, emphasizing their lack of intelligence or awareness.
  • (as) thick as a short plank The idiom "(as) thick as a short plank" is typically used to describe someone who is extremely unintelligent, foolish, or lacking common sense. It implies that the person's intellect is comparable to that of a short piece of wood, which is significantly thicker than a regular plank.
  • (as) thin as a rail The idiom "(as) thin as a rail" means to be extremely thin or skinny. It describes someone or something that lacks substantial weight or body mass.
  • (as) thin as a rake The idiom "(as) thin as a rake" means extremely thin or gaunt, suggesting that the person or object being referred to is very skinny or slender.
  • (as) thin as a stick The idiom "(as) thin as a stick" refers to someone or something that is extremely thin or slender in appearance. It implies that the person or object being described lacks bulk or substance, being very frail or gaunt.
  • (I) can't say as I do(, can't say as I don't) The idiom "(I) can't say as I do (can't say as I don't)" typically means that a person cannot speak with certainty or make a judgment because they have conflicting or uncertain opinions or experiences regarding the subject being discussed. It emphasizes the absence of a firm stance or clear perspective.
  • (it's) just as well (that) (something happened) The idiom "(it's) just as well (that) (something happened)" means that a particular event or outcome turned out to be beneficial or fortunate, even though it may not have been what was originally desired or planned. It implies that the alternative could have been worse or less desirable. It highlights the idea that the eventual result is satisfactory or advantageous under the circumstances.
  • a face as long as a fiddle The idiom "a face as long as a fiddle" is typically used to describe someone who looks sad, disappointed, or dejected. It implies that the person's expression is so long and downcast that it resembles the elongated shape of a fiddle.
  • accept as The idiom "accept as" typically means to acknowledge or to agree to something, especially a proposal, suggestion, or idea, willingly and without hesitations or reservations. It implies accepting or embracing a proposition or concept as valid, real, or truthful, without any doubt or argument.
  • acknowledge as The idiom "acknowledge as" means to recognize or accept someone or something as a specific thing or in a particular way. It implies affirming or admitting the existence, truth, or importance of a person, thing, or idea.
  • address as The idiom "address as" typically means to refer to or call someone by a specific title, name, or a particular designation indicating their position or status.
  • adopt as The idiom "adopt as" means to choose or take someone or something as one's own, often implying a sense of acceptance, support, or inclusion. It can refer to formally taking on parental responsibilities for a child, or more generally, embracing a person, idea, or concept as part of one's own life or beliefs.
  • alike as peas in a pod The idiom "alike as peas in a pod" means that two or more people or things are extremely similar, closely resembling each other in appearance, behavior, or characteristics. It implies a strong resemblance or similarity between the individuals or things being referred to.
  • alike as two peas in a pod The idiom "alike as two peas in a pod" is used to describe two or more people or things that are extremely similar in appearance, behavior, or characteristics. It signifies a close resemblance or likeness between them.
  • also known as The idiom "also known as" is used to introduce an alternate or additional name for a person, place, or thing. It is often used when referring to someone or something that is known by multiple names or aliases.
  • ancient as the hills The idiom "ancient as the hills" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely old or has been around for a very long time. It implies that the object or person in question is as old as the hills, which symbolize timeless, enduring, and ancient formations.
  • as (one) pleases The idiom "as (one) pleases" means to do things according to one's own desires, preferences, or wishes, without consideration of others' opinions or rules. It suggests having the freedom to act in a manner that brings personal satisfaction or pleasure, disregarding any external constraints.
  • as (something) as they come The idiom "as (something) as they come" is used to describe someone or something that perfectly embodies a particular quality, trait, or characteristic. It implies that the person or thing referred to is the epitome or representation of that specific attribute.
  • as a dog returns to his vomit, so a fool repeats his folly The idiom "as a dog returns to his vomit, so a fool repeats his folly" is a biblical proverb originating from the Book of Proverbs, specifically Proverbs 26:11. It metaphorically implies that just as a dog repeats the undesirable and revolting behavior of consuming its vomit, a fool tends to repeat their foolish actions or mistakes despite knowing better. It emphasizes the tendency of some individuals to repeat their errors or engage in self-destructive behaviors, often disregarding the negative consequences.
  • as a matter of form The idiom "as a matter of form" refers to something done out of necessity, obligation or to fulfill a requirement, without much meaning or significance attached to it. It suggests that an action is performed merely as a customary or formal procedure, without real intention or importance.
  • as a pig loves marjoram The idiom "as a pig loves marjoram" is used to describe someone's intense and passionate love or enjoyment for something. It implies that the person's affection or fondness is comparable to how much a pig supposedly loves marjoram, which is an aromatic herb. The phrase can also suggest that the person's preference or attachment to something is unusual or unexpected.
  • as a result "As a result" is an idiomatic phrase used to indicate the consequence or outcome of a particular action or event. It suggests that something occurred or happened due to a prior action, event, or situation.
  • as a result of (something) The idiom "as a result of (something)" is used to indicate that something is happening or has happened because of a particular cause or event. It signifies a cause-and-effect relationship, highlighting the consequence or outcome of a preceding action or condition.
  • as a side note Definition: As a side note is an expression used to introduce an additional, relevant, or interesting piece of information that is not the main focus of the current topic of discussion. It is often used to provide additional context or clarification, but is not essential to the main point of the conversation.
  • as a token The idiom "as a token" means to represent or symbolize something, usually given as a sign of appreciation, gratitude, or friendship.
  • as a token of (something) The idiom "as a token of (something)" means to give or present something as a symbol or gesture to demonstrate a feeling, intention, or appreciation. It is often used to show gratitude, friendship, or goodwill towards someone. The token represents the sentiment or purpose behind the action.
  • as alike as peas in a pod The idiom "as alike as peas in a pod" means that two or more things or people are extremely similar in appearance, behavior, or characteristics. It implies that there is very little or no noticeable difference between them, just like peas in a pod look almost indistinguishable from each other.
  • as alike as two peas in a pod The idiom "as alike as two peas in a pod" means that two people or things are extremely similar or nearly identical in appearance, behavior, or characteristics. The phrase derives from the fact that peas in a pod are typically very similar in shape, size, and color.
  • as alike/like as peas in a pod The idiom "as alike/like as peas in a pod" means that two or more people or things are very similar or nearly identical in appearance, characteristics, or behavior. It emphasizes the strong resemblance or a close similarity between the subjects being compared.
  • as all getout The idiom "as all getout" is an informal expression that emphasizes the degree or extent of something. It is commonly used to convey extreme or excessive intensity, or to intensify the meaning or impact of a statement.
  • as artful as a wagonload of monkeys The idiom "as artful as a wagonload of monkeys" is an exaggerated and humorous way to describe someone who is extremely cunning, sly, or crafty. It implies that the person possesses a high level of cleverness or deceitfulness, similar to the mischievous and unpredictable behavior of a whole wagonload of monkeys.
  • as as all get out The definition of the idiom "as all get out" is an intensifier used to emphasize the extreme nature of something, usually in a positive or negative sense. It is often used to describe an action, event, or situation that is exceptionally intense, extreme, excessive, or remarkable.
  • as as the next man The idiom "as as the next man" is used to indicate that someone is typical or average in a particular aspect or quality. It implies that the person being referred to is no different or unique compared to others in a given situation or characteristic.
  • as as you please The phrase "as you please" is used to express a sense of indifference, allowing someone to do something in any manner they choose or prefer. It suggests that there are no restrictions or specific expectations regarding the person's actions or decisions.
  • as big as all outdoors The idiom "as big as all outdoors" means that something or someone is extremely large, vast, or expansive. It is often used to emphasize the immense size or magnitude of something.
  • as big as life The idiom "as big as life" means that something or someone appears or is presented in a way that is captivating, impressive, or larger than typical expectations. It is often used to express surprise, excitement, or admiration.
  • as bold as Beauchamp
  • as chance/luck would have it The idiom "as chance/luck would have it" is used to indicate that something happens by coincidence or by luck. It suggests that the outcome or occurrence was unexpected or unplanned.
  • as clear as vodka The idiom "as clear as vodka" means something that is very clear, transparent, and easy to understand, just like vodka that is colorless and transparent. It suggests that there is no confusion or ambiguity in the situation or explanation being referred to.
  • as clever, stupid, etc. as they come The idiom "as clever, stupid, etc. as they come" is used to describe someone who is exceptionally intelligent, foolish, or possessing a particular quality to a remarkable extent. It implies that the person in question is among the most intelligent, foolish, etc. in comparison to others.
  • as close as stink on shit "As close as stink on shit" is an informal and vulgar idiom used to emphasize the extreme closeness or inseparability of two things or individuals. It suggests that the connection or proximity between them is incredibly strong, unavoidable, or pervasive, similar to how the significant odor of feces (represented by "stink on shit") would remain in close contact and be difficult to separate.
  • as cold as charity The idiom "as cold as charity" means to be insincere, unfeeling, or lacking warmth and compassion in one's actions or demeanor, similar to the perception of charity work being impersonal or detached. It implies a lack of genuine concern or emotional connection.
  • as easy as ABC The idiom "as easy as ABC" means something that is very simple, straightforward, or uncomplicated, just like the alphabet itself.
  • as easy as winking The idiom "as easy as winking" means that something is extremely simple, effortless, or quick to accomplish. It conveys the idea that a task or action can be completed in the blink of an eye or with minimal effort.
  • as ever trod shoe-leather The idiom "as ever trod shoe-leather" means someone or something that is the most reliable, steadfast, or of the highest quality in their field or category. It implies that the individual or thing has a long-standing reputation or track record of excellence, making them a trusted and honored choice.
  • as far as (one) knows The idiom "as far as (one) knows" means according to the information or knowledge that someone currently possesses. It implies that the information could be limited or incomplete, and also conveys a sense of uncertainty.
  • as far as (something) goes The idiom "as far as (something) goes" means to the extent or extent of progress that has been made or accomplished in a particular matter or topic. It implies discussing or considering only that specific aspect or component and not expanding beyond it.
  • as far as in me lies The idiom "as far as in me lies" means doing everything within one's power or ability to achieve a particular goal or fulfill a responsibility. It implies making every effort or taking every possible action to accomplish something.
  • as far as that goes The idiom "as far as that goes" is usually used to acknowledge or discuss a specific aspect or topic within a larger context. It implies that the mentioned aspect is significant in its own right, but its importance or relevance may be limited or inconsequential when compared to other factors.
  • as fat as a beached whale The idiom "as fat as a beached whale" is a figurative phrase used to describe someone who is extremely overweight or obese. It implies an excessive amount of body fat, comparing the person's size to that of a stranded whale on a beach.
  • as fresh as a daisy The idiom "as fresh as a daisy" is used to describe someone or something that is lively, energetic, and full of energy. It conveys the idea of feeling rejuvenated or revitalized, as if one is as lively and fresh as a newly bloomed daisy.
  • as from The idiom "as from" means starting or beginning from a particular point in time or situation. It implies a change or shift that occurs from that specific moment onward.
  • as fuck The idiom "as fuck" is an intensifier used to emphasize or exaggerate the degree or extent of something. It is generally added after an adjective, adverb, or noun to emphasize its intensity, often in an informal or colloquial context.
  • as game as Ned Kelly The idiom "as game as Ned Kelly" means to be incredibly fearless, brave, or determined in the face of adversity. It refers to Ned Kelly, an infamous Australian bushranger (outlaw) of the 19th century who defied the authorities and fought against them until his capture. The idiom is often used to describe someone who exhibits unwavering courage and resilience.
  • as gay as pink ink
  • as good as (one's) word The idiom "as good as (one's) word" means that a person is reliable and can be trusted to fulfill their promises or commitments. It suggests that the person's word is equivalent to a guarantee or assurance that they will follow through with their stated intentions.
  • as good as gold The idiom "as good as gold" means to be very well-behaved, obedient, or reliable. It refers to someone or something that is trustworthy, dependable, or exhibits exemplary behavior.
  • as good as it gets The idiom "as good as it gets" is used to describe a situation when something is at its absolute best or optimal state, implying that it cannot be improved further. It suggests that the current condition or outcome is as favorable or perfect as it can possibly be, leaving no room for betterment.
  • as good, well, etc. as the next person The idiom "as good, well, etc. as the next person" means to be just as skilled, capable, or knowledgeable as anyone else in a particular area or aspect. It implies being at an average or similar level without any exceptional qualities or abilities.
  • as hot as highway blacktop The idiom "as hot as highway blacktop" refers to something that is extremely hot, often used to describe scorching temperatures or intense heat. This comparison alludes to the heat generated by asphalt or blacktop roads on a hot day, which can become extremely hot and uncomfortable to touch.
  • as I expected The idiom "as I expected" means that the outcome or situation is exactly what was anticipated or predicted beforehand. It indicates that the results align with the person's prior knowledge or foresight.
  • as if (one) owns the place The idiom "as if (one) owns the place" means behaving with a sense of complete confidence, authority, or entitlement, as if one were the owner or in complete control of a certain location or situation. It implies that the person behaves as if they have the right to act without any consideration for others or any regard for the rules or norms of the particular environment.
  • as if (one's) life depends on it The definition of the idiom "as if (one's) life depends on it" means to put forth an extremely intense or desperate effort to achieve something. It conveys the sense of treating a situation or task as if one's entire existence or survival depends on it. It implies giving everything one has, exhibiting determination, and working with utmost urgency and dedication.
  • as if someone owns the place The idiom "as if someone owns the place" means behaving in a confident and assertive manner, as if one has complete control or authority over a particular situation, location, or group of people. It implies a level of dominance, entitlement, or familiarity that disregards any potential resistance or opposition.
  • as if that were not enough The idiom "as if that were not enough" is used to emphasize that something additional or surprising has happened or is about to be mentioned, despite there already being a considerable or overwhelming amount or situation. It indicates that the existing situation is already problematic, challenging, or abundant, and the new addition or event makes it even more so.
  • as if there was no tomorrow The idiom "as if there was no tomorrow" means doing something with an excessive or uncontrolled amount of energy, enthusiasm, urgency, or recklessness, as if one had no concerns about the consequences or limits of their actions. It implies a sense of urgency, as if time is running out or one is driven by a relentless desire to make the most of the present moment.
  • as if there was/were no tomorrow The idiom "as if there was/were no tomorrow" means to do something with extreme or excessive enthusiasm, urgency, or intensity, as if there will be no more opportunities or consequences in the future. It suggests acting without restraint and without considering the potential consequences or limitations of one's actions.
  • as if there's no tomorrow The idiom "as if there's no tomorrow" means doing something with an extreme sense of urgency, enthusiasm, or recklessness as if one will not have another opportunity to do it again in the future. It implies acting with an intense passion or gusto, often motivated by the belief that time is limited or that there are no consequences to worry about.
  • as if you own the place The idiom "as if you own the place" is used to describe someone who behaves confidently and assertively in a certain setting, as if they have complete authority or ownership over it, even if that may not be the case. This expression is often used to convey a sense of entitlement, dominance, or self-assuredness in a particular environment.
  • as it happens The idiom "as it happens" is commonly used to indicate that something is occurring or unfolding at a particular moment or time, often unexpectedly or coincidentally. It implies an immediate or real-time connection to an ongoing event or situation.
  • as it just so happens The idiom "as it just so happens" means that something is coincidentally or unexpectedly occurring or happening.
  • as it/things turned out The idiom "as it/things turned out" means the actual result or outcome of a situation, often contrasting with what was expected or predicted. It refers to the way events or circumstances unfolded in reality, emphasizing the element of surprise, irony, or unexpectedness.
  • as jober as a sudge
  • as luck may have it The idiom "as luck may have it" means that something occurred purely due to chance or coincidence. It implies that the outcome was not planned or expected but rather happened by luck or happenstance.
  • as many as The idiom "as many as" is used to compare two quantities or amounts, indicating that a particular number is the maximum or upper limit. It implies that there could be fewer, but not more than the mentioned number. This idiom is often used when presenting a range or estimating a number without providing an exact figure.
  • as much as somebody can/could do to do something The idiom "as much as somebody can/could do to do something" means that someone is struggling or finding it extremely difficult to accomplish a specific task or action, implying that they are pushing their limits or capabilities to their maximum extent in the given situation.
  • as much as the traffic will bear The idiom "as much as the traffic will bear" refers to charging the highest possible price for a product or service, based on the demand in the market or the willingness of consumers to pay. It suggests maximizing profits by pushing prices to their limit, without crossing the threshold of consumer resistance.
  • as much chance as a wax cat in hell The idiom "as much chance as a wax cat in hell" means having absolutely no chance of success or survival in a particular situation. It implies that the chances are extremely slim or non-existent, comparing the possibility to something that would quickly melt or be destroyed in a completely unsuitable or adverse environment like a fiery hell.
  • as near as dammit The definition of the idiom "as near as dammit" is "very close or almost accurate; approximately." It is often used to suggest that something is almost perfect or nearly meets a specific standard or expectation.
  • as of now The idiom "as of now" means at the present moment or from this point forward. It refers to the current time or the starting point of something.
  • as of right The idiom "as of right" refers to something that is automatically or by default entitled or deserved. It suggests that the person or entity has a legitimate claim or privilege without any additional conditions or requirements.
  • as one The idiom "as one" means collectively or unitedly. It describes a situation in which multiple individuals or entities come together, work harmoniously, or act in unison towards a common goal or purpose.
  • as opposed to The idiom "as opposed to" is used to contrast two things or ideas that are different or opposite from each other. It often highlights a comparison between two alternatives or alternatives that are being considered.
  • as per The idiom "as per" is used to indicate that something is being done or followed according to a specific instruction, request, or agreement. It means "according to" or "in accordance with."
  • as per something The idiom "as per something" is used to indicate that something is being done in accordance with a particular standard, instruction, or directive. It indicates that the actions or details mentioned are in exact accordance with the specified requirement or expectation.
  • as phony as a three-dollar bill The idiom "as phony as a three-dollar bill" means something or someone that is inauthentic, fake, or counterfeit. It suggests that the subject in question lacks genuineness or credibility, much like a non-existent three-dollar bill, which does not exist as a denomination in US currency.
  • as queer as a three-dollar bill The idiom "as queer as a three-dollar bill" refers to someone or something that is strange, unusual, or suspicious. It implies that the person or object being described is eccentric, out of the ordinary, or possibly deceitful. The idiom often carries a connotation of homosexuality, as the word "queer" can be used as a derogatory term for non-heterosexual individuals. However, it's crucial to note that the idiom is considered offensive and derogatory towards the LGBTQ+ community, reinforcing negative stereotypes.
  • as quickly, much, soon, etc. as possible The idiom "as quickly, much, soon, etc. as possible" is used to express the urgency or importance of doing something in the fastest, highest degree or earliest way achievable. It indicates the desire to complete a task or respond promptly without delay. The phrase emphasizes the need for immediate action or completion.
  • as sin The idiom "as sin" is used to intensify the qualities or characteristics of something, indicating that they are extremely strong, intense, or excessive. It implies a negative or undesirable quality being emphasized.
  • as sober as a judge The idiom "as sober as a judge" means to be completely sober and not under the influence of alcohol or any other substances. It refers to judges, who are expected to be rational, reasonable, and impartial in their judgment and decision-making.
  • as the day is long The idiom "as the day is long" refers to something that is long-lasting or enduring, usually used to emphasize the extent, intensity, or duration of something. It implies that the mentioned quality remains constant throughout the entire day or period of time.
  • as the next girl The idiom "as the next girl" is used to indicate that someone possesses typical or average qualities, preferences, or behaviors that are common to most people. It suggests that the person being referred to is not particularly unique or exceptional in any way.
  • as the next guy The idiom "as the next guy" is used to indicate that someone shares common feelings, desires, or opinions with others, as they are no different or unique in that regard. It implies that the person being referred to is just as typical or ordinary as anyone else in a particular situation or circumstance.
  • as the next person The idiom "as the next person" is typically used to indicate that one feels or experiences something to the same extent as others. It implies that one's feelings or preferences are in line with the majority, emphasizing their commonality with others in a particular context.
  • as the spirit moves (one) The idiom "as the spirit moves (one)" refers to acting or doing something based on one's current feelings, emotions, or inclinations rather than following a predetermined plan or schedule. It implies acting spontaneously or according to one's intuition or inspiration at a particular moment.
  • as the white on rice The idiom "as the white on rice" is used to describe something or someone that is closely followed, observed, or monitored with great attention and intensity. It indicates a strong and constant presence, indicating that nothing can be hidden or separated from the thing or person being referred to. It is often used to emphasize how closely connected or attached someone or something is to another.
  • as the wind blows The idiomatic expression "as the wind blows" means to act or behave in an unpredictable or ever-changing manner, often guided by external circumstances or influences. It implies being flexible, adaptable, or going along with whatever situation arises, without a fixed plan or direction.
  • as they say The idiom "as they say" is commonly used to introduce a popular saying or cliche expression that is widely known or accepted. It indicates that the following statement or phrase is a common or widely circulated saying. It can also be used when one wants to attribute a commonly held belief or opinion to a group of people, without specifying who these people are.
  • as things, people, etc. go The idiom "as things, people, etc. go" typically means according to the way things or people are generally expected or judged. It is used to compare or assess the typical or average quality, characteristics, or conditions of something or someone.
  • as tight as a tick The idiom "as tight as a tick" typically refers to something or someone that is extremely secure, firmly fixed, or tightly closed.
  • as to be
  • as ugly as sin The idiom "as ugly as sin" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely unattractive, displeasing, or repulsive in appearance. It emphasizes the strong negative aesthetic quality or lack of appeal in an exaggerated manner.
  • as we know it The idiom "as we know it" is used to emphasize a significant change or potential loss of something familiar or expected. It implies that the current situation or state of affairs could be drastically altered in a way that people might not recognize or be accustomed to.
  • as you know The idiom "as you know" is used to preface a statement and implies that the speaker assumes the listener already possesses the knowledge or information being mentioned. It signifies that the information being shared is commonly known or understood by the listener.
  • as you please The idiom "as you please" means that someone is giving someone else complete freedom or permission to do something in any way they desire or prefer. It suggests that the person has the ability to make their own choices without any interference or objections.
  • as you wish The idiom "as you wish" means that the speaker is willing to comply with or fulfill the desires, requests, or instructions of the other person, showing a willingness to do whatever they want or desire without objection. It is often used to express agreement, deference, or a willingness to please.
  • as/if/when the spirit moves you The idiom "as/if/when the spirit moves you" means to do something or take action only when you feel inspired, motivated, or inclined to do so. It implies that the decision or action is based solely on one's personal emotions, impulses, or desires rather than external pressures or obligations.
  • as/so far as... The idiom "as/so far as..." is a way to express the extent or degree to which something is true or applies. It is used to indicate a limit or boundary of something being discussed.
  • awkward as a cow on a crutch The idiom "awkward as a cow on a crutch" is an expression used to describe someone or something that is extremely clumsy, uncoordinated, or inept. It highlights a situation or person's lack of grace or skill, emphasizing their inability to navigate or perform tasks smoothly and effortlessly.
  • bald as a coot The idiom "bald as a coot" is used to describe someone who is completely bald or has a very minimal amount of hair. It derives from the appearance of the coot bird, which has a distinctive white featherless patch on its forehead and top of the head, giving the impression of baldness. Therefore, the phrase is often used humorously to describe someone who lacks hair on their head.
  • be (as) clean as a new pin The idiom "be (as) clean as a new pin" means to be extremely clean or tidy. It suggests that something or someone is in a pristine and spotless condition, similar to a brand new pin or sharp sewing needle.
  • be (as) green as a gooseberry The idiom "be (as) green as a gooseberry" means to be naive, inexperienced, or lacking in maturity or knowledge. Just like a green, unripe gooseberry, a person described as "green" is seen as youthful, naive, and not yet fully developed.
  • be (as) happy as a clam (at high tide) The idiom "be (as) happy as a clam (at high tide)" means to be extremely happy or contented. It originated from the longer phrase "happy as a clam at high water" where the high tide is the clam's safe and undisturbed state. Since clams are often harvested during low tide, when the tide is high, they are well protected and therefore supposedly happy.
  • be (as) tough as nails The idiom "be (as) tough as nails" means to be very strong and resilient, both physically and emotionally. It refers to someone who can endure difficult situations or overcome challenges without being easily affected or discouraged.
  • be as good as dead The idiom "be as good as dead" means to be in a dangerous or hopeless situation where death is inevitable or highly likely.
  • be as nothing to The idiom "be as nothing to" means that something or someone is insignificant or unimportant to another person. It implies that the person or thing has little or no impact, value, or relevance to the other party.
  • be as plain as the nose on (one's) face The idiom "be as plain as the nose on (one's) face" means that something is very obvious, clear, or easily noticed. This expression is often used to emphasize that someone should easily see or understand something due to its obvious nature.
  • be as well The idiom "be as well" means to be equally good or advantageous in a particular situation, often used as a way to suggest a possible alternative or course of action. It implies that there is no significant difference or preference between two options and that both would yield similar results or benefits.
  • be it as it may The idiom "be it as it may" is used to express acceptance or acknowledgement of a situation, even if one may disagree or have reservations about it. It suggests a willingness to go along with the circumstances, regardless of any personal opinions or preferences.
  • be like/as safe as Fort Knox The idiom "be like/as safe as Fort Knox" means to be extremely secure, well-guarded, or protected against any potential danger or theft. It refers to the high level of security and impenetrability associated with the United States Bullion Depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky, where a significant portion of the country's gold reserve is stored.
  • be mutton dressed as lamb The idiom "be mutton dressed as lamb" refers to a situation where someone, typically an older person, attempts to appear younger or more attractive than they actually are, usually through their clothing or style choices. It implies that the person's efforts are unsuccessful, and they end up looking foolish or inappropriate.
  • be not so much something as something The idiom "be not so much something as something" is used to express that someone or something is not accurately described as the first thing mentioned, but rather as the second thing. It implies that the second description is a more accurate or appropriate characterization.
  • be remembered as/for something The idiom "be remembered as/for something" means that someone or something will be primarily associated with or known for a particular action, quality, achievement, or characteristic. It implies that the person or thing will be enduringly or prominently remembered for that specific aspect or attribute.
  • be so bold as to The idiom "be so bold as to" means to have the audacity or courage to do or say something, especially when it may be considered impudent or inappropriate. It implies stepping out of one's comfort zone or disregarding social norms to assert oneself confidently.
  • be so bold as to do The definition of the idiom "be so bold as to do" is to have the audacity or courage to do something, often implying that the action may be considered impolite, disrespectful, or unusual in some way. It suggests a willingness to defy social norms or take risks.
  • be taken as read The idiom "be taken as read" means to be accepted without the need for further discussion or debate. It refers to assuming something as true or accurate without requiring additional proof or evidence.
  • black as night The idiom "black as night" refers to something that is extremely dark, lacking any light or brightness. It is often used to describe objects or situations that are completely devoid of light, color, or visibility.
  • black as one is painted The idiom "black as one is painted" means that someone is portrayed or regarded in a very negative or unfavorable manner. It suggests that the person's reputation or character is widely perceived as being extremely bad or wicked.
  • black as pitch The idiom "black as pitch" means to describe something or someone as extremely dark in color, often referring to complete darkness or the absence of light.
  • bold as brass The idiom "bold as brass" is used to describe someone who is confident, brazen, and unashamedly self-assured in their actions or behavior, often displaying a lack of respect or consideration for others.
  • bright as a button The idiom "bright as a button" is used to describe someone who is very intelligent, clever, or quick-witted. It suggests that the person has a sharp intellect and is mentally astute.
  • brown as a berry The idiom "brown as a berry" refers to someone who has a deeply and evenly tanned or sunburned skin. It is often used to describe someone who has spent a significant amount of time in the sun, resulting in a dark complexion.
  • busy as a bee The expression "busy as a bee" is an idiom that refers to being very industrious, productive, or overly occupied with numerous tasks or responsibilities. It implies that someone is working diligently, focused, and constantly engaged in activities, resembling the tireless nature of a bee.
  • cast (one) as (something) The idiom "cast (one) as (something)" means to represent or portray someone as a particular character or type, especially in a negative or stereotypical way. It often implies assigning certain characteristics, roles, or labels to someone, often unfairly or without their consent.
  • charge (something) off as (something) The idiom "charge (something) off as (something)" means to regard, classify, or categorize something as something else, typically without giving it proper consideration or thought. It implies hastily or carelessly dismissing or categorizing something without analyzing its true nature or value.
  • charge off as
  • cheap as chips The idiom "cheap as chips" means that something is very inexpensive or affordable. It is often used colloquially to describe a good value or a bargain. The phrase is derived from the fact that chips, in this context referring to French fries, are typically considered a cheap and common food item.
  • choose (one) as (something) The idiom "choose (one) as (something)" typically means selecting or picking someone for a particular role, position, or quality. It implies the act of consciously and deliberately opting for an individual with specific characteristics or abilities to fulfill a certain requirement or expectation.
  • choose as The idiom "choose as" typically means to select or designate someone or something for a particular purpose, role, or position. It implies the act of making a decision or picking an option out of various possibilities.
  • clean as a new pin The idiom "clean as a new pin" refers to something or someone that is extremely clean, neat, and well-organized, often to the point of perfection or faultlessness. It suggests a level of cleanliness and tidiness that is comparable to a brand new pin or needle.
  • clear as day The idiom "clear as day" means something that is very obvious or easy to understand.
  • clear as vodka The idiom "clear as vodka" means something that is very obvious, easily understood, and leaves no room for confusion or doubt. It implies that the situation or information is transparent and easily comprehensible, just like the transparency of vodka.
  • close as a clam The idiom "close as a clam" means being secretive, guarded, or unwilling to reveal one's thoughts or feelings. It is derived from the phrase "happy as a clam," as clams are often tightly closed, making it difficult to open them. Hence, the idiom implies being closed and uncommunicative.
  • close as stink on shit The idiom "close as stink on shit" is a colloquial expression used to emphasize a very close or tight connection between two people or things. It implies that the association or proximity is as inseparable as the strong and unpleasant odor of feces (similar to how odor sticks to it). It often denotes an unbreakable bond or an intimate relationship. However, it is essential to note that this expression contains vulgar language and should be used with caution in formal or polite settings.
  • close as the bark to the tree The idiom "close as the bark to the tree" refers to a relationship or bond between two individuals or things that is extremely strong, intense, or inseparable. It implies a connection that is as close and natural as the relationship between the bark and the tree trunk.
  • cocky as the king of spades The idiom "cocky as the king of spades" refers to someone who is overly confident, arrogant, or self-assured. It implies that a person considers themselves to be superior or holds an inflated sense of importance, similar to a person who sees themselves as the most dominant in a card deck, like the king of spades.
  • cold as ice The idiom "cold as ice" means to be emotionally detached, unsympathetic, or unfeeling. It typically describes a person who shows no warmth, kindness, or compassion in their behavior or interactions with others.
  • come as/be a revelation The idiom "come as a revelation" or "be a revelation" means to surprise or amaze someone, typically by presenting something new or unexpected, often in a positive way. It implies that the person or thing being referred to brings a fresh perspective or a different experience that is enlightening or eye-opening.
  • come on as (something) The idiom "come on as (something)" typically means to assume or take on a particular role, position, or attitude. It refers to someone or something presenting themselves or starting to function in a specific manner.
  • as clear (or sound) as a bell The idiom "as clear (or sound) as a bell" means something that is very clear, distinct, and easy to understand. It typically refers to information, instructions, or an explanation that is well-defined and easily comprehensible.
  • as for someone or something The idiom "as for someone or something" refers to expressing a viewpoint or opinion about a specific person or thing, usually after discussing or mentioning other matters. It implies a transition to addressing or focusing on the mentioned person or thing separately.
  • as near as dammit (or damn it) The idiom "as near as dammit" (or "damn it") is used to express that something or someone is very close or nearly accurate, although not exact. It implies that the difference or discrepancy is insignificant or negligible, emphasizing that the approximation is almost perfect.
  • as well (as somebody/something) The idiom "as well (as somebody/something)" is generally used to indicate that something or someone is in addition to another person or thing, or can perform a similar function. It emphasizes the idea of including or considering an extra element. It is often used to express similarity or equality.
  • as well as someone or something The idiom "as well as someone or something" means in addition to or together with someone or something else. It indicates that a person or thing is included along with another person or thing, and suggests equal importance or involvement.
  • weak as a baby The idiom "weak as a baby" means to be physically or mentally feeble, lacking strength, stamina, or vitality. It suggests a fragility or vulnerability akin to a newborn or very young child who is not yet fully developed or able to perform tasks independently.
  • every bit as good, bad, etc. The idiom "every bit as good, bad, etc." means that something is equal in quality, degree, or intensity to the thing being compared to. It emphasizes that there is no difference or discrepancy between the two things.
  • give somebody/something up as a bad job The definition of the idiom "give somebody/something up as a bad job" is to abandon or abandon hope in someone or something, usually due to a lack of success or progress. It implies accepting that the situation is not going to improve and deciding to move on or stop making efforts to achieve the desired outcome.
  • give something up as a bad job To "give something up as a bad job" means to abandon or stop pursuing a task or endeavor because it is proving to be unsuccessful, unproductive, or futile. It implies that despite one's efforts, the outcome or progress is not as desired or expected, leading to the decision to discontinue any further attempts.
  • give up (something) as a bad job The idiom "give up (something) as a bad job" means to abandon or cease trying to accomplish a particular task or achieve a desired outcome. It implies accepting that further efforts will likely be futile or not worth the time and energy invested.
  • not as bad, tall, etc. as all that The idiom "not as bad, tall, etc. as all that" is typically used to downplay or minimize the severity or exaggerated opinions about something or someone. It suggests that the situation or trait being discussed is not as extreme or negative as it may seem or as others believe it to be. It implies that the negative perception is unfounded or exaggerated.
  • tight as the bark on a tree The idiom "tight as the bark on a tree" means extremely close or firmly united, often used to describe a strong bond or relationship between people. It implies that the connection or unity is as strong and unbreakable as the thick bark that protects a tree's trunk.
  • funny as a barrel of monkeys The idiom "funny as a barrel of monkeys" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely amusing or funny. It implies that the level of humor is comparable to a whole barrel full of playful, mischievous monkeys, which is often seen as a highly entertaining and lively spectacle.
  • sound as a barrel The idiom "sound as a barrel" means to be in good physical or mental condition, without any apparent flaw or problem. It is often used to describe someone who is healthy and well-functioning in every aspect.
  • for all the world as if/though... The idiom "for all the world as if/though..." is used to emphasize that something or someone appears, acts, or resembles something else so convincingly that it is difficult to believe or understand. It describes a striking similarity or resemblance. It can be used to express surprise or disbelief about how something can resemble or imitate another thing.
  • make (something) up as (one) goes (along) The idiom "make (something) up as (one) goes (along)" means to improvise or create something spontaneously and without a preconceived plan or prior preparation. It refers to the act of figuring things out or deciding on a course of action while in the process of doing it. It implies a flexible and adaptable approach to handling a situation or problem.
  • fat as a beached whale The idiom "fat as a beached whale" is a figure of speech used to describe someone or something as excessively overweight or obese. It implies that the person or object being referred to is significantly larger in size or weight than what is considered normal or healthy, making a comparison to a beached whale - a marine mammal known for its large size and inability to move effectively on land.
  • cross as a bear The idiom "cross as a bear" typically refers to someone who is extremely angry or irritable.
  • crazy as a bedbug The idiom "crazy as a bedbug" is used to describe someone who is extremely eccentric, unpredictable, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person's behavior is as irrational and out of control as bedbugs, which are known for their frenzied movements and erratic behavior.
  • red as a beetroot The idiom "red as a beetroot" means to be extremely embarrassed or blushing, resulting in a deep red color on the face, similar to that of a beetroot vegetable.
  • red as a beet The idiom "red as a beet" is used to describe someone who is extremely flushed or blushing, often due to embarrassment, anger, or exertion. It implies that the person's face has turned as red as the color of a beet, which is a deep shade of red.
  • go (as) red as a beetroot The idiom "go (as) red as a beetroot" means to become extremely embarrassed or to have one's face turn bright red due to shame, embarrassment, or nervousness. It refers to the way a beetroot vegetable turns deep red when cooked and is commonly associated with blushing or flushing of the face.
  • the mixture as before The idiom "the mixture as before" refers to a situation or outcome that remains unchanged and follows the same patterns or characteristics as it has in the past. It implies that nothing new or different has been introduced, and things are simply continuing in the same manner as previously experienced.
  • sound as a bell The idiom "sound as a bell" refers to something or someone that is in excellent or perfect condition, physically or mentally, without any flaws or impairments. It suggests a state of robust health or functionality, often used to describe a person's well-being or the quality of an object or system.
  • phony as a three-dollar bill The idiom "phony as a three-dollar bill" means that something or someone is fake, counterfeit, or not genuine. This phrase originated from the fact that there has never been a legitimate three-dollar bill in the United States.
  • queer as a three-dollar bill The idiom "queer as a three-dollar bill" is an expression used to describe something or someone that is peculiar, suspicious, or fraudulent. It implies that the subject in question is unusual or abnormal, often referring to a person's behavior or sexuality. The idiom can carry a negative connotation and is usually used in a derogatory or mocking manner.
  • flat as a board The idiom "flat as a board" means completely level or lacking any curvature or unevenness. It is often used to describe a flat surface or object that is perfectly smooth or without any bumps or irregularities.
  • stiff as a board The idiom "stiff as a board" refers to something or someone that is extremely rigid, inflexible, or lacking movement. It implies that the person or object is completely stiff and unyielding, like a tightly secured board that cannot bend or flex.
  • true as Bob (or God) The idiom "true as Bob (or God)" is typically used to emphasize the sincerity or genuineness of a statement or claim. It suggests that something is undeniably true or accurate, as sure as the existence of Bob (a common given name) or God (the divine being in various religious beliefs).
  • be so bold as to do something The idiom "be so bold as to do something" means to have the audacity or courage to do something, even if it may be seen as impolite, disrespectful, or socially unacceptable. It suggests that the person is taking a daring or fearless action.
  • dry as a bone The idiom "dry as a bone" refers to something that is completely dry, devoid of any moisture. It can also be used to describe someone who is very thirsty or in need of a drink.
  • tough as old boots The idiom "tough as old boots" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely strong, resilient, or durable. It implies that the person or object can withstand difficult or challenging situations without being easily affected or worn down.
  • it's as broad as it's long The idiom "it's as broad as it's long" is typically used to convey that two options or choices are essentially the same, or have the same outcome or result, making it difficult to choose between them. It implies that regardless of which option is chosen, the end result will be the same.
  • cute as a button The idiom "cute as a button" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely cute, charming, or adorable in appearance or behavior. It conveys a sense of endearment and attractiveness.
  • (as) snug as a bug (in a rug) The idiom "(as) snug as a bug (in a rug)" means to be very cozy, comfortable, and content in a specific situation or location. It suggests a feeling of warmth, security, and satisfaction.
  • look as if butter wouldn't melt in your mouth The idiom "look as if butter wouldn't melt in your mouth" is used to describe someone who appears innocent, sweet, or naive, despite possibly having mischievous or deceitful intentions or actions. It implies a person's ability to hide their true nature or intentions behind a seemingly innocent demeanor.
  • flat as a pancake The idiom "flat as a pancake" is used to describe something that is extremely flat or level with no bumps, curves, or irregularities. It implies that the object or surface being referred to is completely smooth and lacking any significant variations in elevation.
  • nutty as a fruitcake The idiom "nutty as a fruitcake" is used to describe someone who is eccentric, crazy, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person's behavior or mindset is odd or unpredictable, similar to the idea of a fruitcake being unconventional or unusual due to containing nuts.
  • take (something) as it comes The idiom "take (something) as it comes" means to deal with a situation or experience without making elaborate plans or expectations, accepting whatever happens naturally or spontaneously. It implies adopting a flexible and adaptable attitude towards life, without trying to control or resist unforeseen events or circumstances.
  • not trust someone as far as you can throw them The idiom "not trust someone as far as you can throw them" means not having any trust or confidence in someone. It implies that the person is highly untrustworthy and unreliable to the extent that you would not rely on them even for a small task. The phrase often implies deep skepticism and doubts about someone's intentions or honesty.
  • use something as a carrot The idiom "use something as a carrot" refers to the act of using a reward or incentive to motivate someone or influence their behavior. It is derived from the idea of dangling a carrot in front of a horse to make it move forward. In a figurative sense, it means offering a desirable outcome or gain to encourage someone to do a particular task or achieve a goal.
  • weak as a kitten The idiom "weak as a kitten" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely weak or lacking in strength.
  • every bit as (something) The idiom "every bit as (something)" means that something is just as much or equally the same as another thing. It emphasizes the equality or equivalence between two things.
  • he, it, etc. is not as black as he, it, etc. is painted The idiom "he, it, etc. is not as black as he, it, etc. is painted" means that someone or something is not as bad as they are described or believed to be. It suggests that the negative portrayal or reputation of a person or thing is overstated or exaggerated. This idiom implies that a more nuanced or fair assessment should be made rather than relying solely on negative judgments or perceptions.
  • not as black as (one) is painted The idiom "not as black as (one) is painted" means that someone or something is not as bad or as evil as they are portrayed or believed to be. It implies that there is a more favorable or redeeming aspect to the person or situation that is not readily apparent or acknowledged.
  • not as black as you are painted The idiom "not as black as you are painted" means that someone's reputation or character is not as negative or unfairly portrayed as believed. It suggests that there is more goodness or positive aspects to the person than commonly depicted or perceived.
  • the devil is not so black as he is painted The idiom "the devil is not so black as he is painted" means that someone or something is not as bad or evil as they are depicted or believed to be. It suggests that a negative perception or reputation may not be entirely accurate or fair.
  • hot as blazes The idiom "hot as blazes" means extremely hot or scorching, often used to describe the temperature or weather. It conveys a sense of intense heat.
  • sure as the wind blows The idiom "sure as the wind blows" means something that is absolutely certain or bound to happen, similar to the reliability of the wind's constant presence or direction.
  • as different as chalk and cheese (or like chalk and cheese) The idiom "as different as chalk and cheese" means that two things or people are extremely dissimilar or have contrasting characteristics. It implies that there is virtually no resemblance or similarity between the two.
  • fussy as a hen with one chick The idiom "fussy as a hen with one chick" refers to someone who is excessively concerned, overprotective, or anxious about a specific person or thing. It suggests that the person in question is overly attentive and fusses over every detail, similar to a mother hen obsessively caring for a single chick.
  • choose someone as something The idiom "choose someone as something" means to select or designate someone for a particular role, position, or attribute based on their qualifications, skills, or characteristics. It implies that the person has been carefully selected or identified for a specific purpose.
  • poor as a churchmouse The idiom "poor as a churchmouse" means being extremely poor or having very little money. It suggests a state of financial destitution or lack of resources, similar to a mouse living in a church that has no access to food or wealth.
  • poor as a church mouse (or as church mice) The idiom "poor as a church mouse" (or "as church mice") is used to describe someone who is extremely poor or lacking in wealth and material possessions. It originates from the idea that mice living in churches would have limited opportunities to find food and therefore be considered poor.
  • happy as a clam at high tide The idiom "happy as a clam at high tide" means to be extremely happy, content, or satisfied. The phrase is derived from the fact that clams are typically harvested during low tide when the shore is exposed, so during high tide, they are safe from being collected. Consequently, the phrase suggests that clams are most content and "happy" when they are safe from danger during high tide.
  • happy as the day is long The idiom "happy as the day is long" means to be incredibly content or joyful for an extended period. It implies a state of unending happiness, as if the day stretches on with no end to the happiness felt.
  • common as muck The idiom "common as muck" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone or something that is very ordinary, not special, or lacking in sophistication. It implies a lack of uniqueness or distinction, comparing the person or object to something that is abundant and easily found.
  • conceive of (someone or something) as (someone or something) The idiom "conceive of (someone or something) as (someone or something)" means to imagine or perceive someone or something in a particular way or as possessing specific qualities or characteristics. It refers to forming an understanding or mental image of someone or something in a particular role, state, or identity.
  • as far as someone is concerned The idiom "as far as someone is concerned" means from one's personal perspective, opinion, or viewpoint. It indicates that the following statement is based on the speaker's judgment or understanding.
  • as far as something is concerned The idiom "as far as something is concerned" is used to specify or discuss a particular aspect, topic, or situation within a broader context. It indicates that the following statement or discussion is focused solely on that specific element or subject, often excluding other factors or considerations.
  • condemn (someone or something) as (something) The idiom "condemn (someone or something) as (something)" means to strongly criticize or disapprove of someone or something, usually branding them as a particular type, quality, or characteristic. It implies a negative judgment or opinion.
  • condemn someone as something The idiom "condemn someone as something" means to strongly criticize or disapprove of someone and declare them to be a certain thing, often with negative connotations. It implies judgment and labeling of someone, usually based on their perceived actions, characteristics, or behavior.
  • construe (something) as (something) The idiom "construe (something) as (something)" refers to the act of interpreting or understanding something in a particular way or context. It suggests that a particular meaning or intention is attributed to something based on how it is perceived or understood.
  • could/might just as well... The idiom "could/might just as well..." indicates that it would be equally convenient or suitable to do one thing as it would be to do another thing. It implies that the difference between the two options is minimal or inconsequential and suggests that either choice would be equally acceptable.
  • I wouldn't trust (someone) as far as I could throw (them) The idiom "I wouldn't trust (someone) as far as I could throw (them)" is a figurative expression used to convey a deep lack of trust or skepticism towards someone. It suggests that the person is considered completely untrustworthy or unreliable, to the extent that one would not rely on them or have any faith in their words or actions. The phrase also emphasizes the idea that the speaker's physical ability to throw the person is minimal or nonexistent, emphasizing the extent of their doubt.
  • not trust someone as far as you could throw them The idiom "not trust someone as far as you could throw them" means to have absolutely no trust or confidence in someone. It implies that the person is untrustworthy or unreliable to an extreme extent, to the point that you wouldn't even trust them with the smallest tasks or responsibilities. The phrase uses a metaphorical distance that represents the limited amount of reliability or trustworthiness that the person possesses, emphasizing that it is extremely short or nonexistent.
  • count (someone or something) as (something) The idiom "count (someone or something) as (something)" means to consider or regard someone or something in a particular way or category. It implies acknowledging an individual or an element as possessing specific qualities or belonging to a specific group.
  • crazy as a loon The idiom "crazy as a loon" refers to someone who is mentally unstable, irrational, or insane. It implies that the person's behavior or thoughts are highly unusual or eccentric, comparing them to the erratic behavior and eerie calls of loons, which are water birds known for their haunting cries.
  • rich as Croesus The idiom "rich as Croesus" refers to someone who is extremely wealthy or affluent. It is derived from the historical figure Croesus, the last king of Lydia in Ancient Greece, known for his vast riches and wealth.
  • happy as the day is long/as a clam/as Larry The idiom "happy as the day is long/as a clam/as Larry" is used to describe someone who is very happy or content. It implies a sense of complete satisfaction or joy. It can also be a way to express extreme happiness or blissful contentment.
  • honest as the day is long The idiom "honest as the day is long" means that someone is exceptionally honest, trustworthy, and reliable. It emphasizes a person's integrity and suggests that they possess a consistent and transparent character, much like the length of a day which remains the same, unaffected by deceit or dishonesty.
  • dead as a/the dodo The idiom "dead as a/the dodo" means completely extinct, obsolete, or no longer in existence. It is used to describe something or someone that is obsolete, irrelevant, or has no chance of revival or continuation. The phrase originates from the dodo bird, a flightless bird native to Mauritius, which became extinct in the late 17th century due to human activities.
  • dead as mutton The idiom "dead as mutton" is used to describe something or someone that is completely lifeless or lacking vitality, with no hope of revival or recovery.
  • there's none so deaf as those that will not hear The idiom "there's none so deaf as those that will not hear" means that some people are stubborn or unwilling to listen or understand something, despite the information or advice being given to them. They intentionally choose not to acknowledge or consider different perspectives, opinions, or facts.
  • define (something) as (something) The idiom "define (something) as (something)" means to provide a specific interpretation or explanation for a particular concept, object, or term, typically in a distinct and definitive manner. It implies establishing a clear and precise definition or understanding of the given subject.
  • denounce (someone) as (something) The idiom "denounce (someone) as (something)" means to publicly and strongly criticize or condemn someone, typically accusing them of being or doing something wrong, immoral, or unacceptable. It involves publicly disavowing or exposing their actions or character.
  • depict (someone) as (something) The idiom "depict (someone) as (something)" refers to portraying or representing someone in a particular way, often leading to a biased or distorted representation. It implies that someone's characteristics, qualities, or actions are being misrepresented or exaggerated, potentially leading to an unfair perception of them.
  • deputize (someone) as (something) The idiom "deputize (someone) as (something)" refers to giving someone temporary or limited authority to act or perform the duties of a specific role or position. This often occurs when the original holder of the position is unable to fulfill their responsibilities. The deputized individual is bestowed with the authority and powers associated with that position during the designated period.
  • describe (someone or something) as (something) The idiom "describe (someone or something) as (something)" means to explain or portray someone or something in a specific manner or using certain characteristics or qualities. It refers to providing an understanding or perception of someone or something by using specific terms or adjectives that convey a particular image, attribute, or behavior.
  • designate (someone or something) as (something) The idiom "designate (someone or something) as (something)" means to officially or formally give a specific title, role, or status to someone or something. It implies an authoritative decision to assign a particular identity, position, or purpose.
  • do (double) duty as The idiom "do (double) duty as" means to serve or function in multiple roles or capacities at the same time. It refers to a person or thing fulfilling more than one purpose or playing more than one role simultaneously.
  • straight as a die The idiom "straight as a die" usually means completely honest, truthful, and trustworthy. It suggests that a person is morally upright and would not engage in any deceitful or dishonest behavior.
  • disguise (someone or something) as (someone or something) The idiom "disguise (someone or something) as (someone or something)" means to alter one's appearance or the appearance of something else in order to make it resemble or appear to be someone or something else. It refers to the act of hiding or concealing the true identity or nature of someone or something by changing their external features or attributes.
  • dull as ditchwater The idiom "dull as ditchwater" means extremely boring or uninteresting. It depicts something or someone as lacking excitement, charm, or liveliness, similar to the uninteresting nature of the water found in a ditch.
  • dull as dishwater (or ditchwater) The idiom "dull as dishwater (or ditchwater)" refers to something or someone that is extremely boring, uninteresting, or lacking excitement and liveliness. It conveys a sense of monotony, lack of sparkle, and overall dullness.
  • dismiss (someone or something) as (something) The idiom "dismiss (someone or something) as (something)" means to reject or disregard someone or something because they are believed to be a certain thing, often underestimating their value or importance. It implies not taking someone or something seriously or considering them as insignificant or unimportant.
  • dismiss something as something To "dismiss something as something" means to disregard or reject something, typically due to a belief that it is unimportant, unworthy of consideration, or not relevant to the situation at hand. It implies not taking the matter seriously and assuming it has little or no value.
  • do as I say The idiom "do as I say" means to follow someone's instructions or commands without questioning or disobeying. It implies that the speaker expects complete obedience or compliance from others.
  • do something as if/like there's no tomorrow The idiom "do something as if/like there's no tomorrow" means to do something with exceptional eagerness, urgency, or enthusiasm as if there will be no opportunity to do it again in the future. It implies taking immediate or drastic action without concern for the consequences or without considering the long-term effects.
  • do unto others as you would have them do unto you The idiom "do unto others as you would have them do unto you" refers to the principle of treating others in the same way you would like to be treated. It embraces the idea of empathy, kindness, and fairness, promoting the notion that if you desire respect, compassion, and consideration from others, you should display those qualities towards them. It suggests that one should behave toward others with the same respect and goodwill as they expect to receive, fostering harmonious interactions and positive relationships. This principle is also known as the "golden rule."
  • dead as a (or the) dodo The idiom "dead as a (or the) dodo" means to describe something or someone as totally extinct, lifeless, or completely finished. It originates from the Dodo bird, a flightless bird species native to the island of Mauritius, which became extinct around the late 17th century due to human activity and predation. The phrase is used metaphorically to convey the idea of irreversibility, finality, obsolescence, or an inevitable demise.
  • dead as a doornail (or as mutton) The idiom "dead as a doornail" (or as mutton) means to be completely and unquestionably dead, beyond any chance of revival or resurrection. It indicates a state of irreversible death or lifelessness. The phrase "dead as a doornail" is more commonly used, but "dead as mutton" carries the same meaning.
  • handsome is as handsome does The idiom "handsome is as handsome does" means that a person's character and actions define their true beauty or attractiveness, rather than just their physical appearance. In other words, a person's true worth lies in their behavior and the way they treat others, rather than their external appearance alone.
  • stupid is as stupid does The idiom "stupid is as stupid does" means that a person's actions or behavior determine their level of stupidity, rather than their intelligence or knowledge. In other words, someone may be perceived as stupid if they consistently make foolish choices or engage in foolish behavior, regardless of their inherent intelligence. It emphasizes the importance of judging people based on their actions rather than superficial assumptions.
  • without so much as something/as doing something The idiom "without so much as something/as doing something" is used to express that someone did not show any effort or consideration in doing a particular action or task. It emphasizes the absence of even the slightest amount or involvement.
  • sound as a dollar The idiom "sound as a dollar" typically means something or someone that is stable, reliable, and trustworthy. It refers to financial steadiness and soundness, suggesting that the person or thing in question is solid and in good condition.
  • good as done, as The idiom "good as done" is used to convey that something is very likely to happen or be accomplished successfully. It implies a high level of confidence in the completion or success of a task, project, or objective. The phrase "as" is often added to emphasize the certainty or ease with which something will be completed, reinforcing the notion that it is nearly certain or guaranteed to happen.
  • double as The idiom "double as" means to have two different roles or functions, to serve two purposes simultaneously, or to be used for two different tasks or activities.
  • double as (someone or something) The idiom "double as (someone or something)" means to act as, serve as, or perform the duties or roles of two different people or things simultaneously. It refers to someone or something having dual or multiple functions or purposes.
  • dress (up) as (someone or something) The idiom "dress (up) as (someone or something)" refers to the act of wearing clothing, accessories, or costume to resemble and represent a specific person or thing. It often involves wearing outfits or items that are not typical or usual for one's everyday appearance, but for the purpose of impersonating or embodying another person, character, or concept. This idiom is commonly used when discussing costumes for parties, events, or theatrical performances.
  • dress as The idiom "dress as" refers to the act of wearing clothes or costumes to portray or imitate someone or something, usually for entertainment purposes or during a specific event or occasion. It implies dressing in a manner that resembles a particular character, profession, historical figure, or any other specific identity.
  • white as a ghost The idiom "white as a ghost" refers to someone or something that has a very pale or ashen complexion, resembling the color of a ghost. It is often used to describe extreme fear, shock, illness, or surprise.
  • serve as the driving force The idiom "serve as the driving force" means to be the main motivator or the decisive factor in progressing or achieving something. It refers to the element or person that provides the energy, determination, or direction necessary to make significant progress towards a goal or to bring about a particular outcome.
  • drunk as a fiddler The idiom "drunk as a fiddler" refers to someone who is heavily intoxicated or very drunk. It implies a state of extreme inebriation, often associated with musicians who play the fiddle or violin professiona
  • drunk as a skunk The idiom "drunk as a skunk" is used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or heavily under the influence of alcohol. Skunks are known for their distinct odor and wobbly movements when threatened, which can be likened to the behavior and unsteadiness of someone who is heavily drunk.
  • drunk as a lord (or skunk) The idiom "drunk as a lord (or skunk)" refers to someone who is heavily intoxicated or drunk. It suggests that the person's level of inebriation is extreme, emphasizing the loss of control or inhibition typically associated with drunkenness.
  • dumb as a post The idiom "dumb as a post" is used to describe someone who is extremely foolish or lacking intelligence. It implies that a person's level of intelligence or understanding is comparable to that of an inanimate object such as a post, which is generally considered to be devoid of any intellectual capacity.
  • easy as ABC/pie/falling off a log The idiom "easy as ABC/pie/falling off a log" is used to describe a task or activity that is extremely simple or effortless to accomplish. It implies that the action is as easy as reciting the alphabet, eating a piece of pie, or simply falling off a log, which are all very uncomplicated actions.
  • easy as one-two-three The idiom "easy as one-two-three" means that something is very simple, straightforward, or effortless to do. It implies that the task at hand can be accomplished quickly and without much difficulty.
  • sure as eggs is eggs The idiom "sure as eggs is eggs" means absolute certainty or something that is undeniably true or predictable. It emphasizes the certainty of a situation or outcome, similar to the reliability of eggs.
  • envision (someone or something) as (someone or something else) The idiom "envision (someone or something) as (someone or something else)" means to imagine or visualize someone or something in a different form or situation. It refers to the ability to see or conceive of someone or something in an altered way, often in terms of their potential or possibilities.
  • employ (someone) as (something) The idiom "employ (someone) as (something)" means to hire or engage someone for a specific position or role. It implies that the individual is being formally appointed or employed to perform a particular job or fulfill a specific function within an organization or context.
  • the end of civilization as we know it The idiom "the end of civilization as we know it" refers to a situation or event that brings about significant and disastrous changes to society, causing it to be fundamentally different from the existing norm. It implies a complete upheaval and often suggests a breakdown of societal structures, values, or systems that have been in place for a long time. It is typically used figuratively to emphasize the magnitude and impact of a certain event or development.
  • the end of the world as we know it The idiom "the end of the world as we know it" refers to a situation or event that brings about significant and often dramatic changes or upheaval in one's life, society, or the world in general. It implies a radical transformation or the occurrence of something that completely alters the existing order or familiar circumstances.
  • engage (someone) as (something) The idiom "engage (someone) as (something)" refers to hiring or employing someone in a specific role or capacity. It implies that the person is being appointed, contracted, or recruited for a particular position or job.
  • envisage (someone or something) as The idiom "envisage (someone or something) as" means to imagine or visualize someone or something in a specific way or role. It refers to forming a mental image or concept of someone or something that might not currently exist or fill that particular role. It involves thinking about a person or thing in a different or future capacity, often with a sense of possibility or potential.
  • envisage someone or something as someone or something The idiom "envisage someone or something as someone or something" means to imagine or perceive someone or something in a particular way or role, often different from their current state or function. It involves visualizing or conceiving someone or something as having a certain identity or characteristic.
  • envision someone as someone else The idiom "envision someone as someone else" refers to the act of mentally imagining or perceiving someone to be similar to or taking on the characteristics of another person. It means to envision or perceive someone in a different identity or role, usually comparing them to someone with specific qualities, abilities, or characteristics.
  • establish (oneself, someone, or something) as (something) The idiom "establish (oneself, someone, or something) as (something)" means to firmly or definitively set up or create a reputation, status, or position for oneself, someone, or something in a certain role, field, or industry. It implies earning recognition, respect, or dominance in a particular area.
  • establish someone or something as someone or something The idiom "establish someone or something as someone or something" means to officially or formally establish someone or something in a particular position, role, or identity. It refers to the act of confirming, legitimizing, or solidifying someone's authority, reputation, importance, or status in a specific capacity.
  • he, she, etc. would just as soon do A The idiom "he, she, etc. would just as soon do A" means that someone has an equal or indifferent preference for doing one thing over another. It implies that the person does not have a strong preference and would be content with either choice.
  • not half as good, nice, etc. as somebody/something The idiom "not half as good, nice, etc. as somebody/something" is used to express that someone or something is not nearly as good, nice, or impressive as another person or thing. It emphasizes that the person or thing being discussed falls significantly short in comparison to the other.
  • evaluate (someone) as (something) The idiom "evaluate (someone) as (something)" means to assess or judge someone's abilities, qualities, or performance in relation to a specific role, position, or task. It implies making a comprehensive and impartial analysis of a person's suitability or aptitude for a particular function or responsibility.
  • hold someone or something up as an example The definition of the idiom "hold someone or something up as an example" is to use or reference someone or something as a model or exemplar, typically to demonstrate a desired behavior, quality, or standard. It means to showcase a person or thing as a shining example that others should follow or emulate.
  • use someone or something as an excuse The idiom "use someone or something as an excuse" means to employ someone or something as a justification or explanation for one's actions, often in order to avoid taking responsibility or facing consequences.
  • extol (someone or something) as (something) The idiom "extol (someone or something) as (something)" means to praise or highly commend someone or something for possessing a specific quality or characteristic. It emphasizes the act of expressing great admiration or approval for the described person or thing.
  • false as Cressida The idiom "false as Cressida" refers to someone or something that is deceptive, treacherous, or untrustworthy. It alludes to the character of Cressida from William Shakespeare's play "Troilus and Cressida," who betrays her lover Troilus and switches her loyalty to the Greeks during the Trojan War. Consequently, the idiom implies a lack of integrity, loyalty, or sincerity.
  • fancy as The idiom "fancy as" typically means something that is stylish, elegant, or sophisticated. It refers to something that is aesthetically pleasing or high-quality.
  • go as far as to (do something) The idiom "go as far as to (do something)" means to take a particular action, usually an extreme or surprising one, showing great dedication, determination, or willingness to achieve something. It implies going beyond what is expected or required in order to accomplish a certain outcome.
  • go as/so far as to do something The idiom "go as/so far as to do something" means to take an extreme or extreme action, often beyond what is considered normal or reasonable. It implies that the person is willing to do something unexpected, unconventional, or unusual because of strong feelings or beliefs.
  • fat as a pig The idiom "fat as a pig" is used to describe someone or something that is excessively overweight.
  • feature someone as something The idiom "feature someone as something" means to showcase or highlight someone in a specific role or capacity. It often refers to giving someone prominence or attention in a particular context or situation.
  • you're only as old as you feel The idiom "you're only as old as you feel" means that one's age is determined by their perception of themselves rather than their actual years. It suggests that a person's attitude, energy, and outlook on life are more important factors in determining their age than the number of years they have lived. It implies that one can feel young and vibrant regardless of their chronological age if they maintain a positive and youthful mindset.
  • figure as The idiom "figure as" is typically used to describe or categorize someone or something in a particular way, usually based on perceived characteristics or qualities. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is seen or recognized as a certain type or can be identified with a specific role or function.
  • speak as you find The idiom "speak as you find" is commonly used to encourage people to express their honest and objective opinion or assessment of someone or something based on their personal experience or observation rather than relying on others' judgments or preconceived notions. It suggests that one should evaluate or describe someone or something based on individual encounters or firsthand knowledge rather than making assumptions or beliefs influenced by others.
  • finger someone as someone The idiom "finger someone as someone" typically means to identify or accuse someone as being involved in a wrongdoing or a particular activity. It implies pointing a finger at someone, suggesting their guilt or association with something.
  • fit as a flea The idiom "fit as a flea" means being in good physical condition or health. It is used to describe someone who is very healthy and has a lot of energy.
  • quick as a flash The idiomatic expression "quick as a flash" means to be extremely fast or rapid in doing something. It implies swift or immediate action, usually without delay or hesitation.
  • flop as something The idiom "flop as something" refers to an action or endeavor that fails or is unsuccessful. It typically describes a situation or performance that does not meet expectations or falls short of anticipated success.
  • free as the air The idiom "free as the air" means to be completely unrestricted, independent, and without any obligations or constraints. It implies a sense of liberation and the ability to do as one pleases.
  • function as The idiom "function as" means to serve or operate as something, to fulfill a particular role or purpose.
  • give up as lost The idiom "give up as lost" means to accept that something cannot be recovered or achieved. It implies acknowledging that all efforts and chances have been exhausted and there is no hope for success or finding a lost item.
  • look as if (one) has seen a ghost The idiom "look as if (one) has seen a ghost" means to appear extremely shocked, pale, or frightened, as if one has just had a terrifying experience. It typically emphasizes a person's bewildered or horrified expression, similar to witnessing something supernatural or unnerving.
  • look as if you have seen a ghost The idiom "look as if you have seen a ghost" means to appear extremely shocked, frightened, or overwhelmed by something unexpected or terrifying. It implies a facial expression or body language that reveals intense surprise or fear.
  • look as though (one) has seen a ghost The idiom "look as though (one) has seen a ghost" means to appear extremely startled, frightened, or shocked, as if one has just experienced a terrifying or supernatural encounter. It is used to describe someone who has an expression of intense fear or astonishment on their face.
  • white as a sheet/ghost The idiom "white as a sheet/ghost" is used to describe a person who appears extremely pale or drained of color due to fear, shock, illness, or any other intense emotion. It implies that the person's complexion resembles the white color of a bed sheet or the pallor of a ghost.
  • give (someone) up as a bad job The idiom "give (someone) up as a bad job" means to abandon or stop trying to help someone because they have proven to be uncooperative, unresponsive, or unlikely to change their behavior or situation for the better. It implies accepting that the efforts made to assist or improve someone's circumstances have been unsuccessful and it is better to discontinue those efforts.
  • smooth as glass The idiom "smooth as glass" refers to something that is perfectly even, calm, or free from any roughness, obstacles, or irregularities, similar to the smoothness and clarity of glass. It implies a state of absolute smoothness, often used to describe surfaces, movements, or actions that are exceptionally sleek and effortless.
  • as (things) go "As (things) go" is an idiom used to describe the general or expected state of affairs, or the usual way something unfolds. It implies that the situation or circumstances being discussed align with common or typical expectations, considering the broader context. It commonly suggests an acknowledgment of relative standards or norms when assessing a particular situation or event.
  • go down as (something) The idiom "go down as (something)" means to be remembered or recorded in a particular way or to have a certain reputation, typically for a notable or significant accomplishment, event, or action. It implies that the person or thing will be remembered or regarded as a specific type or category.
  • go as someone or something The idiom "go as someone or something" has multiple definitions depending on the context. Here are two commonly used meanings of this idiom: 1. To attend a social event or party dressed as a particular person or character: This meaning is often used when people are invited to costume parties or themed events. For example, "I'm going as a pirate for Halloween" means that the person will dress up and act like a pirate during the event. 2. To imitate or adopt the characteristics, behaviors, or actions of someone or something: In this context, going as someone or something implies mimicking the qualities of another person, group, or entity. For instance, "He's trying to go as the cool kids, but it's
  • true as God The idiom "true as God" refers to something that is completely and undeniably true, similar to an absolute reality or undeniable fact, often emphasizing its unquestionable authenticity and reliability.
  • steady as she goes The idiom "steady as she goes" means to maintain a stable and consistent course of action or progress, often in a steady and cautious manner. It often implies a need to stay focused, avoid unnecessary risks, and continue with a steady pace in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • good as gold, as The idiom "good as gold" is used to describe someone or something that is well-behaved, reliable, trustworthy, or of outstanding quality. It is often used to emphasize the positive qualities or characteristics of a person or object.
  • as (something) as the next man/woman/person The idiom "as (something) as the next man/woman/person" means to have the same qualities, opinions, or actions as the majority of people. It is often used to emphasize that someone is ordinary, average, or no different from everyone else in a particular aspect.
  • as good as (something) The idiom "as good as (something)" means to be almost or nearly equivalent in quality, value, or effectiveness as the thing being compared to. It implies that the person or object being referred to is highly comparable to the standard or expectation being set, often expressing a positive connotation that denotes excellence or near perfection.
  • gives as good as (one) gets The idiom "gives as good as (one) gets" means that a person responds to or retaliates equally or in a comparable manner when faced with an attack, provocation, or challenge. It implies that the person is able to hold their ground and respond in an equally strong or efficient manner.
  • good as (one's) word The idiom "good as (one's) word" means that someone is trustworthy and reliable in keeping their promises or fulfilling their commitments. It implies that a person's word can be trusted without hesitation.
  • good as one's word, as The idiom "good as one's word" refers to someone who consistently keeps their promises or behaves in a trustworthy manner. It suggests that the person's actions align with their spoken commitments, demonstrating reliability and integrity.
  • good as, as The idiom "good as, as" is used to describe that one thing or person is equivalent or comparable in quality or ability to another. It signifies that both things or individuals are equally good or skilled at something.
  • miss is as good as a mile, a The idiom "a miss is as good as a mile" is used to convey that whether a mistake or failure is small or large, the end result is the same. It signifies that even if someone narrowly avoids a negative outcome, it doesn't change the fact that they didn't succeed or accomplish their goal.
  • nod's as good as a wink The idiom "a nod's as good as a wink" refers to the idea that a subtle hint or indication can have the same meaning or effect as a more explicit or direct message. It suggests that a subtle gesture, such as a nod of the head, can be understood as an agreement or understanding between people without the need for further explanation or communication.
  • not half as (something) (as someone or something) The idiom "not half as (something) (as someone or something)" means that someone or something is not at all or not even close to being as good, talented, or capable as the other person or thing being compared to. It emphasizes a significant difference in skill, ability, or excellence.
  • nothing is so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse The idiom "nothing is so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse" means that there is no better remedy for a person's wellbeing and character development than spending time with horses or engaging in activities related to them. It suggests that being in the presence of horses, caring for them, and riding them can have profound positive effects on a person's mental, emotional, and physical state.
  • (as) full as a goog The idiom "(as) full as a goog" is an Australian slang phrase that means being completely full or having consumed a large amount of food or drink. It is commonly used to describe someone who has eaten or drunk to their maximum capacity.
  • (as) silly as a goose The definition of the idiom "(as) silly as a goose" is to behave foolishly or foolishly act in a trite or nonsensical manner. It implies someone's actions are lacking in seriousness or common sense, similar to how geese are often seen as foolish birds.
  • silly as a goose The idiom "silly as a goose" is a playful expression used to describe someone who is acting foolishly, behaving in a silly or senseless manner.
  • green as a gooseberry The idiom "green as a gooseberry" means someone who is inexperienced, naive, or lacking in worldly knowledge. It refers to the fruit gooseberry, which is small, round, and green when unripe.
  • take (something) as gospel The idiom "take (something) as gospel" means to believe or accept something as completely true, reliable, or authoritative without questioning or doubting its accuracy or validity. It comes from the reference to the Gospel, which is considered the ultimate truth in Christianity. Therefore, when someone "takes something as gospel," it implies that they unquestionably believe it to be true, akin to a religious doctrine.
  • take as gospel The idiom "take something as gospel" means to believe or accept something as completely true and unquestionable, often without any skepticism or doubt. It is based on the religious concept of the Gospel as an ultimate truth.
  • take something as the gospel truth The idiom "take something as the gospel truth" means to fully and unquestionably believe or accept something as being completely true and accurate, often without any form of doubt or skepticism. It emphasizes the idea of regarding the information or statement as absolutely reliable, similar to the way religious scriptures or teachings are believed by followers without skepticism.
  • have (got) (someone) pegged as (something) The idiom "have (got) (someone) pegged as (something)" means to form a fixed or definite opinion or perception about someone, usually based on their characteristics, behavior, or appearance. It implies that the person has been categorized or labeled as a certain type or with certain qualities, often without knowing them fully or accurately.
  • green as grass The idiom "green as grass" is used to describe someone who is inexperienced, naïve, or lacking knowledge and worldly wisdom. It implies that the person is new or unfamiliar in a certain situation, just like fresh, green grass that has yet to grow and mature.
  • silent as the grave The idiom "silent as the grave" refers to a state of absolute silence or quietness, often used to describe a situation or environment that is completely devoid of sound or noise. It conveys the idea of a silence so profound and deep that it resembles the complete stillness found in a burial ground or cemetery.
  • groom someone as something The idiom "groom someone as something" typically means to carefully prepare or train someone for a particular role, position, or future success. It involves guiding and developing the person's skills, qualities, or abilities with the intention of molding them into a specific role or profession.
  • hail someone as something The idiom "hail someone as something" means to publicly or enthusiastically recognize, praise, or acknowledge someone as being a specific thing or possessing a certain quality or accomplishment. It denotes giving high praise or acclaim to someone for a particular attribute or achievement.
  • hail as To "hail as" someone or something means to enthusiastically praise or acclaim them as highly important, impressive, or successful. It implies giving high recognition, usually expressed in a positive and celebratory manner.
  • (as) happy as a pig in muck The idiom "(as) happy as a pig in muck" means being extremely content or joyful in a situation or environment. It suggests a state of bliss and satisfaction, often associated with indulging in one's desires or being in one's element. The phrase alludes to the notion that pigs are known to be fond of mud and enjoy wallowing in it, thus equating their happiness with that particular behavior.
  • (as) happy as a sandboy The idiom "(as) happy as a sandboy" is used to describe someone who is extremely happy or content. It originates from the 19th-century sandboys, who were young boys or men who sold sand for spreading on floors. They were often seen as carefree and happy, hence the association with happiness in the idiom.
  • (as) happy as Larry The idiom "(as) happy as Larry" means to be extremely happy, content, or joyful. It is used to describe someone who is in a state of great happiness and satisfaction. The origin of this expression is unclear, but it is commonly used in informal conversations.
  • happy as a lark The idiom "happy as a lark" means to be extremely happy or joyful, often while singing or displaying carefree behavior, just like a lark that is known for its joyful singing during the early morning hours.
  • happy as a pig in muck The idiom "happy as a pig in muck" means to be extremely delighted, content, and comfortable in a particular situation or environment. It refers to the phrase that pigs are known to be joyful and satisfied when they are wallowing in mud or muck. The expression is often used to describe someone who is blissfully happy and enjoying themselves to the fullest.
  • happy as a pig in shit The idiom "happy as a pig in shit" is used to describe someone who is extremely content and satisfied with their current situation or circumstances. It implies a state of great pleasure or happiness, often due to being in a situation that is considered ideal for the person in question.
  • happy as a sandboy The idiom "happy as a sandboy" refers to someone who is extremely happy, content, or carefree. This phrase originated in the 19th century in Britain, deriving from the image of a sandboy, a young boy who would be cheerful and elated while selling sand for use in pubs to cover the floor and soak up spilled beer. The association with happiness and carefreeness comes from the boy's ignorance of the true value of what he was selling, as sand is inexpensive, leading to his cheerful state.
  • happy as Larry The idiom "happy as Larry" means to be extremely happy, content, or delighted with a situation or circumstance.
  • (as) hard as the nether millstone The idiom "(as) hard as the nether millstone" refers to something that is extremely difficult, unbending, or unyielding. It implies that the situation or object in question is as hard or impenetrable as the grindstone used in a mill, specifically the lower stone known as the nether millstone, which crushes the grains against the upper stone to produce flour.
  • hard as a motherfucker The idiom "hard as a motherfucker" is an informal and explicit expression used to describe something or someone as very difficult, challenging, or strong. It emphasizes extreme resilience, toughness, or intensity.
  • hard as the nether millstone The idiom "hard as the nether millstone" is used to describe something that is extremely difficult, unyielding, or unbreakable. It originates from the traditional milling process, where a millstone refers to one of the large stones used to grind grain. The nether millstone specifically refers to the bottom stone, which is stationary and exceptionally hard. Therefore, something that is "hard as the nether millstone" is compared to this unyielding rock, implying its extreme level of hardness or resistance to change.
  • mad as a hatter (or a March hare) The idiom "mad as a hatter (or a March hare)" means to be completely crazy or mentally unstable. It originates from the early 19th century when the manufacturing of hats involved the use of mercury, which caused mercury poisoning and resulted in symptoms like delirium, erratic behavior, and mental instability. Similarly, the phrase "mad as a March hare" refers to the erratic and seemingly irrational behavior exhibited by hares during their mating season in March. So, both variations of the idiom convey a state of extreme madness or eccentricity.
  • mad as a March hare The idiom "mad as a March hare" refers to someone who is behaving in a wildly or uncontrollably eccentric manner. It originates from the behavior of hares during their mating season in March, where they engage in frenzied and unpredictable movements, often leaping and boxing with each other, hence being perceived as "mad".
  • have (someone or something) down as (something) The idiom "have (someone or something) down as (something)" means to form a specific impression or opinion about someone or something based on one's perception or knowledge of them. It implies having a certain belief or understanding regarding the nature, characteristics, or qualities of a person or thing.
  • as far as (someone or something) is concerned The idiom "as far as (someone or something) is concerned" is used to indicate a person's or thing's perspective, opinion, or involvement in a particular matter. It suggests that the following statement relates specifically to the mentioned individual or entity.
  • as much as (one) could do (not) (to do something) The idiom "as much as (one) could do (not) (to do something)" means that someone exerted a significant effort or struggled greatly in order to resist or avoid doing something. It implies that the person was tempted or inclined to do that particular thing, but managed to refrain from doing so with great determination or difficulty.
  • be (not) as black as (someone or something) is painted The idiom "be (not) as black as (someone or something) is painted" means that someone or something is (not) as bad or evil as they are portrayed or believed to be. It emphasizes that the negative perception or reputation does not fully reflect the true nature or character of the person or thing in question.
  • speak as (one) finds The idiom "speak as (one) finds" means to express one's honest opinions or observations without inhibition or reservation. It implies that someone is straightforward, genuine, and speaks their mind without any pretense or filter.
  • would just as soon (do something) The idiom "would just as soon (do something)" means to have no particular preference or to feel equally content with either of the options presented. It implies being indifferent or having no strong inclination towards one choice over another.
  • (as) hot as hell The idiom "(as) hot as hell" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely hot or causing intense heat. It implies that the temperature is uncomfortably high, comparing it to the fiery, extreme conditions often associated with the concept of hell.
  • hot as hell The idiom "hot as hell" is used to describe extremely high temperatures or intense heat. It implies that the weather or the environment is unbearably hot or scorching. It is an informal and colloquial expression often used to emphasize the intensity of the heat.
  • mad as hell The idiom "mad as hell" means to be extremely angry or furious about something. It describes a state of intense rage or frustration.
  • rare as hen's teeth The idiom "rare as hen's teeth" is used to describe something that is extremely rare or scarce. The phrase stems from the fact that hens, unlike many other animals, do not possess teeth, making the notion of finding hen's teeth exceptionally unlikely or impossible. Thus, when something is said to be as rare as hen's teeth, it emphasizes its extreme scarcity.
  • rare (or scarce) as hen's teeth The idiom "rare (or scarce) as hen's teeth" is used to describe something that is extremely rare or virtually non-existent. It implies that the item or occurrence being referred to is as uncommon as hen's teeth, which are nonexistent as hens do not have teeth.
  • adopt (someone or something) as To "adopt (someone or something) as" is an idiomatic expression that means to choose, accept, or take on someone or something as one's own, often with a sense of commitment, devotion, or responsibility. It implies a decision to treat or consider someone or something as a part of oneself or one's family, group, cause, or identity.
  • as fast as (one's) legs can carry (one) The idiom "as fast as (one's) legs can carry (one)" means to run or travel as quickly as possible with the maximum speed that one's own legs allow. It implies a sense of urgency or desperate attempt to escape or reach a destination.
  • as long as (one's) arm The idiom "as long as one's arm" refers to something that is very long or extensive in size, length, or scope. It is typically used to emphasize the magnitude or extent of something, often in a figurative way. It implies that the mentioned thing is extremely long or lengthy, comparable to the length of one's arm.
  • be as nothing (compared) to (someone or something) The idiom "be as nothing (compared) to (someone or something)" means to be significantly inferior or inconsequential when compared to someone or something else. It highlights a substantial difference in importance, significance, or skill between two entities.
  • (as) ancient as the hills The idiom "(as) ancient as the hills" refers to something that is extremely old or has been around for a very long time. It suggests that the thing or person being referred to has existed since ancient times and has withstood the test of time.
  • independent as a hog on ice The idiom "independent as a hog on ice" typically refers to someone who is self-reliant, self-sufficient, and able to function without assistance or guidance. It implies a strong sense of autonomy and the ability to handle any situation with ease and confidence.
  • (as) honest as the day is long The idiom "(as) honest as the day is long" means to be completely honest, trustworthy, and having the utmost integrity. It implies that one's honesty lasts throughout the entire day, without any hint of deception or dishonesty.
  • honor as The idiom "honor as" typically refers to treating someone or something with deep respect, admiration, and recognition of their value and accomplishments. It implies giving the highest level of respect and honor to someone or something.
  • (as) rare as rocking horse manure The idiom "(as) rare as rocking horse manure" is an exaggerated way of expressing extreme rarity or scarcity. It means something is exceptionally uncommon, hardly ever found, or almost nonexistent. It plays upon the idea that manure from rocking horses, which do not actually exist in reality, would be extremely scarce if they did.
  • (as) hot as the devil The idiom "(as) hot as the devil" is used to describe extremely high temperatures or very hot weather conditions. It implies that the heat is intense and unbearable, similar to the fiery nature often associated with the concept of the devil.
  • (as) hot as the dickens The idiom "(as) hot as the dickens" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely hot. It implies a high level of heat that can be uncomfortable or intense. The term "dickens" here is simply a euphemism used to emphasize the intensity of the heat.
  • safe as houses The idiom "safe as houses" means extremely safe or secure. It refers to something or someone being very reliable, stable, or protected, similar to the perceived safety of houses or homes.
  • hanged for a sheep as a lamb, might as well be The idiom "hanged for a sheep as a lamb, might as well be" means that if one is going to be punished or face consequences for a minor offense, they might as well commit a more significant offense as the punishment will be similar. It suggests that since the outcome will be negative regardless, one might as well take whatever action they desire without worrying about the consequences.
  • may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is going to get into trouble for a minor offense, they might as well commit a more significant offense since the consequences will be the same. It implies that if the punishment is already severe, there is no additional risk or punishment for committing a more serious act.
  • (as) cold as ice The idiom "as cold as ice" refers to a person or situation being emotionally unresponsive, unfeeling, or lacking empathy. It implies a complete absence of warmth or compassion.
  • might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb" suggests that since the potential consequences (getting hanged) are the same regardless of the scale of one's actions (stealing a sheep or a lamb), one might as well commit the larger offense. Essentially, it implies that if the punishment remains constant, there is no reason to choose a lesser option when the outcome will be equally severe.
  • I might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "I might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is going to be punished or suffer consequences for a certain action, they might as well go all the way and commit a more significant or daring action. In other words, if the punishment is going to be severe, they may as well make it worthwhile. It implies that the person is willing to take risks or face consequences regardless, so they might as well make the most of it.
  • identify someone as someone The definition of the idiom "identify someone as someone" means to recognize and acknowledge a person's true nature, qualities, or abilities, typically through observation, evaluation, or judgment. It refers to correctly perceiving or categorizing someone based on their particular traits, characteristics, or reputation.
  • for all the world as if (someone or something) The idiom "for all the world as if" is used to describe someone or something behaving or appearing in a particular way, often in a manner that is surprising or unexpected. It suggests that the person or thing resembles or acts like something that is completely different from their usual self.
  • for all the world as though (someone or something) The idiom "for all the world as though (someone or something)" means to behave or appear exactly as if someone or something is a certain way, even though it may not be true. It suggests a convincing or authentic imitation of a particular behavior or characteristic.
  • it isn't as if/as though The idiom "it isn't as if/as though" is used to express the idea that something is not true or does not apply, despite appearing or seeming that way. It is often used to rebut or counter a misconception or assumption.
  • it isn't as though The idiom "it isn't as though" is used to emphasize that a particular situation or outcome is not true or likely, emphasizing a contrast between reality and a hypothetical situation or expected result.
  • make as if to do The "make as if to do" idiom means to pretend or simulate that one is going to do something without actually doing it. It refers to the action of creating the appearance or intention of performing a particular task or action, but not following through with it.
  • imagine someone or something as someone or something The idiom "imagine someone or something as someone or something" means to visualize or perceive someone or something in a particular way, even if it may not be the true or accurate representation. It refers to creating a mental image or concept that may deviate from reality.
  • impress someone as something The idiom "impress someone as something" means to give a particular impression or to appear to be a certain way to someone. It describes the way a person or thing leaves an impression or impacts someone in a specific manner.
  • insofar as The idiom "insofar as" means to the extent or degree that something is true or applicable. It is used to specify the limits or boundaries of a particular situation or condition.
  • inasmuch as The idiom "inasmuch as" means to the extent or degree that, considering or acknowledging the fact that, or because of the fact that. It is often used to introduce a statement that clarifies or qualifies a previous statement or action.
  • insomuch as The idiom "insomuch as" means to the extent or because of the fact that. It is used to introduce a reason or condition that explains or justifies a preceding statement or situation.
  • install someone as something The idiom "install someone as something" refers to the act of officially appointing or placing someone in a particular position, role, or status of authority or power. It implies the act of establishing someone in a position of importance or influence, often with a formal or ceremonial process involved.
  • intend something as something The idiom "intend something as something" means to have the purpose or aim of conveying a particular meaning or message through an action or statement. It suggests that the speaker or doer has a specific intention or meaning behind their words or actions, which may not be immediately evident or apparent to others.
  • interpret something as something The idiom "interpret something as something" means to understand or explain the meaning or significance of something in a particular way. It refers to the act of assigning a specific meaning or understanding to an event, action, statement, or situation based on one's own perspective or perception.
  • issue something as something The idiom "issue something as something" typically means to officially release or distribute something, such as a document, report, statement, or announcement, in a specific form or format. It implies the act of making something known or publicizing it in a specific manner or under a particular designation.
  • as it turned out The idiom "as it turned out" means the actual or eventual outcome or result of a situation or event, often in contrast to what was originally expected or predicted. It implies that the final conclusion or resolution was different from what was initially assumed or believed.
  • poor as Job's turkey The idiom "poor as Job's turkey" means to be extremely poor or destitute. It refers to the story of Job from the Bible, who endured great suffering and loss, leaving him in a state of utter poverty. In this context, the reference to "Job's turkey" suggests someone who is in an even worse financial state than Job himself.
  • could just as well The idiom "could just as well" means that there is an equal possibility or likelihood for something to happen or be true. It suggests that two or more options are equally viable or appropriate in a given situation.
  • just as The idiom "just as" is typically used to describe a situation where two things are considered to be equal or equivalent. It implies that something is very similar or nearly identical to another thing.
  • just as soon The idiom "just as soon" means to prefer, choose, or be willing to do something immediately or without hesitation. It is often used to express a strong preference for one option over another.
  • you know as well as I do The idiom "you know as well as I do" is used to emphasize that both the speaker and the listener are aware and have knowledge of the same facts or information. It suggests that there is no need to explain or remind the listener because they are already familiar with the situation and have an understanding of it.
  • label someone or something as something The idiom "label someone or something as something" means to categorize or characterize someone or something with a specific description or term. It refers to defining or identifying a person, object, or concept with a particular label based on certain traits, characteristics, or stereotypes.
  • (as) quiet as a lamb The idiom "(as) quiet as a lamb" means someone or something that is extremely calm, peaceful, and well-behaved. It implies that the person or thing in question is not causing any disturbances or making any noise, similar to the characteristic of a lamb, which is typically known for its gentle and serene nature.
  • meek as a lamb The phrase "meek as a lamb" is an idiom used to describe someone who is extremely gentle, submissive, or obedient. It portrays an individual who is docile, timid, and unlikely to assert oneself or display strong emotions.
  • quiet as a lamb The idiom "quiet as a lamb" means someone or something that is calm, gentle, and peaceful. It is often used to describe a person who is very calm and well-behaved or a situation that is calm and uneventful.
  • (as) tough as leather The idiom "(as) tough as leather" refers to a person or thing that is physically or emotionally very strong, resilient, or durable. It implies that the individual or object can withstand difficult circumstances or challenges without breaking or succumbing to pressure.
  • tough as leather The idiom "tough as leather" means to describe someone or something that is strong, resilient, and able to withstand difficult or challenging situations without easily giving up or being affected. It implies a person or thing's durability and ability to endure adversity.
  • without so much as a by-your-leave The idiom "without so much as a by-your-leave" means to do something without asking for permission or without giving any notice or warning. It signifies a lack of courtesy or consideration for others by not informing them or seeking their approval.
  • like as not The idiom "like as not" typically means very likely or highly probable.
  • like as two peas in a pod The idiom "like as two peas in a pod" is used to describe two people or things that are extremely similar, almost indistinguishable from each other. It implies that the two entities share a striking resemblance in appearance, behavior, or characteristics.
  • list as The idiomatic expression "list as" refers to the act of classifying or categorizing something or someone under a specific category or designation, typically in a formal record or document.

Similar spelling words for AS

Plural form of AS is ASES

Infographic

Add the infographic to your website: