How Do You Spell AT?

Pronunciation: [ˈat] (IPA)

The word "at" is a one-syllable preposition commonly used to indicate location or position. Its IPA phonetic transcription is /æt/ and it is spelled using the letters 'a' and 't'. The letter 'a' represents the vowel sound /æ/ as in "cat", while the letter 't' represents the voiceless alveolar plosive /t/. This simple combination of sounds forms the word "at", which is used in various contexts, such as in time expressions (e.g. "at noon"), in email addresses (e.g. "username@domain.com") or in indicating a particular place (e.g. "I saw him at the park").

AT Meaning and Definition

  1. The term "at" serves various purposes in the English language and can function as a preposition, an adverb, or a part of a verb phrase, depending on the context. As a preposition, "at" denotes a specific location, position, or direction. It specifies a point or place where someone or something is located, present, or arrives. For instance, "The cat is sitting at the window" indicates the cat's position relative to the window.

    Additionally, "at" can indicate a particular time or moment in which something happens, such as "We will meet at 6 p.m." or "She arrived at the party." It highlights a specific instance in time when an action takes place.

    Furthermore, "at" can be utilized as an adverb to imply a fundamental or essential quality of something. For example, "He is good at mathematics" indicates proficiency or skill in mathematics.

    In the realm of verb phrases, "at" is used as an integral part of several idiomatic expressions, such as "laugh at," "look at," or "shout at." These phrases imply actions or behaviors directed toward someone or something.

    Overall, "at" is a versatile word that plays a crucial role in specifying location, time, skill, direction, or focus within English sentences.

  2. Near to; with; towards.

    Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Top Common Misspellings for AT *

  • att 11.0651499%
  • aat 8.4798345%
  • atr 5.7911065%
  • ath 4.2399172%
  • ot 3.5160289%
  • ast 3.4126163%
  • ata 2.9989658%
  • aty 2.4819027%
  • iat 1.9648397%
  • st 1.7580144%
  • atg 1.1375387%
  • af 0.8273009%
  • atl 0.7238883%
  • atb 0.7238883%
  • atv 0.6204756%
  • ayt 0.6204756%
  • ats 0.4136504%
  • aqt 0.4136504%
  • agt 0.3102378%
  • atht 0.3102378%
  • ao 0.2068252%
  • ato 0.2068252%
  • atf 0.2068252%
  • aot 0.1034126%
  • ati 0.1034126%
  • kat 0.1034126%
  • aw 0.1034126%
  • dt 0.1034126%
  • yat 0.1034126%
  • atx 0.1034126%
  • aht 0.517063%
  • nat 0.517063%
  • wat 0.517063%

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for AT

Etymology of AT

The word "at" has its origins in the Old English preposition "æt". This preposition primarily denoted location or position, similar to the way we use "at" today. It eventually became a common preposition in Middle English, where it also started to be used to indicate a specific time or point in time. The Old English form "æt" shares its Germanic root with related words in other Germanic languages, such as Old Frisian "et", Old Norse "at", and Gothic "at". These ultimately trace back to the Proto-Germanic *at, meaning "at" or "to". The word has evolved and remained in use across the centuries, retaining its fundamental meaning of location, time, or point in time.

Idioms with the word AT

  • make eyes at sb The idiom "make eyes at someone" means to look at someone with romantic or flirtatious intentions. It often involves using subtle or seductive eye movements or expressions to show interest or attraction towards the person.
  • at sea The idiom "at sea" is used to describe a state of confusion, perplexity, or uncertainty. It suggests being disoriented or lacking direction, similar to the feeling of being lost at sea with no clear sense of location or purpose.
  • on your mark, get set, go, at on your marks, get set, go! The idiom "on your mark, get set, go!" is a phrase that is typically used to initiate a race or a competition. It is a countdown or a signal given to participants to prepare themselves and then start the activity simultaneously. It is often used figuratively to encourage someone to begin a task or take action promptly.
  • set/put sb's mind at rest/ease The idiom "set/put someone's mind at rest/ease" means to alleviate someone's worries or concerns and provide them with a sense of calmness and reassurance. It involves providing information, assurance, or taking action to convince the person that there is nothing to worry about or that their concerns have been addressed.
  • fill sb's shoes, at step into sb's shoes The idiom "fill someone's shoes" or "step into someone's shoes" means to take over someone else's position, responsibilities, or role, typically implying that the person being replaced is leaving or has passed away. It suggests that the person taking their place will have to meet the same expectations and perform at the same level as their predecessor.
  • shut your gob, at shut your mouth/face The idiom "shut your gob" or "shut your mouth/face" is an informal way of telling someone to stop talking or to be quiet. It is often used in a slightly rude or commanding manner to indicate annoyance or frustration with someone's words or behavior.
  • at bay The idiom "at bay" means to keep someone or something under control or in a position of disadvantage, usually through confrontation or resistance. It refers to holding off or preventing something or someone from advancing or causing harm.
  • be/go on at sb The idiom "be/go on at someone" refers to repeatedly criticizing, nagging, or urging someone to do something in a persistent manner. It implies that someone is being constantly annoyed or pressured by another person in an argumentative or controlling way.
  • (at) full speed/tilt/pelt The idiom "(at) full speed/tilt/pelt" means to do something very quickly or at maximum speed and intensity. It is used to describe an action or movement that is done rapidly and with great energy and force. It implies that the person or thing is moving or operating at its highest possible speed or level of effort.
  • what beats me, at it beats me The idiom "what beats me, beats me" is an expression used when someone is unable to understand or figure out something. It is often used to convey confusion, bewilderment, or a lack of comprehension about a particular situation or problem.
  • stiff cheese!, at hard/tough cheese! The idiom "stiff cheese!" or "hard/tough cheese!" is an expression used to convey the message that someone's disappointment or misfortune is of no concern to the speaker. It implies a lack of sympathy or empathy towards the individual's situation, usually in a lighthearted or dismissive manner.
  • stir your blood, at stir the blood The idiom "stir your blood" or "stir the blood" refers to something that excites or invigorates an individual, typically evoking strong emotions or a sense of passion. It describes a situation or experience that causes a surge in adrenaline or arouses intense feelings within a person.
  • stone me!, at stone the crows! The idiom "stone me!" or "stone the crows!" is an exclamatory expression used to convey surprise, shock, or astonishment. It can be used when something unexpected or unbelievable happens, similar to saying "wow" or "oh my goodness."
  • (at) full stretch The idiom "(at) full stretch" means to be using all of one's physical or mental capacity, or to be fully extended or stretched. It implies reaching one's maximum level of effort, ability, or capacity in order to achieve a goal or complete a task.
  • take sth in stride, at take sth in your stride The idiom "take something in stride" or "take something in your stride" means to handle or deal with an adverse situation or criticism calmly and without let it affect or bother oneself too much. It reflects the ability to face challenges or setbacks with a positive attitude and to maintain composure or self-assurance amidst difficulties.
  • strike lucky, at strike it lucky The idiom "strike lucky" or "strike it lucky" means to unexpectedly and fortuitously experience success, good fortune, or a positive outcome in a particular situation or endeavor. It conveys the idea of stumbling upon or achieving something desirable and advantageous through luck or chance rather than deliberate effort or planning.
  • sweat your guts out, at sweat blood The idiom "sweat your guts out" or "sweat blood" is an expression used to describe intense physical or mental effort, typically in a situation where one is working extremely hard or exerting oneself to the limit. It implies putting in a great amount of effort, perseverance, and dedication to achieve a goal or overcome a difficult challenge.
  • wait at table(s) The idiom "wait at table(s)" means to work as a waiter or waitress in a restaurant, taking orders and serving food and beverages to customers. It refers to the act of providing hospitality service in a dining establishment.
  • tan the hide off sb, at tan sb's hide The idiom "tan the hide off someone" or "tan someone's hide" means to punish or beat someone severely. It implies inflicting physical harm or discipline on an individual. It can also be used figuratively to indicate a severe verbal reprimand or criticism.
  • at full tilt The idiom "at full tilt" means to move or work at maximum speed, capacity, or effort. It implies giving one's utmost effort or operating at the highest level of intensity or efficiency.
  • at the top of your voice The idiom "at the top of your voice" means shouting or speaking very loudly or forcefully.
  • try your hand at sth The idiom "try your hand at something" means to attempt or give it a try to do something new or unfamiliar, often to see if one has a talent or skill in a particular area. It implies engaging in an activity in order to test one's ability or experience it for the first time.
  • mix it up, at mix it The idiom "mix it up" means to engage in a lively or heated argument, altercation, or confrontation with someone. It implies a situation where there is a disagreement or conflict that leads to a verbal or physical confrontation. "Mix it" can be used as a shorter form of the idiom, conveying a similar meaning.
  • use your loaf, at use your head The idiom "use your loaf" is primarily used in British English and it means to use one's common sense or intelligence. It is similar in meaning to "use your head" or "think logically." This idiom is often used to encourage someone to think carefully or make sensible decisions.
  • champ at the bit The idiom "champ at the bit" refers to a person's or animal's restlessness or impatience to start or do something. It originates from the behavior of horses that pull at the bit in their mouths when eager to move forward, often accompanied by a chomping or gnawing motion.
  • in well with, at well in (with) The idiom "in well with" or "at well in (with)" refers to being in a favorable or harmonious relationship or situation with someone or a group of people. It implies that the person is well-liked, accepted, or respected by others and has their support or friendship.
  • at will The idiom "at will" refers to the ability or freedom to do something as one pleases, without restrictions or limitations. It implies having complete control or authority over a situation or action.
  • wipe sth off the face of the earth/globe, at wipe sth off the map The idiom "wipe something off the face of the earth/globe" or "wipe something off the map" means to completely eradicate or destroy something, usually referring to a place or a group of people. It suggests removing all traces or existence of something so that it no longer exists.
  • oh yeah., at yeah, right! The idiom "oh yeah, at yeah, right!" is typically used sarcastically to express disbelief or doubt about something that has been stated or suggested. It implies that the speaker finds the statement to be highly unlikely, untrue, or exaggerated.
  • yeah, yeah, at yeah, right! The idiom "yeah, yeah, at yeah, right!" is a sarcastic or dismissive response used to express doubt, disbelief, or lack of interest in what someone is saying. It implies that the speaker finds the statement or claim highly unlikely or unconvincing.
  • bless me!, at bless my soul! The idiom "bless me!" or "bless my soul!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, astonishment, or disbelief. It is often used when someone encounters unexpected or remarkable information or experiences an extraordinary event. The phrase is meant to emphasize the speaker's astonishment or their need for divine intervention to comprehend the situation.
  • blow me!, at I'll be blowed! The idiom "blow me!" or "I'll be blowed!" is an exclamation of surprise, disbelief, or astonishment. It is typically used when someone is taken aback or caught off guard by something unexpected or remarkable. This idiom conveys a sense of shock or amazement.
  • make both ends meet, at make ends meet The definition for the idiom "make both ends meet" or "make ends meet" is to have enough income or resources to cover one's expenses and financial needs, especially when the income is limited or insufficient.
  • burn the candle at both ends The idiom "burn the candle at both ends" means to excessively tire yourself out by working or engaging in activities late into the night and starting again early in the morning, therefore not getting enough rest or sleep.
  • push it, at push your luck The idiom "push it" or "push your luck" is used to indicate that someone is taking a risk or testing their limits, often by behaving in a way that is daring or provocative. It implies that the person is venturing into a territory where negative consequences could arise if they continue to push the boundaries. It suggests a warning to be cautious and not overstep reasonable limits or engage in excessively risky behavior.
  • hard at it The idiom "hard at it" means to be working diligently or exerting great effort on a task or activity. It is often used to describe someone who is fully engaged and putting in their maximum effort.
  • the pick of the bunch, at the pick of sth The idiom "the pick of the bunch" refers to selecting or choosing the best or most desirable option among a group, usually the best from a collection or selection of something. It implies that the chosen option is superior in quality or standing compared to the others. Additionally, "at the pick of something" refers to being at the peak or highest point of something, indicating the chosen option as the most favorable and optimal choice.
  • burst at the seams The idiom "burst at the seams" refers to a situation or thing that is overly full, strained, or reaching its maximum capacity or limit. It implies that something is expanding or growing rapidly, to the point where it may burst or break due to the pressure.
  • ... at that The idiom "... at that" is used to add emphasis to a statement or remark, often after listing a related point or providing supporting evidence. It is usually employed to indicate that the previous information mentioned is noteworthy, surprising, or impressive.
  • leave it at that The idiom "leave it at that" means to end a conversation, discussion, or situation without further elaboration, explanation, or action. It implies that there is no need to go any further or to continue addressing the matter.
  • at this rate The definition of the idiom "at this rate" is a phrase used to express concern or surprise about a current situation or the expected outcome based on the current progress or speed. It typically implies that if things continue in the same manner, the result will be undesirable or unexpected.
  • at your command The idiom "at your command" means being ready and willing to obey or fulfill someone's wishes or requests. It denotes being available and responsive to someone's authority or instructions.
  • here goes nothing!, at here goes! The idiom "here goes nothing!" or "here goes!" is an expression often used to describe a situation or action where one is about to attempt something risky, challenging, or uncertain. It conveys a sense of determination and willingness to take a leap of faith, even if there is doubt about the outcome or success of the endeavor.
  • look daggers at sb The idiom "look daggers at someone" means to give someone a very angry or hostile look that conveys strong disapproval or displeasure. It implies glaring at someone with intense and piercing eyes, as if ready to attack or harm them with metaphorical daggers.
  • feel hard doneto, at feel hard doneby The idiom "feel hard done to" or "feel hard done by" means to feel unfairly treated or disadvantaged in a situation. It denotes a sense of discontent or resentment towards how one has been treated or the outcome of a particular situation.
  • lay sth at sb's door The idiom "lay something at someone's door" means to blame or attribute a fault or responsibility to someone. It is used to indicate that someone holds another person accountable for a particular situation or problem.
  • at/on the double The idiom "at/on the double" means to hurry up or move quickly, typically in response to a command or urgent situation. It implies a sense of urgency and the need to act with speed and efficiency.
  • at first The idiom "at first" typically means to describe the initial or starting point of something, referring to the earliest stage or moment in a sequence of events or experiences.
  • at hand The idiom "at hand" means that something is readily available, nearby, or within reach. It refers to something that is close by or easily accessible.
  • at heart The idiomatic expression "at heart" means to indicate someone's true or fundamental nature, personality, or beliefs, which may differ from their outward appearance or behavior. It suggests the underlying or essential characteristic or inclination of a person, even if it may not be immediately evident.
  • at large The idiom "at large" typically means not confined or restricted to a specific place or area, unrestricted, or free to move about. It can also refer to someone who is still at large when they have not been captured, apprehended or found.
  • at least The idiom "at least" is used to indicate the minimum amount or a minimum level of something. It suggests that the situation or quantity mentioned is the lowest, and there may be more or a better option available.
  • at peace The idiom "at peace" refers to a state of calmness, tranquility, or contentment, both mentally and emotionally. It indicates a person's ability to be free from inner conflicts, stress, or worry, and to be in harmony with oneself and the surrounding environment.
  • pin your ears back, at pin back your ears The idiom "pin your ears back" or "pin back your ears" typically means to listen attentively, to pay close attention, or to focus intently on what is being said or done. It implies the act of directing one's full attention to something or someone, as if physically pinning back one's ears to capture every sound or piece of information.
  • put your foot in your mouth, at put .your foot in it The idiom "put your foot in your mouth" or "put your foot in it" is used to describe a situation where someone says or does something inadvertently embarrassing, rude, or tactless, usually by accident or without thinking. It refers to making a verbal blunder that leads to an awkward or uncomfortable situation, often resulting in regret or embarrassment for the person speaking.
  • in sth's name, at in the name of sth The idiom "in something's name" or "in the name of something" refers to doing something on behalf of or in representation of that thing or idea. It implies that an action or decision is being made with the authority or permission of a particular entity or in support of a cause. It usually indicates that the action is done to honor, acknowledge, or align with the perceived intentions or wishes of that entity or cause.
  • in sb's/sth's name, at in the name of sb/sth The idiom "in sb's/sth's name" or "in the name of sb/sth" refers to acting or speaking on behalf of someone or something. It means to carry out an action, make a decision, or express oneself using the authority or authorization of another person or entity. It signifies that the person or thing mentioned is the source of approval, endorsement, or responsibility for the action or statement.
  • Good Lord, at (oh) Lord The idiom "Good Lord, at (oh) Lord" expresses surprise, astonishment, or disbelief. It is used to emphasize one's reaction to something unexpected, shocking, or extraordinary. It is an exclamation often used to convey a mix of emotions, such as amazement, frustration, or resignation, depending on the context.
  • at the hands of sb The idiom "at the hands of someone" refers to an action or event being caused or experienced due to someone's actions, usually resulting in harm or suffering. It implies that someone is responsible for a certain negative outcome or situation.
  • keep (sb) at it The idiom "keep (sb) at it" means to encourage or motivate someone to continue putting effort into doing something or to persevere in a task or activity despite difficulties or challenges. It suggests providing support, encouragement, or instructions to ensure the person keeps working diligently towards their goal.
  • lift the lid on sth, at blow/take the lid off sth The idiom "lift the lid on something" or "blow/take the lid off something" means to reveal or expose something that was previously hidden, secret, or confidential. It signifies the act of uncovering or disclosing information or truths that were unknown or kept private.
  • at/in the back of your mind The idiom "at/in the back of your mind" refers to a thought or idea that is not at the forefront of your thoughts or immediate attention, but still present in your subconscious. It suggests that although you may not be actively thinking about it, it is still lingering somewhere in your mind.
  • remain at sm place The idiom "remain at sm place" means to stay or continue to be in a particular location or position for an extended period of time. It implies that the person or thing remains stationary or does not experience any significant change in their position or condition.
  • at sm's request The idiomatic phrase "at someone's request" refers to something being done or carried out due to a specific individual's desire or wish for it to happen. It indicates that the action or behavior is being performed in response to a direct appeal or solicitation from someone.
  • at rest The idiom "at rest" refers to a state of relaxation, calmness, or tranquility. It can describe a person, object, or situation that is in a state of peace or free from disturbance.
  • bay at sth The idiom "bay at sth" refers to when a person or animal loudly and persistently howls, cries, or expresses strong dissatisfaction, anger, or frustration towards something or someone. It is commonly used to describe someone who vehemently protests against a particular situation or outcome. The phrase is often metaphorical, implying a sense of agitation and opposition.
  • roar at sm or sth The idiom "roar at someone or something" means to express strong, loud anger or disapproval towards someone or something. It implies shouting or yelling in a forceful manner out of frustration or irritation.
  • at the top of one's voice The idiom "at the top of one's voice" means to shout or speak very loudly or forcefully. It refers to using the maximum volume or intensity of one's voice while expressing something.
  • rub at The idiom "rub at" generally means to repeatedly touch or apply pressure to a particular area in a vigorous or aggressive manner. It often implies a sense of irritation, annoyance, or frustration. It can be used metaphorically to describe actions, situations, or topics that constantly cause annoyance or provoke negative emotions.
  • run at The idiom "run at" typically refers to an aggressive or impulsive act of attacking or confronting something or someone. It can also imply approaching a challenge with full force or committing to a course of action without hesitation or restraint.
  • foam at the mouth The idiom "foam at the mouth" refers to someone displaying extreme anger, rage, or excitement, often to the point of becoming irrational or losing control. This expression is derived from the literal foaming at the mouth that occurs in certain animals, such as dogs, when they are extremely agitated or in a state of frenzy.
  • sit at The idiom "sit at" means to be present or occupy a particular position or place. It can also refer to having a particular role or responsibility.
  • at sm time sharp The idiom "at sm time sharp" means precisely or exactly at the specified time. It implies punctuality and emphasizes the importance of being on time.
  • scream at sm or sth The idiom "scream at someone or something" means to shout or yell loudly and forcefully in anger, frustration, or fear towards a person or object. It implies an intense emotional reaction expressed through vocalization.
  • sell sth at sth The idiom "sell sth at sth" refers to the act of offering or exchanging something, typically a product or service, for a specified price or value. It indicates the selling or trading of an item at a particular cost or rate.
  • at best The definition of the idiom "at best" is that it describes a situation, outcome, or opinion that represents the most favorable, favorable or best possible result or interpretation of something. It implies that this is the highest level of achievement or quality that can be expected or achieved.
  • at your best The phrase "at your best" refers to someone displaying their highest level of performance, ability, or behavior. It suggests that a person is showcasing their optimal qualities, skills, or characteristics, often implying that they are presenting their most favorable or impressive version of themselves.
  • at one's best The idiom "at one's best" refers to a situation or circumstance in which someone is performing or behaving exceptionally well, displaying their highest level of skill, ability, or competence.
  • at ease The idiom "at ease" means to feel calm, relaxed, or comfortable, often used in a military context to indicate a state of rest or relaxation. It can also be used more generally to describe a state of being free from stress, tension, or discomfort.
  • at home The idiom "at home" refers to being comfortable and familiar in a particular place or situation. It can also imply feeling relaxed and at ease, or having a strong competence or skill in a certain area.
  • at issue The idiom "at issue" is used to refer to a particular subject or matter that is being discussed, debated, or argued about. It signifies that a specific point or topic is the focus of attention or in contention.
  • at (long) last The idiom "at (long) last" means finally or ultimately, referring to something that happened or was achieved after a long period of waiting, anticipation, or delay.
  • at last The idiom "at last" is used to indicate that something has finally happened after a long wait or search, or after encountering various difficulties or delays.
  • at (the very) least The idiom "at (the very) least" means the minimum or smallest amount or level required or expected. It implies that the mentioned thing is the smallest or least that could be done or achieved.
  • at liberty The idiom "at liberty" refers to being free, unrestricted, or not under any form of restraint or confinement. It often denotes the absence of limitations, rules, or obligations that might hinder one's actions or choices. It can also describe a state of freedom from captivity or imprisonment.
  • at (the) most The idiom "at (the) most" is used to indicate the maximum limit or highest possible amount or quantity of something. It signifies that the specified number or situation should not exceed a particular limit or cannot be greater than a certain point.
  • at once The idiom "at once" means to do or happen immediately, without any delay. It suggests a sense of urgency and promptness.
  • at present The idiom "at present" refers to the current moment or time, indicating the specific period or situation one is currently experiencing or witnessing.
  • at random The idiom "at random" means to do something or choose something without any particular pattern, order, or method. It typically implies a lack of deliberate thought or planning.
  • at the ready The idiom "at the ready" means to be prepared, on standby, or in a state of readiness, especially to act or respond quickly when needed. It refers to being fully equipped or available to handle a situation or carry out a task at any moment.
  • at times The idiom "at times" means occasionally or sometimes.
  • at work The definition of the idiom "at work" is when something is actively being done or implemented. It refers to the state or process of undertaking a task, job, or activity.
  • at sb's service The idiom "at sb's service" means that someone is willing and available to assist or help someone else, often in a subservient or helpful manner. It implies that the person is ready to fulfill requests or perform tasks according to the needs or desires of the other person. It expresses a willingness to be at the disposal of someone, providing support, assistance, or any required service.
  • at sm's service The idiom "at someone's service" means that one is willing and ready to help or assist the person mentioned. It conveys a sense of being available and committed to fulfilling someone's needs or desires.
  • set at The idiom "set at" typically means to determine or fix a certain value, level, or position for something. It can refer to establishing a specific price, rate, goal, target, or standard. It is often used when discussing quantifiable or measurable aspects of a situation or object.
  • cut at The idiom "cut at" typically means to criticize or attack someone or something, usually using harsh or hurtful words. It often implies an intention to wound, belittle, or undermine the person or thing being targeted.
  • shoot daggers at The idiom "shoot daggers at" means to look at someone with intense anger, hostility, or resentment. It refers to giving someone a piercing or menacing stare, as if conveying a threatening or antagonistic message nonverbally.
  • bang at The idiom "bang at" means to vigorously or forcefully attempt to do or achieve something. It implies exerting significant effort, determination, or intensity in pursuing a goal or completing a task.
  • bark sth out at sm The idiom "bark something out at someone" typically means to say or shout something in a loud, abrupt, or harsh manner, often expressing annoyance, anger, or a command. It implies speaking forcefully, without consideration for the other person's feelings or opinions.
  • beat at The idiom "beat at" typically means to strike or hit repeatedly in an attempt to defeat or overpower someone or something. It can also be used metaphorically to describe exerting immense effort or determination to overcome a challenge or obstacle.
  • slash (out) at sm To "slash (out) at someone" is an idiomatic expression that means to attack or criticize them, often vehemently and without restraint, through words or actions. It implies launching a verbal or aggressive assault on someone, often with the intention of causing harm, either physically or emotionally.
  • smart at sth The idiom "smart at sth" means feeling acute or sharp pain or discomfort from a particular thing or action. It is often used to convey physical or emotional sensitivity or sensitivity to criticism.
  • snort at sm or sth The idiom "snort at someone or something" refers to the act of scoffing, expressing disrespect, or belittling someone or something through a short, sharp breath through the nose, often accompanied by a derisive sound or facial expression. It implies a dismissive or contemptuous reaction.
  • touch at sm place The idiom "touch at sm place" means briefly stopping or visiting a place during one's journey or travel. It implies a short pause or momentary stay at a specific location, usually not for an extended period of time.
  • out at sm place The idiom "out at (somewhere)" refers to being away from a specific location or establishment, typically for social or recreational activities. It implies that the person is not at their usual or expected place.
  • panic at sth The idiom "panic at something" refers to the state of sudden and extreme fear, anxiety, or agitation caused by a specific situation, event, or stimulus. It implies a loss of control or the inability to cope with a given circumstance, leading to an overwhelming emotional response.
  • the ghost/spectre at the feast The idiom "the ghost/spectre at the feast" refers to a person or thing that detracts from the enjoyment or celebration of an event or gathering, often by reminding others of a specific issue or problem that is causing distress or unease. It alludes to the presence of something unsettling or unwelcome, similar to a ghost or spectre.
  • spell sm (at sth) The idiom "spell sm (at sth)" refers to someone's attempt at doing or achieving something, particularly when it requires a lot of effort, determination, or skill. It indicates that the person is making a focused and sincere attempt to accomplish a task or succeed in a particular endeavor.
  • boggle at sth The idiom "boggle at something" means to be surprised, shocked, or hesitant when faced with a particular situation, idea, or task. It refers to the act of being unable to mentally or emotionally process or accept something.
  • squirt sth at sm or sth The idiom "squirt something at someone or something" means to forcefully project or release a liquid or substance towards a specific person or object. It implies shooting or spraying a liquid in a fast and concentrated manner in their direction. This can be either intentional or accidental.
  • stab at sm or sth The idiomatic expression "stab at something/someone" means to make an attempt or try something without a guarantee of success. It implies giving it a go or trying one's hand at something, often without being highly skilled or experienced.
  • stab sth at sm or sth The idiom "stab something at someone or something" means to forcefully direct or throw something towards someone or something. This phrase suggests a sudden, aggressive, and often reckless action, similar to thrusting a knife or a sharp object at someone or something. It implies a lack of precision, control, or care in the action being performed.
  • at halfmast The idiom "at half-mast" refers to the act of lowering a flag halfway down its pole or mast as a sign of mourning or respect for someone who has died.
  • at this stage of the game The idiom "at this stage of the game" means at the current point in a situation or process, typically implying that it is too late or too far along to change or expect significant developments. It refers to the progress or advancement made in a particular endeavor.
  • stand at The idiom "stand at" typically means to be in a particular state or position, often in terms of numbers, figures, or statistics. It is commonly used when referring to the current level, value, or measurement of something. It can also mean to remain at a specific place or location without moving.
  • stare out at sm or sth The idiom "stare out at someone or something" means to gaze intensely or fixedly at someone or something for an extended period of time. It suggests a focused and concentrated act of looking, often accompanied by curiosity, contemplation, or a sense of astonishment.
  • (at) full pelt/steam/tilt The idiom "(at) full pelt/steam/tilt" means doing something at the highest or maximum speed or intensity possible. It implies putting in maximum effort or moving as fast as one can.
  • play at The idiom "play at" means to engage in an activity or take part in a role or profession casually, without serious commitment or intention. It typically refers to doing something as if it were a game or a temporary endeavor, rather than a serious or dedicated pursuit.
  • at play The idiom "at play" typically means actively in action or influencing something. It suggests that something is in operation or having an impact on a situation or outcome.
  • stop at The idiom "stop at" typically means to limit or restrict oneself to a certain point or level, rather than going beyond it. It implies setting a boundary or ceasing a particular action at a specific extent.
  • storm at sm or sth The idiom "storm at someone or something" typically means to express strong anger, frustration, or disapproval towards someone or something. It implies a sudden and intense outburst of negative emotions, often accompanied by strong words or actions.
  • strike at The idiom "strike at" means to make a forceful or powerful attack or attempt at something, often with the intention of causing harm or trying to achieve a specific outcome. It can also refer to making a strong impact or impression.
  • buy at The idiom "buy at" typically refers to the ability to purchase something at a specific price or under specific circumstances that are advantageous. It means to acquire or obtain something at a favorable or discounted price.
  • buy sth at sth The idiom "buy something at something" typically refers to purchasing an item or service at a particular price or for a specific cost. It indicates the amount of money paid or exchanged in return for a product or service. The "at" in this idiom signifies the price or cost associated with the purchase.
  • succeed at sth The idiom "succeed at sth" means to achieve or attain success in a particular activity, task, or endeavor. It refers to accomplishing a goal or objective with favorable results.
  • swing at sb/sth The idiom "swing at sb/sth" means to take a swing or attempt to hit someone or something. It can be used both literally and figuratively. In a literal sense, it refers to physically swinging or hitting an object or person, usually in a forceful or aggressive manner. Figuratively, it implies attempting to criticize, attack, or confront someone or something, often in a verbal or emotional manner.
  • swing at sm or sth The idiom "swing at someone or something" typically means to make an attempt at attacking or hitting someone or something, either literally or figuratively. It can refer to physical actions of swinging one's arm or an object towards a target, or metaphorically taking a shot at achieving something or expressing strong disapproval.
  • catch at The idiom "catch at" means to try to grasp or seize something quickly, often with a sense of urgency or eagerness. It can also refer to trying to find or take advantage of an opportunity.
  • rage at sm or sth The idiom "rage at someone or something" means to express strong and uncontrollable anger or fury towards a person or thing. It signifies an intense emotional reaction, often accompanied by aggressive or violent behavior.
  • talk at The idiom "talk at" refers to a conversation style where one person speaks to someone else without any real exchange or interaction. It implies that there is no genuine interest in listening or receiving a response, but rather just a desire to express oneself or talk without considering the other person's perspective or input. It often suggests a one-sided or one-way communication.
  • tap at sth The idiom "tap at something" typically means to lightly touch or make gentle movements with one's fingers or a tool on a specific object or surface. It can also refer to acquiring or accessing information or resources from a particular source, often in a careful or subtle manner.
  • come at The idiom "come at" typically refers to someone or something approaching or attacking someone or something else with the intention of confronting or engaging in a conflict or argument. It can be used both in a literal and figurative sense.
  • tear at To "tear at" can mean either physically ripping or shredding something aggressively, or emotionally distressing or tormenting someone deeply.
  • lose one's temper (at sm or sth) The idiom "lose one's temper (at someone or something)" means to become angry or irritable in response to someone or something that has provoked or frustrated you.
  • charge at sm or sth The idiom "charge at someone or something" typically means to run or move quickly and aggressively towards someone or something in an attempt to attack, confront, or engage with them forcefully. It can also imply attacking or tackling a problem or situation in a determined and assertive manner.
  • cheat at sth The idiom "cheat at something" means to engage in dishonest manipulations or deceptive actions in order to gain an unfair advantage or succeed in a particular activity, often to the detriment of others involved.
  • thrust sth at sm or sth The idiom "thrust something at someone or something" means to present or force something towards someone or something with a sudden, forceful movement. It implies a rapid or aggressive action, often without warning or consideration for the recipient.
  • curse at sm or sth The idiom "curse at someone or something" means to express strong anger or disapproval by uttering offensive or profane words towards a person or an object. It involves using swear words or derogatory language to show intense frustration or dissatisfaction.
  • at the top of voice The idiom "at the top of voice" means to speak or shout as loudly as possible. It implies speaking or shouting with full volume and intensity.
  • at the top of the ladder The idiom "at the top of the ladder" refers to being in the highest position or achieving the highest level of success or status in a particular field or hierarchy. It implies reaching the peak of one's career or accomplishments.
  • at the top of game The idiom "at the top of one's game" means to be performing at one's highest level of skill, ability, or expertise in a particular field or activity. It refers to someone who is excelling and performing exceptionally well, often surpassing their peers or competitors.
  • clock sm or sth at sth The idiom "clock sm or sth at sth" means to accurately measure or record the time it takes to do something, typically with the intention of achieving a specific result or deadline. It implies a precise and efficient measurement of time to keep track of progress or completion.
  • toss sth at sm or sth The idiom "toss something at someone or something" typically means to casually or carelessly throw or give something to someone or something. It implies that the action is done without much thought or consideration.
  • trade at The idiom "trade at" refers to the price or value at which a financial instrument, such as a stock, bond, or commodity, is currently being bought and sold on a market. It denotes the current trading price or the prevailing market value of a given asset.
  • present sm (to sm) (at sth) The idiom "present someone (to someone) (at something)" means to introduce or make someone known to another person or a group of people during a specific event or occasion. It often implies a formal introduction or acknowledgement of someone's presence in a particular gathering or situation.
  • prod at sm or sth The idiom "prod at sm or sth" means to poke, push, or nudge someone or something repeatedly, usually in an effort to test or provoke a reaction or to prompt further action or response.
  • push at The idiom "push at" typically means to make an effort or attempt to achieve or influence something, often with perseverance or determination. It suggests the idea of exerting force or pressure to overcome obstacles or resistance in order to accomplish a desired outcome.
  • at the double The idiom "at the double" is a British military command that means to move quickly and with urgency, usually requiring immediate action or response. It is commonly used to instruct someone to hurry or proceed at a fast pace.
  • land at The idiom "land at" typically refers to the act of arriving or reaching a particular destination or location, usually by means of an aircraft or other form of transportation that involves touching the ground. It indicates the point of final descent and touchdown on a specified area.
  • value sth at sth The phrase "value something at something" refers to the act of assigning a specific worth or monetary estimation to an object, product, service, or idea. It involves determining the market price or evaluating the importance, quality, or significance of something based on certain criteria or considerations.
  • cut eyes at The idiom "cut eyes at" refers to a nonverbal expression or gesture made by someone, usually in an unpleasant or disapproving manner, where they look at another person in a contemptuous or disdainful way. It is often used to convey a silent message of disapproval, frustration, or resentment towards the person being looked at.
  • dab at sth The idiom "dab at something" refers to lightly touching or patting an object or area, usually with a cloth or tissue. It suggests a gentle and quick movement, often used when trying to remove a small amount of liquid or substance from a surface.
  • shoot daggers at sb The idiom "shoot daggers at someone" means to give someone an angry or hostile look, often with intense or piercing eyes. It conveys the idea of expressing strong disapproval, anger, or resentment towards someone through glaring or staring at them with a fierce or penetrating gaze.
  • look daggers at sm The idiom "look daggers at someone" means to glare or give someone an intense, angry, or hostile look. It implies shooting imaginary daggers from one's eyes, visualizing a threatening or piercing stare directed towards someone.
  • dart out (of sth) (at sm or sth) The idiom "dart out (of sth) (at sm or sth)" typically means to quickly and suddenly move or run out of a place, often towards someone or something. It implies a swift and unexpected action, often with a sense of urgency or surprise.
  • lie at death's door The idiom "lie at death's door" means to be extremely ill or close to death. It portrays the severity of a person's condition, suggesting that they are on the verge of dying.
  • at death's door The idiom "at death's door" is used to describe someone who is extremely ill or close to dying. It implies that the person's condition is so severe that death seems imminent.
  • wait at sth (for sm or sth) The idiom "wait at (something) for (someone or something)" means to remain in a particular location, usually in anticipation or expectation of a specific person or thing. It implies staying in one place until the expected event or person occurs.
  • demur at sth To demur at something means to express hesitation, reluctance, or objection towards it. It implies showing doubt or disagreement regarding a particular idea, request, or action.
  • wave back (at sm) The idiom "wave back (at someone)" means to respond to someone's wave by making a similar gesture, typically raising one's hand and moving it side to side in a friendly manner. It denotes reciprocating a wave as a gesture of acknowledgement, greeting, or farewell to the person who initiated the wave.
  • wave at sm The idiom "wave at sm" typically means making a friendly or acknowledging gesture towards someone, usually by raising one's hand and moving it back and forth in their direction as if to greet or attract their attention.
  • dine at (sm place) The idiom "dine at (sm place)" typically means to have a meal or eat at a specific location, such as a restaurant, café, or someone's home. It implies the act of sitting down to eat, usually in a social or formal setting.
  • direct sth at sm or sth The idiom "direct something at someone or something" means to aim, address, or target something specifically towards a particular person or thing. It can refer to physically pointing or directing something at someone, or it can also mean directing words, actions, or emotions towards someone or something in a deliberate manner.
  • win at sth The idiom "win at something" means to achieve success or victory in a particular activity or endeavor. It implies achieving a favorable outcome or accomplishing a goal. It can be used in various contexts, such as winning at a game, sport, competition, or any other pursuit where there is a measurable result or achievement.
  • win sth at sth The idiom "win something at something" typically means to achieve or obtain something as a result of a competition, contest, or similar event. It implies that one has successfully emerged as the victor or the best among others in that particular event.
  • wince at sth The idiom "wince at something" means to show a physical or emotional reaction of discomfort or pain in response to something unpleasant or distressing. It can involve a slight flinching, grimacing, or involuntary movement of the body, usually due to something that is seen, heard, or experienced.
  • at your wit's end The idiom "at your wit's end" means to be completely perplexed, frustrated, or at a loss of what to do in a particular situation, often implying a state of extreme mental or emotional exhaustion.
  • at one's wit's end "At one's wit's end" is an idiom that means being extremely frustrated, confused, or perplexed, usually due to being unable to find a solution to a problem or a way out of a difficult situation. It implies a state of desperation or a feeling of being unable to think clearly or logically.
  • take one at word The correct idiom is "take one at their word," and its definition is to accept or believe someone's statement or promise without questioning or doubting it.
  • work at The idiom "work at" means to make an effort or endeavor to achieve or improve something. It entails dedicating time and energy towards a particular goal or objective.
  • lay at door The idiom "lay at one's door" means to blame or place responsibility on someone for a particular action, mistake, or problem. It suggests holding someone accountable or attributing fault to them for a specific situation.
  • hard at (sth) The idiom "hard at (sth)" means to put a lot of effort or concentration into doing something. It implies working diligently and with dedication on a particular task or activity.
  • jab at sm or sth The idiom "jab at someone or something" refers to making a sarcastic, critical, or mocking comment or action in order to provoke or criticize them or it. It involves delivering a quick and sharp verbal or metaphorical attack, usually meant to expose a flaw, point out a weakness, or express disapproval.
  • jab sth at sm or sth To "jab something at someone or something" means to thrust, poke, or stab at someone or something with force or suddenness. It implies a quick and aggressive movement, often done in a hasty or careless manner. This can be both literal, involving physical actions, or figurative, referring to verbal or emotional actions.
  • yank at sm or sth The definition of the idiom "yank at something" or "yank at someone" is to pull or tug forcefully and abruptly on something or someone. It implies using a strong, jerking motion to extract or move something. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a forceful or aggressive action towards a person or situation.
  • yell sth out (at sm or sth) The idiom "yell something out (at someone or something)" means to shout or speak loudly in order to get someone's attention or to communicate something quickly and forcefully. It often implies urgency or a need for immediate response.
  • yell sth at sm or sth The idiom "yell sth at sm or sth" means to shout or yell something loudly and aggressively towards someone or something. It indicates that the person is expressing their thoughts, emotions, or commands forcefully and usually in an angry or aggressive manner.
  • drive at The idiom "drive at" means to have a specific purpose or intention behind one's words or actions, often with an underlying motive or message that is implied rather than directly stated. It implies that the person is leading towards a particular point or conclusion.
  • put one at (one's) ease The idiom "put one at (one's) ease" is used to describe the act of making someone feel comfortable, relaxed, or free from stress or anxiety in a particular situation. It implies making one feel at home or at ease in one's surroundings.
  • nip at sm or sth The idiom "nip at someone or something" typically means to bite or nibble in a quick and gentle manner. It can be used literally to describe the action of an animal biting lightly, or figuratively to describe someone's critical or snappy behavior towards someone or something.
  • at the zenith of sth The idiom "at the zenith of something" means to be at the highest point or peak of something, usually referring to one's success, power, or influence. It suggests that someone or something has reached the pinnacle or apex of their achievement or performance.
  • eat at The idiom "eat at" typically means to cause lingering worry, guilt, or discomfort to someone. It refers to a situation, memory, or thought that continues to bother or distress a person over time.
  • hold at The idiom "hold at" means to remain steady, maintain a stable position, or keep something at a certain level, often related to stock prices, interest rates, or other numerical values. It implies the act of not increasing or decreasing current conditions or values.
  • at wit's end The idiom "at wit's end" means to be in a state of extreme frustration, confusion, or helplessness, usually when trying to solve a problem or overcome a difficulty, and not knowing what else to do.
  • at loose ends The idiom "at loose ends" refers to a state of feeling restless, uncertain, or without purpose. It implies a sense of being unable to find a specific task or direction to occupy oneself with, which can lead to a feeling of aimlessness or frustration.
  • place at The idiom "place at" generally refers to assigning or designating a position, rank, or status to something or someone. It can also indicate the act of ranking or considering something in a particular category or context.
  • pick at The idiom "pick at" means to repeatedly and continuously poke, prod, or touch something lightly and often irritably, or to fuss or complain about something in a critical or nitpicky manner. It can also refer to eating food slowly or sparingly, without much appetite or enthusiasm.
  • rebel at sm or sth The idiom "rebel at someone or something" means to resist or oppose someone or something, often due to a strong disagreement or dissatisfaction. It implies a rebellious behavior or attitude against authority, rules, norms, or any form of control.
  • peek at sm or sth The idiom "peek at someone or something" means to quickly and surreptitiously look at someone or something, often out of curiosity or with the intention of obtaining information or catching a glimpse of something. It implies taking a brief and secretive glance.
  • at the back of mind The idiom "at the back of one's mind" means that something is not currently at the forefront of one's thoughts or consciousness, but is still present or lingering in their subconscious thoughts.
  • point at The idiom "point at" means to direct attention, blame, or accusation towards someone or something.
  • at the point of The idiom "at the point of" typically means being very close to or on the verge of a certain situation, action, or state. It suggests that someone is in a critical or crucial position, almost reaching a breaking point or a significant turning point.
  • pull at The definition of the idiom "pull at" is to tug or yank at someone or something, often in a persistent or insistent manner. It can also refer to emotionally affecting or tugging on someone's heartstrings.
  • make eyes at The idiom "make eyes at" means to look at someone in a way that conveys romantic interest or attraction. It often involves using flirty or seductive expressions or gestures to catch someone's attention.
  • hit at The idiom "hit at" generally means attempting or making an insinuation or criticism towards someone or something, often indirectly or subtly. It can also refer to trying to attack or strike something with force, both physically or metaphorically.
  • lash back (at sm or sth) The idiom "lash back (at someone or something)" means to react strongly and angrily to a person or situation that has caused frustration or resentment. It involves expressing intense criticism, blame, or anger towards the source of one's dissatisfaction.
  • lash at sm or sth The idiom "lash at someone or something" means to criticize, attack, or strongly rebuke someone or something verbally or physically. It typically involves expressing anger, frustration, or disapproval towards the subject.
  • at the rear of sth The idiom "at the rear of something" refers to being situated or located at the back or behind something or someone. It implies being in the position furthest from the front or the main area.
  • at heels The idiom "at heels" typically refers to someone who is following closely behind someone else, often to the point of being persistent or annoying. It can also describe someone who is constantly monitoring or tracking another person's actions.
  • howl at sm or sth The idiom "howl at someone or something" refers to expressing extreme anger, frustration, or opposition towards someone or something by shouting loudly or passionately. It can also signify vehemently criticizing or opposing a particular idea, person, or situation.
  • grin at sm or sth The expression "grin at someone or something" means to smile widely at someone or something in a cheerful or playful manner.
  • look daggers at To "look daggers at" someone means to give them a very angry or hostile look, often expressing strong disapproval or resentment towards them. It implies using intense and piercing eye contact, resembling the sharpness and aggression associated with daggers.
  • look at The idiom "look at" typically means to consider or examine a particular situation or topic closely. It can also mean to review or analyze something in order to understand it better.
  • glance down (at sth) The idiom "glance down (at sth)" refers to the act of quickly directing one's gaze downward towards something. It implies taking a brief look or a quick visual inspection at a lower position or level.
  • peer at sm or sth The idiom "peer at something or someone" means to look at something or someone closely, often trying to see or discern details or to understand more clearly. It suggests a deliberate and attentive examination, typically involving focusing one's eyes or attention intently on the subject.
  • at hazard The idiom "at hazard" refers to something being done or decided upon without careful consideration or planning, and instead being based on chance, luck, or random choice. It implies that there is a lack of risk assessment or proper thought given to the potential consequences or outcomes of the action or decision.
  • ogle (at) sm or sth The idiom "ogle (at) someone or something" means to stare at someone or something with strong interest, often in a way that is suggestive or inappropriate. It implies looking at someone or something in a way that is not discreet or respectful.
  • lose at The idiom "lose at" means to be defeated or not succeed in a particular activity or competition. It implies experiencing a loss or failure in a specific context or situation.
  • rant at sm or sth To "rant at someone or something" means to speak or complain loudly, vehemently, or angrily about them or it. It often implies a lengthy and impassioned monologue or tirade expressing frustration, dissatisfaction, or criticism towards a person, situation, or thing.
  • poke sth at sm or sth The idiom "poke something at someone or something" means to proactively or provocatively incite or agitate someone or something. It often implies deliberately provoking a reaction or a response, typically in a negative or antagonistic manner.
  • jump at The idiom "jump at" means to eagerly and immediately take advantage of an opportunity or offer, especially when it is unexpected or beneficial. It implies a quick and excited response or acceptance.
  • leap at sth The idiom "leap at sth" means to eagerly or enthusiastically seize or accept an opportunity or offer without hesitation. It implies that one is excited and willing to take immediate action, demonstrating eagerness and enthusiasm.
  • leap at sm or sth The idiom "leap at something" means to quickly and eagerly seize an opportunity or chance. It implies a sense of enthusiasm and decisiveness in taking advantage of a certain situation or option.
  • hurl sm or sth at sm or sth The idiom "hurl something at someone" means to forcefully throw or hurl an object in the direction of someone or something. It implies a sudden, aggressive, and often violent action of physically launching an object towards a target. This can be used both in a literal sense (throwing an object) and figuratively (using words or insults aggressively).
  • hiss at sm or sth The idiom "hiss at someone or something" refers to the act of expressing disapproval, anger, or contempt towards someone or something by making a hissing sound, often mimicking the behavior of a snake. It can be a metaphorical way of voicing strong negative emotions or dissent towards a person, action, or idea.
  • flash sth at sm or sth To "flash something at someone or something" means to quickly show or display something briefly, often for the purpose of drawing attention or making an impression. It implies a sudden and brief action of revealing or presenting something in a bold or noticeable manner.
  • fly at The idiom "fly at" means to attack or pounce on someone or something aggressively, usually out of anger or aggression. It can also be used to describe someone's aggressive approach towards a task or situation.
  • lay at feet The phrase "lay at feet" typically means to present or offer something, such as praise, blame, or responsibility, to someone. It suggests giving recognition or acknowledgment directly to someone, usually in a humble or submissive manner.
  • grope at sm or sth The idiom "grope at something" typically means to search for or attempt to understand something without a clear or definite direction or method. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is trying to find a solution or answer but is unsure of what steps to take or has limited knowledge or information on the matter. The phrase can also be used to convey a sense of uncertainty, confusion, or a lack of focus in attempting to accomplish a task or goal.
  • at own game The idiom "at own game" refers to the act of defeating or outperforming someone in an activity or competition in which they themselves are usually skilled or dominant. It implies overcoming an opponent by using their own tactics, strategies, or strengths against them, resulting in a victory or success.
  • fuss at sm or sth The idiom "fuss at someone or something" means to complain, scold, or criticize someone or something in an excessive or exaggerated manner. It involves expressing annoyance or discontent towards a person or thing, often in a persistent or bothersome way.
  • gasp at sm or sth The idiom "gasp at someone or something" means to react with a sudden, sharp intake of breath due to surprise, shock, or astonishment caused by someone or something. It implies being taken aback or having a strong emotional response to the person or thing being observed.
  • kick at The idiom "kick at" means to make an attempt or try something, often with frustration or lack of success. It refers to taking a physical or metaphorical action resembling a kick, indicating that one is attempting to achieve a desired outcome.
  • glare at sm or sth The idiom "glare at someone or something" means to gaze intensely and angrily at someone or something. It refers to a piercing, hostile stare that conveys disapproval, anger, or frustration towards the person or object being looked at.
  • at the hands of The idiom "at the hands of" means experiencing something or being affected by something in a negative or harmful way, usually caused by the actions or behavior of someone else. It implies that someone is responsible for inflicting harm or causing a particular outcome.
  • honk at sm or sth The idiom "honk at someone or something" refers to the act of sounding a car horn loudly in order to get someone's attention or express annoyance or disapproval towards someone or something.
  • pale at sth The idiom "pale at something" refers to the experience of feeling inferior, insignificant, or inadequate in comparison to something or someone. It implies that one's abilities, accomplishments, or qualities are greatly overshadowed by the exceptional nature of the thing or person being compared to.
  • laugh at The idiom "laugh at" means to find something humorous or amusing and express amusement through laughter. It involves finding enjoyment or entertainment in someone or something, often involving mockery or ridicule.
  • make eyes at sm The idiom "make eyes at someone" means to look at someone in a way that suggests attraction or flirtation. It involves using eye contact, expressions, or gestures to show interest or romantic intent towards another person.
  • jaw at sm The idiom "jaw at someone" means to talk to or lecture someone for an extended period of time, often in a forceful or critical manner. It implies that the person speaking is excessively verbose or nagging, while the person being spoken to is passive or unwilling to engage in the conversation. It can also refer to someone complaining or scolding another person in a repetitive manner.
  • catch sm at sth The idiom "catch someone at something" means to find someone in the act of doing something, especially if it is something they shouldn't be doing or if they are unaware that they are being observed.
  • leer at sm The idiom "leer at someone" means to look at or gaze at someone in a suggestive or offensive manner, typically with a lustful or malicious intent. It implies a lewd or inappropriate scrutiny, often making the person being stared at uncomfortable or objectified.
  • stand at sth The idiom "stand at sth" typically means to be positioned or located at a specific place or point. It can also refer to being at a certain stage or level of something, such as in a process or a competition. The exact meaning and usage can vary based on the context in which it is used.
  • lob sth at sm or sth The idiom "lob something at someone or something" means to throw or aim something in a careless or haphazard manner towards a person or object, often with a lack of precision or accuracy. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • peep at sm or sth The idiom "peep at someone or something" means to take a quick look or glance at someone or something secretly or furtively, typically in a cautious or surreptitious manner.
  • rate sth at sth To "rate something at something" means to assess or evaluate the value, worth, quality, or significance of something and assign it a specific rating or numerical value. It implies the act of comparing or measuring one thing against a standard or benchmark in order to determine its level, position, or level of importance. This expression is often used when discussing rankings, grading, or appraisals.
  • at that rate The idiom "at that rate" is often used to express that if a particular action, situation, or trend continues at its current pace, it may result in a certain outcome or consequence. It implies that if things continue as they have been, the expected outcome will be reached or a certain conclusion can be drawn.
  • at this stage at this stage: at this point in time; currently; presently.
  • keep at The idiom "keep at" means to persistently or continuously work on something, usually despite difficulties, obstacles, or setbacks. It implies a determination to stay committed, focused, and dedicated to achieve a particular goal or complete a task.
  • at someone's command The idiom "at someone's command" means to be under someone's control, authority, or at their disposal, following their orders or instructions readily.
  • at one's wits' end The idiom "at one's wits' end" means to be extremely frustrated, confused, or agitated because one cannot find a solution or way out of a difficult or challenging situation. It can describe a state of being mentally or emotionally exhausted, having tried all possible options and still not knowing what to do.
  • wink at The idiom "wink at" means to deliberately ignore or disregard something, often a wrongdoing or an offense, without taking any action or showing disapproval. It implies turning a blind eye to a certain matter, pretending not to notice or overlooking it intentionally.
  • at war The idiom "at war" refers to being involved in a conflict or a state of intense disagreement. It can be used to describe a situation where there is hostility, animosity, or a continuous struggle between individuals, groups, or even nations.
  • hit (out) at The idiom "hit (out) at" means to criticize, attack, or verbally assault someone or something. It implies a feeling of aggression or animosity towards the target, often involving strong words or actions in response to a perceived provocation or wrongdoing.
  • hint at The idiom "hint at" means to suggest or imply something indirectly or subtly, without explicitly stating it. It involves dropping small clues or indications to convey a message or make someone aware of a particular idea or concept.
  • peck at To "peck at" is an idiom that means to continuously criticize, nag, or find fault with someone or something in an annoying or relentless manner, similar to how a bird pecks at its food. It implies repeatedly picking or nitpicking at minor flaws or issues.
  • at heel The idiom "at heel" refers to being under someone's close supervision or control. It typically implies being obedient or submissive to someone, similar to how a well-trained dog walks closely beside its owner's heel.
  • down at the heel The idiom "down at the heel" means to be in a poor or shabby state, particularly relating to someone's appearance or the condition of their shoes or clothing. It implies a lack of care, upkeep, or financial stability.
  • out at the heel (or heels) The idiom "out at the heel (or heels)" refers to someone who is looking shabby, worn-out, or impoverished. It is often used to describe someone whose clothes or shoes are in poor condition and suggests a state of neglect or lack of means.
  • at the hand of The idiom "at the hand of" typically means to be caused or inflicted by someone or something. It refers to an action or event that is directly caused by a specific person, entity, or circumstance.
  • hammer (away) at The idiom "hammer (away) at" refers to persistently and continuously working on or addressing a particular task, issue, or problem. It implies intense and determined effort, often with repetition, to achieve a desired outcome or to make a point. It can also suggest relentless persistence in pursuing a goal or relentlessly emphasizing a particular idea or argument.
  • in at the death The idiom "in at the death" typically refers to being present or involved in the final moments or conclusion of a situation, particularly a conflict, competition, or event. It implies being there until the very end, often when the outcome is determined or impending. The phrase can be used figuratively to describe someone who remains committed or involved until the outcome is decided, regardless of the difficulty or danger involved.
  • at risk The idiom "at risk" means being in a dangerous or vulnerable situation where there is a potential for harm, loss, or negative outcomes.
  • stare daggers at The idiom "stare daggers at" means to look at someone with intense hostility, anger, or resentment. It implies a strong and intense glare that conveys the person's negative emotions towards the subject being stared at.
  • get at The idiom "get at" means to imply or suggest something indirectly, often with the intention of criticizing or accusing someone. It is commonly used when someone is trying to communicate a message or express their real thoughts indirectly or with subtle hints.
  • at the mercy of The idiom "at the mercy of" means being in a situation where you have no control or power over someone or something, and are dependent on their actions or decisions. It implies being vulnerable and subjected to the will or treatment of others without any ability to protect or defend oneself.
  • at someone's service The idiom "at someone's service" means that someone is ready and willing to do something for someone else, indicating a willingness to assist or help in any way possible.
  • lie at someone's door The idiom "lie at someone's door" means to blame or hold someone responsible for something negative or undesirable, usually a mistake, fault, or wrongdoing. It suggests that the responsibility for the situation rests solely on the person being referred to.
  • shoot at The idiom "shoot at" typically means to aim or direct one's efforts or actions towards a specific target or goal. It can also refer to criticizing, attacking, or disparaging someone or something.
  • at sight The idiom "at sight" means that something can be recognized or understood immediately upon seeing it. It refers to the ability to perceive or comprehend something without further examination or analysis.
  • at speed The idiom "at speed" refers to doing something quickly or at a fast pace. It implies performing a task or action with efficiency, swiftness, or rapidity.
  • in at the finish The idiom "in at the finish" means to be present or performing until the very end of a task, competition, or event. It implies being involved or participating until the final outcome or conclusion is reached.
  • at stud The idiom "at stud" refers to a term commonly used in the context of horse breeding. It typically means that a male horse, known as a stallion, is available for breeding purposes and can be used for mating with female horses, known as mares. The phrase is often used in advertisements or discussions related to horse breeding to indicate that the stallion is actively being offered for stud services.
  • at bat The idiom "at bat" refers to a player's turn to bat in a baseball or softball game. It signifies the period when a batter steps into the batter's box and attempts to hit the ball thrown by the pitcher.
  • at table The idiom "at table" typically refers to someone being seated and actively participating in a formal or informal meal or gathering. It means being present and engaged in a social event or discussion that takes place around a table where food is served.
  • at the full The idiom "at the full" typically refers to something being done or happening to its maximum or complete extent. It suggests that something is at its utmost level of intensity or capacity.
  • go at The idiom "go at" generally refers to engaging in something with great determination, energy, or intensity. It means to begin doing or pursuing something with full force or enthusiasm. It often suggests an eagerness or eagerness to accomplish a task or overcome a challenge.
  • at grade The idiom "at grade" refers to something that is situated or located at the same level as the surrounding ground or surface. It typically describes structures or objects, such as buildings, roads, or railway crossings, that are built or positioned without any significant elevation or elevation change compared to the ground level.
  • at odds The idiom "at odds" refers to a state of disagreement or conflict between two or more entities, often used to describe a situation where two people or groups have contrasting opinions, ideas, or objectives. It suggests that there is a lack of agreement or harmony between them.
  • at one The idiom "at one" typically refers to a state of harmony, agreement, or unity among individuals or entities. It suggests that people or things are in agreement, aligned, or united in their thoughts, opinions, or actions. It can also convey a sense of understanding and connection between different parties.
  • at death’s door The idiom "at death's door" means to be very close to death or extremely ill. It refers to a person who is in a critical condition or nearing the end of their life due to severe illness or injury.
  • at this/that rate The idiom "at this/that rate" refers to the way things are currently progressing or developing. It implies that if the current situation continues in the same manner or at the same speed, a particular outcome or conclusion can be anticipated.
  • at cost The idiom "at cost" refers to selling or purchasing something at the original price it was acquired, without any additional profit or mark-up included. It indicates that the price being charged or paid is equal to the actual cost of production or acquisition, without any additional charges for overhead, labor, or profit.
  • put/set somebody’s mind at ease/rest To put/ set somebody’s mind at ease/rest means to reassure or calm someone who is worried or anxious. It refers to easing someone's concerns or fears, making them feel more relaxed and comfortable.
  • at risk (from/of something) The idiom "at risk (from/of something)" refers to the state of being in danger or vulnerable to a certain adverse or negative situation, event, or condition. It suggests a potential harm, harm, or negative outcome that someone or something is exposed to.
  • at the service of somebody/something The idiom "at the service of somebody/something" means being available and willing to assist or support someone or something. It indicates the readiness to work, help, or provide resources for the benefit or fulfillment of a person or an entity's needs, goals, or requirements.
  • at somebody’s service The idiom "at somebody's service" means to be ready and available to assist or help someone. It implies a willingness to take on tasks or fulfill someone's requests promptly and with dedication.
  • at (your) ease The idiom "at (your) ease" typically refers to feeling relaxed, comfortable, or free from tension or stress. It can also indicate a state of being in a position or situation where one is not required to be on guard or alert. The expression is often used in informal or military contexts to request a person to relax or to assure them that they can feel comfortable and be themselves.
  • at source The idiom "at source" typically refers to addressing or dealing with a problem or issue directly from its origin or cause, rather than addressing its consequences or effects. It implies taking action at an early stage or at the root of the problem to prevent it from worsening or spreading.
  • sit at somebody’s feet The idiom "sit at somebody's feet" means to be a devoted and eager student or follower of someone, typically in a literal or figurative sense. It suggests seeking wisdom, guidance, or inspiration from someone considered to be a superior or authority figure.
  • where it’s at The idiom "where it's at" typically means the place or situation that is currently trendy, popular, or important, often referring to the epicenter of an activity or trend. It suggests that the mentioned location or situation is the most happening or desirable at the moment.
  • be bursting/bulging at the seams The idiom "be bursting/bulging at the seams" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely full or overcrowded, to the point of exceeding capacity. It implies that there is no more room or space left, and something is about to burst or break due to the excessive pressure. This can be used in a literal sense to describe a physical object or space, as well as in a figurative sense to depict a situation or group of people that is overwhelmed or overloaded.
  • where it's at The idiom "where it's at" can be defined as the current popular or trendy place or the location of an event, activity, or scene that is considered to be exciting, enjoyable, or important. It often refers to a place or situation where something interesting, valuable, or influential is happening.
  • (at) full pelt The idiom "(at) full pelt" refers to doing something at maximum speed or with great intensity. It suggests moving or performing an action rapidly and energetically.
  • at (one's) ease The idiom "at (one's) ease" means to feel comfortable, relaxed, or free from stress or tension in a particular situation or environment. It implies a state of being at peace and able to be oneself without any pressure or unease.
  • at (one's) heels The idiom "at (one's) heels" means to be pursuing or closely following someone, often in a persistent or aggressive manner. It refers to someone being right behind you or constantly chasing after you.
  • at (one's) own game The idiom "at (one's) own game" is used to describe a situation where someone is successfully competing or defeating someone else in their own area of expertise or specialty. It implies that the person is able to outmatch or outperform their opponent in a particular skill or activity that the opponent is known for or considered skilled in.
  • at (one's) own risk The idiom "at (one's) own risk" refers to a statement or warning that suggests someone will be responsible for any potential harm, loss, or consequences resulting from their own actions or decisions. It implies that there is a level of danger or uncertainty involved, and the individual engaging in the activity or making the choice assumes all liability and should proceed with caution.
  • at (one's) service The idiom "at (one's) service" is used to express a willingness or eagerness to help or assist someone. It signifies a readiness or availability to fulfill someone's needs or requests.
  • at (some time) sharp The idiom "at (some time) sharp" means to do something exactly at the specified time without any delay or deviation. It emphasizes punctuality and precision.
  • at (someone's) mercy The idiom "at (someone's) mercy" means to be completely under the control or power of another person, leaving oneself vulnerable and without any ability to resist or defend.
  • at (someone's) request The idiom "at (someone's) request" means to do something or take action based on someone's specific wish, desire, or demand. It implies that the action is being performed upon the request or instruction of a particular person.
  • at best/worst The idiom "at best/worst" is used to express the most positive or negative outcome or possibility in a given situation or context. It indicates the extreme ends of a spectrum of potential outcomes, emphasizing either the most favorable or the most unfavorable result.
  • at door The idiom "at door" typically refers to someone or something being imminent or about to happen. It suggests that whatever is being referred to is very close or just about to occur.
  • at face value, take The idiom "at face value, take" means to accept something as it appears to be, without questioning its true meaning or intentions. It implies taking information, statements, or situations at their literal or surface level, without analyzing or doubting them.
  • at it The idiom "at it" typically means someone is engaged in an activity or working on something persistently or continuously. It can imply someone is involved in doing something, often with great effort or determination.
  • at its best The idiom "at its best" means to be in its highest or most ideal state or condition. It signifies the optimum or finest version or performance of something.
  • at most The idiom "at most" means the highest or maximum possible amount or degree, indicating a limit or boundary beyond which something cannot exceed.
  • at one's door The idiom "at one's door" refers to something or someone being in close proximity or directly at someone's place of residence or office. It implies that the responsibility, blame, consequence, or impact is directly attributed to that individual.
  • at outs The idiom "at outs" refers to a state of conflict or disagreement between two or more people or groups. It suggests that the individuals involved are not on good terms with each other and are frequently engaged in arguments or quarrels.
  • at par The idiom "at par" refers to a financial term that means the worth or value of something is equal or equivalent to its face or nominal value, especially in relation to bonds, stocks, or currencies. It can also imply that two things are considered equal or on the same level or standard.
  • at request The idiom "at request" means to do something or fulfill a demand or requirement as asked or required by someone else. It signifies carrying out an action based on a specific plea or appeal.
  • at service The idiom "at service" typically means being available or ready to help or assist someone. It often implies being willing to do something for someone else's benefit or satisfaction.
  • at somebody's feet The idiom "at somebody's feet" means to be completely under someone's control or influence, often expressing adoration, loyalty, or submissiveness towards that person.
  • at someone's The idiom "at someone's" typically refers to someone being the target or focus of an action or situation. It indicates that something is directed towards a particular person, often indicating criticism, blame, or attention.
  • at someone's feet, be The idiom "at someone's feet, be" refers to a situation where someone is completely submissive, subservient, or devoted to another person. It means to admire, respect, or love someone to such an extent that they have complete control, power, or influence over the person who is "at their feet."
  • at someone's heels The idiom "at someone's heels" means following closely behind someone, usually in a persistent or bothersome manner. It implies that the person is hounding or pursuing someone closely, often with an intention to observe, monitor, or pester them.
  • at sword's point The idiom "at sword's point" means to be in a state of conflict, enmity, or hostility with someone. It refers to being engaged in a contentious or combative situation, comparable to being on the brink of a swordfight.
  • at that point The idiom "at that point" refers to a specific moment or juncture in a sequence or process, often indicating an important or critical stage. It implies a specific time or circumstance when something noteworthy or significant occurred or became true.
  • at the back of (one's) mind The idiom "at the back of (one's) mind" refers to having a thought or concern that is not at the forefront of one's thoughts but is still present or lingering in one's subconscious. It implies that the thought or concern is being held or remembered, albeit not consciously or prominently.
  • at the back of your mind The idiom "at the back of your mind" refers to when a thought or idea is present in one's consciousness but is not at the forefront of their attention or focus. It implies that something is being considered or remembered, albeit subconsciously or on a secondary level of awareness.
  • at the bottom/top of the pile/heap The idiom "at the bottom/top of the pile/heap" refers to a person, object, or idea being in the lowest or highest position within a group or hierarchy. It implies that the thing in question is of the least or greatest importance, influence, or significance compared to others.
  • at the chalkface The idiom "at the chalkface" refers to being directly involved in teaching or education. It typically denotes the act of being in the classroom, facing the students, and actively delivering instruction.
  • at the feet of The idiom "at the feet of" typically means to be in a subordinate or submissive position to someone else. It suggests being under the authority, guidance, or mentorship of another person, usually someone who is respected or admired.
  • at the helm The idiom "at the helm" refers to being in a position of leadership or control. It means being in charge or having authority over a certain situation or organization. It is typically used metaphorically, likening a person's role to that of a ship's captain who steers the vessel and determines the direction it takes.
  • at the helm/tiller The idiom "at the helm/tiller" refers to being in a position of control or leadership. It originally comes from sailing, where the helm or tiller is the mechanism used to steer a boat. Being "at the helm/tiller" indicates that someone is in charge, making important decisions, and directing the course of action.
  • at the high port The idiom "at the high port" refers to holding oneself or an object in an elevated or prominent position, often denoting a display of pride or readiness.
  • at the least The idiom "at the least" means to consider the lowest amount or the minimum requirement in a given situation. It suggests that even if the situation is not ideal or lacks certain qualities, the minimum expectations should still be met.
  • at the rear of The idiom "at the rear of" means being in or occupying a position behind or at the back of something or someone.
  • at the summit of (one's) success The idiom "at the summit of (one's) success" means reaching the highest point or pinnacle of one's achievements, usually in terms of career, fame, or personal goals. It signifies a moment of great accomplishment or recognition, often accompanied by a sense of pride or fulfillment.
  • at the top of (one's) game "At the top of (one's) game" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who is performing exceptionally well or at their highest level of skill, expertise, or ability in a particular field or activity. It implies that the person is currently in their prime or peak condition and is excelling in their chosen profession or area of interest.
  • at the top of the food chain The idiom "at the top of the food chain" refers to someone or something that holds the highest or dominant position in a particular system or hierarchy. It suggests being at the pinnacle, possessing ultimate power, control, or authority, similar to the role of a predator in an ecosystem.
  • at the top of the tree The idiom "at the top of the tree" refers to being in the highest position or having achieved the greatest level of success in a particular field or organization. It implies that someone or something is the best, most influential, or most powerful.
  • at the zenith of The idiom "at the zenith of" means being at the highest point or peak of something, typically referring to a particular time, success, fame, or power. It signifies the period or state when something or someone is at their most influential, accomplished, or prosperous.
  • at this point The idiom "at this point" refers to the current or specific moment in a situation or conversation. It signifies that the speaker is referring to something occurring or being discussed at that particular time or stage.
  • at top speed The idiom "at top speed" means to move or do something as fast as possible or at the highest possible velocity.
  • at wits' end The idiom "at wits' end" means to be extremely frustrated, confused, or desperate because of a difficult or impossible situation. It refers to the feeling of having exhausted all possible options or solutions and not knowing what else to do.
  • at your heels The idiom "at your heels" typically means someone or something is closely following or persistently chasing after you, often in a figurative sense. It can be used to describe a situation where someone or something is constantly pursuing or pressuring you or staying very close behind you, making it difficult to escape or have any respite.
  • at your service The idiom "at your service" is used to indicate one's willingness and readiness to assist or help someone. It is a polite way of offering one's support and indicates that the person is available to fulfill any request or requirement.
  • at your wits' end The idiom "at your wits' end" means to be extremely frustrated, exhausted, or overwhelmed due to facing a problem or difficult situation for which you do not have a solution or cannot find a way out.
  • at/in one go The idiom "at/in one go" means to complete a task or finish something in a single attempt, without interruptions or breaks. It refers to doing something all at once, without prolonging or dividing the task over multiple instances or periods.
  • at/on somebody's heels The idiom "at/on somebody's heels" refers to closely following or pursuing someone, often in a persistent or intense manner. It suggests being in close proximity and constantly trying to keep up with or track someone's movements or actions.
  • back at it The idiom "back at it" means to resume or start again with determination and energy after a pause, setback, or break. It implies a return to a previous task, activity, or endeavor with a renewed focus and effort.
  • back at you The idiom "back at you" is a phrase used to reflect or return a similar action or comment that was directed towards oneself. It is often employed as a playful or friendly comeback, meaning that the person is reciprocating the same sentiment or action to the other person.
  • bang (away) at The idiom "bang (away) at" typically means to persistently work on or attack something with great effort, enthusiasm, or force. It often conveys the idea of continuous, vigorous, or determined action towards a goal.
  • bark at The idiom "bark at" means to angrily or loudly criticize or reprimand someone or something. It originates from the behavior of dogs, who often bark loudly to express aggression or displeasure. Thus, "bark at" is used metaphorically to describe someone berating or scolding others with intensity or harsh words.
  • bark out at The idiom "bark out at" typically means to shout or speak in a harsh, aggressive, or commanding manner towards someone. It is often used when someone expresses their anger, frustration, or disagreement with loud and forceful words.
  • bay at The idiom "bay at" typically means to howl or bark loudly, usually used to describe the action of dogs. Figuratively, it can also refer to expressing strong opposition or frustration towards someone or something.
  • bay at the moon The idiom "bay at the moon" refers to someone engaging in futile or unattainable pursuits, often used to describe someone who is engaging in pointless arguments or chasing after unrealistic goals. It comes from the image of a dog howling at the moon, as this behavior can be seen as both useless and unachievable.
  • be at The idiom "be at" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To engage in a specific activity or behavior. Example: "He always seems to be at cleaning the house whenever I visit." In this case, "be at" means actively involved in or occupied with a particular task. 2. To be present or available in a certain location. Example: "I will be at the office tomorrow." In this case, "be at" means physically being present or found in a specific place.
  • beat (one) at (one's) own game The idiom "beat (one) at (one's) own game" means to defeat or succeed over someone by using their own strategies, methods, or skills against them. It implies outsmarting or outperforming someone in their area of expertise or preferred activity.
  • blink at The idiom "blink at" means to ignore or disregard something, typically a wrongdoing or unacceptable behavior, without expressing any disapproval or protest. It refers to turning a blind eye or choosing not to acknowledge or confront an issue.
  • boggle at The idiom "boggle at" means to hesitate or be perplexed by something, usually due to it being surprising, difficult, or unfamiliar. It conveys the feeling of being momentarily taken aback or feeling unable to comprehend or decide upon something.
  • boggle at (something) The idiom "boggle at (something)" means to be astonished, overwhelmed, or shocked by something. It is used to express surprise or disbelief in response to a particular situation, statement, or idea.
  • at (someone's) feet The idiom "at (someone's) feet" can be defined as being completely obedient, submissive, or adoring towards someone. It often indicates extreme respect, admiration, or devotion towards another person.
  • at (or on) the double The idiom "at (or on) the double" means to move or act quickly, usually with a sense of urgency or in a hurry. It implies the need for immediate action or expediency.
  • at someone's hands The idiom "at someone's hands" means that someone is responsible for an action or event, usually with negative consequences, which affects another person or group. It implies that the actions or decisions of one individual directly impact or harm another individual or group.
  • howl at the moon The idiom "howl at the moon" means to engage in futile or irrational actions or behaviors, often out of frustration, anger, or desperation. It refers to the act of behaving in a wild or foolish manner without any chance of achieving the desired results, similar to a wolf howling at the moon with no expectation of a response.
  • point the bone at To "point the bone at" someone or something is an idiom that originated in Australian Aboriginal culture. It means to place a curse or hex upon someone by pointing a bone at them during a ritual. The bone is believed to possess mystical powers, and by directing it at someone, it is believed to bring harm or misfortune upon them. In a broader context, the idiom "point the bone at" refers to accusing or assigning blame to someone or something, often with negative consequences or perceived repercussions.
  • set (one's) cap at (someone) The idiom "set one's cap at someone" means to decide or determine to win someone's affection or attraction, typically with the intention of pursuing a romantic relationship with that person. It implies showing special interest and making efforts to woo or impress the individual in question.
  • set your cap at The idiom "set your cap at" is typically used to express someone's romantic interest or desire for a specific person. It means to have a romantic or amorous intention towards someone and to actively pursue a relationship with them. The phrase originated from the practice of women in the 19th century who would wear their caps in a specific manner to indicate their interest in a potential partner.
  • champ (or chafe) at the bit The idiom "champ (or chafe) at the bit" means to be restless, eager, or impatient to start or do something. It originates from the behavior of horses that, when restrained by a bit in their mouths, may gnaw or grind their teeth on it out of impatience or excitement. This idiom is commonly used to describe someone who is eagerly awaiting an opportunity, but feels frustrated or constrained by circumstances or delays.
  • leap at the chance (to do something) The idiom "leap at the chance (to do something)" means to eagerly and eagerly accept or take advantage of an opportunity or offer. It expresses an enthusiastic willingness to seize an occasion or a favorable circumstance without hesitation or delay.
  • charge at The Idiom "charge at" means to make a sudden and forceful movement or attack towards someone or something, usually with great intensity and determination. It implies acting in an aggressive or assertive manner.
  • charge at (someone or something) The idiom “charge at (someone or something)” typically means to move swiftly and aggressively towards a person or object with the intention of attacking, confronting, or overpowering them. It implies a sudden and forceful movement directed towards someone or something.
  • cheat at (something) The idiom "cheat at (something)" refers to the act of dishonestly or unfairly gaining an advantage or manipulating the outcome of a particular situation or activity. It typically implies engaging in deceitful behavior, breaking rules, or disregarding ethical standards in order to achieve personal gain or success.
  • chip at The idiom "chip at" refers to the act of gradually, persistently, or carefully making progress towards a goal or problem by taking small steps or making incremental efforts. It implies steadily and patiently working on something to achieve a desired outcome, often overcoming obstacles or challenges along the way.
  • clock at The idiomatic phrase "clock at" refers to the action of recording or noting the time at which something happens or is completed. It usually implies accurately or precisely noting the time, as one would do with a clock or timekeeping device.
  • curse at (someone or something) The idiom "curse at (someone or something)" refers to the act of expressing intense anger, frustration, or disapproval towards a person or object by reciting offensive, vulgar, or spiritually damaging words or statements. It involves using profanities, insults, or negative language to express strong negative emotions.
  • cut (one) off at the pass The idiom "cut (one) off at the pass" means to prevent or interrupt someone from achieving their goal or completing a task, usually by taking action or making a decision before they have the opportunity to do so themselves. It originates from the image of a cowboy intercepting a person or animal attempting to pass through a mountain pass by positioning oneself strategically beforehand.
  • cut at (someone or something) The idiom "cut at (someone or something)" typically means to criticize or insult someone or something harshly or in a mocking manner. It involves making hurtful remarks or expressing disapproval about a person, an idea, or a situation.
  • cut eyes at (someone or something) The idiom "cut eyes at (someone or something)" means to give a brief, often disapproving or critical, look or glance towards someone or something. It implies looking at someone or something in a sideways or sidelong manner, often accompanied by a negative judgment or attitude.
  • dab at (something) The idiom "dab at (something)" typically means to touch or pat something lightly or briefly, often with a quick and gentle motion. It implies making small, delicate movements to interact with or inspect something without disturbing it too much.
  • shoot daggers at (one) The idiom "shoot daggers at (one)" means to glare at someone with intense anger, hostility, or resentment. It implies conveying strong negative emotions through a piercing or fierce gaze, as if one is shooting sharp objects like daggers toward the person.
  • daggers drawn, at The idiom "daggers drawn, at" means being in a state of intense and bitter hostility, where two or more parties are fiercely opposed to each other and ready to openly confront or attack one another.
  • demur at (something) The idiom "demur at (something)" means to hesitate, object, or raise an objection to something. It signifies expressing doubt or reluctance towards a particular idea, proposal, or action.
  • dig at The idiom "dig at" typically means to make a sarcastic, critical, or mocking remark about someone or something in a subtle or indirect way. It can be used to express an indirect criticism, often with a humorous or teasing tone.
  • direct (something) at (someone or something) The idiom "direct (something) at (someone or something)" means to aim or focus a particular action, statement, or behavior towards a specific person or thing. It can refer to expressing criticism, pointing out flaws, assigning responsibility, or attributing something to someone or something. It implies an intentional targeting or addressing of the subject at hand.
  • dine at (some place) The idiom "dine at (some place)" refers to the act of eating a meal at a particular restaurant or location. It implies that someone is going to have a meal, typically a formal or enjoyable one, at a specific establishment.
  • lay (something) at (one's) door The idiom "lay (something) at (one's) door" means to blame or accuse someone for something that has gone wrong or for a mistake or failure. It suggests that the responsibility or fault solely lies with the person being referred to.
  • lay at someone's door The idiom "lay at someone's door" means to place blame or responsibility on a particular person for a certain action, event, or situation. It implies attributing the fault solely to that person's actions or decisions.
  • lie at (one's) door The idiom "lie at (one's) door" means to be the responsibility or fault of someone. It implies that a particular person is to blame or should be held accountable for a certain situation or wrongdoing.
  • lie at somebody's door The idiom "lie at somebody's door" means to place blame or responsibility for something on someone. It suggests that the fault or consequence of an action is directly related to the person being blamed.
  • down at heel The idiom "down at heel" is used to describe someone or something that is in a poor or neglected state, both physically and financially. It can refer to a person who is shabby or unkempt in appearance, or to something that is run-down or dilapidated.
  • put (oneself) at (one's) ease The idiom "put (oneself) at (one's) ease" means to make oneself or someone else feel relaxed, comfortable, and free from stress or anxiety in a certain situation. It involves creating an atmosphere of calmness or providing reassurance to help someone feel more at ease.
  • put/set somebody's mind at ease/rest The idiom "put/set somebody's mind at ease/rest" means to alleviate someone's worries or concerns, providing them with a sense of calm or reassurance. It involves making someone feel more comfortable, less anxious, or less troubled about a particular situation or issue.
  • up an’ at ’em The idiom "up an’ at ’em" means to be energized, motivated, and ready to take action or start the day with enthusiasm and determination. It implies being proactive and ready to tackle tasks or challenges with vigor and drive.
  • end of one's rope, at the The idiom "end of one's rope, at the" means to be at the point of exhaustion, frustration, or despair, having no more patience, hope, or resources to deal with a situation. It refers to a state of being completely overwhelmed or out of options.
  • when he's, it's, etc. at home? The idiom "when he's, it's, etc. at home" refers to someone or something being at their best or most comfortable state when in their familiar surroundings or environment.
  • take (one) at (one's) word The idiom "take (one) at (one's) word" means to believe or accept what someone says as true and act accordingly, without further questioning or doubting their words. It implies granting someone the benefit of trust and taking their statements as sincere and accurate.
  • fail at life The idiom "fail at life" is a derogatory expression used to imply that someone is utterly unsuccessful or inept in various aspects of their existence, such as personal relationships, career, or overall achievement. It suggests a strong sense of disappointment and lack of fulfillment in life.
  • the ghost at the feast The idiom "the ghost at the feast" refers to a person who behaves or appears in a way that dampens the mood or spoils the enjoyment of a social gathering or celebration. It implies that the individual stands out due to their somber or disruptive demeanor, often reminding others of a negative or depressing topic in an otherwise joyous occasion.
  • the spectre at the feast The idiom "the spectre at the feast" refers to a person or thing that spoils or casts a shadow over a pleasant or joyful situation. It implies that there is a looming or underlying issue or problem that cannot be ignored and negatively affects the overall atmosphere or mood of an event or gathering.
  • lay (something) at (one's) feet The idiom "lay (something) at (one's) feet" means to present or offer something as a gift or tribute to someone. It can also imply taking responsibility for or placing blame on someone for a certain situation or outcome.
  • sit at (someone's) feet The idiom "sit at (someone's) feet" typically means to be in a position of subservience or student-like admiration towards a person, particularly someone of higher knowledge, wisdom, or authority. It is often used figuratively to express a strong desire to learn from or be guided by someone perceived to be highly knowledgeable or influential.
  • world at (one's) feet The idiom "world at (one's) feet" means to have complete control, influence, or dominance over one's surroundings or to be in a position of great power, success, or accomplishment. It suggests that someone has achieved a level of success or mastery that allows them to navigate the world effortlessly and attract admiration or respect from others.
  • full tilt, at The phrase "full tilt, at" means to do something with maximum effort, speed, or intensity. It implies going at full speed or giving one's all in a particular activity or endeavor.
  • play (one) at (one's) own game The idiom "play (one) at (one's) own game" means to compete or engage in a particular activity, typically using the same strategy or tactics as someone else, in order to have an equal chance of success or to outdo them in their own area of expertise. It involves matching or surpassing someone by using their own methods or skills against them.
  • grab at The idiom "grab at" means to try to take or obtain something quickly and eagerly, often in a forceful or desperate manner. It can also refer to attempting to seize an opportunity or advantage without carefully considering the consequences.
  • grasp at The idiom "grasp at" means to desperately or eagerly try to obtain or achieve something, often with little chance of success. It suggests a sense of reaching out or grabbing for something, even if it is beyond one's immediate abilities or resources.
  • hammer at The idiom "hammer at" means to continuously and persistently work on or discuss something in a forceful or intense manner. It often implies a repetitive or relentless effort towards a particular goal or objective.
  • head (someone or something) off at the pass The idiom "head (someone or something) off at the pass" means to intercept or prevent a problem or conflict before it occurs or becomes more difficult to handle. It originated from the idea of intercepting someone or something at a pass, which is a narrow or restricted passage that serves as a natural or strategic point of control. The phrase is often used figuratively to describe taking action to avoid a potential issue or confrontation.
  • out at the heels The idiom "out at the heels" typically means someone or something that is in a state of disrepair or decline, especially in relation to their appearance or social standing. It often refers to someone who is impoverished or neglected, and can suggest a lack of financial stability or personal care.
  • at (one's) command The idiom "at (one's) command" means that someone or something is readily available or obedient to do whatever one requires or demands. It indicates a high level of control or influence over a person or situation.
  • at (one's) feet The idiom "at (one's) feet" is used to describe someone who is greatly admired, respected, or submissive towards another person. It signifies a person's intense admiration or willingness to obey someone.
  • place (oneself) at (someone's) mercy The idiom "place (oneself) at (someone's) mercy" means to voluntarily or willingly subject oneself to another person's power or control, leaving oneself completely vulnerable or dependent on their decisions or actions. It implies surrendering one's fate or well-being to someone else, without any power or ability to influence the outcome.
  • turn (one's) nose up at (someone or something) The idiom "turn (one's) nose up at (someone or something)" means to show disdain or contempt towards someone or something, typically by displaying a haughty or superior attitude. It indicates a refusal to accept or appreciate someone or something, often due to a perceived inferiority or lack of value.
  • know where it’s at The idiom "know where it's at" means to have a deep understanding or knowledge of a particular subject, activity, or situation. It refers to being aware of the most current and relevant information or being in touch with the latest trends or developments related to a specific domain.
  • leap at The idiom "leap at" means to eagerly and enthusiastically accept or take advantage of an opportunity or chance offered.
  • leap at (someone or something) The idiom "leap at (someone or something)" typically means to eagerly accept or enthusiastically seize an opportunity or chance, often without hesitation. It implies quickly reacting to a favorable situation or eagerly embracing someone or something.
  • where head is at The idiom "where one's head is at" refers to a person's current thoughts, interests, opinions, or focus. It essentially asks about where someone's mind, attention, or priorities lie at a particular moment.
  • at least so many The idiom "at least so many" refers to the minimum number or amount that is required or expected. It means the specified number or amount mentioned is the least or minimum, and there could be more or a greater quantity than that.
  • that's what friends are for, at what are friends for? The idiom "that's what friends are for" is used to express gratitude or emphasize the supportive role that friends play in one's life. It implies that friends are always there to help and support each other in times of need, providing comfort, understanding, and assistance. It highlights the selflessness and loyalty that true friends possess. Essentially, it suggests that having friends means having someone who will be there for you and support you through all ups and downs.
  • at a rate of knots The idiom "at a rate of knots" means to do something rapidly or at a fast pace. It is often used to describe something that is progressing quickly or being completed speedily. The term "knots" refers to nautical miles per hour, indicating the speed of a ship. Therefore, this idiom suggests that someone or something is moving or progressing as quickly as a fast-moving ship.
  • at sb's expense, at at the expense of sb The idiom "at someone's expense" or "at the expense of someone" refers to something that is done or enjoyed by one person, but paid for or suffered by another individual. It often implies that the benefit or advantage gained by one person comes at the cost or detriment of another person.
  • at the receiving end The idiom "at the receiving end" refers to being on the receiving side of something, often in a negative or disadvantageous manner. It implies being the target or recipient of an action, typically one that brings harm, criticism, punishment, or the like.
  • have at fingertips The idiom "to have something at your fingertips" means to have immediate and easy access to something, either information, tools, or resources. It implies that the person is knowledgeable or skilled enough to quickly retrieve or utilize the required information or materials.
  • not much to look at The idiom "not much to look at" is used to describe someone or something that is not physically attractive or appealing. It implies that the person or object does not possess visually pleasing qualities or lacks aesthetic appeal.
  • at cross purposes The idiom "at cross purposes" means to have conflicting interests, goals, or intentions that hinder effective communication or collaboration. It refers to a situation where two or more people are misunderstanding or working against each other because they have different objectives or perspectives.
  • take account of sth, at take sth into account The idioms "take account of something" and "take something into account" mean to consider or include something as a factor or element when making a decision or judgment. It implies acknowledging its relevance and impact on the situation at hand.
  • put two fingers up at The idiom "put two fingers up at" is typically used to describe someone displaying a rude or defiant gesture, often involving raising their middle and index fingers in a V shape, which is considered offensive in some cultures. It can be an act of defiance, contempt, or disrespect towards someone or something.
  • get ahold of, at get hold of The idiom "get ahold of" or "get hold of" means to successfully make contact with someone or to obtain something.
  • at all costs The idiom "at all costs" means to accomplish or achieve something regardless of the difficulties, obstacles, risks, or sacrifices involved. It implies a determination or commitment to do whatever is necessary in order to achieve a desired outcome, without any exceptions or compromises.
  • poke fun at someone/something The idiom "poke fun at someone/something" means to make lighthearted jokes or playful comments about someone or something in a good-natured and teasing manner. It involves gently mocking or teasing in a friendly way without intending harm or offense.
  • fire questions, insults, etc. at somebody The idiom "fire questions, insults, etc. at somebody" means to aggressively and rapidly attack someone with a barrage of questions, insults, or criticism. It implies bombarding someone with a continuous flow of intense verbal attacks or challenging inquiries, often leaving them feeling overwhelmed or under attack.
  • drive at sth The idiom "drive at" means to aim or intend to convey a particular point or meaning while speaking or writing. It refers to expressing or hinting towards something specific.
  • at a loose end The idiom "at a loose end" means to be unsure about what to do next or to have a lack of purpose or occupation. It refers to a state of being idle, aimless, or without any particular task or plan.
  • you win sm, you lose sm, at you can't win 'em all The idiom "you win some, you lose some, at you can't win 'em all" is used to express the idea that in life, there will be both successes and failures, and it is not possible to achieve victory in every situation. It implies that one should not be discouraged by their failures, as they are a normal part of life.
  • come at (someone or something) The idiom "come at (someone or something)" means to approach or advance aggressively towards someone or something in order to attack, confront, or challenge them. It implies a forceful, sudden, or direct approach with an aggressive intent.
  • pick at sth The idiom "pick at something" typically means to lightly touch or handle something repeatedly, often in a fussy or casual manner. It can also refer to repeatedly criticizing or finding fault with something, often in a nitpicky or irritating way.
  • don't look at me The idiom "don't look at me" is an expression used to distance oneself from any responsibility or involvement in a given situation or problem. It indicates that the speaker does not want to be held accountable or blamed for something that has occurred or needs to be done.
  • tip the balance/scales, at tilt the balance/scales The idiomatic expression "tip the balance/scales" or "tilt the balance/scales" refers to a situation where a small or seemingly insignificant action, event, or influence can have a significant impact or cause a decisive change in a particular situation or outcome. It implies that a slight shift can determine the outcome in favor of one side or another.
  • at the forefront The idiom "at the forefront" refers to being in a leading or prominent position in terms of importance, innovation, advancement, or influence. It suggests being at the cutting edge or forefront of a particular field, movement, or development.
  • you should talk!, at look who's talking! The idiom "you should talk!" or "look who's talking!" is used in a situation where someone criticizes or gives advice to someone else, but they themselves are guilty of the same behavior or possess the same flaws. It emphasizes the irony of the situation by comparing the speaker to the person they are addressing.
  • tell me another one!, at tell me another! The idiom "tell me another one!" or "tell me another!" is an expression used to indicate disbelief or skepticism towards a statement or story that someone has just shared. It implies that the speaker does not believe what they have just heard and is challenging the person to come up with a more believable or convincing story.
  • take a swing at sm The idiom "take a swing at someone" means to physically attack or attempt to hit them with a punch or swing. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone making a forceful verbal or written attack against someone else.
  • at a canter The idiom "at a canter" means to do something with ease or without much effort, often implying a relaxed or confident manner. It originated from horse riding, where a canter is a leisurely and smooth gait. Therefore, when used figuratively, it signifies accomplishing a task smoothly or effortlessly.
  • more often than not, at as often as not The idiom "more often than not" or "as often as not" means that something happens or is true a majority of the time or on most occasions. It suggests that while there may be exceptions or occurrences where the opposite is true, the stated situation is usually the case.
  • what's your poison?, at name your poison The idiomatic expressions "What's your poison?" and "Name your poison" are used in a casual and playful manner to ask someone what they would like to drink, usually alcoholic beverages. It implies that the person being asked can choose any drink or beverage they prefer, similar to selecting a poison (although the context is not sinister). It is a colloquial way of asking someone about their drink preference.
  • jaw at someone The idiom "jaw at someone" refers to the act of talking at length, usually in a complaining or criticizing manner, directed towards someone. It implies nagging, chiding, or berating someone verbally.
  • at first sight The idiom "at first sight" refers to something that happens or occurs immediately, without needing further investigation or consideration. It describes a quick and initial impression or judgment formed upon first encountering someone or something.
  • at (one's) own peril The idiom "at (one's) own peril" means to do something with great risk or danger. It implies that the consequences of one's actions or decisions are entirely their responsibility, and they should be prepared to face the negative outcomes that may arise.
  • go to sea, at run away to sea The idiom "go to sea" or "run away to sea" refers to someone escaping or running away from their current life or situation by embarking on a voyage or journey, usually by working on a ship or sailing away. It can be used metaphorically to indicate a desire for adventure, freedom, or a fresh start.
  • champing at the bit The idiom "champing at the bit" means to be restless or eager to start or participate in something, often due to impatience or excitement. It refers to the behavior of horses that chew on the bit in their mouths due to eager anticipation or nervous energy, as if they are impatiently urging forward. It is often used to describe someone who is eagerly waiting for an opportunity or action to occur.
  • there's a lot to be said for, at there's sth to be said for The idiom "there's a lot to be said for" or "there's something to be said for" typically means that there are strong arguments or merits in favor of a particular thing or idea. It implies that although there may be alternative perspectives or counterarguments, there are notable benefits or advantages to consider.
  • hold the line (at sm or sth) To "hold the line (at sm or sth)" means to maintain a firm position or resolve, especially when faced with difficulty or opposition. It can be used in different contexts, but it generally implies resisting or defending against unfavorable circumstances or pressures. It can also refer to maintaining control, stability, or standing by a decision or plan.
  • slave away at something The idiom "slave away at something" means to work very hard and diligently on a task, often with little rest or relief. It implies putting in a considerable amount of effort and dedication to accomplish a particular goal or complete a task, even if it feels challenging or exhausting. The phrase draws a comparison between intense labor and the historical institution of slavery, underscoring the level of exertion and commitment involved.
  • look at/see sth through rosecoloured/tinted glasses To look at or see something through rose-colored/tinted glasses means to have an overly optimistic or idealized viewpoint about a person, situation, or event. It implies seeing things in a more positive light than they may actually be, often ignoring or downplaying the negative aspects.
  • keep at a distance The idiom "keep at a distance" means to maintain a physical or emotional separation from someone or something. It implies avoiding close contact, involvement, or any form of association.
  • (stand) at ease The idiom "(stand) at ease" refers to a military command that allows soldiers to relax from the rigid attention position while maintaining a general state of readiness. It can also be used more broadly to mean "to relax" or "to be in a comfortable, informal position."
  • not a care in the world, at without a care in the world The idiom "not a care in the world" or "without a care in the world" refers to a state or feeling of complete freedom from worries, problems, or responsibilities. It suggests that someone is completely relaxed, content, and carefree, as if they have no concerns or troubles in their life.
  • hit the roof, at go through the roof The idiom "hit the roof" or "go through the roof" means to become extremely angry or furious. It refers to a situation where someone's anger or frustration reaches its maximum point, often resulting in an outburst or intense reaction.
  • grasp at someone or something The idiom "grasp at someone or something" means to attempt to gain something or someone desperately or eagerly, often using any available means or opportunities to achieve one's goal. It implies a sense of urgency or desperation in trying to obtain a desired outcome or objective.
  • catch (one) at a bad time The idiom "catch (one) at a bad time" means to approach or contact someone when they are not in an ideal or convenient situation or state of mind to give attention, assistance, or engage in a conversation.
  • at a (single) blow The idiom "at a (single) blow" means achieving or accomplishing something in one decisive action or effort. It refers to the ability or opportunity to resolve a particular situation or accomplish a goal effectively and efficiently with a single stroke or action.
  • in the line of fire, at in the firing line The idiom "in the line of fire" or "at in the firing line" refers to being in a dangerous or vulnerable position, where one is exposed to potential harm or criticism. It originates from military language, specifically referring to soldiers positioned on the front lines directly facing enemy fire. In a figurative sense, it implies being at the forefront of a challenging situation or bearing the brunt of negative consequences.
  • throw a glance at someone or something The idiom "throw a glance at someone or something" means to quickly look or cast a brief, often casual, look in the direction of a person or object. It implies a swift and fleeting observation or assessment.
  • like a cat on hot bricks, at like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "like a cat on hot bricks" is used to describe someone who is extremely restless, agitated, or unable to stay still due to nervousness or anxiety. It implies a high level of discomfort or unease. The idiom "like a cat on a hot tin roof" is similar in meaning and also refers to someone who is restless, nervous, or fidgety. It suggests a sense of extreme discomfort or anxiety, as if the person is trying to find relief from a continuously uncomfortable situation.
  • be in the right place at the right time The idiom "be in the right place at the right time" means to happen to be present or available exactly when a favorable or advantageous opportunity arises. It implies that by sheer coincidence or luck, one is positioned perfectly to take advantage of a situation.
  • leap at the opportunity The idiom "leap at the opportunity" means to eagerly and immediately accept or take advantage of a favorable situation or chance that presents itself.
  • hint at something The idiom "hint at something" means to suggest or imply something indirectly, often through subtle or indirect cues or references. It involves dropping small clues or insinuations to give someone an idea or provoke their curiosity without explicitly stating or revealing the whole information or idea.
  • keep at something The idiom "keep at something" means to continue doing or working on something persistently or consistently despite difficulties, obstacles, or setbacks. It implies showing determination, resilience, and dedication in order to achieve a goal or complete a task.
  • run onto the rocks, at run aground/ashore The idiom "run onto the rocks," or "run aground/ashore," refers to a situation where someone or something encounters a major obstacle or fails, often as a result of a poor decision or course of action. It is commonly used to highlight the consequences of a misguided or unsuccessful endeavor, where one's plans or actions end up in failure or difficulty.
  • on short notice, at at short notice The idiom "on short notice" or "at short notice" refers to doing something with very little advance warning or preparation time. It implies that the event or task being performed was unexpected or the decision to carry it out was made at the last minute.
  • like a (real) bear, at be like a bear with a sore head The idiom "like a (real) bear" or "be like a bear with a sore head" is used to describe someone who is extremely irritable, grumpy, or in a bad mood. It suggests that the person's behavior resembles that of a bear who is either in pain or simply in a bad mood, making them easily agitated and difficult to deal with.
  • at risk to (oneself, someone, or something) The idiom "at risk to" refers to being in a situation where one's safety, well-being, reputation, or interests may be endangered, compromised, or harmed due to certain actions or circumstances. It implies that there is a threat or vulnerability involved that could negatively affect oneself, someone else, or something.
  • be in at the death The idiom "be in at the death" means to be present or involved in the concluding or crucial moment of an event or situation, especially when someone is dying or a decisive outcome is about to occur. It typically refers to being present until the very end, witnessing or participating in the final stages or outcome of something significant.
  • be as easy as taking candy from a baby, at be like taking candy from a baby The idiom "be as easy as taking candy from a baby" or "be like taking candy from a baby" means that a task or situation is incredibly simple, effortless, or requiring little skill or effort to accomplish. It implies that the task is so easy that even a child could do it without any resistance or difficulty.
  • I kid you not, at no kidding The idiom "I kid you not" or "no kidding" is used to emphasize that what someone is saying is absolutely true or not a joke. It is a way of emphasizing sincerity or seriousness when relaying information.
  • look at/see sth through rosecoloured/tinted spectacles, at look at/see sth through rosecoloured/tinted glasses The idiom "look at/see something through rose-colored/tinted spectacles/glasses" is used to describe someone who has an overly optimistic or positive outlook on a situation. It implies that the person sees things in an idealized or overly positive manner, often ignoring or downplaying any negative aspects of the situation.
  • that beats all, at that beats everything The idiom "that beats all" or "that beats everything" is an expression used to convey surprise, astonishment, or disbelief about a certain situation or occurrence. It implies that the situation or event is beyond the norm or expectation, leaving the speaker amazed or impressed.
  • beat somebody at their own game The idiom "beat somebody at their own game" means to outperform or outwit someone by using their own strategies, tactics, or skills against them. It implies winning or achieving success by adapting, imitating, or surpassing someone's methods in order to gain an advantage.
  • laugh at (someone or something) The idiom "laugh at (someone or something)" means to mock, ridicule, or make fun of someone or something in a mocking or derisive manner. It implies finding amusement or entertainment at the expense of another person or situation, often to belittle or demean them.
  • take a pop at sm The idiom "take a pop at someone" means to criticize or verbally attack someone, often unexpectedly or without any apparent reason. It implies making negative comments or expressing disapproval towards an individual.
  • scream the place down, at scream yourself hoarse/silly The idiom "scream the place down" is closely related to the phrases "scream yourself hoarse" or "scream yourself silly." It refers to a situation where someone is screaming, shouting, or making a loud and overwhelming noise continuously, usually due to excitement, anger, or fear. The phrase often implies a lack of control or an excessive display of emotions.
  • pick at sm or sth The idiom "pick at something or someone" is used to describe the act of criticizing, finding faults, or complaining about minor or insignificant details of something or someone. It typically refers to repeatedly and obsessively pointing out flaws or mistakes, often without offering any constructive feedback or solution.
  • laugh yourself silly, at laugh your head off The idiom "laugh yourself silly" or "laugh your head off" refers to laughing uncontrollably or excessively, to the point of feeling lightheaded or foolish. It implies that something is extremely funny or entertaining, leading to an intense and prolonged laughter.
  • at the top of the heap The idiom "at the top of the heap" means to be in the highest or most prestigious position within a group or organization, or to be the most successful or accomplished among others. It refers to being at the pinnacle of one's field or achieving the highest level of success or recognition.
  • at loggerheads (with sm) The idiom "at loggerheads (with someone)" means to be in a state of conflict or disagreement with someone. It suggests a situation where both parties have differing opinions or views and are unable to reach a resolution or compromise.
  • nibble away at sth The idiom "nibble away at sth" means to gradually, persistently, or systematically erode, consume, or diminish something. It implies a slow and steady process of wearing down or reducing something, often used when referring to resources, advantages, or progress.
  • bark at someone The idiom "bark at someone" means to speak or shout angrily and loudly at someone, often in an aggressive or domineering manner. It is derived from the behavior of dogs who bark fiercely to establish dominance or express aggression.
  • at the same time The idiom "at the same time" refers to two or more events or actions occurring simultaneously or concurrently. It implies that multiple things are happening concurrently or in sync with one another.
  • at the bottom of the heap The idiom "at the bottom of the heap" refers to being in the lowest or last position in a hierarchy or ranking system. It means having the least status, power, or advantage compared to others.
  • what (one) is driving at The idiom "what (one) is driving at" refers to understanding or figuring out someone's main point or intention behind their words or actions. It means comprehending the underlying message or purpose of someone's communication or behavior.
  • at the crossroads The idiom "at the crossroads" is a figurative expression that refers to being at a critical point or moment of decision, where one has to choose between different options or directions. It suggests a situation where one's future path or course of action is uncertain and a choice must be made.
  • at one go The idiom "at one go" means to accomplish or complete something in a single attempt or without interruption. It implies doing a task or fulfilling a requirement all at once and without any breaks or pauses.
  • put mind at rest The idiom "put mind at rest" is usually used to describe the action of alleviating or relieving one's worries, anxieties, or concerns about a particular situation or issue. It means to provide reassurance or comforting information that helps to calm one's thoughts and bring a sense of peace.
  • have the ball at (one's) feet The idiom "have the ball at (one's) feet" means to be in complete control of a situation or to have the opportunity to make significant progress or achieve success. It is often used in reference to someone who has the power or advantage in a certain context or scenario.
  • heaven help sb, at God help sb The idiom "heaven help sb" or "God help sb" is an expression used to convey a sense of despair or concern for someone's well-being. It is often said when there seems to be no other solution or when someone is in a difficult or challenging situation that requires divine intervention. It suggests that only a higher power can offer assistance or provide a resolution.
  • What's (something) when it's at home? The idiom "What's (something) when it's at home?" is typically used to express confusion or lack of understanding about a particular thing, especially when the thing being referred to is not well-known or unfamiliar. It suggests that the speaker is struggling to comprehend or identify the essence or true nature of something. It can be seen as a rhetorical question that seeks clarification or explanation.
  • glance at sm or sth The idiom "glance at someone or something" means to quickly look at someone or something without giving it much attention or focus. It is a brief and casual observation rather than a thorough examination.
  • throw a glance at sm or sth To "throw a glance at someone or something" means to quickly look at someone or something, usually for a short period of time and without paying much attention or showing much interest. It is a brief or casual observation directed towards someone or something.
  • recoil at the sight (of sm or sth) The idiom "recoil at the sight (of someone or something)" refers to the strong and involuntary reaction of fear, disgust, or horror when encountering a person, thing, or situation that is repulsive or threatening. It indicates an extreme aversion or revulsion to something visually disturbing or repugnant.
  • cheap at twice the price The idiom "cheap at twice the price" refers to something that is considered an excellent value, even if its cost is higher than expected. It implies that the quality or benefits provided by the item or service justifies the price, making it a great deal.
  • handbags at dawn The idiom "handbags at dawn" refers to a verbal or trivial argument between two individuals, typically two women, that is characterized by intense emotions and hostility. The phrase originates from the stereotypical image of two women arguing fiercely and threatening to physically fight each other, but ultimately only using their handbags as weapons rather than engaging in actual physical violence.
  • jump at the chance (to do something) The idiom "jump at the chance (to do something)" means to eagerly accept or seize an opportunity without hesitation. It implies being proactive and enthusiastic in taking advantage of a favorable situation or being quick to respond positively when presented with an appealing option.
  • the idea of it!, at what an idea! The idiom "the idea of it!" or "at what an idea!" expresses surprise or disbelief at a suggestion or plan that seems absurd or impractical. It indicates astonishment or shock at the proposal, often implying that it is unexpected or contrary to what is considered reasonable or sensible.
  • at/in one fell swoop The idiom "at/in one fell swoop" means to do something all at once, in a single action or with a single decision, instead of gradually or incrementally. It refers to a swift and simultaneous completion of multiple tasks or the achievement of several objectives in a single effort.
  • flash a smile (at sm) The idiom "flash a smile" means to quickly and briefly smile at someone. It implies an expression of friendliness, warmth, or politeness, often used to make a positive impression or to acknowledge someone's presence.
  • have a smack at (something) The phrase "have a smack at (something)" means to attempt or try something, usually with enthusiasm or eagerness. It implies giving something a go, taking a shot at it, or making an effort to accomplish a particular task or challenge.
  • at elbow The idiom "at elbow" typically means to be in close proximity or within arm's reach of someone or something. It implies being very near or easily accessible.
  • have/make a stab at sth The idiom "have/make a stab at sth" means to attempt or try something, usually with a limited or uncertain amount of knowledge or skill. It implies making an effort or taking a shot at something, even if there is a possibility of failure. It suggests a willingness to give something a try or take a chance, even in difficult or unfamiliar circumstances.
  • be a dab hand at something/at doing something The idiom "be a dab hand at something/at doing something" means to be very skilled or proficient in a particular activity or task. It implies that the person is experienced, accomplished, and competent in that specific area.
  • at the top of the/(one's) agenda The idiom "at the top of the/(one's) agenda" refers to something that is of utmost importance or priority, typically referring to a task, issue, or goal that needs immediate attention or consideration. It implies that this particular item is at the highest position on a list of priorities or things to be accomplished.
  • at a push The idiom "at a push" means that something can be done or accomplished, but only with great difficulty or under challenging circumstances. It implies that the task or situation is not ideal, but it can be managed if necessary.
  • love at first sight The idiom "love at first sight" refers to the instant and intense romantic attraction or feeling of love that someone experiences upon seeing another person for the very first time. It implies a sense of immediate connection or deep affection without any prior knowledge or interaction.
  • be in the driver's seat, at be in the driving seat The idiom "be in the driver's seat" or "be in the driving seat" means to be in control or in a position of power and authority. It often implies being in a position to make important decisions or have a significant influence over a situation or outcome.
  • at about The idiom "at about" is generally used to indicate an approximate time, quantity, or location. It suggests that something is close to or near a specific point but not exactly on or at that point.
  • aim at The idiom "aim at" means to target or direct efforts, actions, or words towards a specific goal or objective. It implies focusing one's attention and intentions on achieving or reaching something specific.
  • fannies in the seats, at bums on seats The idiom "fannies in the seats, at bums on seats" is primarily used in the entertainment and event industries to emphasize the importance of having a large audience or attendance. It refers to the number of people physically occupying seats or chairs at a venue. The phrase highlights the need to attract and engage as many people as possible to ensure the success, profitability, or impact of a particular event, production, or performance.
  • have no stomach for sth, at not have the stomach for sth The idiom "have no stomach for something" or "not have the stomach for something" means to lack the willingness, courage, or ability to do or handle a particular task or situation, typically due to its unpleasant or challenging nature. It implies a feeling of aversion, discomfort, or fear towards that specific thing or activity.
  • have first crack at (something) The idiom "have first crack at (something)" means to have the opportunity to be the first to attempt or try something before others. It implies a sense of advantage or priority in getting the initial chance or opportunity to engage in a particular activity or task.
  • from/since the year one, at from/since the year dot The idiom "from/since the year one" or "at from/since the year dot" means from or since a very long time ago, typically since the beginning or the very earliest known time period. It suggests that something has been happening or existing for a significant period, often implying a sense of tradition or longstanding familiarity.
  • at (one's) expense The idiom "at (one's) expense" means that someone is made to suffer or had something negative happen to them, often for the entertainment or benefit of others. It refers to a situation where someone becomes the object or victim of someone else's actions or jokes, causing them to bear the cost or consequences.
  • says a lot about sb/sth, at says sth about sb/sth The idiomatic expression "says a lot about sb/sth" or "says something about sb/sth" refers to making a judgment or drawing conclusions about someone or something based on certain characteristics, actions, or qualities that are observed or known. It implies that these qualities or actions reveal a significant or indicative aspect about the person or thing being referred to.
  • have the world at (one's) feet The idiom "have the world at (one's) feet" means to be in a position of great power, influence, or success; to have the ability to achieve anything one desires. It implies that the person has complete control and dominion over their circumstances, and that everything is attainable to them.
  • have something at your feet The idiom "have something at your feet" typically means to have control, power, or mastery over something or someone. It implies being in a position of dominance or influence, with others being subservient or easily influenced by you.
  • throw money at The idiom "throw money at" means to try to solve a problem or achieve a desired outcome by simply spending a large amount of money, often without a clear understanding of the underlying issues or potential alternative solutions. It implies that money is being used as the primary or only solution, without considering other factors or strategies.
  • have (someone) at (one's) mercy The idiom "have (someone) at (one's) mercy" means to have complete control or power over someone, often in a dominating or superior position. It implies that the person being referred to is entirely vulnerable or helpless and that the person holding the power can choose to act as they please without any constraints or opposition.
  • at gunpoint The idiom "at gunpoint" refers to a situation where someone is threatened or forced to do something under the threat of violence or harm from a firearm. It means to have a gun pointed directly at oneself, symbolizing extreme coercion or control.
  • draw the line at The idiom "draw the line at" means to set a limit or establish a boundary beyond which one is not willing to go or tolerate. It refers to the act of determining the point at which one refuses to proceed any further or accept certain actions or behaviors.
  • put mind at ease The idiom "put mind at ease" means to alleviate someone's worries or concerns, providing them with reassurance and peace of mind.
  • spring at sm or sth The idiom "spring at someone or something" means to quickly or eagerly move towards or attack someone or something often with an aggressive or energetic movement. It refers to the act of pouncing or lunging at someone or something with sudden force or enthusiasm.
  • bristle at sth The idiom "bristle at something" means to react with anger, annoyance, or irritation towards a particular remark, criticism, situation, or action. It implies a defensive or defensive reaction, as if one's hair were standing on end, similar to a bristling animal.
  • take a gander (at sm or sth) The idiom "take a gander (at someone or something)" means to take a quick or casual look or glance at someone or something. It implies a relatively brief observation without extensive examination or analysis.
  • whistle at sm or sth The idiom "whistle at someone or something" refers to the act of making a sharp, high-pitched sound with your mouth, typically to get someone's attention or to express appreciation or admiration for someone or something. It is often used in a context where someone notices something attractive or impressive and shows their approval by whistling.
  • in good conscience, at in all conscience The idiom "in good conscience" or "in all conscience" is typically used to express a moral or ethical judgment. It refers to acting in a way that aligns with the individual's sense of right and wrong, based on their principles and values. It suggests that the person involved is considering their actions carefully, wanting to do what is morally correct or justifiable.
  • level sth at sm or sth To "level something at someone or something" means to direct criticism, accusation, or blame towards them. It refers to pointing out faults, grievances, or negative remarks towards a specific individual or subject. It can also imply confronting or challenging them with an issue or problem.
  • stick at sth The idiom "stick at something" means to persist or continue with a task or activity, especially when facing difficulties or challenges. It suggests not giving up easily and staying committed until the task is completed or the goal is achieved.
  • catch at (a) straw(s) The idiomatic expression "catch at (a) straw(s)" refers to a situation where someone is desperate and tries to seize the slightest or smallest chance or opportunity to improve their circumstances, even if it is unlikely to be successful or effective. It originates from the idea of a drowning person instinctively grasping at a nearby straw to save themselves, even though it is insufficient to keep them afloat.
  • at any rate The idiom "at any rate" means in any case, anyway, or regardless of other considerations. It is often used to introduce a statement that summarizes or clarifies the previous discussion or to indicate that the speaker is unsure about the details but wants to emphasize a particular point.
  • hurl someone or something at someone or something The idiom "hurl someone or something at someone or something" means to throw or forcefully propel a person or an object with great force in the direction of someone or something else. It implies a sudden and aggressive action, often motivated by anger or frustration.
  • play someone at their own game To "play someone at their own game" means to engage in a competition or conflict using someone else's tactics, strategies, or methods against them. It implies that one can outwit, outmaneuver, or gain an advantage over their opponent by adopting their own approach.
  • well may you ask, at you may well ask The idiomatic phrase "well may you ask" or "you may well ask" is used to express surprise or acknowledgement that the question being asked is a legitimate or significant one, usually because the topic or situation is complex, unusual, or perplexing. It implies that the person asking the question has good reason to be curious or inquisitive.
  • what somebody is driving at The idiom "what somebody is driving at" refers to understanding or figuring out the true meaning or intention behind someone's words or actions. It implies a process of deciphering or deducing the underlying message or purpose that someone is trying to convey.
  • at variance The idiom "at variance" means to be in a state of disagreement or conflict with someone or something. It refers to a lack of agreement or harmony between two or more parties.
  • at one with the world The idiom "at one with the world" refers to a state or feeling of complete harmony, unity, or oneness with the world around oneself, often associated with a sense of inner peace, contentment, and connection to nature or the universe. It suggests being in sync with one's surroundings, where all internal conflicts, anxieties, or distractions are temporarily forgotten, allowing for a deep sense of belonging and tranquility.
  • sweet FA, at sweet fanny adams The idiom "sweet FA" is a shortened version of the British slang term "sweet fanny adams." This phrase is used informally to refer to nothing at all or a minimal amount. It is often used to express a lack of value, worth, or importance in a particular situation.
  • appraise at The idiom "appraise at" means to assess or evaluate the value, worth, or quality of something, usually for the purpose of determining its monetary value. It refers to the act of providing an estimation or judgment of the financial or overall worth of something.
  • make advances at (someone) The idiom "make advances at (someone)" refers to the act of expressing romantic or sexual interest or making flirtatious gestures towards someone in an attempt to initiate a romantic or sexual relationship.
  • throw someone in at the deep end The idiom "throw someone in at the deep end" means to put someone into a difficult or challenging situation without much preparation or guidance, expecting them to learn quickly and adapt to the circumstances. It often implies a sink-or-swim scenario where the person is expected to figure things out for themselves and overcome obstacles.
  • exult at something The idiom "exult at something" means to experience great joy, delight, or triumph as a result of a particular achievement, success, or favorable outcome. It suggests a feeling of extreme happiness or satisfaction, often accompanied by a sense of pride or jubilation.
  • make sheep's eyes at The idiom "make sheep's eyes at" refers to someone's act of giving flirtatious or amorous looks to another person, often suggesting a romantic interest or attraction towards them.
  • you should be so lucky!, at you'll be lucky! The idiom "you should be so lucky!" or "you'll be lucky!" is used as a sarcastic or ironic response to someone's unrealistic or overly optimistic expectation or wish. It implies that the chances of their desired outcome are extremely low or improbable. Essentially, it dismisses their expectation as unlikely to happen.
  • if worse/worst comes to worst, at if the worst comes to the worst The idiom "if worst comes to worst" or "if the worst comes to the worst" is used to convey the idea of preparing for or considering the most unfavorable or extreme outcome in a given situation. It suggests that even in the face of potential difficulties or challenges, one should be ready to face the worst possible scenario.
  • at one stroke The idiom "at one stroke" refers to achieving or accomplishing something in a single act or instance, bringing about a significant or immediate change or result. It implies taking swift and decisive action to accomplish a complex task or resolve a problem efficiently.
  • at sixes and sevens The idiom "at sixes and sevens" means to be in a state of confusion, disorder, or disarray; to have a lack of organization or a lack of clear direction.
  • fling sth at sm or sth The idiom "fling something at someone or something" means to throw or hurl something in a forceful or careless manner towards a person or an object. It often implies doing so hastily or impulsively, and not taking careful aim or consideration into the throw.
  • assist (someone) at something The idiom "assist (someone) at something" means to help or support someone in accomplishing a particular task or activity. It implies offering aid, guidance, or expertise to assist someone in successfully completing a specific endeavor.
  • wouldn't know sth if it hit you in the face, at wouldn't know sth if you fell over one/it The idiom "wouldn't know something if it hit you in the face" or "wouldn't know something if you fell over one/it" is used to describe a situation where someone is completely oblivious or unaware of something that is obvious or apparent to others. It implies that the person lacks awareness or perception, even if the thing or situation is right in front of them or highly noticeable.
  • all at sea The idiom "all at sea" means to be confused, disoriented, or unsure about something, often due to a lack of understanding or knowledge about a particular situation or subject. It implies feeling lost or without direction, similar to being adrift at sea.
  • keep something/someone at bay The idiom "keep something/someone at bay" means to hold or keep something or someone away, often by maintaining a distance or preventing them from getting closer or causing harm. It implies keeping something under control or at a safe distance.
  • be/feel at home The idiom "be/feel at home" means to be or feel comfortable, relaxed, and familiar in a particular place, environment, or situation. It implies a sense of ease and belonging.
  • be an easy mark, at be easy game/meat The idiom "be an easy mark" or "be easy game/meat" refers to someone who is vulnerable or easily taken advantage of. It implies that the person is naive, trusting, or lacking in awareness, making them an easy target for scams, deception, or exploitation.
  • kiss goodbye to sth, at kiss sth goodbye The idiom "kiss goodbye to something" or "kiss something goodbye" means to give up on or accept the loss of something, usually because it is unlikely to happen or has already been lost. It implies a sense of finality and resignation in letting go or accepting that something is no longer attainable.
  • take a shot at sm or sth The idiom "take a shot at someone or something" typically means to attempt or try one's luck at accomplishing or achieving something, often with a sense of uncertainty or risk involved. It can be used when referring to trying to do something difficult, taking a chance, or making an attempt without being completely sure of the outcome.
  • not a bed of roses, at not all roses The idiom "not a bed of roses" means that something is difficult, challenging, or unpleasant, and that it requires effort and perseverance to overcome obstacles. It signifies that a situation or task is not as easy and pleasant as it may initially appear. The phrase "not all roses" can be used interchangeably with "not a bed of roses" and conveys the same meaning.
  • dart a glance at sm or sth The idiom "dart a glance at someone or something" means to quickly or abruptly look at someone or something briefly. It implies a sudden or fleeting glance that is usually done with curiosity, suspicion, or interest.
  • at a moment's notice The idiom "at a moment's notice" means to be prepared and ready to act or respond immediately if or when necessary, without any prior warning or delay.
  • ill at ease The idiom "ill at ease" is used to describe a feeling of discomfort, uneasiness, or restlessness. It indicates a state of being mentally or emotionally uncomfortable in a particular situation or environment.
  • gawk at someone or something The idiom "gawk at someone or something" means to stare at someone or something in a rude or overly curious manner, often with a sense of astonishment or disbelief. It implies a lack of tact or respect for the person or object being observed.
  • a second bite at the cherry The idiom "a second bite at the cherry" means getting a second opportunity to achieve something or try again after a previous attempt has failed. It refers to the chance to have another go or another shot at something that was missed or didn't work out the first time.
  • disappointed at sm or sth The idiom "disappointed at someone or something" means to feel let down or unsatisfied by someone or something not meeting your expectations. It conveys a feeling of sadness, disillusionment, or dissatisfaction towards an individual or something that did not fulfill your hopes or desires.
  • poke fun at sb The idiom "poke fun at someone" means to mock or make jokes at someone's expense, typically in a light-hearted or teasing manner. It involves playful teasing or playful ridicule intended to be lighthearted and not hurtful.
  • get your arse in gear, at get off your arse "Get your arse in gear" and "get off your arse" are idiomatic expressions used to convey the urgency or importance of taking action or getting started on something. They both essentially mean the same thing: to stop being lazy or passive and start doing what needs to be done. These phrases are typically used to motivate or admonish someone to be more proactive and productive.
  • at an ungodly hour The idiom "at an ungodly hour" refers to a time that is considered very early or late, often outside of normal or socially acceptable hours. It implies that the mentioned time is inconvenient or unexpected, typically before sunrise or well into the night.
  • gaze at/contemplate your navel The idiom "gaze at/contemplate your navel" means to engage in excessive self-reflection, introspection, or self-absorption, often to the point of being unaware of or disconnected from one's surroundings or other people. It suggests a focus on one's own thoughts, emotions, or concerns to an exaggerated extent, sometimes disregarding the larger world or the perspectives of others.
  • at death's doorstep The idiom "at death's doorstep" means to be very close to death or near the point of dying.
  • a drop in the bucket, at a drop in the ocean The idiom "a drop in the bucket, at a drop in the ocean" refers to a small or insignificant contribution in relation to a much larger problem or situation. It suggests that the action taken or the amount offered is not enough to have any meaningful impact or solve the issue at hand. It emphasizes the disproportion between the effort made and the scale of the problem.
  • have a bash at The idiom "have a bash at" means to try or attempt something, often in an enthusiastic or determined manner, even if one is not fully confident or experienced in it. It implies giving something a go or making an effort without fear of failure or judgment.
  • blanch at (something) The idiom "blanch at (something)" means to react with shock, horror, or fear upon hearing or encountering something surprising, disturbing, or unpleasant. It is often used to describe a visible change in someone's facial expression, where they become pale or appear startled due to the shock or intense emotion they are experiencing.
  • concentrate sm or sth at sth The idiom "concentrate (someone or something) at (somewhere)" means to focus or accumulate a particular person or thing in a specific location or area. It implies directing attention, effort, or resources towards a specific point for maximum impact or efficiency.
  • make a noise, at make noises The idiom "make a noise" or "make noises" refers to vocalizing or expressing oneself in an audible manner, often indicating dissatisfaction, disapproval, or protest. It can be used to describe someone speaking up or taking action to draw attention to a particular issue or problem.
  • not by any stretch of the imagination, at by no stretch of the imagination The idiom "not by any stretch of the imagination" or "by no stretch of the imagination" is used to indicate that something is absolutely impossible or completely implausible. It emphasizes that under no circumstances could a certain statement or scenario be considered true or realistic, even when using creativity or imagination.
  • at a snail’s gallop The idiom "at a snail's gallop" is used to describe something or someone moving extremely slowly or at a sluggish pace. It implies a speed that is significantly slower than what is expected or desired.
  • at every turn The idiom "at every turn" refers to encountering something constantly or continuously, or facing obstacles or challenges at every opportunity or in every aspect of a situation. It implies that there is no escape or respite from the situation or difficulty being experienced.
  • jump at someone or something The idiom "jump at someone or something" typically means to react or respond with great enthusiasm, eagerness, or eagerness to take advantage of an opportunity or offer presented.
  • blaze away at (someone or something) The idiom "blaze away at (someone or something)" means to shoot repeatedly and continuously at someone or something, often with a reckless or excessive amount of gunfire. It can also be used metaphorically to describe vehemently criticizing or attacking someone verbally or in writing.
  • settle (old) scores, at settle an (old) score The idiom "settle (old) scores" or "settle an (old) score" means to take revenge or resolve a past conflict or injustice against someone. It implies seeking retribution or righting a previous wrong.
  • (the) light at the end of the tunnel The idiom "the light at the end of the tunnel" is used to refer to a positive or hopeful perspective or expectation during a difficult or challenging situation. It conveys the idea that there is an eventual end or resolution to the current difficulties and that better times are ahead.
  • compute sth at sth The idiom "compute something at something" means to calculate or determine something based on a particular value, factor, or condition. It implies using a specific measure or parameter to arrive at a result or answer.
  • would sooner, at would (just) as soon The idiom "would sooner" or "would (just) as soon" is used to express a strong preference or inclination towards a particular action or situation. It means that someone would prefer to do or have something rather than an alternative, often indicating a strong aversion towards the alternative.
  • work at sth The idiom "work at something" generally means to put effort into doing or improving something. It implies dedication, persistence, and continuous labor towards a specific task or goal.
  • pull at sm or sth The idiom "pull at someone or something" means to exert a gentle, continuous force on someone or something, generally in order to gain attention, sympathy, or emotional response. It can also imply a persistent attempt to influence or manipulate someone or something.
  • throw a (monkey) wrench in the works, at put/throw a spanner in the works The idiom "throw a (monkey) wrench in the works" means to create a problem or obstacle that disrupts or hinders progress, usually in a planned or ongoing activity. It implies that an unexpected difficulty has been introduced, causing delays, complications, or setbacks. The alternative version, "put/throw a spanner in the works," uses the British term "spanner" instead of "monkey wrench," but the meaning remains the same.
  • it's swings and roundabouts, at what you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts The idiom "it's swings and roundabouts, at what you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts" implies that in life, the gains and losses tend to balance out in the end. When you suffer a setback or lose something, there are also instances where you gain or benefit from other circumstances. It emphasizes the idea of an equilibrium between positive and negative outcomes, highlighting the notion that one can't always have everything without experiencing both ups and downs.
  • eat (away) at sm The idiom "eat (away) at someone" means to cause persistent worry, anxiety, or guilt that gradually affects a person's mental or emotional state. It refers to a situation or thought that consistently preoccupies someone's mind and causes emotional distress or turmoil.
  • at a snail’s pace The idiom "at a snail’s pace" means to move very slowly or at an extremely leisurely speed. It is often used to describe situations or actions that are progressing or happening at an exceptionally slow rate.
  • at a dead end The idiom "at a dead end" refers to being in a situation where no further progress or advancement is possible, often accompanied by a lack of viable options or solutions. It suggests being stuck or blocked with no clear path forward.
  • take a long (cool/hard) look at something The idiom "take a long (cool/hard) look at something" means to carefully and thoroughly examine or evaluate something. It implies the need for a serious and thoughtful analysis or contemplation.
  • keep sb at bay The idiom "keep someone at bay" means to maintain distance from someone or something, keeping them under control or preventing them from getting too close or causing harm. It can also imply managing a situation in a way that prevents it from becoming threatening or overwhelming.
  • before much longer, at before (very/too) long The idiom "before much longer" or "before (very/too) long" indicates that something will happen or occur in a relatively short period of time. It emphasizes that the wait or delay will not be extended, and the desired outcome or event will take place soon or shortly.
  • Lucky at cards, unlucky in love The idiom "Lucky at cards, unlucky in love" implies that when someone is successful or fortunate in one aspect of their life, such as gambling or games, they tend to have less luck or success in matters of love or romantic relationships.
  • assess sth at sth The idiom "assess sth at sth" means to evaluate, estimate, or determine the value, worth, or quality of something based on specific criteria or standards. It involves making a judgment or calculation of the monetary, qualitative, or quantitative worth of something.
  • thumb your nose at sb/sth The idiom "thumb your nose at someone/something" means to openly express disdain, contempt, or rudeness towards someone or something, often in a defiant or mocking manner. It implies a deliberate act of defying or challenging authority, norms, or expectations.
  • in at the deep end The idiom "in at the deep end" means to be thrown or thrust into a challenging or difficult situation without any prior experience or preparation. It implies being faced with a demanding task or responsibility right from the start, often leaving the person feeling overwhelmed or overwhelmed.
  • weigh in at sth The idiom "weigh in at sth" typically refers to stating or determining the weight of something, such as a person, object, or animal. It is often used in a literal sense, especially in contexts like sports, medicine, or competitions, where participants are required to be weighed in.
  • officiate (as sth) (at sth) The idiom "officiate (as sth) (at sth)" refers to the act of performing a formal role or duty in a professional or official capacity, typically in a ceremony, event, or particular role. It implies the person is taking on the responsibilities and functions associated with a specific position, often related to overseeing or guiding others during the event.
  • take a whack at (doing) something The idiom "take a whack at (doing) something" means to attempt or try something, especially when it is untested or unfamiliar. It implies taking a chance or giving it a shot.
  • be at someone's disposal The idiom "be at someone's disposal" means to be available or willing to help or assist someone whenever they need it. It denotes a sense of readiness and willingness to provide one's services or resources for someone's benefit or convenience.
  • keep someone at arm's length The idiom "keep someone at arm's length" means to intentionally maintain a certain distance or level of detachment from someone, usually due to distrust, caution, or a desire to not get too involved or close with them.
  • jest at sm or sth The idiom "jest at someone or something" means to mock, ridicule, or make fun of someone or something in a playful or lighthearted manner.
  • out at elbows The idiom "out at elbows" typically refers to someone or something that is in a state of disrepair or showing signs of neglect. It is commonly used to describe someone who is wearing worn-out or shabby clothing, particularly when the elbows of their garments are visibly torn or frayed. Additionally, the phrase can be extended metaphorically to represent a person or thing that is impoverished, destitute, or lacking in resources.
  • be not much to look at The idiom "be not much to look at" means that someone or something does not have an attractive or impressive appearance. It suggests that the person or object may lack visual appeal or may not meet conventional standards of beauty or attractiveness.
  • a cat may look at a king The idiom "a cat may look at a king" means that even those of lower status or authority have the right to observe or take notice of someone in a superior position, without causing offense. It suggests that no one should be restricted from observing higher-rank individuals, as social boundaries and hierarchies should not prevent people from simply looking or observing.
  • thrill at sm or sth The idiom "thrill at sm or sth" means to experience a feeling of excitement, joy, or pleasure in response to something or someone. It implies a strong and exhilarating emotional response that may be caused by an event, a person's actions, or a particular situation.
  • be of one mind, at be of the same mind The idiom "be of one mind" or "be of the same mind" means to have the same opinion, belief, or viewpoint as someone else. It expresses unity in thought and agreement on a particular matter.
  • lunge at sm or sth The idiom "lunge at someone or something" means to quickly and aggressively move or thrust oneself towards someone or something, usually with the intention of attacking or grabbing them/it. It implies a sudden and forceful forward movement towards a target.
  • what wouldn't I give for sth, at what I wouldn't give for sth The idiom "what wouldn't I give for sth" or "at what I wouldn't give for sth" is used to express strong desire or longing for something. It emphasizes the idea that someone is willing to make great sacrifices or give anything to obtain or experience a particular thing or situation. It signifies the depth of one's longing or yearning for something they value or desire greatly.
  • there's no such thing as bad publicity, at any publicity is good publicity The idiom "there's no such thing as bad publicity" or "any publicity is good publicity" means that regardless of whether the attention a person, product, or idea receives is positive or negative, it still contributes to raising awareness and generating interest. The idiom suggests that even negative publicity can be beneficial, as it keeps the subject in the public eye and may attract curiosity or further discussion.
  • Adequate Remedy at Law "Adequate Remedy at Law" is an idiom used in legal contexts to refer to a sufficient and satisfactory solution or means of redress that may be provided by the existing legal system or through the courts. It implies that there is a recognized and viable legal method available to resolve a dispute or address a grievance, rather than needing to seek alternative or extraordinary means of resolving the issue.
  • tip the scales at something The idiom "tip the scales at something" means to weigh a particular amount. It is often used to describe the weight of a person or an object that exceeds or is very close to a certain limit or target weight. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate the significance or impact of something, such as an event or decision.
  • point the finger at sb The idiomatic expression "point the finger at someone" means to accuse or blame someone for a mistake, problem, or wrongdoing. It suggests attributing responsibility or fault to a specific individual rather than accepting shared accountability or investigating the broader context.
  • you've got to be joking, at you must be joking The idiom "you've got to be joking" or "you must be joking" is an exclamation used to convey disbelief or incredulity towards a statement or situation. It suggests that whatever has been said or implied is so unbelievable or absurd that it cannot be taken seriously.
  • be at somebody's service The idiom "be at somebody's service" means to be available and ready to assist or help someone whenever they need it. It implies being obedient, attentive, and willing to fulfill someone's requests or requirements.
  • leave at the altar The idiom "leave at the altar" refers to the act of abandoning or rejecting someone, usually at the last moment or in a situation where they were expecting commitment or loyalty. It is often used to describe a situation where one person fails to show up or backs out of a planned wedding, leaving their partner standing alone at the altar.
  • young at heart The idiom "young at heart" refers to having a youthful or childlike outlook or attitude despite one's age. It suggests a person who remains lively, enthusiastic, and open-minded, embracing a sense of adventure and curiosity throughout their life.
  • gnaw (away) at sm The idiom "gnaw (away) at sm" means to constantly bother or worry someone, causing them to feel anxious, mentally or emotionally discomforted or haunted by a specific issue or problem. It implies a persistent and nagging feeling that does not easily go away.
  • clouds of war are gathering, at war clouds are gathering The idiom "clouds of war are gathering, at war clouds are gathering" refers to a situation where indicators or events suggest that a conflict or war may be imminent. It implies that tensions, disputes, or aggressive actions are escalating, and it serves as a metaphor for the dark and threatening nature of the approaching conflict. The idiom often denotes a sense of foreboding or danger before the actual outbreak of hostilities.
  • at full strength The idiom "at full strength" refers to being at the maximum or optimal level of capacity, ability, or numbers. It usually implies that all resources, personnel, or elements are present and functioning to their fullest potential.
  • feel like a gooseberry, at play gooseberry The idiom "feel like a gooseberry" or "play gooseberry" is a colloquial phrase commonly used in British English. It refers to feeling awkward or excluded when in the company of two people who are in a romantic relationship or deeply engrossed in each other's conversation and activities. The person who feels like a gooseberry is often seen as a third wheel or as someone who is intruding on the couple's private moments. It signifies a sense of being out of place or unnoticed in such situations.
  • jump in/be thrown in at the deep end The idiom "jump in/be thrown in at the deep end" refers to being suddenly and forcefully put into a difficult or challenging situation without any preparation or guidance. It implies being confronted with a task or responsibility that is beyond one's experience or comfort zone.
  • not worth the trouble, at more trouble than it's worth The idiom "not worth the trouble," often used interchangeably with "more trouble than it's worth," means that something is not beneficial or valuable enough to justify the effort, time, or difficulty associated with it. It implies that the potential benefits or rewards do not outweigh the inconvenience, problems, or negative outcomes one may encounter by engaging in a particular activity or pursuing a certain goal.
  • fire questions at (someone) The idiom "fire questions at (someone)" means to rapidly ask a series of questions to someone, generally without giving them much time to answer or a chance to respond fully. It implies an intense or aggressive interviewing or questioning style.
  • close/near at hand The idiom "close/near at hand" means something is easily accessible or readily available, usually in terms of physical proximity or immediate availability.
  • scoff at sm or sth The idiom "scoff at someone or something" means to express contempt, derision, or disbelief toward someone or something, often in a mocking or scornful manner. It implies dismissing or belittling someone or something as unworthy, unimportant, or inferior.
  • have a stab at something/at doing something The idiom "have a stab at something/at doing something" means to make an attempt or try something, often with limited or uncertain knowledge or skill. It implies taking a shot or giving it a try, even if success is not guaranteed.
  • sb is at your disposal The phrase "sb is at your disposal" means that someone is willing to help or assist you in any way you need. It suggests that the person is available and ready to provide their support or services whenever you require them.
  • at the appointed time The idiom "at the appointed time" means to happen or occur punctually, exactly as planned or scheduled. It implies that something is happening at the designated or agreed-upon time without delay or deviation.
  • happy as a clam at high tide The idiom "happy as a clam at high tide" means to be very content and satisfied. It refers to the fact that clams can only be harvested during low tide, so during high tide, they are safe from being gathered and can happily stay in their natural environment undisturbed.
  • puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means that no matter how successful or important a person is, they are still an ordinary individual who performs everyday tasks in the same manner as everyone else. It emphasizes the idea of equality and humility, suggesting that no one is inherently superior or exempt from the common routines of life.
  • laugh at sb Laughing at someone is an idiom that means to make fun of, mock, or ridicule someone, often making jokes or derisive comments at their expense.
  • at the latest The idiom "at the latest" refers to the latest possible time, indicating a deadline or the maximum amount of time before something must be completed or accomplished.
  • preside at sth The idiom "preside at sth" typically refers to the act of being in a position of authority or leadership over a specific event, gathering, meeting, or organization. When someone presides at something, it means that they are in charge, overseeing the proceedings and ensuring order and control. This can often apply to roles such as chairing a meeting, moderating a panel discussion, or officiating an event.
  • stay at The idiom "stay at" typically refers to lodging or accommodations, indicating the act of residing or living temporarily in a particular place such as a hotel, resort, or someone's house. It implies that one is not permanently residing at that location but rather staying there temporarily for a specified period.
  • at a (or one) blow The idiom "at a (or one) blow" means to accomplish something or achieve a result in a single action or effort. It signifies being able to resolve or complete a task effectively and efficiently with a decisive action.
  • be at beck and call The idiom "be at beck and call" means to be readily available and obedient to someone's every request or demand, always being ready to assist or serve them.
  • cost a bomb/the earth/a packet, at cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idiom "cost a bomb/the earth/a packet" or "cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune" is used to describe something that is very expensive or has a high price tag. It implies that the cost of the item or service is significantly higher than what is considered reasonable or expected.
  • at sm's beck and call The idiom "at someone's beck and call" means to be constantly available and ready to do whatever someone asks or expects. It suggests being wholly attentive and obedient to the desires or demands of another person, typically without hesitation or complaint.
  • put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means to be ordinary or no different than anyone else. It is often used to emphasize that someone should not be considered superior or special, but rather they should be treated equally and with the same expectations as others.
  • the very thing, at just the thing The idiom "the very thing" or "just the thing" is used to express that something is precisely what is needed or desired in a given situation. It refers to a perfect match or solution to a problem or desire.
  • that was that, at that's that The idiom "that was that, and that's that" is used to conclude a situation or discussion in a definite and final manner. It indicates that a decision has been made or an action has been taken, and there is no room for further debate or negotiation. It implies that there is nothing more to be done or said, and the matter is settled.
  • ride two horses at once The idiom "ride two horses at once" suggests attempting to do two conflicting or opposing things simultaneously, which is usually difficult or impossible to achieve due to the conflicting nature of the situations. It refers to a situation where one is trying to maintain a balance or involvement in two different things which are not compatible with each other, resulting in potential failure or unsuccessful outcomes in both activities.
  • take a shot at The idiom "take a shot at" means to attempt or try to do something, especially when there is a chance of success or when the outcome is uncertain. It often implies taking a risk or making an effort to achieve a goal or complete a task.
  • take a rise out of, at get a rise out of The idiom "take a rise out of" or "get a rise out of" refers to intentionally provoking or upsetting someone in order to elicit a reaction or response from them. It involves teasing, baiting, or making provocative statements to try to get an emotional or angry response from someone.
  • speaking of sb/sth, at talking of sb/sth The idiom "speaking of someone/something" or "talking of someone/something" is used to transition the conversation or change the subject by bringing up a person or topic that is related to the ongoing discussion. It is often used when there is a natural connection between what is being talked about and the person or thing mentioned.
  • jeer at someone or something The idiom "jeer at someone or something" means to mock, taunt, or deride someone or something in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner. It refers to expressing scorn, ridicule, or disdain towards a person or a thing, often through verbal insults or negative gestures.
  • come knocking at (one's) door The idiom "come knocking at (one's) door" refers to an individual or a situation that seeks or demands attention or assistance from someone. It implies that a person or issue is actively seeking recognition, involvement, or involvement from a particular individual.
  • a kick in the butt/pants, at a kick up the arse/backside The idiom "a kick in the butt/pants" is typically used to describe an event or action that serves as a strong motivator or wake-up call for someone. It implies a figurative swift physical action that jolts someone into action or forces them to make a change. Similarly, "a kick up the arse/backside" is another variation of the idiom, conveying the same meaning. It suggests a forceful push or encouragement to overcome inertia and start acting or making progress.
  • get back at The idiom "get back at" means to seek revenge or retaliate against someone who has wronged or harmed you. It implies taking action to repay or get even with the person who has caused you harm.
  • ride at anchor The idiom "ride at anchor" refers to a situation where a ship or boat is securely and safely attached to an anchor and floating in a particular location, usually in a harbor, bay, or offshore area. This expression is often used metaphorically to describe someone or something being patiently or comfortably settled in a stable and secure position, waiting for further actions or developments.
  • at (one's) pleasure The idiom "at one's pleasure" means to have the freedom or ability to do something as one wishes, according to one's own preference or convenience. It implies having complete control or authority over a situation, choice, or action.
  • at your earliest convenience The idiom "at your earliest convenience" is used to politely request or suggest that someone should do something as soon as they can, without specifying a particular time or deadline. It implies that the person is free to choose a suitable time within their schedule to complete the task or attend to the matter.
  • Life begins at forty. The idiom "Life begins at forty" means that life becomes more enjoyable, fulfilling, and successful after the age of forty. It suggests that individuals experience personal growth, a sense of purpose, and achieve significant milestones during this stage of life.
  • grasp at sm or sth The idiom "grasp at something" or "grasp at someone" means to attempt to seize or reach for something or someone desperately or anxiously. It conveys the idea of trying to obtain or achieve something eagerly, even if the chances of success are slim. It relates to a sense of urgency or desperation in one's actions.
  • can ill afford, at cannot afford The idiom "can ill afford" or "cannot afford" means that someone is unable to bear the cost or consequences of something. It implies that the individual or entity is in a difficult financial situation or lacks the resources necessary to handle a particular expense or outcome.
  • chomp at the bit The idiom "chomp at the bit" means to be impatiently eager or excited to do something or to begin a particular activity or task. It is often used to convey a strong desire or enthusiasm for an opportunity or event that one is eagerly waiting for. The phrase originated from the behavior of horses, specifically the action of a horse biting down or chomping on the metal bit in its mouth due to impatience or excitement.
  • keep at someone The idiom "keep at someone" means to persistently pester or urge someone to do something or to continue doing something. It implies being persistent in pressuring, persuading, or nagging someone to achieve a desired outcome.
  • stack the deck, at stack the cards The idiom "stack the deck" or "stack the cards" refers to the act of dishonestly arranging a deck of cards before a game or competition to ensure a desired outcome. It figuratively implies manipulation or rigging of a situation or circumstances to gain an unfair advantage.
  • be at it The idiom "be at it" is commonly used to describe someone engaging in a particular activity or task persistently or continuously. It implies that the person is dedicated, actively involved, or making consistent efforts towards achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • guffaw at sm or sth The idiom "guffaw at someone or something" means to laugh loudly, boisterously, or rudely at someone or something, often in a mocking or contemptuous manner. It refers to a loud burst of laughter that typically expresses amusement, disbelief, or ridicule.
  • take sth with a grain of salt, at take sth with a pinch of salt The idiom "take something with a grain of salt" or "take something with a pinch of salt" means to be skeptical or doubtful about the truth or accuracy of something that has been said or reported. It implies not fully believing or accepting the information without questioning or verifying it further.
  • at the longest The idiom "at the longest" means a specific maximum duration or length of time that something is expected to last or continue. It implies that the stated period is the most extended possible timeframe for an event or action.
  • pick away at (something) The idiom "pick away at (something)" means to gradually, persistently, or repetitively work on or address a task, problem, or issue. It entails making small, incremental efforts to make progress or resolve a matter over time. It often implies tackling something difficult or complex by breaking it down into smaller, manageable parts and consistently working on each part until completion or resolution is achieved.
  • be, stay, etc. young at heart The idiom "be, stay, etc. young at heart" means to have a youthful and optimistic outlook, attitude, or enthusiasm, regardless of a person's actual age. It suggests that one continues to maintain a lighthearted and playful approach to life, embracing joy, curiosity, and wonderment as if they were young.
  • disappointed at someone or something The idiom "disappointed at someone or something" refers to feeling let down, dissatisfied, or saddened by the actions, behavior, or outcomes related to a particular person or thing. It implies that one's expectations or hopes were not met in a negative way.
  • be much to look at The idiom "be much to look at" refers to someone or something that has an unattractive or unimpressive appearance. It suggests that the person or object does not possess physical beauty or visual appeal.
  • know where it's at The idiom "know where it's at" refers to someone who is knowledgeable, experienced, or well-informed about a particular subject or situation. It implies that the person understands the essential aspects, details, or current trends associated with the subject matter. It can also refer to someone who knows the most suitable or desired location or circumstance.
  • grab at someone or something The idiom "grab at someone or something" means to make a sudden, quick, and often desperate attempt to take hold of or seize someone or something, usually with a sense of urgency or aggressiveness.
  • lay something at someone's door The idiom "lay something at someone's door" refers to attributing responsibility or blame for a particular action, problem, or mistake to a specific person or group. It suggests holding someone accountable for something negative or undesirable.
  • at loggerheads The idiom "at loggerheads" is used to describe a situation where two or more people or groups are in a state of intense conflict or disagreement, unable to come to an agreement or find a resolution. It portrays a sense of being at an impasse or deadlock.
  • be the spit (and image) of sb, at be the spitting image of sb The idiom "be the spit (and image) of sb" or "be the spitting image of sb" refers to someone who strongly resembles another person, usually in terms of appearance or physical features. The phrase suggests that the person being referred to looks so identical to someone else that they could be their exact replica or duplicate. It emphasizes the striking similarity or resemblance between two individuals.
  • at the helm (of something) The idiom "at the helm (of something)" refers to someone being in a position of leadership or control, especially of a company, organization, or ship. It implies that the person is responsible for making decisions and leading others in a particular endeavor. The phrase is often used to describe someone who is steering or guiding a group towards a specific direction or goal.
  • tip the scales at sth The idiom "tip the scales at sth" refers to someone or something being very heavy or having a particular weight. It is often used to convey the idea of exceeding or surpassing a specific weight limit or expectation.
  • pluck up (the) courage to do sth, at pluck up your courage The expression "pluck up (the) courage to do sth" or "pluck up your courage" means to summon the bravery or confidence necessary to do something challenging or intimidating. It refers to finding the inner strength to face fears or take action despite feeling afraid or uncertain.
  • kick up a rumpus, at raise a rumpus The idiom "kick up a rumpus" or "raise a rumpus" refers to causing a loud and disorderly commotion or disturbance. It implies actively provoking chaos or uproar, often in a spirited or confrontational manner. It can be used to describe someone causing a fuss or making a scene in a disruptive way.
  • wouldn't touch sth with a tenfoot pole, at wouldn't touch sth with a barge pole The idiom "wouldn't touch something with a ten-foot pole" or "wouldn't touch something with a barge pole" is used to express strong aversion or unwillingness to get involved with a certain person, situation, or object. It implies that the subject considers the thing in question to be undesirable, dangerous, or untrustworthy and wants to avoid it completely. The phrase emphasizes a sense of distance and reluctance towards any association.
  • at somebody's beck and call The idiom "at somebody's beck and call" means to be completely and immediately available to serve or obey someone, always ready to respond to their commands or requests.
  • blaze away (at sm or sth) The idiom "blaze away (at someone or something)" typically means to continuously shoot or fire at someone or something, often without aiming or considering accuracy. It implies a relentless and rapid assault. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone speaking or criticizing vehemently and without restraint.
  • blanch at The idiom "blanch at" means to react with fear, surprise, or disapproval towards a particular situation or idea. It refers to being so shocked or appalled that one's face becomes pale or white, similar to the process of blanching food.
  • clicks and bricks, at bricks and clicks The idiom "clicks and bricks, at bricks and clicks" refers to a business strategy that combines traditional physical retail stores (bricks) with online e-commerce operations (clicks). It implies the integration of both offline and online sales channels to serve customers more effectively and cater to their changing preferences. This strategy allows businesses to reach a wider audience and maximize their sales potential.
  • place at a premium The idiom "place at a premium" means that something is in high demand or highly valued, and therefore is scarce or limited in availability. It refers to circumstances where there is a limited supply of something and there is intense competition to obtain or secure it.
  • be/go at it hammer and tongs The idiom "be/go at it hammer and tongs" means to engage in a vigorous and intense activity or argument, usually involving great effort, energy, or enthusiasm. It implies a fervent or relentless pursuit of something.
  • joined at the hip The idiom "joined at the hip" refers to two people who are inseparable or closely connected, sharing a strong bond and often being in each other's company all the time. It implies that the individuals involved are so interconnected that they are like they are physically attached at the hip like conjoined twins.
  • grasp (or clutch or catch) at a straw (or straws) The idiom "grasp (or clutch or catch) at a straw (or straws)" refers to a situation where someone is in desperation or a hopeless situation, and they are willing to try anything, no matter how unlikely or ineffective it may be, in order to find a solution or escape. It originates from the analogy of a person drowning, desperately reaching out and clinging onto a straw or straws in a futile attempt to save themselves.
  • at the best of times The idiom "at the best of times" is used to convey that even in the most favorable or ideal circumstances, a particular situation is still challenging, difficult, or problematic. It emphasizes the inherent difficulty in dealing with or understanding something, regardless of the circumstances.
  • dabble at sth The idiom "dabble at something" means to engage in an activity or pursuit in a superficial or casual manner without fully committing or taking it seriously. It implies a lack of deep involvement or expertise in the subject.
  • raise (sb's) hackles, at make (sb's) hackles rise The idiom "raise (sb's) hackles" or "make (sb's) hackles rise" means to cause someone to become angry, irritated, or defensive. It refers to the physiological response of hairs on the back of an animal's neck or shoulders standing up when it feels threatened or provoked. Similarly, this idiom implies that something or someone has provoked or angered an individual, causing them to become defensive or agitated.
  • at a fast, good, steady, etc. clip The idiom "at a fast, good, steady, etc. clip" typically means to do something at a quick, efficient, consistent, or rapid pace. It refers to performing a task or action with speed and productivity.
  • look/feel (like) a million bucks, at look/feel (like) a million dollars The idioms "look/feel (like) a million bucks" and "look/feel (like) a million dollars" both mean to appear or feel extremely attractive, confident, or impressive. It suggests a person's overall appearance or demeanor exudes glamour, elegance, or success, similar to someone who is impeccably dressed and confident in their mannerisms.
  • at all hours (of the night) The idiom "at all hours (of the night)" refers to something that occurs or happens very late at night or during unconventional hours, usually beyond the typical or expected time. It implies irregular timing that may inconvenience or disrupt normal routines.
  • at this point in time The idiom "at this point in time" is used to refer to the current moment or present period. It signifies a specific point in time, often emphasizing the context or circumstances of the present moment.
  • keep someone or something at a distance The idiom "keep someone or something at a distance" means to maintain a certain physical, emotional, or social separation or distance from someone or something. It suggests the act of purposely keeping oneself guarded, not allowing someone or something to get too close or become too involved in one's life or affairs. This distance can be established due to suspicion, mistrust, caution, or the desire to maintain personal boundaries.
  • foaming at the mouth The idiom "foaming at the mouth" is used to describe someone who is very angry, furious, or outraged. It refers to the literal foaming of saliva that occurs around the mouth of some animals, particularly dogs, when they are extremely agitated or rabid.
  • tug at/touch your forelock The idiom "tug at/touch your forelock" refers to the act of showing deference or subservience to someone in a respectful manner. It originates from the traditional practice of men removing their hats and respectfully touching or tugging their forelocks, a gesture indicating respect towards someone of higher social status. Today, the idiom is often used metaphorically to describe an act of obeisance or deferential behavior towards someone in a position of power or authority.
  • be at (someone) hammer and tongs The idiom "be at (someone) hammer and tongs" means to engage in a vigorous and intense argument or dispute with someone, often using forceful or aggressive means to express one's point of view. It implies a heated exchange where both parties are fully committed and passionate about their opinions or positions.
  • yap at sm The idiom "yap at someone" means to continuously complain or criticize someone in an annoying or nagging manner. It suggests that someone is continually finding fault or expressing their discontent towards another person, often in an aggressive or persistent manner.
  • get into deep water, at be in deep water The idiom "get into deep water" or "be in deep water" typically means to find oneself in a difficult or troublesome situation, often as a result of one's own actions or choices. It implies being involved in a complicated problem or being in a challenging predicament that may be difficult to overcome.
  • off the beaten path, at off the beaten track The idiom "off the beaten path" or "off the beaten track" refers to venturing away from the commonly used or well-known route or location. It suggests deviating from the mainstream, usual, or popular options, and exploring lesser-known places or unconventional alternatives. It often refers to seeking out unique experiences, discovering hidden gems, or taking less-traveled roads.
  • here's looking at you The idiom "here's looking at you" is a phrase used to express a toast or a gesture of good wishes to someone, indicating that the speaker is raising their glass to honor or acknowledge the person being referred to. It is often used in a friendly or affectionate manner to show admiration or appreciation. The phrase can also imply a sense of connection or understanding between the speaker and the person being addressed.
  • at (one's) mother's knee "At (one's) mother's knee" is an idiom that refers to learning or acquiring knowledge or skills from one's mother or through a motherly figure. It signifies the earliest and foundational stages of a person's upbringing or education, typically during childhood. It emphasizes the close bond between a person and their mother or primary caregiver at a young age.
  • have a stab at (doing something) The idiom "have a stab at (doing something)" means to give something a try or attempt, usually when one is unsure or lacks confidence in their ability to do it successfully. It implies taking a chance or making an effort, even if it may not result in a perfect or flawless outcome.
  • connive at sth (with sm) The idiom "connive at sth (with sm)" means to secretly cooperate or conspire with someone to achieve a dishonest or unethical goal. It involves deliberately overlooking or allowing something wrong, usually with the intention of benefiting oneself or others involved.
  • like a bull at a gate The idiom "like a bull at a gate" is used to describe someone who is entering a situation or starting a task with great enthusiasm or without considering any consequences or obstacles. It suggests that the person is charging forward forcefully, often impulsively, and not exhibiting caution or restraint.
  • have/know sth down pat, at have/know sth off pat The idiom "have/know something down pat" or "have/know something off pat" means to have something well-memorized or thoroughly mastered. It implies that someone has memorized a particular skill, information, or task to the point where they can recall or perform it effortlessly and flawlessly.
  • at a snail's pace The idiom "at a snail's pace" means to move very slowly or progress at an extremely sluggish speed. It refers to the slow and steady movement of a snail, which is known for being one of the slowest creatures.
  • at the top of one's lungs The idiom "at the top of one's lungs" means to shout or scream at the highest volume possible. It refers to someone using the maximum force and intensity with their voice in order to be heard.
  • at the helm (of sth) The idiom "at the helm (of sth)" refers to being in a position of leadership or control, typically referring to someone who is in charge of a company, organization, or project. It suggests that the person is responsible for making important decisions and guiding the direction of the enterprise.
  • how can you sleep at night The idiom "how can you sleep at night" is typically used as a rhetorical question to express disapproval, astonishment, or moral outrage towards someone's actions or behavior. It implies that the person being referred to is behaving in a way that is morally wrong or questionable, suggesting that their actions should prevent them from being able to rest peacefully or have a clear conscience.
  • be at the end of your rope The idiom "be at the end of your rope" means to be extremely frustrated, exhausted, or desperate due to a difficult or exhausting situation, and feeling like you have no more options or resources available to solve the problem. It implies a feeling of helplessness or being at a breaking point.
  • be at full strength The idiom "be at full strength" means to be at maximum capacity or at one's highest level of ability, energy, or effectiveness. It suggests that someone or something is operating at their fullest potential or capability.
  • recoil at the sight The idiom "recoil at the sight" means to react with a strong feeling of fear, disgust, or horror when seeing something unsettling or distressing. It describes a sudden and instinctive physical or emotional reaction of pulling back or shrinking away upon encountering something unpleasant or shocking.
  • in no time (at all) The idiom "in no time (at all)" means that something will happen very quickly or occur without any delay.
  • take a gander at The idiom "take a gander at" means to take a quick or casual look at something or someone. It implies looking or observing in a casual or relaxed manner, usually to get a general idea or impression.
  • at the time The idiom "at the time" means during a specific period or moment in the past, usually in reference to when a particular event or situation occurred. It implies that the circumstances or opinions being discussed were relevant or accurate during that particular period, but may have since changed.
  • at the wheel The idiom "at the wheel" refers to being in control or in a position of authority, typically used when someone is leading or directing a situation or organization. It can also describe someone who is driving a vehicle.
  • at (one's) time of life The idiom "at (one's) time of life" refers to a specific stage or age in someone's life. It suggests that a particular event, experience, or situation is more significant or relevant considering the person's current age or stage of life.
  • make yourself at home The idiom "make yourself at home" means to settle in and make oneself comfortable in a new or unfamiliar place, making use of the resources or amenities available as if one were in their own home. It is often used as a polite invitation or friendly gesture to encourage someone to relax and behave as if they were at their own residence.
  • throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick The idiom "throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick" means that if you make enough accusations, criticisms, or claims, some of them are bound to be true or have an impact. It implies that by sheer volume of statements, at least a few are likely to be valid or successful, even if many others are baseless or ineffective.
  • at/from the outset The idiom "at/from the outset" means at the beginning or from the very start of something. It refers to the initial stage or the very first point in a process, event, or situation.
  • like you owned the place, at as if you owned the place The idiom "like you owned the place" or "as if you owned the place" is used to describe someone's behavior when they act with confidence, authority, or familiarity in a particular situation or environment, even if they do not have a rightful claim or ownership over it. It suggests behaving as if one has complete control, dominance, or entitlement over a place or situation, exuding a sense of self-assurance and often disregarding others' opinions or rules.
  • stare at sm or sth The idiom "stare at someone or something" means to look at someone or something for an extended period of time and with fixed attention, often in a rude or intense manner.
  • I'm hanged if I know, at I'll be hanged if I know The idiom "I'm hanged if I know" or "I'll be hanged if I know" is an expression used to convey that one has no idea or knowledge about a particular thing or situation. It signifies a sense of uncertainty or perplexity regarding a specific matter, often suggesting that the speaker is completely unaware or unable to provide an answer or solution. The phrase "I'm hanged if I know" originated from the punishment of hanging where the condemned person has no control or knowledge of their fate. Hence, when someone says this idiom, they imply that they have no more understanding than a person who is on the verge of being hanged and therefore cannot offer any insight.
  • look around (at sth) The idiom "look around (at sth)" means to examine or observe one's surroundings or a particular place in order to assess or understand it better. It implies taking a comprehensive or thorough look at something or exploring the area to gain knowledge or familiarity with it.
  • shovel sth down, at shovel sth into your mouth The idiom "shovel something down" or "shovel something into your mouth" means to eat something quickly and without much thought or enjoyment. It implies that the person is eating in a rushed or careless manner, often because they are in a hurry or not interested in savoring the food. The imagery of using a shovel suggests a lack of delicacy or mindfulness while consuming the food.
  • at the last minute (or moment, second, etc.) The idiom "at the last minute (or moment, second, etc.)" refers to doing something or making a decision very close to the deadline or the final opportunity to do so. It implies that the action was done hastily or with little planning, often creating a sense of urgency or surprise.
  • look up at The idiom "look up at" generally means to direct one's gaze or attention upward towards something or someone that is physically higher or above. It can be used both in a literal and figurative sense.
  • take my word for it, at take it from me The idiom "take my word for it" or "take it from me" means to trust and believe what someone is saying without questioning or doubting it. It implies that the person speaking has personal experience or knowledge about a certain matter and is offering their assurance as a reliable source of information.
  • the blessed event, at the happy event The definition for the idiom "the blessed event" (or "the happy event") is: the birth of a child. This phrase is often used as a euphemism to refer to the arrival of a baby, particularly in a joyful or celebratory context.
  • be at the end of tether The idiom "be at the end of tether" means to be extremely frustrated, exhausted, or out of patience, often after trying to deal with a difficult or challenging situation for an extended period of time. It implies that a person has reached their limit and can no longer tolerate or endure the circumstances.
  • come up/out smelling like roses, at come up/out smelling of roses The idiom "come up/out smelling like roses" or "come up/out smelling of roses" refers to a situation where someone successfully emerges from a difficult or problematic circumstance without any negative repercussions. It implies that despite being involved in a potentially troublesome situation, a person maintains their reputation, credibility, or positive image, often due to clever maneuvering, luck, or favorable outcomes.
  • at a price The idiom "at a price" refers to obtaining or achieving something, but usually with negative consequences or sacrifices. It implies that while something may be possible, it comes with a cost or downside.
  • put/set somebody at ease The idiom "put/set somebody at ease" means to help someone feel relaxed, comfortable, or free from anxiety or nervousness. It refers to taking actions or behaving in a way that makes another person feel more at ease or less stressed.
  • start sm out at an amount of money The idiom "start someone out at an amount of money" refers to establishing a particular salary or wage for someone when they begin a new job or endeavor. It implies setting a starting point for their earnings, usually at a specified amount of money, which may be subject to future adjustments based on performance or other factors.
  • pitch sth at sm or sth The idiom "pitch something at someone or something" means to target, aim, or direct something, such as a product, idea, or message, towards a specific audience or recipient. It implies tailoring or adjusting the content or presentation style to suit the needs, interests, or characteristics of the person or group being targeted. This idiom is commonly used in marketing or communication contexts where personalization or customization is important for effective delivery.
  • bless your heart, at bless you The idiom "bless your heart" is a Southern expression commonly used in polite conversation. It is often used to express sympathy, empathy, or understanding towards someone, usually in a slightly condescending or patronizing manner. While it can have different interpretations based on context and tone, it can also be used as a way to soften the delivery of criticism or to express affection towards someone. "Bless you" is a similar phrase used to offer someone sympathy, support, or encouragement.
  • fall asleep at the wheel The idiom "fall asleep at the wheel" refers to a situation where someone fails to remain attentive or alert, often due to boredom, fatigue, or neglect. This expression is commonly used to describe someone who is careless or neglectful in a situation that requires focus or responsibility, likening their lack of attention to someone who might literally fall asleep while driving a vehicle.
  • at the outset The idiom "at the outset" means at the beginning or the start of something. It refers to the initial stage or point in a project, task, or process. It indicates the early or early stages of an endeavor.
  • at the bottom of the food chain The idiom "at the bottom of the food chain" refers to being in the lowest or least powerful position within a hierarchy or system. It often implies vulnerability, lack of influence, or being easily dominated or controlled by others.
  • jeer at sm or sth The idiom "jeer at someone or something" means to mock, ridicule, or taunt someone or something in a contemptuous or derisive manner. It involves expressing disapproval or scorn by making fun of someone or something, often through sarcastic comments, gestures, or laughter.
  • be at somebody's command The idiom "be at somebody's command" means to be under someone's control or authority, ready and willing to fulfill their orders or requests. It implies being readily available and responsive to someone's needs or demands.
  • fly at sm or sth The idiom "fly at someone or something" means to attack or assault someone or something, either physically or verbally, in a sudden and aggressive manner. It implies acting with high intensity and showing hostility or anger towards the person or thing being attacked.
  • be at sea The idiom "be at sea" means to be confused, perplexed, or unsure about something. It refers to a state of being lost or disoriented, much like being at sea with no land in sight.
  • the matter at hand, at the matter in hand The idiom "the matter at hand" or "the matter in hand" refers to the specific issue or problem that is being currently discussed or dealt with. It emphasizes focusing on the immediate topic or situation under consideration.
  • beaten at the post The idiom "beaten at the post" means to come very close to achieving or winning something but ultimately to be narrowly defeated or surpassed. It is often used in situations where one's efforts or accomplishments are just short of a desired outcome or victory.
  • stay young at heart The idiom "stay young at heart" means to maintain a youthful and optimistic outlook on life, regardless of one's age. It suggests maintaining a sense of wonder, enthusiasm, and playfulness, similar to the way children approach life. It signifies embracing joy, curiosity, and a positive attitude, regardless of the challenges and responsibilities that come with aging.
  • grumble at someone The idiom "grumble at someone" refers to expressing dissatisfaction or complaining in a resentful or discontented manner directed towards a specific person. It implies voicing grievances or frustrations directly to that individual rather than keeping them internalized.
  • you're a fine one to talk!, at look who's talking! The idiom "you're a fine one to talk!" or "at look who's talking!" is used to sarcastically point out someone's hypocrisy or inconsistency. It implies that the speaker finds it amusing or ironic that the person they are addressing is criticizing or giving advice on a topic when they themselves have exhibited the same behavior or have similar shortcomings.
  • strangle sth at birth The idiom "strangle something at birth" refers to stopping or preventing something from progressing or developing further at an early stage. It means to eliminate or hinder an idea, plan, project, or undertaking before it has a chance to grow or succeed. The phrase conveys the act of putting an end to something before it can gain momentum or become a significant issue.
  • aim something at someone or something The idiom "aim something at someone or something" means to direct or focus a particular thing, action, or statement towards someone or something specific. It can indicate targeting something, such as criticism or advice, towards a specific person or object.
  • jump at sm or sth The idiom "jump at something" means to eagerly and quickly accept an opportunity or chance without hesitation. It implies that the person is excited, enthusiastic, and eager to seize the opportunity presented to them.
  • What's sth when it's at home? The idiom "What's sth when it's at home?" is an informal way of expressing confusion or asking to simplify or clarify something that is unfamiliar or unknown. It implies that the speaker is looking for a straightforward explanation or description of the given subject. It is often used humorously to show mock ignorance or skepticism.
  • be on record, at go on record The idiom "be on record" or "go on record" means to have a statement or action officially documented or formally stated for future reference or evidence. It refers to making a statement publicly or officially, usually with the intention of establishing one's position or viewpoint on a particular matter. Being on record or going on record signifies a commitment to a specific stance, which can be held against someone as evidence or proof in the future.
  • look at sm or sth The idiom "look at someone or something" means to give attention, focus, or consideration to a person or thing. It refers to directing one's eyes or mental attention towards a particular subject in order to observe, examine, or evaluate it.
  • tip the scales at The idiom "tip the scales at" means to have a specified weight, especially when it is considered extreme or significant. It is often used to indicate that someone or something weighs more than expected or is particularly heavy.
  • carp at sm or sth The idiom "carp at someone or something" means to constantly complain or find fault with someone or something. It refers to a continuous pattern of criticism or nagging.
  • jump at the opportunity The idiom "jump at the opportunity" means to eagerly and enthusiastically accept or take advantage of a chance or offer. It indicates a willingness to grasp a favorable situation without hesitation or delay.
  • go a long way, at go far The idiom "go a long way" or "go far" means to achieve success or make significant progress in a particular endeavor or situation. It refers to someone's ability or potential to accomplish their goals and aspirations, often implying that they possess qualities like determination, skill, or talent that will lead to favorable outcomes.
  • set mind at ease The idiom "set mind at ease" means to alleviate or relieve someone's anxiety, worry, or concern about something. It implies bringing a sense of calmness and tranquility to someone's thoughts or emotions, making them feel more relaxed and assured.
  • the job/matter at hand, at the job/matter in hand The idiom "the job/matter at hand" or "at the job/matter in hand" refers to the task, issue, or situation that is currently being dealt with or addressed. It implies focusing on and giving attention to the specific matter or task immediately requiring attention.
  • kiss my ass!, at kiss my arse! The idiom "kiss my ass!" or "kiss my arse!" is an impolite and vulgar expression used to dismiss or show disregard for someone else's opinions or requests. It conveys a strong sense of defiance, disrespect, and contempt. It figuratively suggests that the person speaking wants the other person to perform a submissive act, which is seen as derogatory.
  • snipe at sm or sth The idiom "snipe at someone or something" means to make critical or sly remarks about someone or something in a petty or indirect manner. It implies repeatedly and subtly attacking or criticizing someone or something, often with the intention to undermine or belittle them.
  • on/at every corner The idiom "on/at every corner" typically means that something or someone is very common or widespread. It suggests that a particular thing or person is easily found or encountered everywhere one goes.
  • at a low ebb The idiom "at a low ebb" refers to a situation or state when something is at its worst or weakest point. It often describes a time of reduced energy, morale, or success.
  • have best interest at heart The idiom "have best interest at heart" means to genuinely and sincerely care about someone's well-being or success. It implies that the person is looking out for the other person's advantage, making decisions or taking actions based on what is beneficial and in their best interest.
  • go to any lengths, at go to great lengths The idiom "go to any lengths" or "go to great lengths" means being willing to do anything necessary or exerting great effort in order to achieve a desired outcome or goal. It implies that the person is going beyond what is typically expected or considered normal in order to accomplish their objective.
  • ride two horses at the same time The idiom "ride two horses at the same time" means to try to do two conflicting or incompatible things simultaneously, often leading to difficulty or failure in both endeavors. It refers to the challenge of balancing or juggling multiple responsibilities or obligations that are not easily reconcilable.
  • peer out at sm or sth The idiom "peer out at someone or something" means to look at or observe someone or something with curiosity, interest, or caution, usually from a hiding place or a position that offers limited visibility. It implies quietly and discreetly observing or taking a quick look at someone or something without being noticed.
  • at somebody's discretion The idiom "at somebody's discretion" means that a decision or action lies solely in the hands of a particular person, allowing them to exercise their own judgment and make the final call. It implies that the person has the authority or power to determine what is best or appropriate in a given situation.
  • cavil at (one) The idiom "cavil at (one)" means to find fault or criticize someone, often in a petty or nitpicky manner. It refers to the act of constantly complaining about someone's actions, behavior, or decisions without a valid reason.
  • up and at them The idiom "up and at them" is used to encourage someone to quickly get out of bed or start a task energetically and with determination.
  • look at crosseyed The idiom "look at crosseyed" means to scrutinize, examine, or observe something or someone with great intensity or skepticism, usually due to suspicion or doubt. It implies focusing one's attention on a particular subject with a critical or skeptical eye.
  • right back at you The idiom "right back at you" means returning the same action or statement back to the same person who initiated it, often done as a response to imply reciprocity or to show that someone's criticism or remark applies equally to the person who made it.
  • chafe at the bit The idiom "chafe at the bit" means to feel impatient, restless, or eager to take action or move forward, often due to being held back or restricted. It is derived from the behavior of horses that tend to become agitated and irritable when held back by a bit in their mouth. Similarly, a person chafing at the bit is eager to break free from constraints or obstacles in order to pursue their desires or goals.
  • sweeten the pill, at sugar the pill The idiom "sweeten the pill" or "sugar the pill" refers to the act of making something unpleasant or difficult more tolerable or easier to accept. It involves adding something positive or comforting to make the situation or information more palatable, similar to coating a bitter pill with sugar to make it easier to swallow. This idiom is often used in the context of delivering bad news or unpleasant truths in a more gentle or agreeable manner.
  • put the finishing touches on, at put the finishing touches to The idiom "put the finishing touches on" or "put the finishing touches to" means to add or make small final adjustments or enhancements to complete something in a satisfactory manner. It refers to the final steps taken to perfect or refine something, typically a project, an artistic work, or any undertaking that requires attention to detail.
  • draw the line at (something) The idiom "draw the line at (something)" means to set a limit or establish a point beyond which one is unwilling to go or tolerate. It refers to the act of defining a boundary or indicating what is acceptable or unacceptable.
  • at somebody’s beck and call The idiom "at somebody's beck and call" means to be constantly available and ready to do anything for someone, to be completely at their disposal or under their command. It implies being obedient and always willing to comply with their requests or wishes.
  • put in an appearance (at sth) The idiom "put in an appearance (at sth)" means to make a brief visit or attend a social event or gathering, usually without staying for a long time or having a significant impact. It suggests showing up to acknowledge an event or fulfill a social obligation, but not necessarily being fully engaged or committed.
  • at stake The idiom "at stake" refers to something that is at risk, in danger, or in a critical or pivotal situation. It implies that the outcome or result of a particular situation or decision is significant and could have consequences.
  • at arm's length The idiom "at arm's length" means to keep someone or something physically or emotionally distant or close enough to avoid direct contact or influence. It implies keeping a degree of separation or caution in dealing with someone or something.
  • at knifepoint The idiom "at knifepoint" refers to a situation where someone is threatened or forced to do something against their will, typically by someone holding a knife.
  • where there's smoke, there's fire, at there's no smoke without fire The idiom "where there's smoke, there's fire" or "there's no smoke without fire" is a figurative expression that suggests where there are rumors, suspicions, or indications of something negative or controversial, there must be some truth to it. It implies that on some level, there is likely a foundation or basis for the claims or accusations being made.
  • in a pinch, at at a pinch The idiom "in a pinch" or "at a pinch" means when someone is in a difficult or desperate situation and needs to find a solution or make do with limited resources or options. It refers to being able to handle a demanding or challenging circumstance with whatever means available, even if it is not the ideal or preferred choice.
  • take offense (at sm or sth) The idiom "take offense (at sm or sth)" means to feel insulted, upset, or resentful about something that someone has said or done. It implies feeling personally attacked or insulted by someone's words or actions, often resulting in a negative emotional reaction.
  • dirty work at the crossroads The idiom "dirty work at the crossroads" refers to engaging in deceitful or unethical actions, often in secret or hidden from others. It implies performing tasks or activities that are morally questionable, morally compromising, or morally reprehensible. The phrase conveys a sense of dishonesty, manipulation, or underhanded behavior.
  • the best of men are but men at best The idiom "the best of men are but men at best" essentially means that even the most virtuous individuals are still imperfect human beings. It acknowledges that all people, regardless of their merits or achievements, have flaws and make mistakes. In essence, it highlights the universal fallibility of humankind, reminding us not to idolize or expect flawlessness from anyone.
  • sling/throw mud at sb The idiom "sling/throw mud at someone" means to speak or write untruths or make malicious accusations about someone with the intention of damaging their reputation or to attack their character. It implies spreading false information or engaging in slanderous behavior.
  • jab at someone or something The idiom "jab at someone or something" refers to making a quick, pointed, and often critical remark or comment about someone or something. It involves delivering a verbal or written jab that is intended to provoke or criticize in a slightly aggressive or mocking manner. This idiom is commonly used to describe a situation where a person takes a subtle swipe at a specific individual, group, idea, or action.
  • have a bash at (doing) something The idiom "have a bash at (doing) something" means to attempt or try doing something, especially if it is challenging or unfamiliar. It implies a willingness to give it a go and see how it turns out, even if success is not guaranteed.
  • aim sth at sm or sth The idiom "aim sth at sm or sth" means to direct something, such as a remark, criticism, action, or effort, specifically towards a particular person or thing. It implies targeting or focusing one's intention or purpose on a specific target or objective.
  • sth is at your disposal The idiom "something is at your disposal" means that someone or something is available for you to use or have whenever you need or want it. It implies that you have full freedom and control over the thing or person that is being offered to you.
  • cutting edge, at the The idiom "cutting edge, at the" refers to being at the forefront or the most advanced point in a particular field or industry. It denotes being innovative, pushing boundaries, and being ahead of competition in terms of technology, design, or ideas.
  • be at the end of something The idiom "be at the end of something" means to be at the conclusion or final stage of a task, project, or situation. It implies that there is not much more to be done and that the process or event is nearing completion.
  • with your tongue in your cheek, at tongue in cheek The idiom "with your tongue in your cheek" or "tongue in cheek" refers to a statement or remark that is meant to be humorous or ironic, often with a hint of sarcasm or insincerity. It signifies a form of expression where the speaker is not being completely serious and may be subtly poking fun or making a sly comment.
  • frown at sm or sth To "frown at someone or something" means to express disapproval or displeasure through a facial expression where one's eyebrows are drawn together and their mouth is turned downward. It signifies a negative reaction to the person or thing being observed.
  • at the end of the day The idiom "at the end of the day" is used to highlight a fundamental or ultimate truth or conclusion after considering all the relevant factors or details of a situation. It is often used to emphasize the most important point or outcome in a broader context.
  • put two fingers up at (someone or something) The idiom "put two fingers up at (someone or something)" is a British slang term that means to express a strong and offensive gesture, often by extending the middle and index finger in a V shape, towards someone or something in an act of defiance or disrespect. It is a crude gesture that is considered vulgar and impolite.
  • make a stab at (something) The idiom "make a stab at (something)" means to attempt or try something, especially when one is unsure if they will be successful. It suggests making an effort or taking a shot at something, even if it may not result in perfect or complete success.
  • be sleeping at the wheel The idiom "be sleeping at the wheel" means to be negligent, unaware, or not paying attention to an important situation or task, often resulting in negative consequences or missed opportunities. It implies someone's failure to be alert or vigilant, similar to a driver who falls asleep while operating a vehicle.
  • have a go at The idiom "have a go at" means to make an attempt or try something, often implying taking a chance or giving it a shot. It suggests participating in an activity or endeavor with enthusiasm, even if uncertain of the outcome.
  • at the (very) outside The idiom "at the (very) outside" generally means the maximum limit or the furthest extent of something, usually in terms of time or quantity. It suggests that a certain event or situation is unlikely to go beyond or exceed that particular point.
  • be of two minds, at be in two minds The idiom "be of two minds" or "be in two minds" means to be unable to make a decision or to be unsure about something. It refers to being conflicted or having contradictory opinions, thoughts, or feelings about a particular matter or situation. It implies a state of indecisiveness or uncertainty.
  • a cat can look at a king The idiom "a cat can look at a king" means that even someone of low status has the right to observe or look at someone of higher status without consequence or fear. It suggests that no one should be denied the basic freedom to observe or inquire about someone or something, regardless of their social standing.
  • bring sth to a head, at come to a head The idiom "bring something to a head" or "come to a head" refers to a situation or problem reaching a critical or decisive point. It implies that something has been building up or escalating over time, and it has finally come to a climax or breaking point. It often suggests that action or resolution is imminent.
  • throw oneself at the mercy of sm authority The idiom "throw oneself at the mercy of [someone's] authority" means to willingly and completely surrender to someone in a position of power or authority, usually in a desperate or vulnerable situation, and to rely on their leniency, mercy, or judgment for the outcome.
  • put sb off their stroke, at put sb off their stride The idiom "put sb off their stroke" or "put sb off their stride" refers to disrupting or distracting someone from their usual or effective rhythm, concentration, or performance. It implies causing someone to lose their focus or confidence, hindering their abilities or progress in a particular task or situation.
  • pain in the ass/butt, at a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "pain in the ass/butt" is a colloquial expression used to describe something or someone that is irritating, bothersome, or causes trouble or inconvenience. It refers to a situation or person that is frustrating or difficult to deal with, resulting in feelings of annoyance or inconvenience. The alternative phrase "pain in the arse/backside" is a variation of the same idiom, used particularly in British English.
  • at a good clip The idiom "at a good clip" refers to something happening or moving quickly or at a fast pace.
  • in glorious technicolour, at in glorious technicolor The idiom "in glorious technicolour/technicolor" refers to something being portrayed or presented in a vivid and impressive manner, typically associated with vibrant colors and high-definition visuals. It is often used to emphasize the richness, beauty, or extravagance of a scene, event, or experience. The phrase "in glorious technicolor" originated from the use of the Technicolor film process, known for its ability to create vibrant and eye-catching colors in movies.
  • (all) at sea (about sth) The idiom "(all) at sea (about sth)" means to be confused, perplexed, or unsure about something. It suggests a state of disorientation or lack of understanding regarding a particular situation or topic.
  • go at (someone) The idiom "go at (someone)" typically means to attack, criticize, or confront someone aggressively or fiercely. It implies a strong or intense verbal or physical altercation directed towards another person.
  • keep sb/sth at arm's length The idiom "keep someone or something at arm's length" means to maintain a certain distance or avoid getting too close to someone or something. It suggests being cautious and not forming close or intimate relationships or associations with a person or thing.
  • at one's disposal The idiom "at one's disposal" refers to something that is available or ready to be used by someone, implying that they have control or ownership over it. It suggests that a person has the authority to use or allocate resources or assistance as they see fit.
  • if the shoe fits (wear it), at if the cap fits, wear it The idiom "if the shoe fits (wear it), and if the cap fits, wear it" means that if someone recognizes themselves or feels personally targeted by a statement or description, they should accept it and take responsibility for it. It suggests that if someone feels that they fit the description or hold the characteristics being discussed, they should not deny or avoid it, but rather embrace it or admit to it.
  • nine times out of ten, at ninetynine times out of a hundred The idiom "nine times out of ten, at ninetynine times out of a hundred" is an expression used to convey a high degree of probability or likelihood. It suggests that something is almost always true or happens almost every time, with only rare exceptions occurring. Essentially, it denotes a situation or outcome that is highly predictable or expected to occur the majority of the time.
  • at regular intervals The idiom "at regular intervals" means something that occurs or happens repeatedly or consistently at fixed, predetermined time intervals or intervals of the same length.
  • at someone's beck and call The idiom "at someone's beck and call" refers to being completely obedient and always available to do someone's bidding or fulfill their requests without question, as if one is constantly on call for that person's commands.
  • asleep at the wheel The idiom "asleep at the wheel" refers to a situation where someone is neglecting their responsibilities or failing to take action, particularly when they should be proactive or attentive. It implies being unaware, unprepared, or indifferent to a crucial situation, similar to how a driver who is asleep at the wheel would be inattentive and unresponsive to their driving duties.
  • look down one's nose at The idiom "look down one's nose at" means to show a condescending or disdainful attitude toward someone or something. It implies a sense of superiority or arrogance, often based on perceived social or intellectual superiority. It is often used when someone judges or belittles others based on their perceived lower status or less prestigious qualities.
  • in the name of God/heaven, at in God's/heaven's name The idiom "in the name of God/heaven" or "in God's/heaven's name" is an expression used to emphasize a strong plea or command, often indicating urgency, surprise, or frustration. It can be seen as an invocation of a higher power to lend credibility or urgency to a statement or request.
  • concentrate someone or something at something The idiom "concentrate someone or something at something" means to focus or gather a person or thing towards a specific point or objective. It implies bringing together or directing one's attention, efforts, or resources in a particular direction to achieve a specific goal or outcome.
  • at the stroke of a pen The idiom "at the stroke of a pen" refers to the ability or power to make a decision, implement a change, or have significant impact with just a single action, typically with the use of one's signature or written authorization. It implies that something can be accomplished or undone swiftly and easily through the simple act of writing or signing.
  • at this moment The idiom "at this moment" refers to the current point in time or the present moment. It indicates that something is happening or being considered presently or at the specific time being referred to.
  • keep at arm's length from sm or sth The idiom "keep at arm's length from someone or something" means to keep a safe distance or to maintain a certain level of caution, avoidance, or detachment in dealing with someone or something, usually due to mistrust, suspicion, or a desire to protect oneself.
  • beat sb hands down, at win (sth) hands down The idiom "beat someone hands down" or "win something hands down" means to achieve victory easily and effortlessly, without any doubt or competition. It implies winning comfortably, with a significant lead over the opponent, making the victory almost guaranteed.
  • can't cut the mustard, at can't cut it The idiom "can't cut the mustard" or "can't cut it" is used to describe someone who fails to meet expectations or perform up to the required standards in a particular situation or task. It implies that the person is not capable or skilled enough to succeed in that specific endeavor.
  • get stuck into sth, at get stuck in The idiom "get stuck into something" or "get stuck in" refers to actively and enthusiastically engaging in a task, activity, or project. It conveys the idea of dedicating oneself wholeheartedly, making a diligent effort without hesitation or delay. It implies being highly involved and committed to accomplishing the task at hand.
  • know where is at The idiom "know where it's at" means having a clear understanding or knowledge about something, typically referring to being well-informed or knowledgeable in a particular field or subject. It implies knowing the most important or relevant aspects of a situation or being aware of what is currently popular or trendy.
  • at a (fair) lick The idiom "at a (fair) lick" means to do something quickly or at a fast pace. It implies that someone is working or progressing efficiently and effectively. The addition of "fair" typically signifies that the speed is reasonable or satisfactory.
  • be wiped off the face of the earth, at disappear off the face of the earth The idiom "be wiped off the face of the earth" or "disappear off the face of the earth" refers to someone or something vanishing or disappearing completely and without a trace. It implies that the person or object is completely eliminated or eradicated, leaving no evidence or knowledge of their existence behind.
  • keep sb/sth on a tight rein, at keep a tight rein on sb/sth The idiom "keep sb/sth on a tight rein" or "keep a tight rein on sb/sth" means to exercise strict control or supervision over someone or something. It refers to maintaining a firm and disciplined approach to managing or directing a person, situation, or organization. This phrase implies a careful monitoring and restriction of actions or behavior to prevent any deviation or undesirable outcomes.
  • armed at all points The idiom "armed at all points" means to be fully prepared and ready for any situation or challenge, both mentally and physically. It implies being equipped with knowledge, skills, resources, and a strong ability to defend oneself or handle any difficulties that may arise.
  • will stop at nothing The idiom "will stop at nothing" means that someone is determined to achieve their goal, regardless of any obstacles, challenges, or actions they have to take. It implies a relentless and unwavering commitment to succeeding, without any moral or ethical boundaries.
  • at face value The idiom "at face value" means accepting or judging something exactly as it appears initially, without considering any underlying meaning or hidden agenda. It refers to accepting a statement, appearance, or situation without questioning its authenticity or deeper implications.
  • to the verge of, at on the verge (of) The idiom "to the verge of" or "on the verge (of)" refers to being at the point or threshold of something, typically a significant event or action. It suggests being on the brink, just before the occurrence of a certain situation or action. It implies a state of being close to or near the edge of something, often indicating readiness or potential for action or change.
  • jump at the opportunity (to do something) The idiom "jump at the opportunity (to do something)" means to eagerly and immediately accept or take advantage of a chance or opportunity that is presented. It implies that the person is enthusiastic and quick to seize the moment without hesitation.
  • get up on the wrong side of the bed, at get out of bed (on) the wrong side The idiom "get up on the wrong side of the bed" (or "get out of bed on the wrong side") refers to someone starting the day in a bad mood or feeling irritable for no apparent reason. It implies that the individual woke up in a negative state and throughout the day they may remain grumpy or easily irritated. It is often used humorously to explain a person's temporary or unexplained bad mood.
  • skeleton at the feast The idiom "skeleton at the feast" refers to an unwelcome or uncomfortable presence or topic that ruins or dampens a joyful or celebratory atmosphere. It alludes to the presence of a skeleton (a symbol of death and negativity) among people who are typically enjoying themselves at a feast or gathering. This idiom implies that the unpleasant, unresolved, or hidden issue is often a cause of distress or discomfort, disrupting the merriment or happiness of an event or occasion.
  • a ghost (or spectre) at the feast The idiom "a ghost (or spectre) at the feast" refers to a person, event, or issue that dampens the atmosphere or enjoyment of a gathering. It implies the presence of something unsettling, disturbing, or negative amidst an otherwise pleasant or celebratory occasion, causing discomfort or unease for those involved.
  • angle at (something) The idiom "angle at (something)" refers to manipulating or scheming in order to obtain a particular advantage or goal. It implies using cunning or strategic maneuvering to achieve a desired outcome.
  • take aim at sm or sth The idiom "take aim at someone or something" means to direct criticism, accusations, or actions towards a specific person or thing, often with the intention of attacking or discrediting them. It implies a deliberate and focused effort to challenge or confront the target.
  • jump at something The idiom "jump at something" means to eagerly accept or seize an opportunity or offer without hesitation. It implies being quick to react or take advantage of a favorable situation.
  • look/feel like death warmed over, at look/feel like death warmed up The idiom "look/feel like death warmed over" or "look/feel like death warmed up" is used to describe someone who appears extremely ill, exhausted, or unhealthy. It emphasizes the person's physical condition, suggesting that they resemble a person who has experienced the coldness of death and has been brought back to a somewhat "warmer" state.
  • at the end of (one's) fingertips The idiom "at the end of (one's) fingertips" means to have easy access to a piece of information, knowledge, or skill, implying that it is readily available or easily retrievable. It suggests that the person possesses a vast understanding or proficiency in a particular field or subject matter.
  • at variance with sb/sth The idiom "at variance with someone/something" means to have a disagreement, conflict, or difference of opinion with someone or something. It suggests a state of disagreement or inconsistency between two individuals or things.
  • at all cost/costs The idiom "at all cost/costs" means to do or achieve something regardless of the difficulties, risks, or sacrifices involved. It implies a determined and unwavering pursuit of a goal, even if it requires great effort or personal loss.
  • growl at someone or something The idiom "growl at someone or something" means to express strong disapproval or anger towards a person or thing. It implies a low, guttural sound akin to what an animal may make when it is feeling threatened or hostile.
  • at first glance The idiom "at first glance" means to initially perceive or judge something based on a quick and superficial observation, typically without deeper consideration or analysis.
  • spring out at sm The idiom "spring out at someone" means to surprise or startle someone by suddenly appearing or presenting oneself unexpectedly.
  • along those lines, at along the lines of sth The idiom "along those lines" or "along the lines of something" is used to indicate a similar or related idea or concept. It suggests that what is being discussed or described is similar in nature, although not exactly the same. It can be used to express a general similarity or approximation.
  • glower at sm or sth The idiom "glower at someone or something" means to look at someone or something in an angry or displeased manner, often with a fierce or intense gaze. It typically conveys a feeling of hostility, irritation, or disapproval.
  • one for the books, at turnup for the book(s) The idiomatic expression "one for the books" or "turnup for the books" refers to an event or occurrence that is extremely noteworthy, remarkable, or unusual. It typically involves a surprising or unexpected outcome that leaves a lasting impression. This phrase implies that the event is so remarkable that it should be recorded or remembered as a remarkable event in history or literature.
  • at a moment’s notice The idiom "at a moment's notice" means to be ready or available to act or respond immediately, without any delay or advance warning. It implies being prepared to take action or fulfill a request quickly and without hesitation.
  • clutch/grasp at straws The idiom "clutch/grasp at straws" means to make desperate or hopeless attempts to find a solution or to save a situation, typically when facing failure or uncertainty. It refers to the action of clutching or grasping at the slender and unlikely hope, similar to trying to hold onto and control a bundle of loose straws.
  • lay at the door of To "lay at the door of" means to assign blame or responsibility to someone or something for a particular action, event, or outcome. It suggests holding someone accountable for something negative or unfavorable that has occurred.
  • take a crack at sth/doing sth To "take a crack at something/doing something" means to attempt or try to do something, often for the first time or when unsure of the outcome. It implies taking up a challenge or giving it a shot.
  • snap at sm or sth The idiom "snap at someone or something" means to respond or react to someone or something with sudden anger, irritation, or impatience. It implies that the person is harsh or short-tempered in their response, often without a good reason.
  • at a lick The idiom "at a lick" means to do something quickly or rapidly. It implies performing a task or activity with high speed or efficiency.
  • can hardly wait, at can't wait The idiom "can hardly wait" or "can't wait" means to be extremely eager or impatient for something to happen or to experience something. It implies a strong desire or anticipation for a particular event or outcome.
  • make eyes at someone The idiom "make eyes at someone" means to flirt with someone or to exchange meaningful glances or gestures to show romantic or sexual interest in them. It often involves using subtle or suggestive eye contact and body language to convey affection or attraction.
  • set someone's heart at rest The idiom "set someone's heart at rest" means to calm, reassure, or alleviate someone's worries or concerns. It refers to providing comfort or peace of mind, putting someone's anxieties to rest.
  • pay your last respects, at pay your respects The idiom "pay your last respects" or "pay your respects" refers to the act of showing honor, acknowledgement, or mourning for a deceased person. It involves attending their funeral or memorial service, expressing condolences to the bereaved family, and often includes viewing or saying goodbye to the deceased. It is a gesture of final farewell and respect for the deceased individual.
  • Don't swap horses at midstream. The idiom "Don't swap horses at midstream" means that it is unwise or risky to change plans or make significant alterations to a situation or course of action that is already underway or nearing completion. It emphasizes the importance of staying committed and not making drastic changes that could jeopardize progress or disrupt the momentum of a project or goal.
  • at one blow The idiom "at one blow" means accomplishing or resolving something in a single decisive action or event. It refers to achieving a goal, overcoming an obstacle, or making a significant impact with a single effort or occurrence.
  • make a stab at sth The idiom "make a stab at sth" means to make an attempt or try something, usually when it is difficult or uncertain. It implies taking a shot or making an effort, even if it may not be successful.
  • fling at The idiom "fling at" typically means to make an attempt at something without much effort, thought, or expectation of success. It refers to doing something hastily or impulsively, showing little commitment or dedication.
  • at one time or another The idiom "at one time or another" means at some unspecified point in the past or future; it refers to different occasions or instances that have occurred or will occur.
  • retail at sth The idiom "retail at something" refers to the price at which a particular product is sold to customers in a retail store or market. It means the specified price for which a product or item is available for individual purchase by consumers.
  • not to be sneezed at The idiom "not to be sneezed at" means that something or someone should not be dismissed or underestimated. It typically refers to something of value, worth, or importance that should be taken seriously or considered carefully.
  • charity starts at home The idiom "charity starts at home" means that one should prioritize taking care of their family and loved ones before helping others or donating to charitable causes. It implies that it is essential to address the needs and well-being of those closest to oneself before extending assistance to others.
  • take the bit between your teeth, at get the bit between your teeth The idiom "take the bit between your teeth" or "get the bit between your teeth" originates from horseback riding where a metal bit is used to control the horse's movement and direction. When a horse takes the bit between its teeth, it disregards the rider's commands and becomes difficult to control. Figuratively, the idiom means to seize control of a situation or take initiative in a determined and assertive manner, often in the face of obstacles or opposition. It implies a sense of resolve and proactivity.
  • be taken at face value The idiom "be taken at face value" means accepting something or someone as they appear or claim to be, without questioning or doubting their true intentions or meaning. It implies that no further analysis or deeper interpretation is necessary in understanding the situation or person accurately.
  • all well and good, at all very well The idiom "all well and good" or "all very well" is used to suggest that something may seem acceptable or desirable in theory or on the surface, but may not be practical or effective in reality. It implies that while a certain idea or solution may sound good in principle, it may not hold up when put into practice or faced with real-world challenges.
  • jest at someone or something The idiom "jest at someone or something" means to make fun of or mock someone or something in a lighthearted or joking manner. It involves using humor or witty remarks to poke fun at someone's actions, behavior, or circumstances.
  • tear at sth The idiom "tear at something" usually means to forcefully or aggressively remove or separate something by pulling it apart with great effort or intensity. It can be used to describe physical actions like tearing fabric or paper, as well as metaphorical actions such as attacking or dismantling an argument, relationship, or structure.
  • at the last minute/moment The idiom "at the last minute/moment" refers to doing or completing something just before the deadline or scheduled time. It implies that the action was delayed until the very end, often causing stress or urgency.
  • wonder at sm or sth The idiom "wonder at someone or something" means to be amazed, surprised, or filled with admiration for someone or something. It conveys a sense of curiosity and astonishment towards a person, situation, or object.
  • a kick at the can The idiom "a kick at the can" refers to getting an opportunity to try or participate in something, especially when it may be one's last chance. It implies taking advantage of a given situation or making the most of an opportunity while it exists.
  • assist (one) at The idiom "assist (one) at" typically means to help or support someone during a particular event or activity. It implies actively providing aid or aid in accomplishing a task or goal.
  • at (someone's) behest The idiom "at (someone's) behest" means to do something or take action as a result of a specific person's request, urging, or command. It implies that the action or task is performed at the request or insistence of the individual mentioned.
  • guess at sth The idiom "guess at something" means to make an estimate or speculate about something without having precise or accurate information. It implies offering a guess or approximation rather than providing a definite answer or solution.
  • asleep at the switch The idiom "asleep at the switch" refers to someone who is not paying attention or failing to perform their responsibilities, especially in a situation where quick action or decision-making is necessary. It suggests negligence, inattentiveness, or a lack of awareness. The phrase can be traced back to the early days of railroads, where an operator who fell asleep or failed to switch the tracks at the appropriate time would cause a derailment or accident.
  • go/fly off at a tangent The idiom "go/fly off at a tangent" means to abruptly or unexpectedly change the subject or focus of a conversation or discussion, usually diverting it onto a completely unrelated or irrelevant topic. This expression is used to describe someone who quickly veers off track from the main point or purpose of the conversation or argument.
  • shit bricks, at shit a brick "Shit bricks" or "shit a brick" is an idiom that is used to describe extreme feelings of fear, surprise, or shock. It expresses the idea of being so overwhelmed that it feels as if one's reaction might be physical and cause them to excrete bricks instead of feces.
  • at home with someone or something The idiom "at home with someone or something" refers to feeling comfortable, familiar, or at ease in the presence or company of someone or something. It implies a sense of ease, understanding, and affinity towards the person or thing being referred to.
  • at the crack of dawn The idiom "at the crack of dawn" means to do something very early in the morning, right at the moment when the day begins or when the first light of dawn appears.
  • call at sm place The idiom "call at sm place" typically refers to visiting or stopping by a specific location, often for a social or business purpose. It suggests making a brief visit or stopping in at a particular place. This can be used to indicate dropping by someone's home, office, or any other designated location.
  • fly off at a tangent The idiom "fly off at a tangent" means to suddenly change the topic or shift the focus of a conversation or discussion in a completely unrelated or unexpected direction. It implies losing track of the main point or deviating from the original subject matter.
  • at the last gasp The idiom "at the last gasp" means to be at the final moment or point of extreme exhaustion, decline, or desperation. It refers to a situation where someone or something is barely able to continue or survive.
  • laugh at sth The idiom "laugh at something" means to find something amusing or humorous and express it through laughter. It can also imply making fun of or ridiculing something or someone in a mocking or scornful manner.
  • have (someone's) (best) interests at heart The idiom "have (someone's) (best) interests at heart" means to genuinely care about and prioritize the well-being and success of someone. It implies a sincere concern for their welfare and making choices or decisions that are beneficial and in their best interest.
  • well I'm blessed!, at bless my soul! The idiom "well I'm blessed!" or "bless my soul!" is an expression of surprise, astonishment, or disbelief. It is often used to convey a sense of amazement or incredulity at something unexpected or unusual happening.
  • be at (one's) command The idiom "be at (one's) command" means to be readily available to obey or follow the instructions or orders of someone else. It implies being under someone's complete control or at their disposal.
  • what someone is driving at The idiom "what someone is driving at" means to understand or interpret someone's underlying message, intention, or purpose behind their words or actions. It relates to grasping the main point or objective that the person is trying to convey or achieve.
  • end up at The idiom "end up at" refers to the final or eventual destination, result, or situation that someone or something reaches after a series of events or decisions. It signifies where someone or something ultimately ends or finds themselves.
  • knock at your door The idiom "knock at your door" generally means that someone or something has come or arrived unexpectedly in your life, typically referring to an opportunity, a problem, or a new situation. It implies that there is an unanticipated occurrence or event seeking your attention or intervention.
  • eat crow, at eat humble pie The idiom "eat crow" is typically used to mean admitting and accepting one's mistake or defeat, often by a public apology or acknowledgment. It implies being forced to swallow one's pride, dignity, or arrogance. "Eat humble pie" has a similar meaning, emphasizing the act of humbling oneself or being humiliated due to a mistake or failure. Both idioms convey the idea of facing embarrassment or humiliation after being proven wrong.
  • clicks and bricks, at clicks and mortar The idiom "clicks and bricks, at clicks and mortar" refers to a business model that combines both online (clicks) and offline (bricks) presence. It represents the integration of e-commerce (online) and physical retail (offline) strategies into one cohesive operation. This idiom highlights the coexistence and synergy between digital and traditional retail channels.
  • more power to you!, at more power to your elbow! The idiom "more power to you!" or "more power to your elbow!" is a phrase used to express support, admiration, or encouragement towards someone's actions or endeavors. It conveys the idea that the person should continue doing what they are doing and that they have the speaker's blessing or good wishes. It can often be used to acknowledge someone's achievements or efforts and is a way of saying "keep up the good work!"
  • would as soon do as look at you The idiom "would as soon do as look at you" means having a strong dislike or lack of interest in someone or something. It suggests that a person would prefer to avoid any contact or interaction with the subject, as merely looking at them is challenging or unappealing.
  • spit nails, at spit blood/venom The definition of the idiom "spit nails" or "spit blood/venom" is to express intense anger, fury, or outrage. It implies a state of extreme agitation or frustration, where the person is figuratively "spitting" nails or bodily fluids as a reflection of their intense emotions.
  • fall asleep at the switch The idiom "fall asleep at the switch" refers to someone's negligence or failure to perform one's duty or responsibility. It suggests that the person is not attentive or aware of the situation, often leading to the missing of an important opportunity or making a critical mistake.
  • take a look at sm or sth The idiom "take a look at sm or sth" means to examine, observe, or evaluate someone or something closely or in a thorough manner. It suggests actively paying attention or inspecting with intent.
  • you can bet your bottom dollar, at you can bet your life The idiom "you can bet your bottom dollar" or "you can bet your life" is a phrase used to express absolute certainty or confidence in a particular statement or situation. It implies that one is willing to stake their last dollar or even their life on the accuracy or outcome of something. In other words, it emphasizes that the speaker is extremely confident or certain about the truth or success of what they are asserting.
  • would as soon do sth as look at you The idiom "would as soon do something as look at you" means that a person has no interest, regard, or desire for something or someone. It implies that they would be equally willing or unwilling to do a particular action as they would be to simply glance at the person in question. Essentially, it states that the person has no preference and little to no interest in the matter at hand.
  • be/lie at the bottom of something The idiom "be/lie at the bottom of something" refers to the underlying cause or root of a certain situation or problem. It suggests that something is the fundamental or primary reason for an event or outcome.
  • be at the mercy of sth/sb The idiom "be at the mercy of something/somebody" means to be completely dependent on or powerless against something or someone. It implies that you have no control over the situation and must rely on the decisions or actions of others.
  • go off at halfcock The idiom "go off at halfcock" refers to a situation where someone acts or speaks too quickly, rashly, or prematurely without careful consideration or preparation. It implies that the person has acted before being fully ready or allowing the situation to develop appropriately.
  • bring sth into play, at come into play To bring something into play or come into play means to make use of or utilize something in a particular situation or context. It refers to the act of employing or utilizing a particular factor, element, or resource in order to achieve a desired outcome or address a specific situation. It suggests that something is being brought forward or activated to have an impact or influence on the situation at hand.
  • eat away at The idiom "eat away at" refers to a process of slowly eroding or gradually destroying something, such as one's emotions, health, or a physical object, usually caused by worry, guilt, regret, or a negative influence. It implies the idea of something gnawing at or consuming someone or something over time.
  • put one at ease The idiom "put one at ease" means to make someone feel comfortable, relaxed, and free from any anxiety or tension. It refers to the act of creating a sense of calmness or reassurance in someone's mind or emotions.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell, at not have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" (or "not have a cat in hell's chance") means having no possibility or extremely slim chances of success or accomplishment. It implies that the circumstances or conditions are so adverse or unfavorable that success is almost impossible, similar to a snowball surviving in the fiery environment of hell or a cat surviving in hell itself.
  • bristle at (something) The idiom "bristle at (something)" means to react with anger, defensiveness, or irritation towards a particular thing or situation. It refers to the way a person's body hair (like the bristles of a brush) can stand on end when they feel antagonized or provoked.
  • bark at sm or sth The idiom "bark at someone or something" refers to the act of angrily or aggressively expressing disapproval, criticism, or annoyance towards someone or something. It often signifies a loud and confrontational reaction, similar to the way a dog might bark at a perceived threat.
  • take sb at their word The idiom "take sb at their word" means to believe or trust someone based solely on what they have said, without further questioning or skepticism. It implies accepting their statement as true without seeking additional evidence or verification.
  • stop at nothing The idiom "stop at nothing" means to be determined and persistent in achieving a goal, without any moral or ethical boundaries. It implies that one is willing to do whatever it takes, regardless of the consequences, to accomplish what they have set out to do.
  • make eyes at somebody The idiom "make eyes at somebody" refers to the act of looking at someone in a way that shows romantic or flirtatious interest. It often involves using facial expressions or gestures to convey attraction or affection.
  • lay it on with a trowel, at lay it on a bit thick The idiomatic expression "lay it on with a trowel" or "lay it on a bit thick" refers to the act of exaggerating or overemphasizing something, often to a point where it becomes excessive or insincere. It implies the use of excessive flattery, praise, or embellishment in order to create a stronger impact or impression on someone.
  • be in at something The idiom "be in at something" means to be present or involved in a particular activity or event. It signifies actively participating or witness to a specific situation or happening.
  • come (or fall) apart at the seams The idiom "come (or fall) apart at the seams" refers to a situation or thing that is breaking down or failing catastrophically. It suggests that the person, object, or project is deteriorating and experiencing multiple problems or failures simultaneously, as if the seams that hold it together are coming undone. It implies a complete loss of control, organization, or functionality.
  • I'll bet, at I bet The idiom "I'll bet" or "I bet" is an expression used to indicate certainty or strong belief in a statement or prediction. It is often used in casual conversations and friendly bets to assert confidence in a particular outcome or situation.
  • be at daggers drawn The idiom "be at daggers drawn" means to be in a state of bitter hostility, conflict, or intense disagreement with someone. It implies a situation where there is a strong animosity or enmity between two parties, usually engaged in a heated argument or confrontation. The term "daggers drawn" refers to the act of drawing daggers or weapons as a symbol of aggression or readiness to attack.
  • cheap at the price The idiom "cheap at the price" refers to something that is considered to be a great value for the cost or price it is being offered. It implies that the item or service being sold is of high quality and worth more than the amount being asked for.
  • point a finger at The idiom "point a finger at" means to accuse or blame someone for something, often without conclusive evidence or proof.
  • put a brave face on it, at put on a brave face The idiom "put a brave face on it" or "put on a brave face" means to conceal one's true feelings of fear, disappointment, or sadness and display a courageous or confident demeanor despite facing difficulties or adversity. It refers to maintaining a positive appearance or attitude externally, even though internally one may feel scared or upset.
  • have sm's best interest(s) at heart The idiom "have someone's best interests at heart" means to genuinely care about and prioritize someone's well-being or success. It suggests that the person is acting selflessly and with genuine concern for the other person's happiness, rather than being motivated by personal gain or selfish motives.
  • be at pains to do sth The idiom "be at pains to do something" means to make a deliberate effort or take great care in doing something. It implies that someone is putting in extra effort, going through difficulties, or being meticulous in order to accomplish a task or achieve a desired outcome.
  • grasp at straws The idiom "grasp at straws" means to make a desperate or futile attempt to find a solution or make sense of a situation when facing difficulties or uncertainty. It refers to the act of reaching out for any available option or possibility, even if it is unlikely to succeed or provide significant help.
  • keep on at The idiom "keep on at" means to persistently or continuously nag, criticize, or urge someone to do something. It implies repeatedly or constantly reminding or pressuring someone about a particular matter.
  • hurl/throw/sling mud at sb The idiom "hurl/throw/sling mud at sb" means to publicly make defamatory or damaging accusations or criticisms about someone, usually in an attempt to harm their reputation or credibility. It implies that the accusations or criticisms are often baseless or exaggerated. The term "mud" is used metaphorically to represent negative or false information being thrown at someone.
  • (one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time The idiom "(one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time" means that everyone, regardless of their status or abilities, is just as human and ordinary as anyone else. It highlights the idea that no person is superior to or fundamentally different from another, emphasizing the commonality and equal footing of people. It implies that everyone has similar basic routines and experiences, and no one should be seen as inherently better or more important than others.
  • bad feelings, at bad feeling The idiomatic expression "bad feelings, at bad feeling" typically refers to a situation or interaction that results in negative emotions or animosity between people. It suggests that there is tension or conflict, usually stemming from past events or unresolved issues, causing discomfort or hostility in a particular setting or relationship.
  • let me see/think, at let's see The idiom "let me see/think" or "let's see" is an expression used to indicate that the speaker needs some time to consider or evaluate a situation, make a decision, or gather information before giving a definite answer or response. It implies that the person needs a moment to think, reflect, or consult their thoughts or knowledge in order to provide a suitable answer or course of action.
  • be up your alley, at be up your street The idiom "be up your alley" (or "be up your street") is used to express that something is matching someone's specific interests, skills, or preferences. It suggests that a particular activity, subject, or opportunity is well-suited to someone's inclinations or expertise.
  • stay at sth The idiom "stay at something" generally means to continue or persevere in an activity or endeavor, often despite challenges or difficulties. It implies a committed or steadfast approach, not giving up easily. It can refer to various situations, such as staying at a task, staying at a job, staying at a sport, staying at a relationship, or staying at a goal.
  • at odds (with sm) The idiom "at odds (with sm)" means to be in a state of disagreement or conflict with someone, often due to differing opinions, beliefs, or interests.
  • be left at the post The idiom "be left at the post" refers to someone or something being left behind or at a disadvantage in a competition, race, or pursuit. It implies that others have moved ahead or made progress while the person or thing in question has fallen behind. The phrase originates from horse racing, where being left at the starting post significantly hampers a competitor's chances of winning.
  • at odds (with sb/sth) The idiom "at odds (with sb/sth)" means to be in a state of disagreement or conflict with someone or something. It refers to a situation where two parties have differing opinions, beliefs, or objectives, leading to a lack of harmony or agreement.
  • sling mud at The idiom "sling mud at" means to make derogatory or slanderous remarks about someone in order to damage their reputation or credibility. It refers to the act of attacking someone's character or integrity by spreading negative and often false information about them.
  • the straw that breaks the camel's back, at the final/last straw The idiom "the straw that breaks the camel's back" refers to a situation where a small, seemingly insignificant event or circumstance becomes the final addition to a series of burdens or problems, causing an individual or situation to collapse or fail. It signifies that a seemingly minor or trivial occurrence can have a significant and fatal impact, as symbolized by the straw that causes a camel's back to break under the weight of its load.
  • go off at a tangent The idiom "go off at a tangent" means to veer off or deviate from the main topic or subject of discussion, often by introducing unrelated or irrelevant information or ideas. It refers to a sudden and unexpected change of direction in a conversation or thought process.
  • keep a cool head, at keep your head The idiom "keep a cool head" or "keep your head" means to remain calm and maintain composure in a difficult or stressful situation. It implies not letting one's emotions or panic control their actions, but instead, staying level-headed and making rational decisions.
  • at all The idiom "at all" is used to emphasize the absence or presence of something to even a slight degree or extent. It is commonly used in negative sentences or questions and can convey a sense of surprise, disbelief, or emphasis.
  • have somebody's interests at heart The idiom "have somebody's interests at heart" means to genuinely care about someone's well-being and prioritize their best interests when making decisions or taking actions.
  • opportunity knocks at every man's door The idiom "opportunity knocks at every man's door" means that there are chances or possibilities for success and progress available to everyone. It implies that each person has the potential to find opportunities for growth and achievement when they arise. The idiom emphasizes the notion that individuals need to be prepared and attentive to recognize and seize these opportunities when they present themselves.
  • at the end of rope The idiom "at the end of the rope" typically refers to a state of extreme frustration, exhaustion, or helplessness. It means that someone is feeling overwhelmed and has exhausted all possible options or solutions to a problem.
  • right and left, at right, left, and centre The idiom "right and left, at right, left, and centre" means something or someone happening or appearing in numerous places, without exception or restriction. It implies that something or someone is widely spread or distributed, often in an overwhelming or excessive manner. This idiom emphasizes the extensive nature or reach of a particular thing, event, or person.
  • keep at (someone or something) The idiom "keep at (someone or something)" typically means to persistently continue working on or pursuing someone or something, despite difficulties, obstacles, or resistance. It suggests an unwavering determination to achieve a goal or make progress, especially when faced with challenges.
  • at someone's convenience The idiom "at someone's convenience" means to do something or to schedule an event in a way that is most suitable or convenient for the person being addressed. It implies that the person can choose a time or situation that is most convenient for them without causing any inconvenience or disruption.
  • exult at sth The idiom "exult at something" means to rejoice or take great pleasure in something. It reflects a strong feeling of happiness, pride, or triumph.
  • lonely hearts club/column, etc., at lonely hearts The idiom "lonely hearts club/column, etc., at lonely hearts" refers to a group or gathering place, such as a club or a column in a newspaper, where people who are longing for companionship, romance, or love come together or seek advice. It is often used to describe a space or platform where individuals who feel lonely or are seeking to find a partner can connect with others who share a similar desire.
  • level something at someone or something The idiom "level something at someone or something" means to direct criticism, blame, or an accusation towards a particular person or thing. It typically refers to expressing a negative viewpoint or judgment in a straightforward and candid manner.
  • sling sth at sm or sth The idiom "sling something at someone or something" means to throw or forcefully hurl an object toward someone or something in a quick or careless manner. It can be used both literally and figuratively. In a literal sense, it is often used to describe someone throwing an object hastily or recklessly. In a figurative sense, it can be used to describe someone making a verbal attack or hurling accusations in a forceful or aggressive manner.
  • put sm or sth at sm's disposal The idiom "put someone or something at someone's disposal" means to make someone or something available or accessible for someone's use or benefit. It implies that the person or thing is offered or placed under the control or service of the individual, typically in a helpful or accommodating manner.
  • weigh each word, at weigh your words To "weigh each word" or "weigh your words" means to carefully consider and choose your words before speaking or writing. It implies the need for caution, thoughtfulness, and precision in expressing oneself, often to avoid misunderstandings, offense, or any negative consequences that may occur due to careless or inappropriate language. This idiom suggests that one should think about the impact and repercussions their words may have before delivering them.
  • at the mercy of someone The idiom "at the mercy of someone" means to be in a vulnerable position or completely dependent on another person or entity's decisions, actions, or whims. It implies having no control or power to influence one's own situation, leaving one potentially exposed to harm, mistreatment, or exploitation.
  • at the instance of "At the instance of" is an idiom that means something happens or is done because of someone's request or suggestion.
  • be on at someone The idiom "be on at someone" refers to persistently criticizing, pressuring, or nagging someone about a particular issue or task. It implies continuous and relentless communication or instruction to motivate or push someone to do something.
  • come apart at the seams The idiom "come apart at the seams" means to fall apart or deteriorate completely, often referring to a situation or an object that was once stable or functional but is now disintegrating. It can also describe a person who is emotionally or mentally breaking down.
  • be at a loss The idiom "be at a loss" means to be confused, unsure, or not knowing how to proceed or what to do in a particular situation.
  • at the very worst The idiom "at the very worst" refers to the potential or hypothetical worst-case scenario or outcome in a situation. It implies considering the extreme or most negative possibility.
  • at pains The idiom "at pains" means to make a deliberate effort or take great care to do something. It implies that the person is willing to go to great lengths or inconvenience themselves in order to achieve a certain outcome or fulfill a particular responsibility.
  • I wouldn't bet on it, at don't bet on it The idiom "I wouldn't bet on it" or "Don't bet on it" is used to express skepticism or doubt about the likelihood or success of a particular outcome, event, or statement. It implies that the speaker does not have confidence or trust in the mentioned possibility, indicating that they would not wager money on its occurrence.
  • at all hours (of the day and night) The idiom "at all hours (of the day and night)" refers to frequently or constantly, without regard for specific times or schedules. It implies that something happens or someone is active at any given time, regardless of day or night.
  • at the grass roots The idiom "at the grass roots" refers to something that is occurring or originating at the most basic or fundamental level. It signifies the involvement or support from ordinary people or the general public rather than those in positions of power or influence. It emphasizes the importance of starting or building something from the ground level, focusing on grassroots actions, opinions, or movements.
  • pull up stakes, at up sticks The idiom "pull up stakes" or "up sticks" is an expression that means to leave or move away from one's current location or residence, often abruptly or with the intention of starting fresh elsewhere. It implies the act of picking up or removing the stakes (stakes used for tents or temporary structures) or sticks (referring to pegs used to secure tents) from the ground before departure.
  • cock a snook at To "cock a snook at" is an idiom that means to defiantly or rudely show disregard, disrespect, or contempt for someone or something. It involves making a disrespectful gesture by placing the thumb on the nose, extending and wiggling the other fingers, especially the little finger. This idiom is often used to describe an act of defiance or rebellion against authority or societal norms.
  • of a sort, at of sorts The idiom "of a sort" or "of sorts" is used to indicate that something or someone is not exactly what is expected or desired, but has some resemblance or similarity to it. It suggests that the item or person in question is not a perfect example, but can still be recognized or categorized in some way.
  • be at (one's) beck and call The idiom "be at (one's) beck and call" means to be constantly available and ready to fulfill someone else's requests or demands without question or hesitation. It implies being entirely subservient and obedient to someone's every whim or command.
  • be/go at somebody/something hammer and tongs The idiom "be/go at somebody/something hammer and tongs" means to approach or engage in a task, argument, or physical activity with great force, intensity, or determination. It signifies a vigorous and relentless effort or pursuit towards achieving a goal or confronting someone. The phrase "hammer and tongs" refers to the use of tools associated with blacksmiths, highlighting the idea of fiercely wielding or attacking something.
  • on the street, at on the streets The idiom "on the street" or "at on the streets" typically refers to someone who is homeless or living without a permanent residence. It can also be used to describe someone who is involved in illegal activities or living a dangerous and unstable lifestyle.
  • in another world, at in a world of your own The idiom "in another world" or "in a world of your own" refers to the state of being completely absorbed, preoccupied, or lost in one's thoughts, dreams, or imagination. It implies that someone is mentally detached from their surroundings, often appearing distant or disconnected from reality.
  • keep (one) at arm's length The idiom "keep (one) at arm's length" means to maintain a certain distance or to be cautious in one's relations with someone, often implying a lack of trust or a desire to avoid a close or intimate relationship. It suggests keeping someone at a distance or not getting too involved with them.
  • home away from home, at home from home The idiom "home away from home" or "home from home" refers to a place or environment that provides a sense of comfort, familiarity, and relaxation similar to one's own home, despite being physically distant from it. It suggests that the place in question offers the same level of comfort, security, and ease as being at home.
  • sneeze at sm The idiom "sneeze at someone or something" is used to imply that one dismisses or underestimates the importance or significance of the person or thing in question. It suggests not giving proper attention or consideration to someone or something that may actually be deserving.
  • 'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all "'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all" is an idiom that means it is more beneficial to have experienced love, even if it ends in heartbreak or loss, than to have never experienced love at all. It suggests that the pain and disappointment of lost love is worth the joy and growth that comes from experiencing love in the first place.
  • fall into line, at fall in line The idiom "fall into line" or "fall in line" means to conform to the agreed-upon rules, standards, or expectations of a group or authority. It refers to following orders or instructions, or adhering to a particular system or set of guidelines. It implies aligning oneself with others and becoming part of a collective entity, often involving cooperation and compliance.
  • When poverty comes in at the door, love flies out of the window The idiom "When poverty comes in at the door, love flies out of the window" means that financial difficulties and scarcity can put a strain on relationships and cause love and affection to diminish or even disappear altogether. The focus on financial problems can overshadow other aspects of the relationship, leading to conflicts and a loss of connection between partners.
  • at your/somebody's disposal The idiom "at your/somebody's disposal" means that someone or something is available to be used or accessed by someone else whenever and however they wish. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is fully at the service or command of the other person.
  • hold/keep sb at arm's length The idiom "hold/keep someone at arm's length" means to keep someone at a distance, both physically and emotionally, usually due to distrust, suspicion, or a desire to maintain one's personal space and privacy. It implies a deliberate effort to avoid intimacy or close involvement with someone.
  • at second hand The idiom "at second hand" means receiving information or knowledge indirectly, usually from someone who has experienced it firsthand. It refers to obtaining information through a secondary or intermediary source, rather than experiencing or witnessing something personally.
  • fall apart (at the seams) The idiom "fall apart (at the seams)" means to experience a complete breakdown or failure in various aspects, such as physically, emotionally, mentally, or in terms of organization or functionality. It suggests a state of disintegration or deterioration where something or someone is no longer able to hold together or operate effectively.
  • poke fun at someone or something To "poke fun at someone or something" means to mock, tease, or make lighthearted jokes at the expense of that person or thing. It involves playfully making fun of someone or something in a harmless manner, often in a joking or sarcastic way.
  • throw yourself at somebody's feet The idiom "throw yourself at somebody's feet" means to express or demonstrate extreme devotion, submissiveness, or admiration towards someone. It implies figuratively lowering oneself to a subservient position or pleading for mercy, forgiveness, or favor from someone in a highly emotional or desperate manner.
  • be at work The idiom "be at work" generally means that someone is actively engaged in a task or job, usually referring to physical or mental effort being exerted in a productive manner. It implies being focused, diligent, and committed to completing one's responsibilities or duties.
  • You can’t dance at two weddings The idiom "You can't dance at two weddings" means that it is not possible to fully commit to or be involved in two completely different or contradictory things at the same time. It suggests that one must make a choice between two conflicting options, as trying to do both at once would be impractical or impossible.
  • have at someone The idiom "have at someone" means to confront or attack someone, often aggressively or with determination. It refers to engaging in a physical or verbal confrontation, showing a strong determination to challenge or fight with someone.
  • at fingertips The idiom "at fingertips" means having something readily available or easily accessible, usually referring to information or resources. It signifies that something is within reach or immediately at hand.
  • (at) full blast The idiom "(at) full blast" refers to doing something with maximum intensity, speed, or volume. It suggests that a person or thing is operating or functioning at the highest level or capacity possible.
  • make out a case for sth, at make a case for sth The idiom "make out a case for something" or "make a case for something" means to present arguments, evidence or reasons in support of a particular idea, opinion, or perspective. It involves articulating valid points to convince others of the value, validity, or feasibility of a certain course of action, decision, or belief. This idiom is commonly used in discussions, debates, or presentations where individuals aim to logically and persuasively present their viewpoints in order to win support or strengthen their position.
  • have both feet on the ground, at have/keep your feet on the ground The idiom "have both feet on the ground" or "have/keep your feet on the ground" means to be practical, level-headed, and realistic in one's thinking and approach to life. It suggests staying grounded, not getting carried away by dreams or fantasies, and maintaining a sensible perspective. It signifies a person's ability to make rational decisions and navigate life's challenges in a down-to-earth manner.
  • Come in and make yourself at home The idiom "Come in and make yourself at home" means to invite someone into a space and encourage them to feel comfortable or at ease, as if they were in their own home. It implies that the person should feel free to relax, behave as they would in their own home, and make use of the space as if it were their own.
  • the world outside, at the outside world The idiom "the world outside" or "at the outside world" refers to the larger society or external environment beyond one's immediate surroundings or personal perspective. It implies the contrast between one's own limited perspective or familiar surroundings and the vastness and diversity of the world beyond. It suggests the idea of stepping outside of one's comfort zone or familiar bubble to explore and engage with the broader world and its various challenges, opportunities, and perspectives.
  • roots and all, at root and branch The idiom "roots and all, at root and branch" is often used to describe a complete and thorough removal or destruction of something, including all the fundamental aspects or components. It implies that the entire thing is being uprooted or eliminated, leaving no traces or remnants behind.
  • catch someone at something The idiom "catch someone at something" refers to the act of discovering, observing, or finding someone in the act of doing something, usually that they shouldn't be doing or that they were attempting to hide. It implies catching someone in the act, often implying unexpected or undesired behavior.
  • burn someone at the stake The idiom "burn someone at the stake" is a figurative expression meaning to publicly and severely criticize or condemn someone. It originates from the historical practice of executing individuals by tying them to a stake and burning them alive, typically for crimes such as heresy or witchcraft. In the idiom's modern usage, it refers to subjecting someone to intense and vehement attack or censure, often in a public or humiliating manner.
  • at a pinch/push The idiom "at a pinch/push" refers to being willing or able to do something if absolutely necessary, usually in a difficult or challenging situation. It signifies that one is willing to make an effort or sacrifice, even if it is not the ideal or preferred option. It implies doing something as a last resort or when there are no better alternatives available.
  • be at the receiving end The idiom "be at the receiving end" means to be in a position where one is on the receiving side of something, often negative or undesirable, such as criticism, blame, or physical harm. It implies being at the receiving end of something unpleasant or disadvantageous.
  • rub elbows (with), at rub shoulders (with) The idiom "rub elbows (with)" or "rub shoulders (with)" means to have close contact or interact closely with someone, often someone influential or important. It refers to being in the same social or professional circle as that person and engaging in conversations or activities together.
  • at the end of your tether The idiom "at the end of your tether" means to be extremely frustrated, exhausted, or distressed, usually due to dealing with a difficult or challenging situation for a prolonged period of time, and feeling as though one's ability to cope or endure is reaching its limit.
  • run sb/sth to earth, at run sb/sth to ground The idiom "run sb/sth to earth" or "run sb/sth to ground" means to diligently search for and find someone or something that is difficult to locate. It refers to the act of pursuing someone or something tirelessly until they are ultimately discovered or captured. This idiom is often used when describing the efforts made to find a fugitive, solve a mystery, or uncover a hidden truth.
  • at one sitting The idiom "at one sitting" means to complete or consume something in a single session or without interruption. It refers to doing or finishing something in a single attempt, without taking breaks or stopping in between. It is often used when referring to activities such as eating, reading, or watching something continuously until completion.
  • could have died of sth, at almost/nearly die of sth The idiom "could have died of something" or "almost/nearly die of something" is used to describe an extreme reaction to a shocking or surprising event. It means that the person was greatly startled or frightened, feeling as if they were on the verge of passing out or experiencing a near-death experience due to the intensity of the situation. It is a figurative expression emphasizing the severity of their reaction rather than a literal near-death experience.
  • be pushing at an open door The idiom "be pushing at an open door" means to have someone's cooperation or support without much effort or resistance. It implies that the person you are dealing with is already inclined to agree or assist, making your task much easier.
  • get back at (one) The idiom "get back at (one)" means to take revenge or seek retribution against someone for a perceived wrong or harm done to oneself. It refers to the act of retaliating or getting even with someone who has caused harm or hurt in order to restore a sense of justice or vindication.
  • slave away (at sth) The idiom "slave away (at sth)" means to work very hard and tirelessly at something, often with little reward or recognition. It implies a sense of dedication and perseverance despite the challenges or difficulties involved.
  • What's when it's at home? The idiom "What's when it's at home?" is used to express confusion or a lack of understanding about something, especially when trying to identify or define a particular object, person, or concept. It suggests that the speaker is seeking a simple and clear explanation or description of the thing in question.
  • clutch at sm or sth The idiom "clutch at someone or something" means to desperately and anxiously try to grasp or grab onto someone or something in order to gain support, assistance, or stability. It typically connotes a sense of desperation or urgency.
  • have a cow, at have kittens The idiom "have a cow" (also known as "have kittens") means to overreact or become extremely upset or agitated about something, usually in an exaggerated or irrational manner. It implies a strong emotional response characterized by anger, frustration, or panic.
  • down the gurgler, at down the drain The idiom "down the gurgler" or "down the drain" refers to something that has been wasted, lost, or ruined. It is used when describing a situation or effort that has ended unsuccessfully or unproductively, resulting in a complete loss or failure of what was expected or intended.
  • more (...) than you can shake a stick at The idiom "more (...) than you can shake a stick at" is used to emphasize that there is a large or excessive quantity of something. It suggests that there are more of a specific item, people, or things than one can easily count or manage.
  • leap at the opportunity (to do sth) The idiom "leap at the opportunity" means to eagerly and enthusiastically seize or take advantage of a chance or offer to do something. It implies that someone is quick to take action and does not hesitate when presented with a favorable opportunity.
  • sweep sth under the rug, at sweep sth under the carpet The idiom "sweep something under the rug" or "sweep something under the carpet" refers to the act of trying to hide or disregard a problem, conflict, mistake, or unpleasant truth instead of dealing with it openly and honestly. It implies avoiding or ignoring an issue in the hopes that it will be forgotten or go unnoticed.
  • be on the move, at make a move The idiom "be on the move" means to be active, constantly busy, or traveling from place to place. It implies a state of being energetically engaged in various activities or constantly seeking new opportunities or experiences. The idiom "make a move" often refers to taking action or initiating a change, especially in a strategic or decisive manner. It can be used in various contexts, such as making a significant decision, starting something new, or making progress in a situation.
  • at full speed The idiom "at full speed" means to move or operate at the maximum or highest level of speed or intensity. It refers to performing actions swiftly and with complete determination or energy.
  • at all cost(s) The idiom "at all cost(s)" means that something must be achieved or avoided no matter what obstacles or sacrifices are involved. It emphasizes the determination to accomplish a goal or prevent something from happening, without considering any negative consequences or difficulties that may arise.
  • at a set time The idiom "at a set time" means precisely or exactly when planned or scheduled. It refers to an event or action that takes place at an arranged or predetermined time.
  • get mad (at sth) The idiom "get mad (at sth)" means to become angry or upset about something. It refers to feeling intense emotions of displeasure or frustration towards a particular situation, action, or person.
  • at one with (someone or something) The idiom "at one with (someone or something)" refers to a state of complete harmony, unity, or agreement with another person or thing. It implies a deep connection, understanding, or alignment where there is a lack of conflict or discord. It can be used to describe a deep bond, shared values, or a feeling of being in sync with someone or something.
  • at the expense of The idiom "at the expense of" means that something is achieved or obtained by causing harm, loss, or disadvantage to someone or something else. It refers to gaining an advantage or benefit by sacrificing, neglecting, or hurting someone or something.
  • go off at half-cock The idiom "go off at half-cock" means to act or speak prematurely, without being fully prepared or considered. It originates from the misfiring of a flintlock firearm, where the hammer falls just halfway, causing the gunpowder to ignite but the bullet not being propelled forward, leading to a weak or failed discharge. In a broader sense, it refers to someone rushing into a situation or making hasty decisions before having all the necessary information or resources.
  • bark at the moon The idiom "bark at the moon" is typically used to describe behavior that is futile, pointless, or absurd. It implies that someone is expending their energy or efforts on something that cannot be achieved or is beyond their control. It can also suggest the idea of howling or barking at something that is unattainable, similar to a dog barking at the moon. Overall, it signifies engaging in a fruitless or irrational pursuit.
  • be pipped at the post The idiom "be pipped at the post" means to narrowly miss out on achieving success or victory, especially in a competition or race. It refers to being defeated or overtaken right before reaching the finish line.
  • look at cross-eyed The idiom "look at cross-eyed" refers to the act of looking at someone or something with a sideways or disapproving glance, often with a sense of skepticism or suspicion. It suggests a skeptical or critical judgement towards someone or something being observed.
  • hand and glove, at hand in glove The idiom "hand and glove" or "at hand in glove" means to have a close and cooperative relationship with someone, usually suggesting a connection that involves secrecy or conspiracy. It signifies two individuals who work closely together, are complicit in a plan, or share a deep understanding and synergy in their actions and intentions.
  • grab at sm or sth The idiom "grab at something" typically means to make a sudden and desperate attempt to obtain or achieve something, often in a hasty or uncontrolled manner. It can imply a sense of urgency or eagerness to acquire something quickly, without much consideration or thought.
  • at the mercy of sb/sth The idiom "at the mercy of sb/sth" means to be in a situation where one has no control or power and is completely subjected to the actions, decisions, or influence of someone or something else. It implies being vulnerable, helpless, and having no choice but to rely on the mercy or will of others.
  • pluck at sm or sth The idiom "pluck at sm or sth" refers to the act of pulling or tugging at someone or something in a persistent or determined manner, usually in order to gain attention or address a specific issue. It can also describe attempting to extract or obtain something from a person or object with effort and perseverance.
  • be/talk at cross purposes The idiom "be/talk at cross purposes" means to misunderstand or miscommunicate with someone due to pursuing different objectives or having conflicting viewpoints. It implies that the two parties involved are not on the same wavelength or are discussing different things, leading to confusion and ineffective communication.
  • be etched with sth, at be etched smw To be etched with something or be etched somewhere is an idiom that means something is deeply ingrained or permanently imprinted in someone's memory or consciousness. It refers to a memorable or significant event or experience that has left a lasting impact on a person. The word "etched" suggests a deep and indelible impression, as if it has been carved or engraved into one's mind.
  • knock at (one's) door The idiom "knock at (one's) door" refers to an opportunity or situation that presents itself to someone, typically in a way that requires their input, attention, or action. It implies that an opportunity or problem has arisen, demanding one's immediate response or involvement.
  • grope at someone or something The idiom "grope at someone or something" refers to making fumbling, uncertain, or hesitant attempts to find, understand, or achieve something, often involving a lack of clarity or knowledge. It can be used metaphorically or literally, suggesting a groping or searching action either physically or figuratively.
  • excel at (something) The idiom "excel at (something)" means to be exceptionally skilled, proficient, or successful in a particular activity, subject, or task. It implies being better than others or surpassing the average level of performance.
  • at the forefront (of something) The idiom "at the forefront (of something)" refers to being in a leading or prominent position in a particular area or field. It signifies being at the cutting edge, innovating, or being the most advanced in a specific context or industry.
  • at a sitting The idiom "at a sitting" means accomplishing or completing something in one continuous effort, without interruption or breaks. It typically refers to tasks that require prolonged and focused attention.
  • lay waste, at lay sth to waste The idiom "lay waste" or "lay something to waste" typically means to destroy, damage, or ruin something entirely or extensively. It is often used to describe a situation where a place, object, or resource is devastated or made useless.
  • cry buckets, at weep buckets The idiom "cry buckets" or "weep buckets" means to cry excessively or uncontrollably. It implies shedding an abundance of tears, suggesting intense emotions or a deep state of sorrow.
  • strike at the heart of sth The idiom "strike at the heart of something" refers to directly targeting or attacking the most important or essential part of a certain issue, problem, concept, or organization. It refers to hitting the central or crucial aspect that is fundamental or critical to the overall entity.
  • put/stick two fingers up at somebody The idiom "put/stick two fingers up at somebody" typically means to show strong disrespect or defiance towards someone. It involves making a hand gesture by extending the index and middle fingers in a V shape towards the person as a sign of contempt or rudeness.
  • If at first you don't succeed The idiom "If at first you don't succeed" means that if someone fails or faces obstacles while attempting something, they should not give up and should try again or even find alternative methods to achieve their goal.
  • throw (oneself) at (someone's) feet The idiom "throw (oneself) at (someone's) feet" refers to an act of extreme submission, pleading, or devotion toward someone. It often implies a display of utmost respect, admiration, or supplication, where the person demonstrating this behavior metaphorically places themselves at the feet of the other person, symbolizing complete subservience or humility.
  • be champing/chomping at the bit The idiom "be champing/chomping at the bit" refers to someone who is eager, impatient, or restless to start a desired activity or task. It often conveys the sense of anticipation and enthusiasm, stemming from the imagery of a horse or a racehorse "champing at the bit" or biting down on the bit in its mouth, ready to bolt forward. This expression is commonly used to describe individuals who cannot wait to get started on something they are excited about or eager to do.
  • make a grab at The idiom "make a grab at" typically means to attempt to seize or take hold of something quickly and abruptly, often in a hasty or overly assertive manner. It implies an action of trying to obtain or gain control of something eagerly or forcefully.
  • work like a dog, at work like a Trojan The idiom "work like a dog, work like a Trojan" is used to describe someone who puts in a tremendous amount of effort, passion, and dedication into their work. It implies that the person works tirelessly, exhaustively, and consistently, often going above and beyond what is expected of them. The idiom draws inspiration from the strong and diligent work ethics associated with dogs and the mythological Trojans.
  • eat (away) at something The idiom "eat (away) at something" means to gradually erode or consume something, usually in a metaphorical sense. It refers to a situation where a problem, concern, or worry continuously preoccupies or troubles someone, slowly wearing them down emotionally or mentally. It can also imply impacting or depleting something slowly over time.
  • take a long, hard look at The idiom "take a long, hard look at" means to carefully and critically examine or consider something or someone in great detail, typically with an objective and introspective approach. It implies taking a serious and thorough evaluation or analysis.
  • (be) at the mercy of somebody/something The idiom "(be) at the mercy of somebody/something" means to be completely dependent on or under the control of someone or something, with no power or ability to resist or escape their actions or influence. It implies being entirely at the disposal or whims of another person or a particular circumstance, often leaving one vulnerable or helpless.
  • put sth at an amount The idiom "put something at an amount" refers to estimating or approximating the value, cost, or quantity of something. It denotes the act of assigning or attributing a specific, typically numerical, value to a particular item or concept.
  • put at someone's disposal The idiom "put at someone's disposal" means to make something available or accessible to someone, often to be used or enjoyed as they wish. It indicates offering or providing something for someone's use or control.
  • (at) daggers drawn The idiom "(at) daggers drawn" means to be in a state of intense hostility or conflict with someone, often suggesting a severe and bitter disagreement or enmity. It implies that the individuals involved are ready to fight or attack each other, symbolized by the drawn daggers.
  • between you and me, at between you, me, and the gatepost The idiom "between you and me" or "between you, me, and the gatepost" is a phrase used to introduce a piece of information or a secret that should be kept confidential. It suggests that the information is only to be shared between two individuals and should not be divulged to others.
  • be at odds The idiom "be at odds" means to be in a state of disagreement, conflict, or discord with someone or something. It is typically used to describe a situation where two or more parties have opposing views, opinions, ideas, or interests, resulting in a lack of harmony or agreement.
  • get off at (some place) The idiom "get off at (some place)" typically refers to disembarking or exiting a mode of transportation, usually at a particular destination. It can be used when talking about getting off a bus, train, or any other mode of transportation at a specific stop.
  • at sm's doorstep The idiomatic expression "at someone's doorstep" refers to something arriving or happening very near to someone's location or with direct implications for them. It typically implies that someone is held responsible or accountable for a situation or problem that has arisen.
  • disgusted at (someone or something) The idiom "disgusted at (someone or something)" means to feel a strong aversion, revulsion, or extreme displeasure towards someone or something due to their actions, behavior, or qualities. It signifies a deep feeling of disappointment, distaste, or disapproval.
  • gnaw at The idiom "gnaw at" means to cause persistent discomfort, worry, or anxiety. It refers to a situation or feeling that continues to trouble or bother someone, often gradually eroding their peace of mind.
  • heave sth at sm or sth The idiom "heave sth at sm or sth" typically means to throw or hurl something forcefully and with great effort towards someone or something. It implies a forceful or aggressive action of throwing, sometimes with the intention of causing harm or expressing anger.
  • tip the wink to sb, at tip sb the wink The idiom "tip the wink to someone" or "tip someone the wink" means to discreetly signal or give a secret hint or clue to someone. It implies sharing confidential or privileged information with someone in a secretive or sly manner.
  • at each other's throats The definition of the idiom "at each other's throats" is when two or more people are engaged in a fierce argument, quarrel, or conflict, often characterized by intense animosity or aggression.
  • at the end of nowhere The idiom "at the end of nowhere" refers to a remote or isolated location that is far away from civilization or any recognizable landmarks. It is often used to describe a place that is difficult to reach or seemingly inaccessible.
  • go at like a boy killing snakes The idiom "go at like a boy killing snakes" means to approach a task or activity with great enthusiasm, energy, and speed. It implies tackling something with a sense of determination, fearlessness, and a relentless focus on the goal, just like a young boy fervently killing snakes.
  • chew at The idiom "chew at" typically means to continuously worry or think about something, often in a persistent or nagging manner. It refers to the repetitive action of chewing on something, which can be compared to the mental process of pondering or ruminating over a matter.
  • take (someone or something) at face value The idiom "take (someone or something) at face value" means to accept or believe what someone or something presents themselves to be without questioning or considering any hidden or alternative meanings or intentions. It implies accepting things literally and not reading too deeply into them.
  • bark at someone or something The idiom "bark at someone or something" refers to the act of angrily or aggressively speaking or complaining about someone or something. It implies expressing discontentment, criticism, or disapproval vocally and vehemently. The phrase often alludes to the behavior of a dog barking fiercely at an intruder or someone it perceives as a threat.
  • heave something at someone or something The idiom "heave something at someone or something" means to throw or hurl something forcefully towards a person or an object. It implies a strong or aggressive action of throwing something with considerable effort.
  • be at halfmast The idiom "be at half-mast" refers to lowering and positioning a flag halfway down a mast or pole as a sign of mourning, respect, or tragedy.
  • laugh out of the other side of your mouth, at be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "laugh out of the other side of your mouth" is typically used to convey the idea that someone's enjoyment or satisfaction in a situation will eventually turn into disappointment or regret. It implies that the person will experience a complete reversal of emotions or circumstances. Similarly, the phrase "laughing on the other side of your face" suggests that the person who is currently happy or triumphing will soon encounter an unexpected setback or be humiliated. Ultimately, both expressions emphasize the notion of a drastic change in someone's fortunes or perspective.
  • make a face (at sb/sth) The idiom "make a face (at sb/sth)" refers to contorting one's facial expression in a way that conveys disapproval, disgust, or dislike towards someone or something. It typically involves distorting the features of the face, such as raising eyebrows, wrinkling the nose, sticking out the tongue, or frowning, as a non-verbal expression of negative emotions or sentiments.
  • all guns blazing, at with guns blazing The idiom "all guns blazing" or "with guns blazing" is an expression used to describe a situation where someone is approaching or tackling a task or challenge with maximum energy, enthusiasm, or force. It signifies a full-on, aggressive, and intense effort to achieve a goal, often in a determined and relentless manner. The imagery of guns blazing suggests a powerful and unrestrained approach, similar to the firing of multiple guns simultaneously.
  • at somebody’s convenience The idiom "at somebody's convenience" means that something is arranged or scheduled according to someone else's preferred or appropriate time. It implies accommodating someone's ease, availability, or comfort in making arrangements or setting a meeting time.
  • at lightning speed The idiom "at lightning speed" means to move, act, or happen very quickly or rapidly. It is used to describe something that occurs with great speed or efficiency, similar to the speed of lightning.
  • tilt at windmills The idiom "tilt at windmills" means to vigorously and persistently pursue a futile or impossible goal or engage in a hopeless or pointless struggle. This phrase is derived from the novel Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, in which the main character, Don Quixote, famously attacks windmills, mistaking them for giants. Therefore, to "tilt at windmills" often refers to someone pursuing an impractical or unachievable objective, similar to how Don Quixote fought imaginary foes.
  • give/allow full play to sth, at give/allow sth full play The idiom "give/allow full play to something" means to let something unfold or develop freely and completely without any restrictions or limitations. It is often used when talking about allowing full expression or exploration of ideas, creativity, emotions, or abilities. It refers to giving something maximum freedom or opportunity to be fully utilized or realized.
  • smirk at sm or sth When someone "smirks at someone or something," it means they have a smug, smirking expression on their face while looking at the person or thing. It indicates a mixture of amusement, contempt, or superior attitude towards the person or situation at hand. This idiom implies a subtle, mocking gesture.
  • what's the good of ..., at what good is ... The idiom "what's the good of ..." or "at what good is ..." is used to express doubt or skepticism about the usefulness or practicality of something. It questions the worth or value of a particular action, object, or situation.
  • flog yourself into the ground, at flog yourself to death The idiom "flog yourself into the ground" or "flog yourself to death" implies that someone is exhausting themselves mentally or physically by working excessively hard or pushing beyond their limits to achieve a goal or complete a task. It emphasizes the idea of putting extreme effort and dedication into something, often to the point of overexertion or detriment to one's well-being.
  • at the drop of a hat The idiom "at the drop of a hat" means to do something immediately or without hesitation. It implies responding instantly to a situation or request, often indicating a readiness or willingness to take action.
  • burn your fingers, at get/have your fingers burned The idiom "burn your fingers" or "get/have your fingers burned" typically means to experience negative consequences or suffer harm as a result of one's own actions or decisions. It implies getting involved in a situation or undertaking without being adequately prepared or cautious, leading to unfavorable outcomes.
  • at odds with (someone, something, or oneself) The idiom "at odds with (someone, something, or oneself)" refers to being in conflict, disagreement, or discord with another person, object, or even one's own beliefs or desires. It implies a lack of harmony or compatibility between two or more elements.
  • at/on the cutting edge The idiom "at/on the cutting edge" refers to being at the forefront or leading position in a particular field or industry, often associated with technology or innovation. It means being at the most advanced, progressive, or current stage of development in a specific area. It implies being ahead of others in terms of new ideas, techniques, or practices.
  • be bulging/bursting at the seams The idiom "be bulging/bursting at the seams" means that something or a place is extremely crowded, full, or overflowing with people or things. It implies that the capacity or limit of a space or situation has been exceeded, and there is little room left for additional items or individuals.
  • at the top/bottom of the heap The idiom "at the top/bottom of the heap" refers to someone who is either in a position of great success or achievement (at the top of the heap) or in a position of low status or little recognition (at the bottom of the heap) compared to others. It is often used to describe relative rankings or levels of success in a particular field or context.
  • the gift of gab, at the gift of the gab The gift of gab refers to the ability to speak fluently, eloquently, and persuasively. It is used to describe someone who has a natural talent for conversation and is able to hold people's attention and engage them with ease. When someone possesses the gift of gab, they are often regarded as being charming and charismatic, as their communication skills allow them to excel in social situations or public speaking.
  • what is she/he like?, at what are you like? The idiom "what is she/he like?" or "what are you like?" is often used as a conversational opener to inquire about someone's personality, characteristics, or nature. It expresses curiosity and interest in understanding a person's traits, habits, or general demeanor. It can be employed when someone wants to explore or describe the qualities or behavior of an individual.
  • have sb eating out of the palm of your hand, at have sb in the palm of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of the palm of your hand" or "have someone in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually by being able to manipulate or persuade them easily. It suggests that the person is willingly submissive, trusting, and eager to follow your lead or do your bidding.
  • at someone's expense The idiom "at someone's expense" means to benefit, enjoy, or have amusement at the cost or detriment of another person. It indicates that one person is gaining an advantage or experiencing something enjoyable while someone else is bearing the negative consequences or paying for it.
  • tip the balance, at tip the scales The idiom "tip the balance" or "tip the scales" typically means to significantly alter or influence a situation or outcome in favor of one side rather than the other. It often refers to the act of causing a slight change that ultimately leads to a decisive result.
  • He who would climb the ladder must begin at the bottom. The idiom "He who would climb the ladder must begin at the bottom" means that in order to achieve success or progress in life, one must start from the very beginning and work their way up gradually. It emphasizes the importance of starting small, gaining experience, and putting in the necessary effort to advance.
  • laugh at sm or sth The idiom "laugh at someone or something" means to find humor or amusement in someone's actions, words, or a particular situation, often resulting in mockery or ridicule. It implies finding something funny precisely because it is ridiculous, embarrassing, or absurd.
  • He puts his pants on one leg at a time The idiom "He puts his pants on one leg at a time" refers to the fact that someone is just like anyone else, with no special skills or abilities. It suggests that the person in question is ordinary and does things in the same way as everyone else, without any exceptional qualities or advantages.
  • the line of least resistance, at the path of least resistance The idiom "the line of least resistance" or "the path of least resistance" refers to the easiest or most convenient course of action. It suggests choosing the option that requires the least effort or resistance in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • difficult is done at once the impossible takes a little longer The idiom "Difficult is done at once, the impossible takes a little longer" suggests that tasks or challenges that are considered difficult can be accomplished efficiently, while those believed to be impossible may require additional time and effort. It emphasizes the importance of resilience, patience, and perseverance in achieving goals that are seemingly impossible.
  • get on sb's goat, at get sb's goat The idiom "get on someone's goat" or "get someone's goat" is used to describe irritating or annoying someone. It refers to an action or behavior that specifically gets under someone's skin or irritates them to a great extent.
  • gaze at someone or something The idiom "gaze at someone or something" means to look at someone or something for an extended period, often in a contemplative or mesmerized manner. It implies a fixed and intense visual focus on the subject, as if captivated or lost in thought while observing them/it.
  • beat about the bush, at beat around the bush "Beat about the bush" or "beat around the bush" is an idiom that means to avoid getting to the point or to speak indirectly instead of addressing a subject directly. It refers to being hesitant, evasive, or vague in communication, often using unnecessary details or distractions instead of directly addressing the main issue or question.
  • and be done with it, at and have done with it The idiom "and be done with it" or "and have done with it" is used to suggest a desire to complete or finish something quickly, without further delay or discussion. It implies a sense of finality or resolution upon taking a certain action or decision. It can also convey a willingness to end a situation or issue abruptly without prolonging it.
  • excel at sth The idiom "excel at sth" means to be exceptionally skilled, talented, or successful in a particular activity or field. It implies being beyond average or proficient and often implies a high level of proficiency or expertise.
  • run off at the mouth The idiom "run off at the mouth" refers to speaking excessively or rambling on, often without considering the consequences or thinking before speaking. It implies someone who talks too much or shares unnecessary or unfiltered information without being asked or invited to do so.
  • too big for your britches, at too big for your boots The idiom "too big for your britches" (or "too big for your boots") is used to describe someone who has an exaggerated sense of their own importance, capabilities, or skills. This person typically displays excessive confidence, arrogance, or overestimates their abilities in a way that is considered inappropriate or unwarranted. It suggests that the individual has a self-perception that surpasses their actual abilities or social status, thus implying a need for humility or a reality check.
  • bridle at (someone or something) The idiom "bridle at (someone or something)" means to feel resentful, frustrated, or irritated by someone or something and express it openly or in a restrained manner. It implies a sense of resistance or unwillingness to accept someone's authority, control, or certain circumstances. It can also signify reacting with anger or impatience towards a particular person, situation, or restriction.
  • fuss at someone or something The idiom "fuss at someone or something" means to express annoyance, anger, or dissatisfaction toward a person or thing. It implies verbally scolding, criticizing, or complaining about someone's behavior or action, often with strong emotions and excessive attention to minor details.
  • arrive at The idiom "arrive at" means to reach a conclusion or decision after careful consideration, analysis, or discussion. It implies the process of arriving at a definite or specific outcome or result.
  • turn up one's nose at The idiom "turn up one's nose at" means to display a scornful or disdainful reaction towards something or someone, usually due to a sense of superiority or arrogance. It implies an act of rejecting or refusing something based on the belief that it is inferior or unworthy.
  • old hand (at doing sth) The idiom "old hand (at doing sth)" refers to someone who is highly experienced or skilled in a particular activity or task. They have been doing it for a long time and have developed a great deal of knowledge and expertise in that area.
  • not have two pennies to rub together, at not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have two pennies to rub together" or "not have a penny to your name" means to be completely broke or extremely poor. It refers to a person who does not possess even a small amount of money or any valuable assets. It emphasizes their lack of financial resources or stability.
  • at an impasse The idiom "at an impasse" is used to describe a situation where there is a deadlock or a stalemate, meaning progress or further resolution seems impossible. It suggests that two or more parties are unable to reach an agreement or find a solution to a problem, leaving them stuck or unable to move forward.
  • Here’s looking at you The idiom "Here's looking at you" is a phrase used to express friendly or affectionate feelings towards someone. It typically implies a sentiment of goodwill, often accompanied by a toast or a friendly gesture.
  • at the point of sth The idiom "at the point of sth" typically refers to being at the moment of greatest intensity or impact regarding a particular situation or event. It suggests reaching a critical stage or reaching the climax of a specific circumstance. It can also imply being close to achieving or experiencing something significant.
  • spoil the party for sb, at spoil sb's party The idiom "spoil the party for someone" or "spoil someone's party" means to ruin or disrupt someone's enjoyment or celebration. It refers to any action or behavior that negatively impacts the mood or atmosphere of a gathering, event, or occasion, thereby preventing others from having a good time.
  • nibble at sth The idiom "nibble at something" means to eat or consume small amounts or portions of something gradually and in a leisurely manner, often without fully committing to or finishing it. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of engaging with or exploring a topic or task in a cautious or hesitant manner.
  • sit at the feet of sb The idiom "sit at the feet of someone" means to be a humble and attentive student or disciple of someone, usually indicating a strong desire to learn from their wisdom, knowledge, or expertise. It implies a position of respect and admiration for the person being referred to.
  • have a whack at The idiom "have a whack at" means to make an attempt at doing something or trying one's hand at a task or activity, usually in an enthusiastic or ambitious manner. It implies giving something a try, taking a shot, or giving it your best effort.
  • move up in the world, at go/come up in the world The idiom "move up in the world" or "go/come up in the world" refers to the act of improving one's social, financial, or professional status. It suggests a positive advancement or progress in life, often correlating with achieving greater success, wealth, or prestige than one had before.
  • set sm's mind at ease (about sm or sth) The idiom "set someone's mind at ease (about something)" means to alleviate someone's worries, concerns, or anxieties about a particular person or thing. It refers to calming someone down and giving them reassurance or providing them with information that helps them feel more confident or relaxed.
  • bursting at the seams The idiom "bursting at the seams" is used to describe something or someone that is excessively full, crowded, or at maximum capacity. It implies that a situation, place, or individual is unable to contain or accommodate any more due to an overwhelming amount or force.
  • put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" is used to remind someone that they are not superior or exceptional, and they should not act or think of themselves as such. It means that everyone, regardless of their status or abilities, is equally human and faces similar everyday tasks and challenges.
  • work a treat, at work wonders/miracles The idiom "work a treat" or "work wonders/miracles" refers to something that is very effective and successful in achieving the desired result. It indicates that a particular approach or solution is highly efficient in producing the expected outcome or solving a problem.
  • not get a word in edgewise, at not get a word in edgeways The idiom "not get a word in edgewise" (or edgeways) is used to describe a situation where someone is unable to interject or speak due to another person dominating the conversation by talking excessively or without pause. It implies that the individual cannot find an opportunity to contribute their own thoughts or opinions.
  • at one fell swoop The idiom "at one fell swoop" means to accomplish or complete something in a single, swift and decisive action. It refers to doing something all at once or in one single motion, without hesitation or delay.
  • at pointblank range The idiom "at pointblank range" refers to a very close distance where someone or something is directly in front of you, making it difficult to miss or escape. It is often used to describe a situation where there is no time for preparation or reaction, and the outcome is often immediate and decisive.
  • go far, at go a long way The idiom "go far" or "go a long way" is used to describe someone's potential for success or achievement in their endeavors. It implies that the person has the necessary skills, determination, or favorable qualities that will enable them to achieve great things. It suggests that the person will be able to make significant progress or have a successful future.
  • buy something at something The idiom "buy something at something" typically means to purchase or acquire something at a specific price or rate. It implies that the item is available for purchase at a particular cost or value.
  • point the finger at someone The idiom "point the finger at someone" refers to the act of accusing or blaming a specific individual for a wrongdoing or undesirable situation, often without sufficient evidence or proof. It implies assigning responsibility or guilt to that person publicly or privately.
  • at the end of one's rope The idiom "at the end of one's rope" is used to describe a situation where someone has exhausted all options, resources, or patience, and feels overwhelmed, frustrated, or desperate. It typically implies that they are unable to cope with the situation any longer and need immediate relief or a solution.
  • lash out (at sb/sth) The idiom "lash out (at sb/sth)" means to suddenly or violently express anger, frustration, or criticism towards someone or something. It typically involves reacting with hostility or abusive remarks in response to a provoking situation.
  • a new lease on life, at a new lease of life The idiom "a new lease on life" or "a new lease of life" refers to a fresh start or a revitalization of someone's life or situation. It implies a renewed sense of energy, optimism, and enthusiasm which allows someone to embrace a better, more positive future. This idiom is often used when someone has overcome a significant obstacle or undergone a positive change that brings about a transformation in their outlook or circumstances.
  • labor at sth The idiom "labor at sth" means to work diligently, persistently, or strenuously at something, putting in a lot of effort and time. It implies putting in hard work or exerting oneself to achieve a particular task or goal.
  • have something at one's fingertips The idiom "have something at one's fingertips" means to have knowledge or information readily available or easily accessible. It implies being well-informed or knowledgeable about a subject and having easy access to the necessary resources or tools needed for a task or situation.
  • thanks a bunch, at thanks for nothing The idiom "thanks a bunch, at thanks for nothing" is a sarcastic way of expressing disappointment or resentment towards someone for their lack of help, effort, or contribution. It implies that the person's actions or efforts were either meaningless or unhelpful, despite an initial expectation or request for assistance.
  • be in the right spot at the right time The idiom "be in the right spot at the right time" refers to being in a fortunate or advantageous position or situation when an important or beneficial event occurs. It suggests being present or available when opportunities arise, resulting in success or favorable outcomes.
  • lick sb's arse/ass, at lick sb's boots The idiom "lick sb's arse/ass" or "lick sb's boots" is a derogatory expression that refers to someone excessively flattering, praising, or ingratiating themselves towards someone else in order to gain favor or obtain specific benefits. It implies a submissive or subservient behavior where the person is willing to do anything to please the other individual, even if it means compromising their dignity or self-respect.
  • eat (away) at (someone or something) The idiom "eat (away) at (someone or something)" typically means to gradually and continuously bother, worry, or disturb someone's emotions, thoughts, or beliefs. It refers to a situation or issue that consumes one's mind, causing them to feel anxious, frustrated, or unsettled. It can also pertain to something gradually eroding or deteriorating over time, such as a relationship, trust, or a material object.
  • in at the kill The idiom "in at the kill" means to be present at or involved in the final stages or decisive moment of a undertaking, often referring to a competition, battle, or completion of a project. It implies being present to witness or participate in the ultimate outcome or climax.
  • strike back (at sm or sth) The idiom "strike back (at someone or something)" refers to retaliating or responding to an attack, criticism, or injustice in an equally forceful manner. It involves taking action to defend oneself or to counteract the harm caused by an individual or a situation.
  • cock a snook at somebody/something The idiom "cock a snook at somebody/something" means openly and disrespectfully showing contempt, disregard, or defiance towards someone or something. It often involves making a gesture of raising the hand with the thumb to the nose and extending the remaining fingers, symbolizing insolence or mockery.
  • be no question of (doing) sth, at be out of the question The idiom "be no question of (doing) sth" or "be out of the question" is used to express that something is not possible, practical, or acceptable. It implies that there is no doubt or debate about the impossibility or impracticality of a particular action or decision.
  • be foaming at the mouth The idiom "be foaming at the mouth" is used to describe someone who is exceedingly angry, enraged, or furious. It references the literal image of a rabid animal displaying frothy saliva around its mouth, indicating extreme agitation or aggression.
  • glare at someone or something The idiom "glare at someone or something" means to look at someone or something with intense anger, disapproval, or hostility. It involves fixing one's gaze with a sharp, piercing, and often unpleasant expression, usually conveying strong negative emotions towards the target.
  • be asleep at the wheel To be asleep at the wheel means to be inattentive, unaware, or neglectful of something important that requires immediate action or attention. It is often used to describe someone who is failing to fulfill their responsibilities or to notice something obvious or significant. The idiom alludes to a lack of vigilance or alertness, similar to someone being physically asleep while driving a vehicle.
  • gaze around (at sm or sth) The idiom "gaze around (at sm or sth)" means to look in all directions, allowing one's eyes to explore and observe their surroundings or a particular person or thing. It implies a curious or attentive way of examining the environment or a specific object.
  • fetch up at The idiom "fetch up at" means to end up or arrive at a particular place or situation, often unexpectedly or unintentionally. It suggests the result of a journey or series of events leading to a specific outcome or destination.
  • hold (or keep) someone or something at bay The idiom "hold (or keep) someone or something at bay" means to keep something or someone at a distance or under control, usually to prevent a negative outcome or avoid a confrontation. It implies keeping a threat, danger, or challenge away and maintaining a safe or manageable distance from it.
  • at your convenience The idiom "at your convenience" refers to a request or arrangement that can be scheduled or accomplished at a time that is most convenient or suitable for the person being addressed. It implies flexibility and allows individuals to choose a time that is most comfortable or advantageous for them.
  • deliver the goods, at come up with the goods The idiom "deliver the goods" or "come up with the goods" means to fulfill expectations or promises by performing or producing what is required, expected, or desired. It refers to successfully meeting or exceeding the expected outcome or providing the desired result. The idiom is often used in situations where someone is expected to prove their ability, competence, or reliability by producing the desired or promised outcome.
  • chafe at (something) The idiom "chafe at (something)" means to be irritated, annoyed, or restless due to a restriction, limitation, or restraint. It implies a feeling of frustration or impatience with a particular situation or condition.
  • sneer at sm or sth The idiom "sneer at someone or something" means to show contempt, scorn, or derision towards someone or something. It involves making a facial expression or using mocking or dismissive words to convey a negative attitude or lack of respect.
  • know the ropes, at know your way around sth The idiom "know the ropes, at know your way around something" means to be familiar with the procedures, rules, or techniques related to a particular task, job, or situation. It suggests having experience and knowledge that allows one to navigate and operate comfortably and effectively in a given environment.
  • at length The idiom "at length" means to talk or discuss something in great detail or for a long period of time. It refers to giving an extensive or comprehensive account or explanation of a subject.
  • come out at The idiom "come out at" generally refers to the final result or outcome of a situation, especially when it is unexpected or not as initially anticipated. It implies that after going through a process or taking certain actions, the final result or consequence becomes evident or apparent.
  • come knocking at the door The idiom "come knocking at the door" means to seek or request something from someone, usually an opportunity, help, or assistance. It implies a situation where someone is in need and seeks assistance from others.
  • snap at sth To "snap at something" means to respond to something with sudden or irritable anger or impatience. It implies that someone reacts quickly and sharply to a situation or a comment, often with a touch of aggression or annoyance.
  • at a/one stroke The idiom "at a/one stroke" means to accomplish something or make a significant change in one single action, without any further effort or additional steps. It implies that a task or goal was achieved instantly and completely.
  • take a potshot at sm or sth The idiom "take a potshot at someone or something" means to make a careless or hasty criticism, comment, or attempt to harm someone or something, usually without much thought or consideration. It denotes taking a random or casual shot without precision or careful aim, much like shooting at a target just for fun or to show off, rather than for a specific purpose.
  • at a (single) stroke The idiom "at a (single) stroke" means to achieve or accomplish something in a single decisive action or effort, often implying that it was done quickly or efficiently. It suggests that a significant change or outcome has been achieved without much effort or delay.
  • God forbid, at heaven forbid The idiom "God forbid" or "heaven forbid" is an expression used to convey a fervent wish that something unpleasant or negative does not happen. It is typically used to emphasize the speaker's strong desire to avert a potential harm or disaster.
  • guess at The definition of the idiom "guess at" is to estimate or speculate about something without having complete knowledge or information. It implies making an educated guess or approximate calculation.
  • this, that, and the other, at this and that The idiom "this, that, and the other" is used to refer to a variety of things, often emphasizing a long or diverse list of items, topics, or activities. It is typically used to convey a sense of vagueness, confusion, or a lack of specificity. It can also imply that someone is discussing or doing a lot of things without providing specific details.
  • be bursting at the seams The idiom "be bursting at the seams" means to be extremely full or overflowing with something, such as people, things, or emotions. It suggests that a particular space or situation is unable to accommodate or contain everything that is within it, creating a sense of excess or abundance.
  • cheap at half the price The idiom "cheap at half the price" is used to describe something that is very inexpensive or of great value for its price. It implies that the item is so reasonably priced that even if it were sold at double the current price, it would still be considered a good deal.
  • stand no nonsense, at not stand any nonsense The idiom "stand no nonsense" or "not stand any nonsense" refers to a person who does not tolerate or accept any form of silliness, foolishness, or unreasonable behavior from others. This individual is known to be strict, serious, and does not hesitate to confront or reprimand anyone who acts inappropriately. They have a low tolerance for nonsense or foolishness.
  • stay at sm place The idiom "stay at sm place" means to remain in a specific location or position, either physically or metaphorically. It suggests not moving or deviating from the current situation, whether it's staying in a physical place or maintaining a particular state or position.
  • chip (away) at sth The idiom "chip (away) at something" means to make small, gradual efforts or progress towards achieving a goal or completing a task. It implies persistent and consistent work or action, usually through incremental steps or contributions, in order to gradually overcome or accomplish something significant.
  • look daggers at someone The idiom "look daggers at someone" means to glare or give someone an intense and angry look, conveying strong feelings of hostility, animosity, or resentment towards that person.
  • marvel at sm or sth The idiom "marvel at someone or something" means to show or experience a sense of wonder, amazement, or admiration towards something or someone. It implies being in awe, fascination, or astonishment due to the exceptional qualities, skills, or qualities demonstrated by the subject.
  • grin at someone or something The idiom "grin at someone or something" means to smile broadly or show amusement or satisfaction towards a person or thing. It suggests expressing joy or happiness through a wide smile, often accompanied by positive emotions.
  • at the forefront (of sth) The idiom "at the forefront (of sth)" means being in a leading or prominent position in a particular field, activity, or movement. It refers to being at the cutting edge or forefront of innovation, progress, or relevance in a specific area or industry.
  • quicken sm's pulse, at set sm's pulse racing The idiom "quicken someone's pulse" or "set someone's pulse racing" means to make someone feel excited, nervous, or anxious. It refers to something that stimulates or arouses strong emotions or anticipation in someone, often causing their heart rate to increase or their pulse to quicken.
  • fall at the last hurdle The idiom "fall at the last hurdle" means to fail or experience a setback or disappointment just before reaching the end goal or completing a task. It refers to the concept of stumbling, tripping, or making a mistake when only one obstacle remains before achieving success or completion.
  • hit back (at sm or sth) The idiom "hit back (at someone or something)" means to respond or retaliate against someone or something that has previously attacked, criticized, or provoked you. It implies returning the same level of aggression or force, often in defense of oneself or one's beliefs.
  • keep your fingers crossed, at cross your fingers The idiom "keep your fingers crossed" or "cross your fingers" means to hope for good luck or success in a particular situation. It is usually used when one is uncertain about the outcome of something and wishes for a positive outcome. The phrase is often accompanied by the literal action of crossing one's fingers, which is believed to bring good luck or serve as a superstitious gesture to counter negative outcomes.
  • point the finger at The idiom "point the finger at" means to blame someone or accuse them of being responsible for a certain situation or problem. It implies that someone is directly indicating or singling out another person as the culprit or cause of an issue.
  • look at sm crosseyed The idiom "look at someone crosseyed" means to examine or observe something or someone closely or with suspicious intent. It implies that the person is scrutinizing or giving special attention to someone or something, often with a skeptical or doubting attitude.
  • not give a tinker's damn, at not give a tinker's cuss The idiom "not give a tinker's damn" (sometimes also "not give a tinker's cuss") means to not care about something at all or to have no interest whatsoever. It implies a complete lack of concern or value towards a particular person, thing, or situation. The phrase originated in the 19th century, where "tinker" referred to a person who repaired household utensils, and "damn" or "cuss" represented a strong expression of indifference or worthlessness.
  • gaze at sm or sth The idiom "gaze at someone or something" means to look at someone or something for a long period of time, usually in a fixed or focused manner, often with a sense of admiration, wonder, or curiosity.
  • have the world at your feet The idiom "have the world at your feet" means to be in a position where you have achieved significant success and have countless opportunities or options available to you. It implies having control or influence over various aspects of life, such as career, personal relationships, or achieving one's goals. It often signifies being at the peak of one's abilities or accomplishments.
  • thumb one's nose at sm or sth The idiom "thumb one's nose at someone or something" means to openly express disrespect, defiance, or contempt towards someone or something. It involves making a provocative gesture of placing the thumb on the nose while wiggling the fingers as a sign of mockery or contemptuous defiance. This idiom is used to describe a person's act of rejecting or dismissing someone or something with a disrespectful and defiant attitude.
  • know sb to speak to, at be on speaking terms The idiom "know sb to speak to" or "be on speaking terms" means to be familiar with, but not very close to someone, to the extent that you can greet and have a polite conversation with them. It suggests a basic level of acquaintance or familiarity, but not necessarily a deep or personal relationship.
  • Amount at Risk The idiom "Amount at Risk" refers to the monetary value or extent of potential loss or danger in a specific situation, usually in terms of financial investments or business ventures. It denotes the amount of money or resources that could be lost or put in jeopardy due to certain risks or uncertainties associated with a particular endeavor.
  • be all thumbs, at be all fingers and thumbs The idiom "be all thumbs" or "be all fingers and thumbs" refers to someone who is awkward, clumsy, or lacking dexterity, especially when attempting a task or handling objects. It suggests that the person is having difficulties in doing something that requires careful handling or manual skills.
  • set (one's) mind at ease The idiom "set one's mind at ease" means to alleviate or relieve someone's worries or anxieties, providing comfort and reassurance to someone.
  • pinch and scrape, at pinch pennies The idiom "pinch and scrape" or "pinch pennies" refers to the act of being extremely frugal or thrifty, often with limited resources. It involves saving or conserving money by trying to spend as little as possible, even in difficult or tight situations. People who "pinch and scrape" are careful with their expenses, seeking ways to cut costs and avoid unnecessary spending.
  • at sb's knee The idiom "at someone's knee" refers to being in a position of learning or being mentored by someone, usually an older or more experienced individual. It denotes a close and intimate relationship, where the person being referred to is taking guidance, instruction, or inspiration from the person they are with, as if they were sitting or kneeling at their teacher's or mentor's knee.
  • keep someone at something The idiom "keep someone at something" means to persistently encourage or motivate someone to continue doing or pursuing a certain activity, task, or goal, often despite difficulties, challenges, or lack of enthusiasm. It refers to the act of ensuring someone's commitment or dedication to a particular endeavor.
  • put (one's) mind at ease The idiom "put (one's) mind at ease" means to provide reassurance or relief to someone by easing their worries, doubts, or anxieties. It is done by offering information, explanations, or actions that alleviate their concerns and create a sense of peace or calmness.
  • at the expense of sb The idiom "at the expense of sb" means to cause harm or disadvantages to someone in order to gain benefits or advantages for oneself. It implies sacrificing or disregarding the well-being or interests of another person in order to further one's own goals or ambitions.
  • all, completely, etc. at sea The idiom "all at sea" is used to describe a state of confusion, bewilderment, or not knowing what to do or how to proceed in a situation. It implies being lost or disoriented, similar to being adrift at sea without any navigation.
  • strike at the heart of (something) The idiom "strike at the heart of (something)" means to address or target the most important or central aspect of a particular issue, problem, or matter. It implies a thorough and impactful action or statement that directly affects the core or essence of whatever is being discussed.
  • plod away at The idiom "plod away at" means to continue working on something persistently or diligently, often in a steady and methodical manner, even if it feels monotonous or exhausting. It implies putting effort and dedication into a task or goal despite the lack of immediate progress or visible results.
  • cock a snook at sm The idiom "cock a snook at someone" means to display contempt or disrespect towards someone by making a rude or defiant gesture, usually involving holding one hand to the nose with the thumb extended outwards. It is an expression of defiance or defiance, often used to show disregard for authority or to challenge someone's rules or expectations.
  • at odds with the world The idiom "at odds with the world" means being in a state of conflict or disagreement with the people or circumstances around you. It suggests a feeling of alienation or disconnect from the world and a lack of harmony or agreement with one's surroundings.
  • the odd man out, at the odd one out The idiom "the odd man out" or "the odd one out" refers to someone or something that is different or distinct from the rest of a group or set. This expression is often used to describe a person who doesn't fit in or doesn't share the same characteristics, opinions, or interests as others. It can also refer to an object or element that doesn't belong or doesn't conform to the pattern or norm of a particular group.
  • hold/keep somebody/something at bay The idiom "hold/keep somebody/something at bay" means to prevent someone or something from approaching or reaching too close. It is often used to describe keeping a potential threat or difficulty under control or at a safe distance.
  • have a lash at The idiom "have a lash at" means to attempt or try something, often with enthusiasm or vigor. It is commonly used when one wants to give something a go or make an effort to accomplish a task, even if they are uncertain about the outcome.
  • all cats are grey at night The idiom "all cats are grey at night" implies that in certain situations or circumstances, appearances or differences cease to matter or become less significant. It suggests that when it is dark or when the conditions are unfavorable, it is difficult to distinguish or judge based on external characteristics or qualities. In essence, it means that physical attributes or distinctions become irrelevant in certain contexts.
  • if ever I saw one, at if ever there was one The idiomatic expression "if ever I saw one" or "if ever there was one" is used to emphasize that something or someone exemplifies a particular quality or characteristic to a great extent, often in an obvious or undeniable manner.
  • fly into a temper/fury, at fly into a rage The idiom "fly into a temper/fury" or "fly into a rage" refers to an extreme and sudden expression of anger or outrage. It describes a person becoming instantly and explosively angry, often over trivial or insignificant matters. The phrase emphasizes the rapid and intense nature of the emotional response, likening it to a sudden outburst or eruption.
  • sink like a lead balloon, at sink like a stone The idiom "sink like a lead balloon" is interchangeable with "sink like a stone" and is used to describe something that quickly fails, gets rejected, or receives a negative response. It implies that the idea, plan, or situation is doomed or has no chance of success, similar to a heavy object sinking rapidly in water rather than remaining afloat.
  • make a dead set at The idiom "make a dead set at" means to pursue or strive for something with great determination and focus. It implies that the person is committed and unwavering in their efforts to achieve a particular goal or outcome.
  • appraise sth at sth The idiom "appraise sth at sth" means to estimate or determine the value, worth, or quality of something in terms of a particular price, value, or standard. It typically involves assessing and evaluating an item or situation to assign a specific value or rating.
  • quail at sm or sth The idiom "quail at" refers to feeling hesitant, fearful, or apprehensive about someone or something. It denotes a sense of unease or anxiety when faced with a particular person or thing.
  • preach at sm The idiom "preach at someone" refers to a situation where someone is delivering a lengthy, moralizing, or self-righteous speech or advice to another person in a condescending or judgmental manner. It implies that the speaker is trying to impose their beliefs or opinions on the listener without considering their perspective or feelings.
  • make a stab at The idiom "make a stab at" means to attempt or try something, usually without a lot of certainty or confidence. It implies giving it a try or making an effort, even if one is not entirely sure of success.
  • be at odds (with) The idiom "be at odds (with)" means to have a disagreement or conflict with someone or something, to be in a state of disagreement or discord. It refers to a situation where two or more parties have opposing views, opinions, or goals, leading to a lack of agreement or harmony between them.
  • at one's leisure The idiom "at one's leisure" means to do something when one has free time or at a comfortable pace, without any hurry or pressure.
  • snap at sb's heels To "snap at someone's heels" means to closely pursue or threaten someone, just like a predator or competitor chasing after its prey. It implies a competitive or confrontational relationship, where the person or entity being pursued is constantly under pressure or threat from the pursuer.
  • at (one's) earliest convenience The idiom "at (one's) earliest convenience" means doing something as soon as one is able to or at the earliest possible time.
  • at the bottom of the heap/pile The idiom "at the bottom of the heap/pile" refers to being in the lowest position or rank in a group or hierarchy. It suggests being at the very bottom, with little or no power, status, or importance compared to others.
  • ring any bells, at ring a bell The idiom "ring any bells" or "ring a bell" is used when trying to jog someone's memory about something they may have forgotten. It means to ask if something sounds familiar or if it brings any recollection or recognition to the person.
  • more than can shake a stick at The idiom "more than can shake a stick at" is used to convey the idea of an overwhelming or excessive amount of something. It suggests that there are so many of a particular thing or things that one would not be able to count or handle them all with just a stick.
  • push at an open door The definition of the idiom "push at an open door" is to enthusiastically pursue or advocate for an idea or cause that is already widely accepted or supported, making the effort almost effortless or unnecessary. It implies that one is not encountering any resistance or opposition while advocating for something.
  • shoot a glance at sb The idiom "shoot a glance at sb" means to quickly or briefly look at someone, usually with a direct or intense gaze. It can convey various emotions or intentions, such as curiosity, suspicion, disapproval, or attraction. The phrase "shoot a glance" implies a swift and focused visual interaction between individuals.
  • I would give my eye teeth/right arm, at I would give anything/a lot The idiom "I would give my eye teeth/right arm" means that someone is willing to sacrifice or give up something of great value in order to obtain or achieve something they desire or need. This expression emphasizes the strong desire or willingness of an individual to make a significant sacrifice.
  • hold/keep sb/sth at bay To hold/keep someone or something at bay means to keep them at a distance or prevent them from getting too close or causing harm. It refers to maintaining control or restraining someone or something from advancing or causing trouble.
  • at the height of something The idiom "at the height of something" refers to the peak or most intense point of a particular situation, event, or condition. It indicates a time when something is at its maximum level, popularity, or intensity.
  • a couple of shakes, at in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "a couple of shakes" or "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" means a very short period of time or very quickly. It implies that something will be done or accomplished in a matter of seconds or moments. The phrase is often used to emphasize the speed or efficiency with which something can be done.
  • have sth off to a fine art, at have sth down to a fine art The idiom "have something off to a fine art" or "have something down to a fine art" means to have perfected a skill or activity to a high level of proficiency and expertise. It indicates that someone has mastered a particular task, making it seem effortless and flawless.
  • at (one's) knee The idiom "at (one's) knee" typically refers to being in close proximity or close association with a person who is an expert or a revered authority figure, often a teacher or mentor. It suggests that someone is learning from or being guided by that person, similar to sitting or being close to their knees in a symbolic sense.
  • keep sb at arm's length To "keep someone at arm's length" means to maintain a certain distance or level of remoteness from someone, typically because of mistrust, caution, or a desire to keep a personal or emotional distance from them. It implies not allowing someone to get too close or involved in one's life or affairs.
  • a fair shake, at a fair crack of the whip The idiom "a fair shake, at a fair crack of the whip" means to receive equal and fair treatment or opportunities. It suggests that everyone involved should be given a genuine and equitable chance without any bias or disadvantage, as one would expect in a just and honest situation.
  • gnaw (away) at someone The idiom "gnaw (away) at someone" means to cause persistent worry, anxiety, or mental distress. It refers to a situation or thought that bothers someone relentlessly, just like the action of a rodent gnawing incessantly on something. It implies a slow but constant erosion of one's peace of mind or emotional well-being.
  • down the pan, at down the toilet The idiom "down the pan" or "down the toilet" refers to something that has failed, been wasted, or come to an unfortunate end. It suggests that a situation or effort has been ruined or lost irretrievably.
  • it's my pleasure, at it's a pleasure The idiom "it's my pleasure" or "it's a pleasure" is an expression used to convey a sense of sincere enjoyment or satisfaction in fulfilling a task or providing assistance to someone. It implies that the person genuinely takes pleasure in the opportunity to help or do something for others.
  • grind away (at sth) The idiom "grind away (at sth)" refers to the act of persistently and tirelessly working on something, especially a task or project, without giving up or getting discouraged. It implies putting in continuous effort and dedication to achieve a specific goal, often in a repetitive or monotonous manner.
  • get at (someone or something) The idiom "get at (someone or something)" means to criticize, attack, or find fault with someone or something persistently or indirectly. It refers to the act of attempting to undermine or provoke someone or target something unfavorably in various ways, such as through comments, actions, or subtle hints.
  • charity begins at home The idiom "charity begins at home" means that one should take care of and provide for their own family and loved ones before helping others or contributing to charitable causes. It emphasizes the importance of prioritizing the well-being and support of those closest to us.
  • at the mercy of sm The idiom "at the mercy of someone" means being completely dependent on or under the control or power of someone, often implying vulnerability or helplessness.
  • wink at sm The idiom "wink at someone" means to purposely ignore or overlook something that is usually considered wrong or unacceptable, without taking action or showing disapproval. It implies turning a blind eye or giving tacit approval to someone's actions or behavior.
  • curdle sb's blood, at make sb's blood curdle To curdle someone's blood, or make someone's blood curdle, is an idiom that means to cause intense fear, horror, or revulsion. It describes a situation or event that is so shocking or horrifying that it causes a physical sensation in the body, as if one's blood is congealing or curdling.
  • at a loss The idiom "at a loss" means to be in a state of confusion or uncertainty, not knowing how to proceed or what to do. It implies a feeling of being perplexed, bewildered, or lacking knowledge or understanding in a particular situation.
  • gnaw (away) at sm or sth The idiom "gnaw (away) at someone or something" refers to a persistent, nagging, or troubling feeling or thought that continuously bothers or preoccupies someone's mind, causing emotional distress or anxiety. It implies the feeling of being consumed slowly and persistently, like a nagging sensation that cannot be ignored.
  • at a crossroads "At a crossroads" is an idiom that typically means being at a significant point or moment in life where an important decision or choice needs to be made, often implying uncertainty about which direction to take. It symbolizes being at a literal crossroad, where multiple paths diverge, and one must decide which way to go.
  • put yourself about, at put it about The idiom "put yourself about" or "put it about" means to engage actively in various social activities or to work energetically and vigorously. It implies that a person is actively involved in multiple endeavors or relationships, often seeking to broaden their social circle or expand their influence.
  • have a shot at (someone or something) The idiom "have a shot at (someone or something)" means to make an attempt or try to achieve or attain something, often referring to an opportunity or a chance. It can also mean to attempt to criticize, attack, or confront someone.
  • at (one's) suggestion The idiom "at (one's) suggestion" refers to something that has been proposed, advised, or recommended by a particular person. It signifies that a particular course of action or idea was put forth by an individual.
  • lash at someone or something The idiom "lash at someone or something" refers to a strong and aggressive verbal or physical attack, usually sudden and fierce, directed towards a person or an object. It implies the action of striking or criticizing vigorously and forcefully.
  • have/keep your eye on the clock, at be watching the clock The idiom "have/keep your eye on the clock" or "be watching the clock" means to constantly monitor or observe the time, usually in a situation where it is important to be aware of deadlines or schedules. It implies a sense of urgency or a need to manage time efficiently.
  • a drowning man will clutch at a straw The idiom "a drowning man will clutch at a straw" means that when people are in desperate situations, they will try anything, no matter how hopeless or unlikely for success, to try to save themselves or make the situation better. It emphasizes the desperate and often irrational actions of someone who is in extreme distress or trouble.
  • play sb at their own game The idiom "play someone at their own game" means to engage in a competition or confrontation with someone using the same strategies, tactics, or methods they employ. It suggests that one is willing to confront or challenge another person on their terms, often with the intention of outsmarting or defeating them.
  • tear/tug at your heartstrings The idiom "tear/tug at your heartstrings" refers to a situation or event that deeply moves or affects someone emotionally. It describes a feeling or experience that elicits strong sentiments, often causing sadness, sympathy, or compassion.
  • chew (away) at sth The idiom "chew (away) at something" means to persistently worry, think about, or be bothered by something. It refers to the act of repeatedly gnawing or chewing on an object, reflecting the continuous mental preoccupation with a particular issue or problem. It implies a sense of unease or anxiety caused by a persistent concern that cannot be easily resolved or forgotten.
  • frighten/scare the wits out of sb, at frighten/scare sb out of their wits The idiom "frighten/scare the wits out of someone, at frighten/scare someone out of their wits" means to terrify or startle someone to an extreme extent, causing them to lose their composure or become extremely frightened. It refers to a situation where fear is so intense that it overwhelms one's rational thinking or mental faculties.
  • compute (something) at (some amount) The idiom "compute (something) at (some amount)" typically refers to the process of calculating, determining, or estimating something to be a specific value or quantity. It suggests performing mathematical or logical operations to arrive at a result.
  • at sb's beck and call The idiom "at sb's beck and call" means to be constantly available and willing to do whatever someone asks, being ready to respond to their every command or desire. It implies being obedient and always ready to serve or cater to someone's needs or wishes.
  • fume at someone The idiom "fume at someone" means to be extremely angry or displeased with someone and openly express that anger or displeasure towards them. It implies a visible display of frustration or irritation towards the person being addressed.
  • at the top of the/ agenda The idiom "at the top of the agenda" means that something is of utmost importance or priority. It refers to an issue, task, or topic that is considered the most significant and deserves immediate attention or discussion.
  • strain at gnats and swallow camels The idiom "strain at gnats and swallow camels" means to focus on minor, insignificant issues or flaws while disregarding or accepting major, more important problems or faults. It implies a skew in priorities or a lack of perspective when dealing with different matters.
  • sit on your ass, at sit on your arse The idiom "sit on your ass" or "sit on your arse" refers to someone being lazy, inactive, or not taking any action. It implies that the person is spending excessive time sitting around and doing nothing productive.
  • lurch at The idiom "lurch at" refers to making a sudden, impulsive, or uncontrolled movement towards something or someone, often in an aggressive or reckless manner. It can imply a lack of caution or restraint in one's actions.
  • eat (away) at (someone's) conscience The idiom "eat (away) at (someone's) conscience" refers to a feeling of guilt or remorse that slowly and persistently troubles a person's mind and causes moral distress. It describes the internal conflict and unease that arise when someone is constantly reminded of their wrongdoing or unethical behavior, leading to a sense of moral unease that cannot easily be resolved.
  • make sheep's eyes at sb The idiom "make sheep's eyes at someone" means to give someone a look or expression that shows romantic or flirtatious interest. It is often used to describe making subtle or coy gestures to attract someone's attention or to show romantic attraction.
  • honk at someone or something The idiom "honk at someone or something" refers to the act of sounding the horn of a vehicle as a means of getting someone's attention or warning them. It often implies that the person or thing being honked at is obstructing or causing inconvenience in some way.
  • keep someone or something at arm's length The idiom "keep someone or something at arm's length" means to maintain a safe or cautious distance from someone or something, usually due to a lack of trust, suspicion, or a desire to avoid any potential harm, involvement, or emotional connection.
  • be at (one's) disposal The idiom "be at (one's) disposal" means that someone or something is available or ready to be used or accessed by someone else, typically implying a willingness to assist or accommodate the other person's needs or requests. It suggests that the person or thing is at the complete service or control of the individual.
  • spend the night with sb, at spend the night together The idiom "spend the night with someone" or "spend the night together" refers to staying overnight with another person, often in an intimate or romantic context. It implies spending quality time with someone during the evening and staying together until the next morning.
  • put up at auction The idiom "put up at auction" means to offer something for sale to the highest bidder through a public bidding process.
  • balk at something The idiom "balk at something" means to hesitate or refuse to accept or do something due to resistance, fear, or uncertainty about the situation or its consequences. It often implies a sudden stop or resistance in response to a challenge or demand.
  • the handwriting is on the wall, at the writing is on the wall The idiom "the handwriting is on the wall" or "the writing is on the wall" is used to convey that a certain outcome or event is inevitable or imminent. It is a reference to the biblical story of Daniel, in which the prophet interpreted a message written on a wall, predicting the downfall of a Babylonian king. Thus, when someone says "the handwriting is on the wall," they mean that the signs or indications of a particular outcome are unmistakable and cannot be ignored.
  • be ill at ease The idiom "be ill at ease" means to feel uncomfortable, restless, or uneasy in a particular situation or environment. It signifies a general feeling of uneasiness, typically due to social awkwardness, anxiety, or a lack of confidence.
  • start out at an amount of money The idiom "start out at an amount of money" means to begin or commence something, typically a financial transaction or negotiation, with a specific sum of money. It refers to the initial amount or starting point from which further discussions or actions may proceed.
  • the whole enchilada, at the whole bit The idiom "the whole enchilada" or "the whole bit" is often used to refer to the entirety or the whole of something. It implies that everything related to a particular situation, topic, or matter is included. It emphasizes the completeness or entirety of a situation or process.
  • can't see the forest for the trees, at can't see the wood for the trees The idiom "can't see the forest for the trees" or "can't see the wood for the trees" means being too focused on small details or individual parts of a situation, and therefore, not being able to see or understand the bigger picture or the overall perspective. It implies being so engrossed in minor aspects that one fails to grasp the broader context or main idea.
  • at the risk of doing sth The idiom "at the risk of doing something" means that one is willing to take the chance or face the potential negative consequences in order to achieve or accomplish something. It implies that even though there may be potential dangers or downsides involved, the person is still willing to proceed.
  • hold at bay The idiom "hold at bay" means to keep someone or something at a distance, usually through determined effort or precautions, in order to prevent them from approaching or causing harm. It implies successfully managing or controlling a potentially threatening or dangerous situation or individual.
  • play at sth The idiom "play at something" means to do an activity or engage in something without taking it seriously or fully committing to it. It suggests a lack of dedication or genuine effort in the pursuit of a particular goal or task.
  • draw the line (at sth) The idiom "draw the line (at sth)" means to set a limit or a boundary, indicating the point at which one refuses to go any further or engage in a particular action or behavior. It signifies establishing a stopping point or mark where one declares that something is unacceptable or intolerable.
  • too many cooks spoil the soup, at too many cooks spoil the broth The idiom "too many cooks spoil the soup" (also known as "too many cooks spoil the broth") means that when too many people are involved in a task or project, especially if they have conflicting ideas or approaches, the outcome is likely to be of lower quality or unsuccessful. It suggests that too much involvement can lead to confusion, lack of coordination, and an overall negative impact on the final result.
  • take a stab at (something) The idiom "take a stab at (something)" means to make an attempt or try, usually with a task that is uncertain or difficult. It implies taking a chance or giving it a try, even if one is not completely confident or skilled in that particular area.
  • at a stand The idiom "at a stand" typically means to be at a complete stop or a state of no progress or movement. It can also refer to a situation where there is a deadlock, a lack of decision or compromise, or a time when further action or development is temporarily halted.
  • in the right place at the right time The idiom "in the right place at the right time" refers to being in a situation where one is present or available at the perfect or opportune moment to benefit from it or achieve success. It suggests being lucky or fortunate enough to be in the ideal circumstances for a particular event or opportunity.
  • bone dry, at as dry as a bone The idiom "bone dry" or "as dry as a bone" refers to something that is completely without moisture or water. It signifies a state of extreme dryness, often used to describe objects, places, or individuals that are devoid of any dampness.
  • at/in/to the forefront The idiom "at/in/to the forefront" refers to a situation or position where someone or something is leading or considered of primary importance. It means being at or occupying a prominent or influential position in a particular field, activity, or situation. It suggests being at the cutting edge, taking the lead, or being highly visible or significant.
  • weak at the knees The idiom "weak at the knees" refers to feeling physically or emotionally overwhelmed, typically due to intense attraction, fear, or excitement. It describes a sensation of the legs becoming weak and unstable, often as a metaphor for strong emotions or infatuation.
  • gripe at someone The idiom "gripe at someone" means to complain or criticize someone in an aggressive or nagging manner. It refers to expressing dissatisfaction or annoyance towards someone by continually finding fault with their actions, behavior, or decisions.
  • at the buzzer The idiom "at the buzzer" means to do something or achieve something just before a deadline or time limit expires. It originated from the world of sports, specifically basketball, where a shot made just before the sound of the buzzer signals the end of the game or a quarter. In a broader sense, it refers to completing a task or achieving a goal right at the last possible moment.
  • have a crack at The idiom "have a crack at" means to attempt or try to do something. It implies taking a chance or giving something a go, even if it may be difficult or uncertain.
  • bridle at sm or sth The idiom "bridle at sm or sth" means to feel or show anger, irritation, or strong resistance towards someone or something. It suggests a reaction of restraint or defiance, similar to how a horse may resist being controlled by pulling on its bridle.
  • big wheel, at big fish/gun/noise/shot The idiom "big wheel, big fish/gun/noise/shot" refers to a person who holds a position of power, influence, or importance in a particular domain or situation. It suggests that the person referred to is highly respected or powerful in their field or social circle, often involved in major decision-making or having significant impact.
  • throw money at sth The idiom "throw money at something" is used to describe a situation where excessive amounts of money are spent on a problem or project in an attempt to solve it or make it better, often without considering alternative solutions or the actual effectiveness of the spending. It implies using money as a quick and possibly ineffective solution to address an issue, rather than considering other factors or approaches.
  • be at (one's) service The idiom "be at (one's) service" means to be ready or available to help or assist someone. It is usually used as a courteous way of offering one's assistance or cooperation to another person. It implies a willingness to meet someone's needs or fulfill their requests.
  • catch at a bad time The idiom "catch at a bad time" means that something happens or someone approaches you when you are in an inconvenient or unfavorable situation. It suggests that the timing of the occurrence or request is poor, often causing difficulty or frustration for the person being "caught."
  • on the firing line, at in the firing line The idiom "on the firing line" or "in the firing line" typically refers to being directly involved or exposed to criticism, blame, or danger. It originates from military terminology, indicating being positioned in the line of fire during combat. In a figurative sense, it means being in a vulnerable or high-pressure situation where one is likely to face scrutiny or negative consequences.
  • be/feel sick at heart The idiom "be/feel sick at heart" means to feel deeply distressed, saddened, or disheartened about something. It expresses a heavy emotional burden or a sense of profound disappointment or despair in a particular situation.
  • if at first you don't succeed, try, try again The idiom "if at first you don't succeed, try, try again" means to persist and keep trying even if you are initially unsuccessful. It emphasizes the importance of perseverance and determination in overcoming challenges and achieving success.
  • steal a glance at sm or sth The idiom "steal a glance at someone or something" means to look at someone or something quickly and discreetly, usually without being noticed or drawing attention. It implies taking a quick, furtive glimpse without others being aware of it.
  • revolted at sm or sth The idiom "revolted at someone or something" means to feel a strong feeling of disgust, repulsion, or aversion towards someone or something. It implies a sense of intense displeasure or feeling of revolt against a particular person or thing.
  • be playing at sth The idiom "be playing at something" typically means to be engaging in a particular activity half-heartedly or without serious intent. It suggests that the person is not fully committed or dedicated to what they are doing and may just be going through the motions.
  • at the last count The definition of the idiom "at the last count" is to refer to the most recent and accurate number or total known. It implies that the information or data being discussed might change or be updated in the future.
  • have (something) at heart The idiom "have (something) at heart" means to deeply care about or be deeply concerned about something or someone. It implies that the person values or prioritizes a particular thing or person and is genuinely invested in their well-being or success.
  • be at a disadvantage The idiom "be at a disadvantage" refers to being in a position or situation where one has less favorable circumstances or fewer advantages compared to someone else. It implies being in a less favorable position that may hinder one's chances of success or achieving desired outcomes.
  • at the push of a button The idiom "at the push of a button" means that something can be done or achieved effortlessly or instantly, typically through the simple act of pressing a button or activating a control mechanism. It implies convenience, ease, or instantaneous response to a specific action.
  • have at one's fingertips The idiom "have at one's fingertips" means to have thorough knowledge or easy access to something. It refers to being fully acquainted or familiar with information or resources and being able to retrieve or utilize them quickly and effortlessly.
  • first crack at The idiom "first crack at" refers to being given the initial opportunity or chance to do or attempt something before anyone else. It implies being the first in line or having the first turn at trying or accomplishing a particular task or activity.
  • Look (at) what the cat dragged in! The idiom "Look (at) what the cat dragged in!" refers to the act of expressing surprise or disapproval upon seeing someone or something unexpected or unwelcome. It typically conveys the sentiment that the person or thing in question is undesirable or of low quality.
  • tug at heartstrings The idiom "tug at heartstrings" is used to describe something that evokes deep emotions, sympathy, or touches one's feelings deeply. It refers to a strong and powerful emotional response that can elicit empathy or sadness.
  • there is always room at the top The idiom "there is always room at the top" means that there is always an opportunity or space for people to achieve success or become leaders in their field, indicating that one can always strive to reach the highest level or position. It implies that with determination, hard work, and skill, individuals can continually progress and excel, as there is no limit to success or advancement.
  • (out from) under your nose, at (from) under your nose The idiom "(out from) under your nose, at (from) under your nose" means something that is happening or someone is doing something right in front of you, yet you remain unaware or oblivious to it. It refers to something unanticipated or hidden in plain sight that surprises or shocks you when you finally notice it.
  • at a tender age The idiom "at a tender age" means at a young or delicate age, typically referring to someone who achieves or experiences something significant or challenging at a young stage of life. It can also imply vulnerability or immaturity due to youth.
  • at the top of the/sb's agenda The idiom "at the top of the/sb's agenda" refers to something that is of utmost importance or priority to an individual or a group. It indicates that a particular task, issue, or topic is the primary focus or goal that needs to be addressed or dealt with immediately.
  • get at someone The idiom "get at someone" means to criticize, annoy, or provoke someone intentionally in order to make them angry or upset. It often involves persistently targeting someone to provoke a reaction or to express disapproval.
  • chomp at the bit, at champ at the bit The idiom "chomp at the bit" or "champ at the bit" refers to someone who is impatiently eager to take action or get started on something. It originates from the behavior of a horse when it impatiently bites down on the bit (the metal mouthpiece of a bridle) while waiting to be released and allowed to run. The expression is used to describe individuals who are restless, anxious, or enthusiastic about initiating a task or achieving a goal.
  • keep sm or sth at a distance The idiom "keep someone or something at a distance" means to maintain a certain distance, either physical or emotional, from someone or something. It suggests a cautious or wary approach towards someone or something, often due to a lack of trust or the desire to avoid getting too involved. This idiom implies keeping a safe distance to protect oneself from potential harm or negative consequences.
  • warning bells start to ring/sound, at hear warning bells The idiom "warning bells start to ring/sound or hear warning bells" is used to describe a sense of caution or concern that arises when something potentially dangerous, risky, or problematic is observed or experienced. It implies that the person has noticed or become aware of possible red flags or signals indicating a potential problem or negative outcome. It serves as a metaphorical warning sign that urges one to pay attention, be cautious, and take necessary precautions.
  • go at it hammer and tongs The idiom "go at it hammer and tongs" means to engage in a vigorous, intense, or forceful manner. It can describe a situation where people or parties are involved in a heated argument, intense competition, or vigorous physical activity. It suggests a pursuit with great energy, enthusiasm, and determination.
  • put the bite on sb, at put the squeeze on sb The idiom "put the bite on someone" or "put the squeeze on someone" means to pressure or extort someone, especially for money or favors. It refers to the act of trying to extract something from someone, often forcefully or with a sense of urgency.
  • drop beneath the/sb's radar, at fall off/drop off the radar To "drop beneath the/sb's radar" or "fall off/drop off the radar" is an idiomatic expression that means to go unnoticed or to be forgotten or neglected by someone or a group of people. It refers to the action of something or someone being overlooked or not receiving attention or recognition. It originates from the concept of a radar system that fails to detect an object or aircraft moving at a low altitude and thus disappears from the radar's range. In a figurative sense, it implies that the mentioned individual or thing has become inconspicuous or has lost importance or relevance.
  • put sb's mind at ease The idiom "put someone's mind at ease" means to reassure or calm someone, alleviating their doubts, worries, or concerns about a particular issue or situation. It suggests providing comfort and peace of mind to someone who may be anxious or troubled.
  • at one's discretion The idiom "at one's discretion" means that someone has the freedom or authority to make a decision or choice based on their own judgment or preference. It implies that the decision is entirely up to that person and they have the autonomy to exercise their own discretion in the matter.
  • at (something's) lowest ebb The idiom "at (something's) lowest ebb" means being at the lowest point or level of something, typically referring to a difficult or challenging situation, a person's state of mind, or the nadir of a particular circumstance. It implies being at the bottom or in the worst condition related to a specific aspect.
  • at someone's earliest convenience The idiom "at someone's earliest convenience" means as soon as someone is able to do something, whenever it is most convenient for them. It implies that there is no specific time or urgency but rather a request to complete or address something whenever it is suitable for the person being referred to.
  • take someone at his (or her) word To take someone at their word means to believe and trust what someone says without questioning or doubting their honesty. It implies accepting their statement without requiring evidence or further verification.
  • carp at (one) To "carp at (one)" means to continually complain or find fault with someone, often in a nagging or critical manner. It implies a tendency to constantly criticize and nitpick, focusing on minor mistakes or shortcomings in the person's actions or behavior.
  • arrive at sth The idiom "arrive at something" means to reach a decision, conclusion, or understanding after careful thought, consideration, or evaluation. It implies the process of arriving at a specific result or outcome through a logical or systematic approach.
  • at your mother's knee The idiom "at your mother's knee" refers to the experience of being taught or learning something from one's mother, often during early childhood. It implies a close and nurturing relationship between a mother and her child, where the child receives guidance, wisdom, and instruction in various aspects of life.
  • to look at somebody/something The idiom "to look at somebody/something" refers to the act of directing one's gaze or attention towards a particular person or thing. It can imply analyzing, observing, or studying someone or something closely.
  • have a method to your madness, at have method in your madness The idiom "have a method to your madness", or "have method in your madness", means that although someone's actions or behavior may initially appear odd, chaotic, or irrational, there is actually a logical or strategic approach behind it. It suggests that the person is intentionally and intelligently pursuing their goals, even if their methods seem unconventional or questionable.
  • nothing to sneeze at The idiom "nothing to sneeze at" means that something is significant, important, or impressive, contrary to a dismissive or casual attitude towards it. It suggests that the thing in question deserves attention, respect, or consideration.
  • be as one, at be at one The idiom "be as one" or "be at one" refers to a state of unity or harmony between individuals or groups. It implies a seamless agreement, understanding, or synchronization in thoughts, feelings, or actions. It suggests a sense of alignment and cooperation in order to achieve a common goal or to establish a strong bond between individuals.
  • not to be sneezed/sniffed at The idiom "not to be sneezed/sniffed at" means that something should not be dismissed or overlooked because it is actually valuable, important, or impressive. It implies that the thing being referred to deserves serious consideration or attention, even though it may not appear to be exceptional at first glance.
  • not to be sniffed at The idiom "not to be sniffed at" means that something should not be dismissed or disregarded, as it has value or significance even if it may not seem excessively impressive or important at first glance. It suggests that the matter being referred to deserves attention or consideration.
  • at short notice The idiom "at short notice" refers to something that is arranged or notified with very little time in advance or preparation. It typically implies a sudden or unexpected requirement to respond or act quickly.
  • have a crack at (something) The idiom "have a crack at (something)" means to attempt or try something, often a task or challenge. It implies giving it a go or taking a shot at something, even if success is not guaranteed.
  • teethgnashing, at gnashing of teeth The idiom "teeth gnashing, at gnashing of teeth" refers to an act of extreme frustration, anger, or distress, typically characterized by grinding or clenching one's teeth together. It implies a state of deep displeasure or vexation where a person feels angered or exasperated to the point of physically expressing their emotions through grinding or gnashing of their teeth.
  • be asleep at the switch The idiom "be asleep at the switch" means to be unaware, negligent, or remiss in performing one's duties or responsibilities. It refers to a person who fails to take action or remain alert in a critical situation, often resulting in negative consequences or missed opportunities.
  • be at odds with sth The idiom "be at odds with something" means to disagree or have a conflict or difference of opinion or belief with someone or something. It signifies a state of being in opposition or disagreement, often leading to tension or a lack of harmony.
  • maintain sth at sth The idiom "maintain something at something" means to keep something at a particular level or condition, typically through constant effort or attention. It implies the act of ensuring that something remains within a specific state or range.
  • at the last minute "At the last minute" is an idiom that means doing something or making a decision very close to the deadline or just before a scheduled time. It implies acting or finalizing something in a hurried or hurriedly manner, often resulting in added pressure or lack of thorough preparation.
  • whip sth/sb into shape, at knock/lick sth/sb into shape The idiom "whip something/someone into shape" or "knock/lick something/someone into shape" means to improve or organize something or someone, usually through strict discipline, training, or effort. It implies the act of transforming or molding someone or something to be more orderly, efficient, or effective.
  • at expense The idiom "at expense" typically refers to taking up the financial burden or cost of something. It commonly implies that one individual or entity bears the cost, often to benefit or accommodate another person or group.
  • at/behind the wheel The idiom "at/behind the wheel" refers to being in control of a vehicle as a driver. It is often used figuratively to indicate being in control or in a position of authority or responsibility in any given situation.
  • Have at it. The definition of the idiom "Have at it" is to encourage or give permission to someone to begin or start doing something, usually with enthusiasm or vigor. It is often used to indicate that there are no restrictions, limitations, or obstacles in pursuing a task or activity.
  • (as) clean as a whistle, at (as) clean as a (new) pin The idiom "(as) clean as a whistle" means very clean or completely devoid of any dirt, mess, or imperfections. Similarly, the idiom "(as) clean as a (new) pin" also refers to something that is impeccably clean, neat, or tidy. Both idioms convey a sense of a high level of cleanliness and neatness.
  • to hand, at on hand The idiom "to hand" or "at hand" means to be readily available or easily accessible. It implies that something is physically nearby and can be reached or used without difficulty.
  • have not heard the half of it, at not know the half of it The idiom "have not heard the half of it" or "not know the half of it" implies that the information or story one has heard is incomplete or only a fraction of the truth. It suggests that there is much more to the situation or story that the person is unaware of.
  • look askance at sm or sth The idiom "look askance at someone or something" means to view or regard someone or something with suspicion, doubt, or disapproval. It suggests a skeptical or wary attitude towards the person or thing being observed.
  • slip through the cracks, at slip through the net The idiom "slip through the cracks" or "slip through the net" refers to a situation where someone or something is overlooked, unnoticed, or not given adequate attention or supervision. It implies that a person or thing is able to avoid detection or escape from the normal or expected processes, systems, or safeguards in place.
  • keep at bay The definition of the idiom "keep at bay" is to keep someone or something at a distance or under control, usually in order to prevent harm or danger.
  • at a stretch The idiom "at a stretch" means doing something continuously, without a break or pause, for an extended period of time. It suggests performing a task or activity without interruption or rest, often requiring extended effort or endurance.
  • fight back (at sm or sth) The idiom "fight back (at someone or something)" means to resist or retaliate against someone or something that is causing harm or adversity. It implies standing up for oneself or taking action to defend against an attack or criticism.
  • the betting is, at what's the betting? The idiom "the betting is, at what's the betting?" refers to a situation where a speculative guess or prediction is being made about the outcome of something. It is often used to express uncertainty while asking for opinions or guesses from others.
  • new pastures, at greener pastures The idiom "new pastures, at greener pastures" means moving on to a different opportunity or situation that is perceived to be better or more favorable than the current one. It refers to the desire for a fresh start or a change in circumstances that promises greater benefits or advantages.
  • chew (away) at (something) The idiom "chew (away) at (something)" means to persistently or anxiously work on or engage with something, usually in a determined or relentless manner. It often implies that the task or problem is difficult or challenging, requiring continuous effort and focus. It can also convey a sense of frustration or impatience.
  • be at the bottom of sth The idiom "be at the bottom of sth" typically refers to being the root cause or underlying factor behind a particular situation or problem. It suggests that something or someone is the source or origin of a particular issue or occurrence.
  • be at home The idiom "be at home" typically means to feel comfortable or familiar in a certain place or situation, to be in one's element, or to have a sense of belonging. This phrase implies that a person feels relaxed, at ease, or confident in a particular environment.
  • at someone's doorstep The idiom "at someone's doorstep" refers to something happening in close proximity or directly affecting a particular person or entity. It implies that the responsibility or consequence falls upon them or is within their control.
  • poke fun at sm or sth The idiom "poke fun at someone or something" means to mock, tease, or make lighthearted jokes about a person or something in a playful or humorous way. It involves lightly teasing or joking with the intention of not offending or harming the subject but rather having fun or amusing others.
  • keep at arm's length from When you keep someone or something at arm's length, it means you maintain a cautious or distant relationship with them. It implies keeping a safe and careful distance, both physically and emotionally, to avoid getting too close, involved, or affected by someone or something.
  • just another day at the office "Just another day at the office" is an idiom used to describe a situation or task that is routine, mundane, or unremarkable. It implies that the described experience or occurrence is ordinary and does not deviate from the norm or the person's usual routine. This phrase is often used in a sarcastic or lighthearted manner to convey that an event or situation was uneventful or predictable.
  • near at hand The idiom "near at hand" means that something is close by or easily accessible. It refers to something being in proximity or within reach.
  • at worst The idiom "at worst" refers to a situation or outcome that is the most negative or extreme possibility within a given context.
  • clutch at (someone or something) The idiom "clutch at (someone or something)" refers to a desperate or frantic attempt to grab or hold onto someone or something tightly. It suggests a strong desire to gain control, support, or stability in a chaotic or uncertain situation.
  • take somebody/something at face value The idiom "take somebody/something at face value" means to accept someone or something as it appears, without questioning or doubting its authenticity, sincerity, or truthfulness. It implies taking things at their initial impression or without deeper analysis or skepticism.
  • concentrate at (some place) The idiom "concentrate at (some place)" typically means to focus one's attention, energy, or efforts intensively in a specific location or area. It suggests the act of giving undivided attention or directing all resources towards a particular place for optimal productivity or effectiveness.
  • take each day as it comes/take it one day at a time The idiom "take each day as it comes" or "take it one day at a time" means to focus on the present moment or immediate situation without worrying too much about the future. It implies dealing with life's challenges, tasks, or problems gradually and as they occur, rather than overwhelming oneself by thinking too far ahead. This idiom suggests being flexible and adaptable in facing each day without getting anxious or consumed with long-term concerns.
  • frown at someone or something The idiom "frown at someone or something" means to express disapproval or disfavor towards someone or something, typically by furrowing one's eyebrows and curling down the corners of the mouth in a displeased or displeasing manner. It can indicate a negative reaction or a sign of disapprobation towards a person, action, or situation.
  • be in at the kill The idiom "be in at the kill" refers to being present or participating in the final and decisive stage or outcome of a situation, typically a victory, triumph, or success. It often implies being involved or witnessing the culmination of an event, especially one that involves achievement or an important result. This phrase is commonly used in contexts related to competition, hunting, battles, or any situation where there is a definitive conclusion or outcome.
  • not say boo to a goose, at not say boo The idiom "not say boo to a goose, at not say boo" means to be extremely shy, timid, or quiet, to the point of being unable to speak up or assert oneself in a situation. It implies a lack of confidence or a reluctance to speak or voice one's opinion.
  • at an unearthly/ungodly hour The idiom "at an unearthly/ungodly hour" refers to a time that is excessively early or late, typically outside the normal or socially acceptable hours of operation. It implies a very inconvenient or inconvenient time, often suggesting a lack of sleep, disturbance, or disruption of one's regular routine.
  • set (one's) heart at rest The idiom "set one's heart at rest" means to alleviate or calm one's worries or anxieties. It implies finding peace of mind or reassurance in a certain situation, allowing a person to feel more at ease and free from concerns or stress.
  • not by any means, at by no means The idiom "not by any means, and by no means" is used to emphasize that something is absolutely not possible or allowed under any circumstances. It indicates that there is no way or method to achieve a particular outcome, or that something is completely prohibited or unthinkable.
  • keep sth at bay The idiom "keep something at bay" means to prevent or hold off something undesirable or harmful from happening or approaching. It refers to keeping a threat, danger, or problem under control or at a safe distance.
  • be gimleteyed, at have gimlet eyes The idiom "be gimlet-eyed" or "have gimlet eyes" refers to someone who has a piercing and intense gaze or stare. It suggests that the person's eyes are extremely sharp, focused, and penetrating, as if they are capable of drilling holes or piercing through obstacles. This expression often implies a sense of alertness, keen observation, and an ability to scrutinize and see the truth or hidden aspects of a situation.
  • try one's hand at The idiom "try one's hand at" means to attempt or try to do something new or unfamiliar, usually referring to a particular skill, activity, or task. It implies giving it a go, experimenting, or testing oneself in that area.
  • beat sb at their own game The idiom "beat someone at their own game" means to outperform or outmaneuver someone using their own strategies or methods. It implies being more skilled or successful in a specific area than the person who is typically considered the expert or originator in that field.
  • handbags at ten paces The idiom "handbags at ten paces" refers to a situation where two individuals, typically women, engage in a heated or aggressive confrontation, usually verbal rather than physical. The phrase draws an image of the individuals standing ten paces (a distance of about 30 feet) apart, ready to engage in a dispute, with their handbags symbolically serving as weapons instead of guns.
  • at the expense of someone or something The idiom "at the expense of someone or something" means achieving or gaining something, but at the cost or harm of someone or something else. It refers to the idea that one person or thing is benefiting or profiting at the detriment of another.
  • gripe at sm The idiom "gripe at someone" means to complain or express dissatisfaction towards someone, typically in a nagging or critical manner. It implies repeatedly finding fault or fault-finding behavior towards the person being griped at.
  • throw oneself at the mercy of some authority The definition of the idiom "throw oneself at the mercy of some authority" means to submit oneself completely to the discretion and judgment of a person or organization in a desperate plea for leniency or forgiveness. It implies relinquishing control and relying on the mercy or compassion of the authority figure.
  • have a lash at (something) The idiom "have a lash at (something)" means to attempt or try one's hand at something, often without being particularly skilled or experienced in it. It implies giving something a try, even if success is uncertain or unlikely. The phrase suggests taking a shot or making an effort, even if there are doubts about the outcome.
  • call at (some place) The idiom "call at (some place)" typically means to visit or stop by a specific location, often for a short period of time. It can be used to refer to visiting a person's house, office, or any other designated place. This idiom suggests making a brief visit or stopping by for a specific purpose or to accomplish a particular task.
  • cut off at the pass The idiom "cut off at the pass" means to prevent someone from reaching their intended destination or accomplishing their goal by taking action in advance, intervening effectively, or thwarting their progress. It derives from the imagery of cutting off someone's route or path before they can get any further.
  • a/one step at a time The idiom "a/one step at a time" means to proceed gradually and cautiously, taking each step or task separately and in sequence. It emphasizes the importance of patience, perseverance, and not rushing through things. It implies focusing on the process rather than worrying about the end result, implying that success can be achieved by breaking down complex tasks into manageable parts.
  • burn the candle at both the ends The idiom "burn the candle at both ends" means to work excessively hard or live a lifestyle that is both physically and mentally draining and exhausting. It refers to a person who is pushing themselves to their limits by overcommitting and exerting themselves in multiple directions simultaneously, leaving little time for rest or relaxation.
  • get at something The idiom "get at something" means to make progress or find a solution to a problem, typically through persistent effort, investigation, or inquiry. It refers to the act of attempting to reach or attain something, often by overcoming obstacles or challenges.
  • at a/the crossroads The idiom "at a/the crossroads" typically refers to a critical point or decisive moment in one's life or a significant turning point in a particular situation. It implies that one or a group of individuals are faced with a choice, dilemma, or important decision that will significantly impact their future direction or outcome. It suggests being at a crucial junction where one must make a difficult choice or take a new path.
  • be at the end of (one's) tether The idiom "be at the end of one's tether" means to be completely exhausted, frustrated, or overwhelmed with a situation or problem. It refers to the feeling of having reached the limit of one's patience, energy, or resources, and being unable to cope any longer.
  • at (one's) doorstep The idiom "at (one's) doorstep" means that something or someone is very close or imminent, usually referring to a problem, threat, or opportunity that is directly affecting or confronting someone. It implies that the issue is so near that it is right outside their door or about to enter their life.
  • gasp at someone or something The idiom "gasp at someone or something" means to react with shock, surprise, or astonishment towards a person or something. It typically involves an audible inhalation of breath (a gasp) as a response to the unexpected or extraordinary nature of what has been seen or heard.
  • bite (one's) thumb at The idiom "bite (one's) thumb at" is rooted in an old gesture that expressed insulting or offensive contempt towards someone. It originates from William Shakespeare's play, Romeo and Juliet, where biting one's thumb at someone was a provocative gesture. Today, the idiom means to show disdain, disrespect, or defiance towards someone.
  • not any longer, at no longer The idiom "not any longer" or "at no longer" means that a previous situation or condition has ceased to exist or continue. It indicates that something that used to be true or happening, is now no longer the case. It implies a change or cessation of the mentioned activity, state, or event.
  • gaze at (one's) navel The idiom "gaze at (one's) navel" refers to being excessively self-absorbed or self-centered, often to the point of introspection or self-obsession. It implies an intense focus on one's own thoughts, feelings, or personal concerns while disregarding or neglecting the larger world or the needs of others.
  • keep at arm’s length The idiom "keep at arm's length" means to maintain a safe or cautious distance from someone or something, typically due to suspicion, distrust, or dislike.
  • by the numbers, at by numbers The idiom "by the numbers" or "at by numbers" refers to following a set of rules or instructions precisely and in a methodical manner, without any creativity or originality. It suggests a strict adherence to a predetermined and predictable process, often implying a lack of innovation or imagination.
  • play at (doing something) The idiom "play at (doing something)" refers to engaging in an activity or attempting something without truly committing to it or taking it seriously. It implies a superficial or casual involvement without genuine effort or dedication.
  • put someone or something at someone's disposal The idiom "put someone or something at someone's disposal" means to make someone or something available or ready to be used by someone. It suggests that the person or thing is being placed under the control or availability of another person for their convenience or use.
  • goggle at sm or sth The idiom "goggle at someone or something" means to stare or gaze at someone or something with curiosity, astonishment, or amazement. It often implies staring with wide-open eyes and an open mouth, as if in disbelief or shock.
  • see the light (at the end of the tunnel) The idiom "see the light (at the end of the tunnel)" refers to perceiving or experiencing a positive outcome or solution after enduring a difficult or challenging period. It implies that there is hope, relief, or success approaching after a long ordeal or struggle.
  • get into hot water, at be in hot water The idiom "get into hot water" or "be in hot water" means to be in trouble or facing a difficult or dangerous situation due to one's actions, decisions, or behavior. It suggests a state of being involved in trouble or facing consequences.
  • be (as) plain as a pikestaff, at be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as a pikestaff" or "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" means to be clearly evident or obvious. The phrase compares something's clarity to the simplicity and conspicuousness of a pikestaff or one's own nose on their face. It implies that there is no need for further explanation or analysis as the truth or fact is apparent to everyone.
  • blink at sth The idiom "blink at something" means to ignore or disregard something, especially something that is controversial or objectionable. It implies turning a blind eye or not reacting to something that would normally warrant a response or attention.
  • quick as a flash, at in a flash The idiom "quick as a flash" or "in a flash" means to do something very quickly or rapidly. It implies that an action or event occurs with great speed, without any delay.
  • one after the other, at one after another The idiom "one after the other" or "at one after another" means in a sequence, one thing happening immediately or continuously after another without any interruption or delay. It refers to a consecutive series of events or actions taking place in quick succession.
  • at the outside The idiom "at the outside" means the maximum or outer limit of something. It is often used to convey the maximum amount of time, quantity, or estimation that something could take or be.
  • put in a hard day at work The idiom "put in a hard day at work" means to work diligently and exert a lot of effort or energy throughout the day. It implies that one has worked intensely, faced challenges, and possibly endured physical or mental exhaustion while fulfilling their job responsibilities.
  • pissed off at someone/something The idiom "pissed off at someone/something" means to be extremely angry, annoyed, or irritated with someone or something. It suggests a strong negative emotional response towards an individual or a situation that has caused frustration or dissatisfaction.
  • gawk at sm or sth The idiom "gawk at someone or something" means to stare at someone or something in a rude, curious, or inattentive manner. It implies a sense of fascination, surprise, or disbelief, often without any attempt to conceal the staring or show proper manners.
  • wait on table(s), at wait at table(s) The idiom "wait on table(s)" or "wait at table(s)" refers to the act of serving food and beverages to customers at a restaurant or a similar establishment. It specifically denotes the role and responsibility of a server who is in charge of taking orders, bringing food to the table, refilling drinks, and attending to other needs of the diners.
  • at the top of the hour The idiom "at the top of the hour" refers to the exact hour, specifically when the minute hand of a clock points to 12. It is commonly used to indicate the starting time of an event, broadcast, or any activity scheduled to begin precisely at the beginning of a new hour.
  • be at/on the receiving end The idiom "be at/on the receiving end" means to be the person who is experiencing or receiving the negative or unpleasant effects of something, often as a result of someone else's action or behavior. It denotes being in a vulnerable or disadvantaged position in a given situation.
  • put the brakes on, at put a brake on The idiom "put the brakes on" or "put a brake on" means to slow down or stop something, usually a process, activity, or plan. It refers to taking measures to control or limit the speed, progress, or enthusiasm of something. Just like brakes help slow down or stop a moving vehicle, this idiom implies taking action to reduce the momentum or prevent something from advancing further.
  • what sb is driving at The idiom "what sb is driving at" refers to understanding or figuring out the main point or purpose of what someone is saying or implying. It is often used when someone's message or intention is not explicitly stated and requires careful interpretation or deducing.
  • be on/at the receiving end The idiom "be on/at the receiving end" means to be the person who is experiencing or suffering the effects of someone else's actions or behavior. It implies being in a vulnerable or disadvantaged position, typically when faced with criticism, blame, or aggression.
  • bay at something The idiom "bay at something" means to howl, bark, or make loud and persistent vocalization in response to a threat or in expression of frustration or annoyance. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone vehemently expressing their displeasure, protest, or frustration about a situation or person.
  • at your elbow The idiom "at your elbow" refers to someone or something that is in close proximity or readily available to assist, support, or provide guidance to an individual. It implies having someone or something nearby to offer immediate help or advice whenever needed.
  • froth at the mouth The idiom "froth at the mouth" means to be extremely angry, excited, or agitated. It refers to the physical manifestation of excessive emotion resembling froth coming out of a person's mouth, usually associated with rabid animals.
  • at all hours The idiom "at all hours" refers to frequently or regularly, without regard for the time of day, often implying that something occurs during late or unusual hours.
  • be at the mercy of (something) The idiom "be at the mercy of (something)" means to be in a situation where one has no control or power and is completely vulnerable or dependent on another person, thing, or circumstance. It implies being helpless or subjected to the will or control of others.
  • balk at the idea (of something) The idiom "balk at the idea (of something)" means to hesitate, object to, or refuse to accept or consider a particular idea or proposal. It suggests that someone is resistant, reluctant, or unwilling to go along with or support a certain suggestion or plan.
  • have a shy at (something) The idiom "have a shy at (something)" means to make an attempt at doing something, to have a go or try your hand at something. It implies giving it a try, even if you may not have much expertise or confidence in succeeding.
  • at opposite poles The idiom "at opposite poles" refers to two things or people that are completely opposite or contradictory in nature or opinions. It signifies a significant difference or contrast between two entities, indicating they are positioned at the extreme ends of a spectrum or mindset.
  • take a crack at (doing) something To "take a crack at (doing) something" means to attempt or try something, often implying that it is a difficult task or challenge. It suggests that the person is willing to give it a shot, despite potential uncertainty or lack of expertise.
  • go at each other tooth and nail The idiom "go at each other tooth and nail" means to engage in a fierce or intense conflict or confrontation, often using all available means to gain an advantage or achieve victory. In this context, "tooth and nail" signifies a willingness to fight fiercely, using both teeth and nails as weapons, to defend oneself or to attack vigorously.
  • peep out (of sth) (at sm or sth) The idiom "peep out (of sth) (at sm or sth)" means to cautiously or briefly emerge or appear from a hidden or concealed place in order to observe someone or something. It implies a hidden or secretive observation.
  • carp at someone (about someone or something) The idiom "carp at someone (about someone or something)" means to constantly criticize, complain, or find fault with someone or something, often in a nagging or petty manner. It implies a persistent and nitpicking nature of criticism.
  • go at (something) The idiom "go at (something)" typically means to attack or confront a task, problem, or challenge with determination, enthusiasm, or vigor. It implies giving full effort, actively engaging, and persistently working in order to achieve the desired goal.
  • at intervals The idiom "at intervals" refers to something that happens or occurs repeatedly but with periods of time in between. It implies a pattern or frequency with breaks or pauses in between.
  • make good (at sth) The idiom "make good (at sth)" means to become successful or proficient in a particular activity, skill, or endeavor. It refers to the act of demonstrating competence, improvement, or achievements in a specific area.
  • (at) full steam The idiom "(at) full steam" means to work or operate with maximum effort, energy, or intensity; to do something at the highest level of productivity, performance, or speed. It is often used to describe someone or something that is operating or functioning at its peak capacity or efficiency.
  • turn nose up at The idiom "turn nose up at" means to show contempt, disdain, or disapproval towards something or someone. It implies snobbish or haughty behavior, often indicating a refusal or rejection of something perceived as inferior or unworthy.
  • gnaw (away) at someone or something The idiom "gnaw (away) at someone or something" means to persistently and gradually eat away, erode, or consume someone's thoughts, emotions, or well-being. It expresses the idea of a persistent, nagging feeling or worry that continues to bother or trouble someone over time.
  • hit your stride, at get into your stride The idiom "hit your stride" or "get into your stride" refers to finding your rhythm or reaching a state where you become comfortable and confident in what you are doing. It's the moment when you start performing at your best, effortlessly and with ease.
  • at swords' points The idiom "at swords' points" means to be in a state of conflict or intense disagreement, often referring to two parties who are engaged in heated arguments or conflicts. It describes a situation where two individuals or groups are at odds and ready to fight or argue fiercely. The phrase derives from the image of two people standing face to face and pointing their swords towards each other in preparation for combat.
  • strike a blow against/at sth The idiom "strike a blow against/at something" means to take action or make an effort to weaken or undermine something, usually an oppressive system, injustice, or a negative situation. It signifies fighting or standing up against a particular issue or cause, aiming to make a difference or create a change.
  • hiss at someone or something The idiom "hiss at someone or something" means to express disapproval, anger, or scorn towards someone or something by making a hissing sound. It is often used to convey strong disapproval or to show one's dislike or anger towards a person or an action.
  • an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, at prevention is better than cure The idiom "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" means that it is more effective and efficient to take precautions and prevent problems from happening, rather than trying to fix or resolve them after they have occurred. It emphasizes the idea that investing a small amount of effort or resources in advance can save a significant amount of effort or resources in the future. Another common related saying is "prevention is better than cure," which conveys the same meaning.
  • keep at it The idiom "keep at it" means to persistently continue doing something, often in the face of challenges, difficulties, or setbacks, without giving up or losing focus. It emphasizes the importance of maintaining determination, perseverance, and commitment to achieving a particular goal or completing a task.
  • snatch at sm or sth The idiom "snatch at" means to eagerly or hastily grasp or seize someone or something. It conveys the idea of taking hold of an opportunity or object quickly, often with a sense of urgency or desperation.
  • at (the) worst The definition of the idiom "at (the) worst" is when a particular situation is considered to be in its most negative or unfavorable state or condition. It refers to the extreme or lowest point of a situation.
  • the shit flies, at (the) shit hits the fan The idiom "the shit flies, or when the shit hits the fan" is an expression used to describe a situation where problems or chaos arise suddenly and uncontrollably. It implies that a situation, often negative or unpleasant, has escalated to a point where it becomes unavoidable or difficult to handle.
  • Marry in haste, (and) repent at leisure. The idiom "Marry in haste, (and) repent at leisure" means that when someone rushes into a marriage without proper consideration or thought, they may come to regret their decision afterward when they have more time to reflect on the consequences or problems that arise in the relationship. It suggests that making impulsive decisions in important matters can lead to long-term regret or dissatisfaction.
  • not last five minutes, at not last long The idiom "not last five minutes" or "not last long" means that something or someone is unable to endure or survive for a significant amount of time. It implies that the person or thing in question is easily defeated, does not have the necessary qualities or strength to endure, or lacks the capability to survive or persist.
  • tug at your heartstrings The idiom "tug at your heartstrings" means to evoke strong emotions, particularly sympathy or sentimentality. It refers to something that deeply touches or affects one's emotions, often leading to a strong emotional response.
  • at close quarters The idiom "at close quarters" refers to being in close proximity or in a personal and intimate setting with someone or something. It often implies being in a close and immediate situation where one can closely observe or experience something or someone.
  • at close range The idiom "at close range" refers to a situation where something or someone is located or observed from a short distance, typically within a few feet or meters. It suggests being in close proximity or having a direct and intimate encounter or observation with the subject matter.
  • have sb on tape, at have sb taped The idiom "have sb on tape" or "have sb taped" typically means to have someone's actions, words, or behavior recorded on tape or a similar medium. It implies having evidence or proof of someone's actions or statements. This idiom can also refer to having obtained a secret recording of someone without their knowledge, potentially capturing incriminating or embarrassing information.
  • scream your head off, at scream yourself hoarse/silly The idiom "scream your head off" or "scream yourself hoarse/silly" means to yell, shout, or scream enthusiastically, passionately, and often for an extended period of time. It suggests that the person is expressing their emotions or opinions loudly and vehemently, possibly to the point of losing their voice or becoming exhausted.
  • try hand at The idiom "try hand at" means to attempt or give something a try, often referring to trying a new skill, activity, or task that one is not experienced or familiar with. It implies making an effort to engage in or learn something new.
  • tear at sm or sth The idiom "tear at someone or something" means to criticize, attack, or excessively question and challenge someone or something. It implies forcefully and aggressively expressing doubts or skepticism towards a person, idea, or a particular situation.
  • be joined at the hip The idiom "be joined at the hip" is commonly used to describe two people who are inseparable and always together, often implying a close or codependent relationship. It suggests that the individuals are closely connected, just like the hip joint that holds the thigh bone and pelvis together in the human body.
  • take a dig at someone The idiom "take a dig at someone" means to make a sarcastic or critical remark about someone in a teasing or mocking manner. It refers to intentionally saying something that may hurt or criticize someone indirectly.
  • sit at the feet of The idiom "sit at the feet of" refers to a metaphorical position of humble learning or seeking knowledge from someone more experienced, wise, or knowledgeable in a particular field. It implies a student or disciple figuratively sitting on the ground at the feet of their master or mentor, keen to absorb their teachings, wisdom, or guidance.
  • at short (or a moment's) notice The idiom "at short (or a moment's) notice" means to do something or be ready to do something with little or no advance warning or time to prepare. It refers to being available or able to act quickly when required, without much time for planning or preparation.
  • at peace with sth/yourself The idiom "at peace with something/yourself" means to be in a state of harmony, contentment, or acceptance with a particular situation, circumstance, or with one's own emotions, beliefs, or actions. It suggests a sense of inner tranquility, absence of conflict, and a feeling of being in alignment with oneself or the external world.
  • try sth on for size, at try sth for size The idiom "try something on for size" or "try something for size" means to test or evaluate something to see if it fits or suits one's needs or preferences. It is often used metaphorically to describe a process of trial or experimentation to determine the suitability or appropriateness of a particular option, idea, or course of action.
  • have/make a stab at sth/doing sth The idiom "have/make a stab at sth/doing sth" means to make an attempt at something, try something, or give it a try even if unsure of success. It suggests taking a chance or making an effort despite not having complete knowledge or confidence.
  • read sb's thoughts, at read sb's mind To "read someone's thoughts" or "read someone's mind" is an idiom used to suggest that you understand what someone is thinking or feeling without them having to express it verbally. It implies a deep level of understanding or intuition about another person's thoughts or emotions, as if you can perceive their innermost desires or intentions.
  • at a guess The idiom "at a guess" means to make an estimation or guess about something, usually without precise or detailed information. It is used when providing an answer or making a judgment based on limited knowledge or speculation.
  • be/go/keep on at somebody The idiom "be/go/keep on at somebody" means to persistently and repeatedly criticize, nag, or urge someone to do something. It expresses the idea of constantly pressuring or harping on someone about an issue or task.
  • take a shot at sth The idiom "take a shot at sth" means to try or attempt something, often when the outcome cannot be guaranteed or is uncertain. It implies taking a chance or giving it one's best effort despite the possibility of failure.
  • come at sm or sth The idiom "come at someone or something" can have different meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To approach someone or something with an aggressive or confrontational intent. Example: The angry dog came at me, barking and growling. 2. To attack or criticize someone or something verbally. Example: In the meeting, he came at me with all sorts of accusations. 3. To strive or make an effort to accomplish a goal or objective. Example: She is really determined to succeed; she always comes at her work with great enthusiasm. Overall, the idiom implies an action of approaching, attacking, or making an effort towards a person or thing, often with intensity or intention.
  • double or nothing, at double or quits The idiom "double or nothing, at double or quits" refers to a gambling or betting phrase where a person has the option to risk everything they have wagered in order to either double their winnings or lose it all. It signifies a high-stakes decision or situation in which one can either gain a significant advantage or endure a complete loss.
  • at risk to yourself/somebody/something The idiom "at risk to yourself/somebody/something" means putting oneself or someone/something in a situation where they are in danger or facing potential harm or negative consequences. It refers to the act of undertaking a risky action or being exposed to a risky situation without considering the potential negative outcomes.
  • hold at arm's length The idiom "hold at arm's length" means to keep someone or something at a distance, both physically and emotionally, in order to avoid being affected or influenced by them. It implies maintaining a level of detachment or caution towards someone or something.
  • kiss sb's ass, at kiss sb's arse The idiom "kiss someone's ass" or "kiss someone's arse" is a colloquial expression that means to excessively flatter or praise someone in order to gain favor, often in a subservient or insincere manner. It implies being overly obsequious or ingratiating towards another person to seek their approval, often at the expense of one's own dignity or integrity.
  • take a jab at someone To "take a jab at someone" means to make a teasing or mocking remark or to criticize someone in a light-hearted or playful manner. It typically involves making a quick and sarcastic comment intended to lightly provoke, annoy, or jest with someone, often done in a good-natured or humorous way.
  • point the finger at sm The idiom "point the finger at someone" means to blame or accuse someone for something, often without sufficient evidence or in a judgmental manner.
  • hold (one) at arm's length To hold someone at arm's length means to keep them at a distance, usually emotionally or socially. It implies maintaining a certain level of detachment or reluctance to fully engage with the person. It can also suggest being cautious or guarded in dealing with someone.
  • in the wrong place at the wrong time The idiom "in the wrong place at the wrong time" refers to a situation where someone is unfortunate enough to be present in a specific location or moment when something bad or undesirable occurs. It suggests that the individual's timing or positioning is unfortunate, causing them to experience an unfavorable outcome beyond their control.
  • be champing at the bit The idiom "be champing at the bit" means to be eagerly or impatiently waiting for an opportunity to take action or do something. It is derived from the behavior of horses who, when biting down on a metal bit, may show impatience or eagerness by repeatedly clenching their teeth or making chewing motions. In a figurative sense, someone who is champing at the bit is ready and eager to begin or participate in something.
  • thing you don't want is dear at any price The idiom "thing you don't want is dear at any price" means that something becomes undesirable or unappealing when its cost or consequences outweigh its benefits or value. In other words, even if something is offered or available at a low price, it is still not worth acquiring if it is not what you truly desire or need.
  • more than one can shake a stick at The idiom "more than one can shake a stick at" means an excessive or overwhelming amount of something, often used to convey the idea of a large number or variety that is challenging to count or manage. It implies that there are so many of a particular thing that it is impractical or impossible to handle or address them all.
  • at all events The idiom "at all events" means regardless of what happens, in any case, or in any event.
  • play at own game The idiom "play at own game" refers to the act of competing or engaging with someone on their own terms or using their own methods. It means to confront or challenge an opponent using the same strategies, tactics, or skills they possess, often in order to gain an advantage or demonstrate superiority.
  • be at each other's throats The idiom "be at each other's throats" means to be engaged in intense conflict or to be arguing fiercely with someone. It implies a state of hostility or aggression between two or more individuals.
  • turn away from sth, at turn your back on sth The idiom "turn away from something" or "turn your back on something" means to deliberately ignore, reject, or abandon something or someone. It signifies a deliberate act of disengagement or refusal to participate or acknowledge a situation, person, or opportunity.
  • know your onions, at know your stuff The idiom "know your onions" is an expression referring to someone who possesses a deep knowledge or expertise about a particular subject or field. It is often used to emphasize that someone is well-informed, experienced, or skilled in a specific area. The phrase "know your stuff" carries a similar meaning and is often used interchangeably with "know your onions." Both idioms suggest that the person has comprehensive knowledge and competence in their respective domain.
  • be a tissue of lies, at be a pack of lies The idiom "be a tissue of lies" or "be a pack of lies" refers to a statement, story, or information that is entirely false or made up. It implies that the content is full of falsehoods, fabrications, or deceit, making it completely unreliable or untrustworthy.
  • at the end of the line The idiom "at the end of the line" refers to being in a situation where all options or alternatives have been exhausted, leaving one with no further possibilities or prospects. It conveys the idea of being last in line in terms of options or opportunities, implying a sense of finality or defeat.
  • money for jam, at money for old rope The idiom "money for jam" (also known as "money for old rope") refers to a task or a job that requires very little effort but yields great financial gain or rewards. It implies that the task is so easy that it is comparable to getting paid for something as effortless as spreading jam on bread or selling old rope.
  • fling oneself at someone The idiom "fling oneself at someone" typically means to make a bold, impulsive, or unrestrained romantic or amorous advance towards someone, often with a sense of desperation or intensity. It suggests that one is actively and passionately pursuing another person, often without considering the potential consequences or reflecting on the appropriateness of their actions.
  • take a dig at The idiom "take a dig at" means to make a sarcastic or critical remark towards someone, usually in a playful or mocking manner. It is often used to tease or intentionally provoke someone.
  • in a good, bad, etc. state of repair, at in good, bad, etc. repair The idiom "in a good/bad/etc. state of repair" or "in good/bad/etc. repair" refers to the overall condition or quality of something, such as a building, machinery, or an object. It indicates whether it is well-maintained, functioning properly, and visually appealing or if it is poorly maintained, damaged, and in need of repair. It is used to describe the physical state or condition of something.
  • jump in at the deep end The idiom "jump in at the deep end" means to start or engage in something without prior experience or preparation, often in a risky or unfamiliar situation. It refers to taking on a challenging or difficult task head-on, without any caution or hesitancy.
  • If at first you don't succeed, (try, try, and try again). The idiom "If at first you don't succeed, (try, try, and try again)" is a popular phrase that encourages persistence and resilience in the face of failure. It means that if you fail to achieve something on your initial attempt, you should continue to keep trying repeatedly until you eventually succeed. It emphasizes the importance of perseverance and not giving up easily when faced with setbacks or obstacles.
  • in the last resort, at as a last resort The idiom "in the last resort" or "as a last resort" means when all other options or alternatives have been exhausted, or as a final attempt or solution. It refers to the course of action that is taken only when everything else has failed and there are no other choices left.
  • rail at sm (about sth) The idiom "rail at someone (about something)" means to angrily complain, criticize, or express strong disapproval towards someone or something.
  • make way for sth, at give way to sth The idiom "make way for something" or "give way to something" means to allow something or someone to succeed or take priority over others. It implies yielding or moving aside to clear a path for something or someone more significant.
  • connive at (something) The idiom "connive at (something)" means to silently or secretly agree to or allow an illegal, immoral, or unethical behavior or action to occur without actively participating in it. It implies a level of understanding or cooperation, often with the intention to deceive or evade responsibility.
  • at first glance/sight The idiom "at first glance/sight" means forming an initial impression or opinion based on a quick and superficial observation, often before further investigation or consideration. It refers to making a judgment or evaluation without taking into account all the details or deeper aspects of a situation or person.
  • at full/half throttle The idiom "at full/half throttle" refers to operating or performing at maximum (full) or moderate (half) speed or intensity. It is often used when describing the act of accelerating an engine or motor vehicle to its maximum or moderate power. It can also be used more broadly to describe any action, project, or endeavor conducted with great or moderate energy and effort.
  • swear at sm or sth The idiom "swear at someone or something" refers to the act of using offensive, vulgar, or profane language towards a person or thing in order to express anger, frustration, or disapproval. It implies verbally abusing or cursing at someone or something.
  • rolling in money, at be rolling in it The idiom "rolling in money" or "rolling in it" is used to describe someone who is extremely rich or has a large amount of wealth. It conveys the idea of someone being excessively affluent or having an abundance of material resources.
  • shoot questions at sb The idiom "shoot questions at someone" means to ask someone a rapid succession of many questions, often without allowing them sufficient time to answer each one before moving on to the next. It implies a barrage of inquiries, usually aimed at gathering information or seeking clarification on various topics or issues.
  • send sb round the twist, at be/go round the twist To "send someone round the twist" or "be/go round the twist" is an idiomatic expression that means to drive someone crazy, irritate them, or cause them to become mentally and emotionally disturbed or overwhelmed.
  • do sb/sth justice, at do justice to sb/sth To do someone or something justice, or to do justice to someone or something, means to portray or appreciate them in a way that accurately represents their true value, worth, skill, or beauty. It implies giving proper credit, recognition, or a fair depiction. It can also refer to performing something in a satisfactory or skillful manner.
  • not the thing to do, at not the done thing The idiom "not the thing to do, and not the done thing" refers to behavior or actions that are considered improper, inappropriate, or socially unacceptable in a given situation or context. It suggests something that goes against commonly accepted norms, conventions, or expectations.
  • tremble at sth The idiom "tremble at sth" means to feel intense fear, apprehension, or anxiety about something. It implies being extremely nervous or frightened by a particular situation, event, or outcome.
  • not be carved/etched in stone, at not be set/carved in stone The idiom "not be carved/etched in stone" or "not be set/carved in stone" means that a particular plan, idea, or decision is not fixed or final and can still be changed or altered. It implies flexibility and the possibility of modifications based on circumstances or new information.
  • at a pinch The idiom "at a pinch" refers to being able to manage or accomplish something with difficulty, using limited resources or under challenging circumstances. It suggests that a person is able to make do or find a solution in a challenging situation, albeit not ideally or without some difficulty.
  • appear at some time The idiom "appear at some time" means to become visible or present at a specific moment or occasion. It implies that something or someone was not initially present, but then suddenly becomes noticeable or available.
  • take at face value To take something at face value means to accept it as true or genuine without questioning or analyzing it further. It refers to accepting something based solely on its outward appearance or initial impression, without considering any underlying meanings or motives.
  • bark at sm The idiom "bark at sm" refers to someone angrily criticizing or berating someone else, often in a loud and aggressive manner, similar to how a dog would bark at someone. It signifies expressing frustration or disapproval towards another person.
  • wolf at the door The idiom "wolf at the door" refers to a critical or desperate situation where someone is in immediate danger or facing a severe crisis, usually involving poverty or financial hardship. It implies that the person is struggling to meet their basic needs or is in imminent danger of losing their livelihood or resources.
  • be at the end of (one's) rope The idiom "be at the end of one's rope" means to have reached the limit of one's patience, endurance, or ability to cope with a situation. It signifies a state of extreme frustration or desperation, where someone feels as though they can no longer handle or tolerate the difficulties they are facing.
  • bits and bobs, at bits and pieces The idiom "bits and bobs" or "bits and pieces" refers to a collection of small, miscellaneous objects or things. It suggests a haphazard assortment of various unrelated items, often of little value or significance individually, but collectively forming a mix of different elements.
  • at your peril The idiom "at your peril" means that if someone does something, they do it with a high degree of risk or potential negative consequences. It implies that failing to take caution or heed warnings can lead to severe or harmful outcomes.
  • be wearing blinders, at be wearing blinkers The idiom "be wearing blinders" or "be wearing blinkers" refers to someone who is narrowly focused or ignoring certain aspects of a situation, usually due to personal biases, preferences, or preconceived notions. It implies that the individual is intentionally disregarding other perspectives or information that may be relevant or important.
  • cut quite a figure/dash, at cut a fine figure The idioms "cut quite a figure" or "cut a fine figure" both refer to someone's appearance or demeanor, usually indicating that they are appearing or presenting themselves in an impressive or stylish manner. It suggests that the person looks confident, attractive, and stands out in a positive way, often leaving a lasting impression on others.
  • when it rains, it pours, at it never rains but it pours The idiom "when it rains, it pours" or "it never rains but it pours" refers to a situation where multiple unfortunate or difficult events occur consecutively or simultaneously. It implies that when something challenging or negative happens, it is often followed by a series of additional difficulties or setbacks, creating a cascade of problems.
  • (all) at sea (about something) The idiom "(all) at sea (about something)" means to be completely confused, uncertain, or bewildered about something. It implies a state of being lost or adrift, like a ship in the open sea without any sense of direction or purpose.
  • be hard at it The idiom "be hard at it" means to be fully engaged or occupied with a task or activity, often implying that the person is working diligently or intensely.
  • talk at sm The idiom "talk at someone" refers to the act of speaking to someone without genuinely engaging in a conversation or considering their perspective. It implies that the person speaking is only interested in conveying their own thoughts or opinions, disregarding any input or response from the other party. It typically indicates a one-sided and unproductive form of communication.
  • be where it's at The idiom "be where it's at" typically means to be in a place or situation that is currently trendy, exciting, or popular. It refers to being at the center of activity or in the most desirable location. It can also imply being knowledgeable about a subject or having access to something that is highly sought after.
  • clutch at a straw The idiom "clutch at a straw" is used to describe a desperate or last-ditch attempt to find hope or a solution in a desperate situation. It refers to the action of grabbing or clutching onto a straw (a thin, flimsy material) in the hope of it providing support or salvation, even though it is unlikely to be of any real help. It implies that someone is willing to try anything, no matter how unlikely or futile, when faced with a challenging or desperate situation.
  • fire away (at sm) The idiom "fire away (at sm)" means to ask questions or make inquiries, often in a rapid or aggressive manner, directed at someone. It suggests giving someone permission or encouragement to start asking their questions or expressing their thoughts freely.
  • at the expense of sth The idiom "at the expense of something" refers to achieving or benefiting from something, but at the cost or detriment of something else. It typically indicates that one thing is gained or prioritized, while another thing is sacrificed or neglected.
  • keep (someone or something) at bay The idiom "keep (someone or something) at bay" means to maintain a certain distance or prevent someone or something from coming too close or causing harm or trouble. It suggests keeping someone or something under control or at a distance by remaining vigilant or taking necessary actions.
  • take one (thing) at a time The idiom "take one (thing) at a time" means to focus on or deal with a single task or issue without getting overwhelmed by the larger picture or multiple tasks at once. It emphasizes the importance of proceeding in a step-by-step manner and not trying to handle everything simultaneously.
  • pissed out of your brain/head/mind, at pissed as a newt/fart The idiom "pissed out of your brain/head/mind" typically means being extremely intoxicated or drunk, usually to the point of impaired judgment or behavior. It implies excessive consumption of alcohol or being in a state of extreme inebriation. On the other hand, the phrase "pissed as a newt/fart," while less commonly used, refers to being extremely intoxicated or drunk as well. It emphasizes the level of drunkenness by comparing it to the state of a newt or a fart, both of which are considered insignificant or small entities.
  • be at someone's beck and call The idiom "be at someone's beck and call" means to be constantly ready and available to do whatever someone asks or demands, without hesitation or refusal. It implies being submissive or obedient to another person's every beckon or request.
  • be at loggerheads The idiom "be at loggerheads" means to be in a state of strong disagreement or conflict with someone, usually regarding opposing viewpoints or ideas.
  • end up at something The idiom "end up at something" refers to the eventual outcome or result of a situation or course of action. It means to eventually reach or arrive at a particular place, state, condition, or circumstance, often unexpectedly or as a consequence of one's actions or decisions.
  • be home and hosed, at be home and dry The idiomatic expressions "be home and hosed" and "be home and dry" refer to being in a situation where success or victory is assured, and there is no possibility of failure or difficulty. These phrases indicate that someone has completed a task or achieved a goal with little or no obstacles remaining, thus being on the brink of success and guaranteed a favorable outcome.
  • chafe at sth The idiom "chafe at something" refers to feeling irritated, annoyed, or frustrated by a particular situation or constraint. It suggests a sense of discontent and restlessness caused by being limited or restricted in some way.
  • lay (something) at the feet of (someone) The idiom "lay (something) at the feet of (someone)" means to assign responsibility or blame for something to someone. It refers to the act of figuratively placing an issue, problem, or burden at someone's feet, symbolizing them as being accountable or responsible for it.
  • be one thing after the other, at be one thing after another The idiom "be one thing after the other" or "be one thing after another" refers to a situation where a series of problems, challenges, or events occur in quick succession or without any respite, often causing stress, frustration, or exhaustion. It implies a sense of continuous or overwhelming occurrence of negative or troubling circumstances.
  • be at large The idiom "be at large" means to be free or to exist without any restrictions or limitations. It can refer to a person who is not confined or incarcerated, or to a situation or concept that is not confined or limited in any way.
  • at pains to The idiom "at pains to" means making a considerable effort or taking great care to do something. It indicates that someone is making a deliberate attempt and putting in significant effort to accomplish a task or achieve a certain outcome.
  • keep somebody at a distance The idiom "keep somebody at a distance" means to maintain a certain level of distance or separation from someone, either physically or emotionally. It implies disengagement or caution, usually to avoid getting too close or involved with that person.
  • at (one's) fingertips The idiom "at (one's) fingertips" means that something is easily accessible and available for immediate use or reference. It refers to having knowledge, information, or resources readily at hand.
  • appear at sm time The idiom "appear at [some time]" means to make an entrance or become visible or present in a specific time or situation. It conveys the idea of showing up or being seen at a particular moment.
  • what use is...?, at what's the use of...? The idiom "what use is...?, what's the use of...?" is used to express doubt or frustration about the practicality or value of something. It questions the purpose or benefit of a particular thing or action, implying that it is not useful or worthwhile.
  • be at an end The idiom "be at an end" means that something is finished or concluded. It implies that a particular situation or event has come to its conclusion or reached its end point.
  • rise from the dead, at come back from the dead The idiom "rise from the dead" or "come back from the dead" refers to a situation or event where someone or something unexpectedly returns or becomes active again after a period of inactivity, decline, or presumed death. It is often used metaphorically to describe a surprising revival or resurgence of someone or something that was believed to be lost, defeated, or irrelevant.
  • easy does it!, at gently does it! The idiom "easy does it" or "gently does it" is an expression used to advise someone to proceed slowly, carefully, or cautiously, often when performing a task or action that requires precision or delicate handling. It emphasizes the importance of taking one's time and avoiding excessive force or haste in order to achieve the desired outcome without any unnecessary risks or mistakes.
  • go beet red, at go/turn beetroot (red) The idiom "go beet red" or "go/turn beetroot (red)" is an expression used to describe someone's face turning noticeably red, often due to embarrassment, shame, anger, or intense emotion. The phrase is derived from the red color of beetroots and is used metaphorically to describe a person's flushed or blushing face.
  • howl at someone or something The idiom "howl at someone or something" typically means to loudly and angrily express strong criticism, disapproval, or outrage towards someone or something. It can also refer to vehemently protesting or complaining about a situation or individual. The usage of "howl" implies passionate or intense vocalization, mirroring the way a wolf or other animal might vocalize when angered or threatened.
  • at the end of one's tether The idiom "at the end of one's tether" means to be completely exhausted, frustrated, and unable to cope with a situation or task any longer. It denotes a state of being physically, mentally, or emotionally drained, with no more patience or resources left to continue.
  • goggle at someone or something The idiom "goggle at someone or something" means to stare at someone or something in a wide-eyed or amazed manner, often with a sense of curiosity or surprise.
  • keep at arm's length The definition of the idiom "keep at arm's length" is to maintain a certain distance or to be cautious and avoid getting too close to someone or something, often due to suspicion, distrust, or the desire to keep a safe distance from potential harm or negative influences.
  • go at (someone) hammer and tongs The idiom "go at (someone) hammer and tongs" means to engage in a vigorous or aggressive manner, often in the context of a heated argument, confrontation, or physical altercation. It implies going at someone with full force and determination, not holding back.
  • it's tough at the top The idiom "it's tough at the top" means that being in a position of power or authority can be difficult and challenging. It suggests that those in high-ranking positions often face numerous responsibilities, pressures, and expectations, which may come with a high level of stress and scrutiny.
  • be at half-mast The idiom "be at half-mast" refers to the act of lowering a flag on a flagpole to a position halfway between the top and the bottom as a sign of mourning or respect, typically done following the death of a notable person or during a period of national mourning. Metaphorically, it can also imply a sense of sadness, solemnity, or a low-spirited mood.
  • pound away (at sm or sth) The idiom "pound away (at someone or something)" refers to the persistent and relentless effort put into a task or situation. It signifies the act of working hard and continuously, often in an intense or forceful manner, to achieve a goal or overcome obstacles. It suggests a focused and determined approach where one pushes through challenges repeatedly until success is achieved.
  • at sb's elbow The idiom "at sb's elbow" means to be physically close to someone, often in order to offer assistance or guidance. It suggests being in close proximity to someone, usually in a supportive or watchful manner.
  • guess at something The idiom "guess at something" means to make an estimate or form an opinion about something without having complete or accurate information. It implies making an educated guess or conjecture based on limited knowledge or evidence.
  • given half a chance, at given the chance/choice The idiom "given half a chance" or "given the chance/choice" means if someone is provided with an opportunity or given a favorable circumstance, they are likely to take advantage of it or make the most of it. It implies that the person in question has the capability or desire to achieve something, and if given the opportunity, they would seize it and succeed.
  • the lay of the land, at the lie of the land The idiom "the lay of the land" refers to the current state or condition of a particular situation, especially in terms of how things are organized, arranged, or understood. It often refers to having knowledge or awareness of the way things are operating or the overall structure of a specific area. It can also imply having a good grasp of the circumstances or factors influencing a situation.
  • have it away, at have it off The idioms "have it away" and "have it off" are colloquial expressions meaning to engage in sexual intercourse or have a sexual encounter. These phrases are informal and often used casually or humorously.
  • be chomping at the bit The idiom "be chomping at the bit" means to be extremely eager or impatient to start or do something. It comes from the behavior of a horse that is held back by a bit in its mouth but is so eager to run that it starts biting down on the bit in anticipation.
  • stick two fingers up at (someone or something) The idiom "stick two fingers up at (someone or something)" is slang primarily used in British English. It means to make a rude or offensive gesture by extending the index finger and the middle finger of one's hand as a sign of disrespect, defiance, or contempt towards someone or something. This gesture, commonly known as "giving the finger" or "flipping the bird," involves forming a V-shape with the fingers towards the recipient. It symbolizes a strong and offensive expression of one's disregard or hostility.
  • plod away at sth The idiom "plod away at something" means to persistently work on or continue doing something, especially a task or project, even though it may be slow, difficult, or tedious. It implies a steady and determined effort to accomplish a particular goal or objective, often involving sustained hard work and perseverance.
  • at an early date The idiom "at an early date" means to do something or arrange something in the near future or as soon as possible, without specifying a specific time or date. It implies that the action will be taken promptly without delay.
  • take a long, hard look at sth The idiom "take a long, hard look at something" means to carefully and critically examine or analyze something, usually in order to gain a better understanding or find a solution or improvement. It implies taking a serious and thorough assessment of a situation, object, or idea.
  • lay something at someone's feet The idiom "lay something at someone's feet" means to attribute or place the responsibility, blame, or credit for something on a specific person or group. It implies holding someone accountable or crediting them for the outcome or consequences related to a particular matter.
  • lurch at sm or sth The idiom "lurch at someone or something" typically means to make a sudden and aggressive move or action towards someone or something. It often implies a sense of impulsive or uncontrolled behavior, characterized by a sudden jerky movement or lunge. This idiom is often used to describe a physical action, but it can also be used metaphorically to describe rapid, unexpected reactions or decisions.
  • take a look at The idiom "take a look at" means to examine, observe, or evaluate something closely or briefly. It implies directing one's attention towards a particular object or situation in order to gain knowledge or a better understanding of it.
  • at a glance The idiom "at a glance" refers to something that is understood or evaluated quickly or superficially, typically by taking a brief look or a single observation. It implies making a judgment or forming an opinion based on a first impression or a cursory examination.
  • at the expense of somebody/something The idiom "at the expense of somebody/something" refers to the act of benefiting or gaining something, while causing harm, loss, or inconvenience to someone or something else. It implies that one person or thing is being favored or prioritized, often resulting in the detriment or disadvantage of another.
  • come out at an amount The idiom "come out at an amount" means to reach or result in a specific quantity or sum, typically after accounting for various factors or calculations. It refers to the final outcome or total value of something.
  • look askance at (someone or something) The idiom "look askance at (someone or something)" means to view someone or something with suspicion, doubt, or disapproval. It implies a cautious and skeptical attitude towards the person or thing being observed.
  • at the expense of sm or sth The idiom "at the expense of someone or something" means to benefit or achieve something, often at the cost or detriment of someone or something else. It implies that one person or thing is being favored or prioritized over another, typically resulting in negative consequences for the latter.
  • I'm terrible at names. The idiom "I'm terrible at names" refers to a person's self-awareness and admission of being forgetful or having difficulty remembering and recalling people's names accurately.
  • at a word The idiom "at a word" means immediately or instantly. It refers to someone who takes action or does something as soon as they are asked or told to do so. It implies a sense of promptness and readiness to comply.
  • be on at The idiom "be on at" typically means to constantly criticize, nag, or complain to someone about something. It implies persistent, reoccurring demands or complaints directed towards an individual.
  • plug away (at sth) The idiom "plug away (at sth)" means to persistently work on or continue to do something, especially when it is challenging or tedious. It implies consistent effort and determination to achieve a goal, even if progress is slow.
  • at pains, be at The idiom "at pains, be at" means to take great effort or be willing to expend time, energy, or resources in order to accomplish something or solve a problem. It suggests that someone is making a deliberate and sincere attempt to achieve a specific outcome, even if it requires considerable exertion or discomfort.
  • at the mercy of somebody/something The idiom "at the mercy of somebody/something" means to be completely under the control or power of someone or something else, without the ability to defend or protect oneself. It implies being in a vulnerable position, having no choice or options, and being subject to the whims or actions of another person or force.
  • at (your) leisure The idiom "at (your) leisure" means to do something in one's own time, without any rush or particular timeframe. It implies that there is no pressure or urgency to complete a task and that one can take their time and enjoy it.
  • be in the right place at the right moment The idiom "be in the right place at the right moment" means being present or situated at the perfect location and time to take advantage of a particular opportunity or situation. It suggests that one's timing or location is exceptionally favorable, leading to a successful outcome or fortuitous event.
  • be at peace The idiom "be at peace" refers to a state of tranquility, inner calmness, or harmony where one is free from worry, conflict, or disturbance. It implies a sense of serenity or contentment in one's mind, emotions, or surroundings.
  • level at The idiom "level at" means to direct criticism, blame, or accusation towards someone or something.
  • floor it, at put your foot down The idiom "floor it" or "put your foot down" means to strongly press the accelerator pedal in a vehicle, usually to increase speed or drive at maximum velocity. It implies driving swiftly, forcefully, or with a sense of urgency.
  • at great length The idiom "at great length" means to speak, explain, or discuss something in a detailed or extensive manner for a prolonged period of time. It implies that the topic or conversation is being thoroughly explored or explained with a lot of detail.
  • come/fall apart at the seams The idiom "come/fall apart at the seams" means to completely disintegrate or break down, often referring to a situation or entity becoming chaotic, dysfunctional, or unmanageable. It can describe a loss of control, organization, or cohesion, leading to failure or collapse.
  • fray at the edges The idiom "fray at the edges" means to gradually wear out or become worn or damaged, usually referring to something literal or metaphorical that is starting to show signs of wear, deterioration, or decline. It suggests that the situation or thing in question is becoming progressively less functional, stable, or intact.
  • at the bottom of the hour The idiom "at the bottom of the hour" refers to a specific time, usually occurring 30 minutes past the hour, or the 30-minute mark in an hour. It is often used in broadcasting or scheduling to indicate a particular time for an event or program.
  • need your head testing, at need your head examined/examining The idiom "need your head testing" or "need your head examined/examining" is used to describe someone's behavior or thoughts as irrational, illogical, or insane. It implies that the person's actions or ideas are so strange or foolish that it suggests they should undergo a mental examination to assess their sanity. It conveys a figurative meaning rather than a literal one and is often used humorously or sarcastically.
  • go at someone or something The idiom "go at someone or something" means to attack, confront, or engage aggressively with someone or something physically, verbally, or emotionally. It implies an intense or forceful approach towards a person or an object.
  • you can/can't talk!, at look who's talking! The idiom "you can/can't talk!" or "look who's talking!" is an expression used to point out someone's hypocrisy or inconsistency in criticizing or advising others. It implies that the person making the comment is equally guilty of the fault they are attributing to someone else, rendering their criticism or advice hypocritical.
  • feel at home The idiom "feel at home" means to be comfortable and relaxed in a new or unfamiliar environment, as if in one's own home. It suggests a sense of ease, familiarity, and the ability to behave as if one is in a place where they belong.
  • fall at the first hurdle The idiom "fall at the first hurdle" means to fail or give up at the initial obstacle or difficulty encountered in a task or endeavor. It implies that the person or group fails to proceed further due to their inability to overcome the initial challenge.
  • (as) regular as clockwork, at like clockwork The idiom "(as) regular as clockwork" or "at like clockwork" refers to something that happens with precision and consistency, following a strict and predictable schedule. It implies that an event, action, or occurrence takes place at the same time or in the same manner every time, just like the precise and regular movements of a clock.
  • strike at sm or sth The idiom "strike at someone or something" generally means to direct an attack, either literal or figurative, towards a specific person or thing with the intention to harm, affect, or undermine it. It can refer to physical violence, verbal criticism, or any action taken to confront or challenge someone or something directly.
  • be coming/falling apart at the seams The idiom "be coming/falling apart at the seams" means that something or someone is deteriorating or experiencing a total breakdown in various aspects. It suggests that there are multiple issues or problems that are causing a situation or a person to be on the verge of collapse or failure.
  • blurt sth out (at sm) The idiom "blurt sth out (at sm)" refers to speaking or uttering something suddenly, often without thinking or without intending to do so. This expression typically implies that the statement or information revealed is unplanned, spontaneous, or possibly inappropriate. It can be used when someone speaks impulsively or blurts out something without considering the consequences, usually in a situation or towards a person where caution or discretion is required.
  • be at wits' end The idiom "be at wits' end" means to be extremely perplexed, frustrated, or at a loss as to what to do or how to handle a situation. It implies a state of confusion or despair where all attempts to find a solution or resolve an issue have been exhausted.
  • at the height of "At the height of" is an idiomatic expression that refers to the peak or pinnacle of something, indicating the time or period when something is at its most intense, strong, or successful. It represents the culmination or maximum state of a particular situation or condition.
  • that figures, at it figures The idiom "that figures" or "it figures" is used to express resignation or agreement when a situation or outcome was predictable or expected. It conveys the message that the result is not surprising given the circumstances.
  • hem and haw, at hum and haw The idiom "hem and haw" or "hum and haw" is used to describe someone who hesitates, stumbles, or is indecisive while speaking or making a decision. It refers to the act of making repetitive sounds such as "hem" or "haw" when one is unsure, buying time, or trying to avoid giving a definite answer.
  • throw in at the deep end The idiom "throw in at the deep end" means to put someone in a difficult or challenging situation without any prior preparation or guidance. It refers to immersing someone directly into a complex or high-pressure task, expecting them to quickly adapt and learn to swim without any assistance.
  • at a (or the) crossroads The idiom "at a (or the) crossroads" is typically used to describe a point in time or a situation where someone is faced with an important decision or choice that will significantly impact their life or future. It signifies being at a critical juncture where one must make a decision or choose a direction to proceed.
  • at the present time The idiomatic expression "at the present time" refers to the current moment or the period of time that currently exists. It implies that something is happening or existing at that specific point in time.
  • smile at sm The idiom "smile at someone" typically means to display a friendly or cheerful facial expression in response to seeing or acknowledging that person.
  • time heals (all wounds), at time's a great healer The idiomatic expressions "time heals (all wounds)" and "time's a great healer" imply that with the passing of time, emotional pain, grief, or distress caused by difficult or traumatic experiences will gradually diminish or fade away. The phrase emphasizes that time has the power to help individuals overcome or recover from challenging circumstances, and that the healing process takes time and patience.
  • make at home The idiom "make at home" typically means to feel comfortable, at ease, or familiar with a particular place or situation. It suggests a sense of familiarity and a feeling of being in one's own element.
  • (really) take the cake, at (really) take the biscuit The idiom "(really) take the cake" or "(really) take the biscuit" is used to express surprise, annoyance, or disbelief about something that is particularly outrageous, absurd, or extreme. It implies that the situation described is the most extreme or exceptional among many others. The phrase may also be used sarcastically to refer to a situation that is unexpectedly impressive or remarkable.
  • dart a glance at (someone or something) The idiom "dart a glance at (someone or something)" means to quickly and briefly look at someone or something, usually in a stealthy or cautious manner. It implies a swift and fleeting glance that is often focused or targeted.
  • up and at 'em The idiom "up and at 'em" means to be energetic, motivated, and ready to start something actively and enthusiastically. It implies being ready to tackle tasks or face challenges with determination and vigor.
  • be at it hammer and tongs The idiom "be at it hammer and tongs" means to do something with great energy, force, or intensity. It implies that someone is engaged in a task or activity passionately, exerting maximum effort and not holding back.
  • be sharptongued, at have a sharp tongue The idiom "be sharptongued" or "have a sharp tongue" is used to describe someone who speaks in a way that is critical, sarcastic, or harsh. It refers to a person's ability to use witty and cutting remarks effectively in conversations or arguments. Such individuals often possess a quick and clever verbal response, which can sometimes be hurtful or offensive to others.
  • at a venture The idiom "at a venture" means to act or do something without careful thought or planning, taking a risk or a chance without knowing or guaranteeing the outcome. It implies making a guess or attempting something uncertainly, often based on intuition or instinct rather than thorough analysis or preparation.
  • burn at the stake The idiom "burn at the stake" refers to a brutal execution method wherein a person is tied to a wooden stake and set on fire. Figuratively, the expression implies public humiliation, severe criticism, or punishment, often due to an unpopular opinion, belief, or action.
  • stand in sb's way, at stand in the way of sth/sb The idiom "stand in someone's way" or "stand in the way of something/somebody" means to hinder or obstruct someone or something from achieving their goals or making progress. It implies being an obstacle that prevents someone from moving forward or accomplishing what they desire.
  • glance at someone or something The idiom "glance at someone or something" means to quickly look at someone or something for a brief moment and then redirect one's attention elsewhere. It implies a casual and fleeting observation rather than a prolonged or intentional gaze.
  • at this moment in time The idiom "at this moment in time" means the current situation or circumstances at a specific point in time. It refers to the present moment, highlighting the significance or relevance of a particular event or situation happening right now.
  • be smooth sailing, at be plain sailing The idiom "be smooth sailing" or "be plain sailing" means that a situation or task is going or will go smoothly, without any major difficulties or obstacles. It implies that everything is going well or will go well without complications.
  • with a bit of luck, at with any luck The idiom "with a bit of luck" or "with any luck" is used to express optimism or hope for something to happen or turn out positively. It implies that there is a possibility of achieving a desired outcome if fortunate circumstances or events occur.
  • at the hands of someone The idiom "at the hands of someone" means to be the victim or recipient of someone's actions, often implying that the actions were harmful, destructive, or caused suffering. It emphasizes that someone or something was responsible for the negative consequences being experienced.
  • be at pains The idiom "be at pains" means to make a great effort or exert oneself in order to accomplish something difficult or important. It suggests taking extra care and going to great lengths to ensure a desired outcome.
  • at a loss (for words) The idiom "at a loss (for words)" means to be unable to think of anything to say because of shock, surprise, confusion, or inability to find the right words to express oneself adequately.
  • hold your (own) ground, at hold your own To "hold your (own) ground" or "hold your own" means to defend or maintain one's position or stance despite opposition or challenges. This idiom typically refers to standing firm in an argument, a debate, a conflict, or any situation where one's opinion or position is tested. It emphasizes the ability to remain resolute, unyielding, and confident, even when faced with adversity or opposition.
  • be at the end of your tether The idiom "be at the end of your tether" means to be extremely frustrated, exhausted, or at the limit of one's patience or resources. It implies a feeling of being completely worn out or unable to handle a situation any longer.
  • puff (away) at sth The idiom "puff (away) at sth" typically means to smoke or blow air forcefully at something. It can refer to inhaling and exhaling smoke from a cigarette, pipe, or any smoking device, or simply blowing air forcefully out of one's mouth.
  • Don't change horses at midstream. The idiom "Don't change horses at midstream" means to not make a major or significant change in plans, actions, or allegiances after starting a particular course of action or project. It suggests the importance of sticking with a decision or strategy until it is completed, without altering it halfway through.
  • sell sb a pup, at sell sb a bill of goods The phrase "sell sb a pup" or "sell sb a bill of goods" both have a similar meaning and refer to the act of deceiving or misleading someone by convincing them to buy or believe in something that is of relatively low value or quality. It implies that the person has been tricked into making a bad or unfavorable decision.
  • kick back (at sm or sth) The idiom "kick back (at someone or something)" generally refers to a relaxed and leisurely attitude or behavior adopted in response to stress, pressure, or a demanding situation. It means to take time off or engage in activities that allow one to unwind, relax, and alleviate stress. It is often used to express the need to rest and recuperate after a period of hard work or intense effort.
  • keep somebody at arm's length The idiom "keep somebody at arm's length" means to maintain a certain distance or level of caution with someone, often because they are deemed untrustworthy, suspicious, or unpleasant. It implies avoiding close involvement or emotional attachment with the person and maintaining a guarded or reserved attitude towards them.
  • take aim at somebody/something The idiom "take aim at somebody/something" means to direct criticism, attack, or effort towards a specific person or thing with the intention of achieving a particular goal or purpose. It denotes focusing attention or energy on someone/something as a target.
  • blink at (something) The idiom "blink at (something)" means to overlook, ignore, or tolerate something objectionable or unusual without any response or reaction. It refers to consciously or unconsciously ignoring or dismissing something that would typically require attention or concern.
  • beat your retreat, at beat a retreat The idiom "beat your retreat" or "beat a retreat" refers to the act of withdrawing or retreating from a specific situation or place, often due to a negative outcome or the desire to avoid further conflict or difficulties. It can also imply the act of quickly leaving a location or situation to escape potential trouble or danger.
  • cock an ear/eye at something/somebody The idiom "cock an ear/eye at something/somebody" means to pay close attention or listen carefully to something or someone. It implies the action of turning one's head slightly or tilting an ear/eye to better focus on a particular sound or situation. This expression is often used when someone wants to emphasize their interest or curiosity in what is being said or observed.
  • hammer (away) at sm The idiom "hammer (away) at someone/something" refers to persistently and continuously focusing on a particular task, problem, or topic, often with great effort or determination. It implies repeatedly and vigorously addressing or emphasizing an issue, idea, or challenge until a desired outcome is achieved or completed. The term "hammer" conveys the image of striking with force, highlighting the intensity and determination in dealing with a specific matter.
  • eat (away) at sth The idiom "eat (away) at something" means to gradually and persistently consume or erode something, or to cause physical or emotional damage over time. It is commonly used to describe a situation where something is affecting someone mentally or emotionally, causing feelings of anxiety, guilt, or regret. It can also refer to the gradual deterioration or erosion of a physical object or substance.
  • grumble at sm The idiom "grumble at someone" means to complain or express discontentment to someone, usually in a persistent or grumpy manner. It implies expressing dissatisfaction or disapproval towards that person or their actions.
  • at full cock The idiom "at full cock" refers to a state of readiness or preparation for action, often used in relation to firearms. It originates from the term used to describe the position of a firearm's hammer, which is fully drawn back and ready to be released. This idiom is commonly used metaphorically to describe someone who is alert, focused, and prepared for a challenge or to tackle a task with maximum effort.
  • strike at the heart of The idiom "strike at the heart of" means to target or attack something or someone at its center, core, or most important aspect, often with the intention of causing significant damage or impact. It refers to aiming or focusing on the most critical or fundamental part of a situation, problem, or issue.
  • at (one's) elbow The idiom "at (one's) elbow" refers to someone or something being close by, typically in a physical sense, and positioned conveniently within arm's reach for easy access or assistance. It implies the proximity of a person or an object at a close distance, ready to provide support or guidance when needed.
  • be coming apart at the seams The idiom "be coming apart at the seams" means to be in a state of disintegration, collapse, or extreme dysfunction. It is often used to describe a situation, person, organization, or system that is deteriorating or falling apart due to various problems or challenges.
  • dig at sm or sth The idiom "dig at someone or something" means to make a critical or sarcastic remark about someone or something in an attempt to mock or ridicule them. It involves subtly or indirectly expressing disapproval or making a cutting comment.
  • keep at arm's length from someone or something To keep someone or something at arm's length means to maintain a certain distance or avoid getting too close or involved with them. It implies keeping a cautious or guarded attitude towards someone or something, often to protect oneself from potential harm or negative consequences.
  • end up at (some place) The idiom "end up at (some place)" means to eventually arrive or find oneself in a particular location, often by chance or after a series of events. It implies a destination or outcome that was not originally planned or expected.
  • at your/somebody's pleasure The idiom "at your/somebody's pleasure" means according to one's own desire or preference. It refers to someone having complete control or the freedom to do something whenever they wish, without any restrictions or obligations. It suggests that the person has the power to make decisions or take actions at their own convenience or enjoyment.
  • cat can look at a king The idiom "a cat can look at a king" is used to imply that everyone is entitled to observe, examine, or consider something or someone, regardless of their status or position. The phrase suggests that no one should be denied the right to observe or be curious about a person of higher authority.
  • not get a wink of sleep, at not sleep a wink The idiom "not get a wink of sleep" or "not sleep a wink" refers to the inability to sleep at all. It implies a state of restlessness or insomnia where no sleep is achieved, even for the shortest duration of time.
  • cavil at someone The idiom "cavil at someone" means to criticize or find fault with someone in a petty or nitpicking manner. It refers to the act of trivially or unnecessarily objecting to or complaining about someone's actions, behavior, or decisions.
  • throw oneself at The idiom "throw oneself at" means to make an excessive or desperate attempt to gain someone's attention, affection, or favor in a highly assertive or aggressive manner. It often implies an exaggerated display of affection, pursuit, or effort towards someone.
  • at the top of your lungs The idiom "at the top of your lungs" refers to shouting or yelling loudly and with great force. It suggests using one's maximum vocal capacity to make a powerful and intense sound.
  • lie at (or on) the lurch The idiom "lie at (or on) the lurch" means to be in a state of uncertainty, abandonment, or vulnerability. It suggests being left unaided or unsupported in a difficult or challenging situation, similar to being figuratively stranded or abandoned on a boat that is stuck or lurching.
  • at variance (with) The idiom "at variance (with)" refers to a situation where two or more things, ideas, concepts, or people are in disagreement, conflict, or opposition with each other. It often implies a difference in opinion, belief, values, or goals.
  • come at a price The idiom "come at a price" means that achieving or obtaining something desirable requires some form of sacrifice or negative consequence. It suggests that there is a trade-off or cost associated with obtaining a particular outcome or benefit.
  • tear sb off a strip, at tear a strip off sb The idiom "tear (someone) off a strip" or "tear a strip off (someone)" means to scold or reprimand someone severely, usually in an angry and confrontational manner. It often involves expressing strong disapproval or rebuking someone for something they have done wrong or for their behavior.
  • I beg your pardon, at pardon (me) The idiom "I beg your pardon, or pardon me" is an expression used to apologize or ask for forgiveness for something one has said or done. It is a polite way to acknowledge a mistake or occurrence of unintentional rudeness.
  • know at a glance that... The idiom "know at a glance that..." means to quickly and easily understand or recognize something without needing to examine it closely or in detail. It often implies an immediate and clear understanding of a situation, person, or thing by simply looking at it briefly.
  • all done in, at done in The idiom "all done in" or "at done in" is typically used to describe someone who is completely exhausted or drained due to physical or mental exertion. It refers to a state of being completely worn out or fatigued, often to the point where one cannot continue with a particular task or activity.
  • at the cutting edge The idiom "at the cutting edge" typically refers to being at the forefront of innovation, advancement, or new developments in a particular field or industry. It means being at the leading edge of knowledge, technology, or ideas, often suggesting being ahead of others and pushing boundaries.
  • move down in the world, at go/come down in the world The idiom "move down in the world" or "go/come down in the world" refers to experiencing a decline or deterioration in social standing, wealth, or overall quality of life. It describes a situation where someone's position or status is lowered compared to their previous, higher state.
  • old hand at something The idiom "old hand at something" refers to a person who is experienced, skilled, or knowledgeable in a particular activity, task, or field due to years of practice and familiarity.
  • rejoice at sth The idiom "rejoice at something" means to feel or express great joy, happiness, or satisfaction in response to a particular event, situation, or outcome. It conveys a sense of deep pleasure and celebration.
  • like a spare prick at a wedding The idiom "like a spare prick at a wedding" is a crude and vulgar expression originating from British slang. It refers to someone who feels awkward, out of place, or irrelevant in a particular situation, similar to showing up to a wedding where everyone has a role or purpose but feeling unnecessary or superfluous. This idiom emphasizes a sense of being surplus or unneeded, often causing the person to feel uncomfortable or inadequate.
  • be at pains to do something The idiom "be at pains to do something" means to make a great effort or be extremely careful in doing something, usually to ensure accuracy, thoroughness, or to avoid mistakes or misunderstandings. It implies that the person is taking special care or going out of their way to complete a task or communicate a message in the best possible way.
  • two can play at that game The idiom "two can play at that game" means that if someone engages in a certain behavior or strategy, another person can also adopt the same behavior or strategy in order to respond or retaliate. It implies that one can reciprocate or mirror someone's actions in order to achieve the same outcome or advantage.
  • another/a second bite at/of the cherry The idiom "another/a second bite at/of the cherry" refers to getting another opportunity to try or succeed at something after a previous attempt has failed or fallen short. It implies a chance to have another go or make another attempt at achieving a desired outcome.
  • yell at sm or sth The idiom "yell at someone or something" means to shout or speak loudly and angrily in order to express frustration, anger, or dissatisfaction towards a person or object. It typically involves raising one's voice in a harsh manner to convey disapproval or criticism.
  • a ghost at the feast "A ghost at the feast" is an idiomatic phrase used to describe a person who brings a sense of sadness, discomfort, or tension to an otherwise joyful or celebratory event. This person's presence or actions may cast a shadow over the atmosphere, making others feel unsettled or uneasy. The expression draws upon the image of a ghost, a haunting and intangible presence that disturbs the merriment and happiness of a feast or gathering.
  • be running at sth The idiom "be running at something" typically means to be doing an activity or task vigorously or energetically. It implies dedication, effort, or focus towards accomplishing a specific goal or objective.
  • not half such a, at not half as The idiom "not half such a" or "not half as" is used to emphasize the degree or quality of something, indicating that it is much greater, better, or more extreme than what has been previously mentioned or expected. It suggests that the described person or thing is outstanding or exceptional.
  • at sea level The idiom "at sea level" refers to something or someone being at the same elevation as the surface of the ocean. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate a normal or average condition, lacking any extremes or variations.
  • at the eleventh hour The idiom "at the eleventh hour" means to do something just in time, at the last possible moment before a deadline or critical moment.
  • rub sb the wrong way, at rub sb up the wrong way The idiom "rub someone the wrong way" (also known as "rub someone up the wrong way") is used to describe an action or behavior that irritates or annoys someone. It suggests causing someone to feel uncomfortable, frustrated, or agitated due to a certain interaction or attitude. It can also refer to actions that create an unpleasant impression or tension between individuals.
  • throw the book at sb The idiom "throw the book at someone" means to punish someone severely or to apply the maximum possible penalty or punishment for their actions or behavior. It originated from the concept of a judge or legal authority literally throwing a large book, such as a law book or a rulebook, at a person to administer a harsh punishment.
  • hint at sth The idiom "hint at something" means to suggest or imply something indirectly or subtly, usually without explicitly stating it. It involves dropping subtle clues or indications about a certain topic or idea without directly addressing or discussing it. It is often used to convey a message or idea in a discreet or less explicit manner.
  • snarl at (sm, sth, or an animal) The idiom "snarl at" refers to the act of displaying anger, aggression, or hostility towards someone, something, or an animal. It can involve baring one's teeth, growling, or making aggressive vocalizations, resembling the behavior of a snarling dog.
  • at Her Majesty's pleasure The idiom "at Her Majesty's pleasure" refers to the authority and power held by a reigning monarch, usually Queen Elizabeth II in the case of the United Kingdom, to keep an individual in custody for an indefinite period of time. It typically applies to prisoners who have been deemed a threat to society, mentally ill, or unable to complete a prison sentence due to their circumstances. The length of imprisonment is determined solely by the will of the monarch and is not subject to a fixed term or parole considerations.
  • be all mouth and no trousers, at be all mouth The idiom "be all mouth and no trousers" is used to describe someone who speaks boastfully or confidently about their abilities or intentions but fails to act upon them or deliver on their words. It implies that the person lacks substance or the ability to follow through with their claims. The alternative form "be all mouth" conveys the same meaning.
  • be like a spare prick at a wedding The idiom "be like a spare prick at a wedding" is an informal expression that is primarily used in British English. It is considered vulgar and offensive, so it's important to exercise caution when using it. The phrase implies feeling awkward, out of place, or unnecessary in a particular situation or gathering. It humorously compares a person, "a spare prick," who doesn't have a purpose or role at a wedding to an object that is surplus to requirements.
  • who's (someone) when (he's/she's/they're) at home The idiom "who's (someone) when (he's/she's/they're) at home?" is used to express confusion or surprise about someone's identity or importance. It implies that the person being referred to may seem unimpressive or unknown in their ordinary or familiar environment compared to their reputation or perceived significance.
  • (as) tough as shoe leather, at (as) tough as old boots The idiom "(as) tough as shoe leather" or "(as) tough as old boots" refers to someone or something that possesses exceptional resilience, strength, or durability. It implies that the person or object in question can withstand challenging or adverse circumstances without easily succumbing to wear, damage, or exhaustion.
  • assist (sm) at sth The idiom "assist (someone) at something" means to help or support someone in accomplishing a particular task, activity, or event. It implies providing aid or aid in a specific context or situation.
  • make sheep's eyes at someone The idiom "make sheep's eyes at someone" refers to a flirtatious or smitten behavior, wherein someone looks at another person with an adoring or amorous gaze, often accompanied by playful or seductive gestures. It implies expressing romantic interest or attraction towards someone through eye contact and non-verbal signals.
  • off and on, at on and off The idiom "off and on" or "at on and off" means periodically or intermittently. It suggests that something is happening or being done in an irregular or sporadic manner, with periods of activity or occurrence followed by periods of inactivity or absence.
  • sick at heart The idiom "sick at heart" means to feel extremely saddened, anguished, or deeply troubled emotionally. It describes a state of profound sadness or despair.
  • be in the cards, at be on the cards The idiom "be in the cards" (or "be on the cards" in British English) means that something is likely or possible to happen in the future. It is often used when discussing potential outcomes or events that have a good chance of occurring. The phrase stems from the idea of drawing fortune or prediction from a deck of playing cards.
  • be left holding the bag, at be left holding the baby The idiom "be left holding the bag" means to be left responsible for a difficult situation or task that others have abandoned or avoided. It implies being left with the consequences or burden of something while others escape or evade their responsibilities. The idiom "be left holding the baby" has a similar meaning, often used interchangeably with "be left holding the bag." It suggests being left with the responsibility of dealing with a difficult or challenging situation, typically due to the negligence or absence of others.
  • at odds with something The idiom "at odds with something" means to be in a state of disagreement, conflict, or contradiction with something or someone. It implies that there is a lack of harmony or compatibility between two or more elements.
  • kick out (at sm or sth) The idiom "kick out (at someone or something)" generally refers to an act of forcefully or aggressively reacting against someone or something, often in an attempt to harm or repel them. It can be both used literally, like physically kicking out at someone or something, or metaphorically, indicating a defensive or combative response to a situation or an individual.
  • pale beside sth/sb, at pale in comparison The idiom "pale beside sth/sb" or "pale in comparison" means that something or someone appears insignificant, unimpressive, or inferior when compared to another thing or person. It emphasizes a stark contrast between two things, with one being notably less remarkable or powerful than the other.
  • be different/opposite sides of the same coin, at be two sides of the same coin The idiom "be different/opposite sides of the same coin" or "be two sides of the same coin" is used to describe two things or people that may appear to be different or opposite, but are actually closely related or interconnected in some way. It suggests that despite their apparent differences, the two things or people are fundamentally similar or connected as part of a larger whole.
  • murmur at (sm or an animal) The idiom "murmur at (someone or an animal)" refers to the act of speaking softly or making gentle and soothing sounds towards someone or an animal. It often conveys a sense of calming or reassuring communication.
  • tough shit, at tough luck The idiom "tough shit" is a vulgar expression that originated in informal contexts, and it is used to convey a lack of sympathy or empathy for someone's unfortunate circumstances or misfortunes. It implies that the speaker does not consider the situation to be deserving of sympathy or concern. Similarly, "tough luck" is used to express a lack of sympathy for someone's bad luck or unfortunate situation. Overall, both idioms indicate a dismissive or unsympathetic response to someone's difficulties.
  • snap at sm The idiom "snap at someone" means to react angrily or rudely towards someone without much patience or self-control.
  • break the mold, at break the mould The idiom "break the mold" or "break the mould" is used to describe someone or something that defies traditional expectations, norms, or conventions. It means to act or behave in a unique or innovative manner, challenging the status quo and setting a new standard. It implies breaking away from established patterns and paving a different path.
  • tear at heartstrings The idiom "tear at heartstrings" refers to something that deeply affects or moves someone emotionally. It describes a situation or event that evokes strong feelings, especially sadness, sympathy, or compassion. The expression suggests that the emotional impact is so powerful that it feels as though someone's heartstrings, metaphorical strings tied to the emotions, are tugged or pulled intensely.
  • at His/Her Majesty's pleasure The idiom "at His/Her Majesty's pleasure" refers to a situation where someone is in a position or office that is held entirely at the will or discretion of a monarch or ruler. It signifies that the person serves and remains in their position as long as the ruler is pleased or content with their performance or behavior.
  • by the look of it, at by the look(s) of things The idiom "by the look of it" or "by the look(s) of things" is used when someone makes an assumption or inference based on outward appearances or initial observations. It implies that the speaker is drawing their conclusion solely from what they see or perceive at first glance, without any concrete evidence or further investigation. It signifies a judgment or evaluation made based on observable factors or indicators.
  • be sleeping at the switch The idiom "be sleeping at the switch" refers to someone who is neglecting their responsibilities or failing to take action in a situation where they should be attentive and proactive. It implies that the person is not paying attention or is being careless in a situation that requires alertness and action.
  • feel sick at heart The idiom "feel sick at heart" means to experience a profound feeling of sadness, disappointment, or distress. It implies a deep emotional discomfort that might affect someone physically and make them feel unwell or nauseous.
  • be at the bottom of (something) The idiom "be at the bottom of (something)" means to be the root cause or underlying reason behind a situation, problem, or phenomenon. It refers to identifying the primary source or origin of something.
  • at any cost The idiom "at any cost" means to achieve or obtain something regardless of the effort, sacrifices, or negative consequences involved. It implies a determination to achieve a goal or outcome, showing willingness to do whatever it takes, regardless of the obstacles.
  • froth (or foam) at the mouth The idiom "froth (or foam) at the mouth" refers to an exaggerated or excessive display of anger, outrage, or extreme agitation. It is often used to describe someone who is furious or very upset, to the point of behaving irrationally or in an uncontrollable manner. The expression originates from the physical manifestation of excessive saliva or foam formed at the mouth during periods of extreme distress or rage.
  • let things lie, at let it lie To "let things lie" or "let it lie" means to choose not to pursue or address an issue further, allowing it to remain unresolved or untouched. It suggests not dwelling on or reopening a matter, and instead accepting the current state of affairs.
  • at loggerheads (with someone) The idiom "at loggerheads (with someone)" means to be in a state of intense disagreement or conflict with someone. It describes a situation where two or more individuals or groups have opposing viewpoints or are unable to reach a compromise, resulting in a heated or hostile relationship.
  • be at your wits' end The idiom "be at your wits' end" means to be extremely frustrated, confused, or overwhelmed, usually after trying various solutions but without success, and not knowing what to do next. It suggests a state of desperation or mental exhaustion in dealing with a problem or situation.
  • giggle at sm or sth The idiom "giggle at someone or something" means to laugh quietly or uncontrollably in response to someone or something. It implies finding amusement or humor in a person, situation, or remark, often in a lighthearted or playful manner.
  • at someone's elbow The idiom "at someone's elbow" means to be physically close to someone, usually implying being near enough to offer assistance, support, or guidance. It suggests being in close proximity and readily available to assist or accompany the person.
  • no sth to speak of, at none to speak of The idiom "no something to speak of" or "at none to speak of" is used to describe a situation where there is a complete absence or scarcity of something. It indicates that there is very little or hardly any of the mentioned thing worth mentioning or discussing.
  • be at cross purposes The idiom "be at cross purposes" means to be working towards conflicting or contradictory goals or objectives. It implies a situation where individuals or groups are misunderstanding or misinterpreting each other's intentions, resulting in a lack of coordination or cooperation.
  • put at an amount The idiom "put at an amount" means to estimate or speculate about the cost, value, or worth of something. It refers to making an educated guess or providing an approximation of the monetary figure or quantity involved in a particular situation.
  • at half cock The idiom "at half cock" refers to being unprepared or incomplete in one's actions or plans. It originates from the terminology used in firearms, where "cocking" refers to the act of preparing a gun for firing by pulling back the hammer. "Half cock" refers to a partially cocked position, which renders the firearm incapable of firing. In a figurative sense, "at half cock" signifies being in a state of incomplete readiness or insufficient preparation to carry out a task or handle a situation effectively.
  • connive at something (with someone) The idiom "connive at something (with someone)" means to secretly cooperate or conspire with someone to allow or overlook something that is morally wrong or unethical. It often involves ignoring or assisting others in their improper actions without openly expressing disapproval.
  • at any cost, at at all cost(s) The idiom "at any cost" or "at all cost(s)" means to do something regardless of the difficulties, risks, or consequences involved. It implies a strong determination or commitment to achieving a certain goal, without considering the sacrifices or negative outcomes. It suggests that no matter what obstacles or challenges arise, the desired outcome must be accomplished.
  • bricks and clicks, at clicks and mortar The idiom "bricks and clicks, at clicks and mortar" refers to a business model that combines both physical retail locations (bricks and mortar) and online or digital sales channels (clicks). It suggests the synergy created by operating in both traditional and online environments, enhancing customer experience and reaching a wider audience.
  • at the cutting edge of something The idiom "at the cutting edge of something" refers to being at the forefront or leading position in a particular field or area. It suggests being innovative, ahead of others, and embracing the latest advancements or developments in a given domain. Being at the cutting edge implies being involved in groundbreaking research, technology, or ideas that push the boundaries of what is currently known or done in that field.
  • look daggers at somebody The idiom "look daggers at somebody" means to glare or give someone an angry and fierce look, usually conveying strong disapproval, hostility, or intense anger towards the person. It implies a piercing gaze that could metaphorically cause harm or injury, as if shooting daggers through one's eyes.
  • make a pass at The idiom "make a pass at" can be defined as attempting to flirt with or make romantic or sexual advances towards someone. It typically implies showing interest or attraction towards another person in a suggestive or forward manner.
  • blanch at sth The idiom "blanch at something" means to react with fear, shock, or anxiety in response to something particularly alarming, unsettling, or intimidating. It implies a sudden and visible change in facial expression or demeanor, resembling the paleness or whitening of one's face when experiencing a strong negative emotion.
  • beat someone at his or her own game To "beat someone at his or her own game" means to outperform or outsmart someone in a particular situation or activity that they are typically skilled or experienced in. It involves using the same tactics, strategies, or methods as the other person but achieving better results. It can also refer to gaining an advantage over someone by understanding and using their own strengths or weaknesses against them.
  • go off on a tangent, at go/fly off at a tangent The idiom "go off on a tangent" or "go/fly off at a tangent" refers to the act of suddenly changing or diverting from the main topic of a conversation, discussion, or thought and embarking on a different, often irrelevant or unrelated subject. It signifies a departure from the original focus, often resulting in a lengthy and unnecessary deviation.
  • thumb nose at To "thumb one's nose at" someone or something means to openly express a contemptuous or defiant attitude towards them, often by means of mocking, disregarding, or intentionally disrespecting them. This idiom conveys an act of displaying arrogance, insolence, or defiance towards someone or something.
  • at around The idiom "at around" refers to approximately or roughly a specific time, place, or quantity. It implies that the exact details may not be precise or exact, but it gives a general indication or estimation.
  • the next to last, at the last but one The idiom "the next to last" or "at the last but one" refers to the second-to-last item in a sequence or the one occurring immediately before the final one. It signifies being right before the end or the penultimate position in a series or order.
  • pick up the check, at pick up the bill/tab To "pick up the check" or "pick up the bill/tab" is an idiom that refers to taking responsibility for paying the bill or expenses incurred during a meal, social gathering, or outing. It often implies that someone is treating or paying for others, showcasing their generosity or willingness to cover the cost.
  • throw at The idiom "throw at" typically means to present someone with a challenge, task, or responsibility unexpectedly or without prior preparation or warning. It can also refer to someone facing an unexpected or difficult situation.
  • hammer (away) at sth The idiom "hammer (away) at sth" means to persistently and energetically work on or discuss something in a determined manner, often with the goal of achieving a specific outcome or understanding. It implies a repetitive and forceful effort to emphasize or address a particular issue.
  • hither and yon, at hither and thither The idiom "hither and yon, at hither and thither" means moving or traveling in various directions, often with a sense of aimlessness or without a specific destination. It suggests that someone or something is wandering or going from place to place without a particular purpose or direction.
  • be at the wheel The idiom "be at the wheel" refers to being in control or taking charge of a situation. It implies the idea of being the one navigating or steering the circumstances. The person who is "at the wheel" is responsible for making decisions and leading others in a certain direction.
  • from head to foot, at from top to toe The idiom "from head to foot" or "from top to toe" is used to describe something or someone being completely covered or dressed. It means that every part of a person or an object is included or accounted for, signifying thoroughness, comprehensiveness, or careful attention to detail.
  • stick at The idiom "stick at" means to persist or continue with a task or activity, even when it becomes difficult or challenging. It implies not giving up easily and showing determination to complete something despite obstacles or setbacks.
  • make a grab at sm or sth The idiom "make a grab at someone or something" means to try to quickly and eagerly seize or obtain someone or something in a sudden or desperate manner. It often implies a sense of urgency or a lack of consideration for others.
  • set at naught The idiom "set at naught" means to disregard, ignore, or treat as worthless or unimportant. It refers to the act of not valuing or attaching importance to something or someone.
  • be at sixes and sevens The idiom "be at sixes and sevens" means to be in a state of confusion, disorder, or disarray. It refers to a situation where things are not properly organized, causing uncertainty or chaos.
  • at a discount The idiom "at a discount" refers to something being sold or offered at a price lower than its usual or original value. It implies a reduction or markdown in the price of an item or service.