How Do You Spell BAT?

Pronunciation: [bˈat] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "bat" may seem straightforward, but its pronunciation can be a bit tricky. According to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcription, "bat" is pronounced /bæt/. The first sound /b/ represents a bilabial voiced consonant, followed by the vowel sound /æ/, which is an open front unrounded vowel, and finally the voiced consonant /t/, formed by touching the tongue to the alveolar ridge and releasing a puff of air. So, while the spelling is simple, the IPA transcription can help us understand the sounds that make up the word "bat."

BAT Meaning and Definition

Bat is a noun that typically refers to a small, flying mammal belonging to the order Chiroptera. These nocturnal mammals are characterized by their leathery wings, which are formed by a thin membrane of skin extending from elongated fingers. They are usually active at twilight and night, roosting in caves, trees, or man-made structures during the day. The bat's ability to fly, navigate, and locate prey in the dark using echolocation is highly advanced and unique among mammals.

The term "bat" can also be used to denote a wooden or metal implement used in various sports and games. In baseball, a bat is a club-shaped object made of wood or metal, used to hit the ball propelled by the pitcher. Similarly, cricket, softball, and table tennis also employ bats in their respective gameplay. The specific designs and materials of bats may vary according to the sport, with some being smooth, cylindrical wooden sticks and others featuring flat surfaces with rubber coatings.

Furthermore, "bat" can be a verb, indicating the act of striking or hitting, usually repeatedly and often swiftly. This action is commonly associated with animals defending themselves or humans engaging in sports activities. Additionally, it can serve as a noun referring to a turn or period of play in a game, particularly in cricket, where each team has a chance to bat and bowl.

In a figurative sense, "bat" can be used colloquially to describe someone's mental and emotional state as "going batty." This expression suggests that a person is acting erratically, behaving strangely, or losing sanity, drawing an association with the erratic flight patterns of bats.

Top Common Misspellings for BAT *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for BAT

Etymology of BAT

The word "bat" has a complex etymology and has been used to refer to various things throughout history. When specifically referring to the mammal, the term "bat" is believed to have derived from the Old English word "bætt" or "blæc-bætt", which were used to describe the animal's black or dark color. However, the origin of these Old English words is uncertain.

Interestingly, "bat" also has other meanings in different contexts. For instance, in baseball, "bat" refers to the wooden or metal club used to hit the ball. This usage of the word comes from the shortening of the term "battledore" or "batfowling piece", which were used to describe the racket-like equipment used in various games since the 16th century.

Idioms with the word BAT

  • do sth off your own bat The idiom "do sth off your own bat" means to do something independently or without any instruction, assistance, or influence from others. It refers to taking initiative and being self-motivated to accomplish a task or pursue a goal on one's own accord.
  • off the bat The idiom "off the bat" typically means immediately or without delay. It refers to doing or happening something right at the beginning or right away, without any hesitation or delay.
  • not bat an eyelid The idiom "not bat an eyelid" means to remain calm, composed, or unaffected in response to a surprising, shocking, or unusual situation. It describes someone who doesn't show any visible signs of surprise, disbelief, or emotion on their face or in their actions.
  • (as) blind as a bat The idiom "(as) blind as a bat" refers to someone who has very poor eyesight or is completely unable to see.
  • right off the bat The idiom "right off the bat" means immediately or without delay. It suggests that something happens or is done promptly, without the need for any further thought or preparation.
  • bat around The idiom "bat around" is commonly used to describe the act of discussing or debating a topic thoroughly, often in an informal or casual manner. It carries the connotation of exchanging ideas or opinions back and forth, much like how a baseball is hit back and forth by players during practice.
  • bat for the other side The idiom "bat for the other side" is an expression that refers to someone who supports or belongs to a different team, group, or organization than the one being discussed or assumed. It often implies a change in loyalty or allegiance.
  • not bat an eye The idiom "not bat an eye" means to remain calm and unaffected, typically in a situation that might surprise, shock, or cause concern to most people. It implies that someone shows no visible reaction or emotion to something unexpected or unusual happening.
  • like a bat out of hell The idiom "like a bat out of hell" refers to acting or moving very quickly, often in a reckless or frenzied manner. It implies great speed and urgency, typically indicating a sense of intense and sudden departure or activity.
  • go to bat for sb/sth To "go to bat for someone/something" means to show support or defend someone or something, especially in a difficult or challenging situation. It originates from baseball, where the batter's teammates take turns batting to support their team's efforts to score. Using this idiom implies that someone is willing to stand up or advocate for someone's rights or interests, even if it means facing opposition or difficulties.
  • bat around sth The idiom "bat around something" means to discuss or exchange ideas or opinions about a particular topic or problem in a casual or informal manner, usually in a group setting. It implies a back-and-forth conversation where different perspectives or suggestions are shared and explored.
  • play a straight bat The idiom "play a straight bat" originates from the sport of cricket and refers to an approach or behavior characterized by honesty, fairness, and adherence to the rules. In cricket, playing a straight bat means hitting the ball with the middle part of the bat, which is considered to be the correct and proper technique. Consequently, the idiom has evolved to imply conducting oneself ethically and with integrity, without resorting to deceit, dishonesty, or bending the rules. It can be used in various contexts to encourage individuals to act honestly and straightforwardly.
  • off your own bat The idiom "off your own bat" means to do something without being prompted or without assistance from others. It refers to acting or taking initiative independently, without relying on external support or instructions.
  • go to bat for sb The idiom "go to bat for someone" means to support or defend someone, often in a difficult or challenging situation. It originates from the sport of baseball, where a batter's teammates stand ready to support and defend them when they are at the plate, facing the opposing team's pitcher. Thus, going to bat for someone implies taking their side, advocating for their interests, or coming to their defense in a similar manner.
  • be as blind as a bat The idiom "be as blind as a bat" means to have extremely poor vision or to be visually impaired. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone who cannot see or understand something clearly.
  • not bat an eye/eyelash/eyelid The idiom "not bat an eye/eyelash/eyelid" is used to describe someone who remains calm or unaffected in a situation that would typically cause surprise, shock, or emotional reaction in others. It implies that the person's facial expression or behavior does not show any sign of astonishment or disturbance.
  • go to bat for sm To "go to bat for someone" means to support or defend someone, especially in a difficult or challenging situation. It originates from the sport of baseball, where a teammate takes turns batting to help their team score runs. So, when someone "goes to bat" for someone else, they metaphorically step up to support and advocate for them.
  • go to bat against sm To "go to bat against someone" means to defend or support someone in a conflict or challenge, typically against an opponent or adversary. It refers to the act of stepping up and advocating for someone's interests or cause, often by confronting or opposing those who oppose them.
  • bat sth around The idiom "bat something around" refers to discussing or considering ideas, suggestions, or proposals in a casual or informal manner. It implies tossing or batting an idea back and forth among individuals or a group, contemplating different perspectives, and exploring various options before reaching a conclusion or decision.
  • go to bat against The definition of the idiom "go to bat against" is to support or defend someone or something, often in a confrontational or challenging situation. It is derived from the sport of baseball, where "going to bat" means to take one's turn at hitting the ball. In this context, it implies actively stepping up to fight for a cause or advocate on behalf of someone.
  • bat an eye The idiom "bat an eye" means to show no emotional reaction, particularly when something surprising, shocking, or unusual occurs. It refers to maintaining a calm and composed demeanor, usually in response to unexpected or bizarre situations.
  • at bat The idiom "at bat" refers to a player's turn to bat in a baseball or softball game. It signifies the period when a batter steps into the batter's box and attempts to hit the ball thrown by the pitcher.
  • bat out
  • go to bat for The idiom "go to bat for" means to support, defend, or speak up for someone or something, especially in a challenging or difficult situation. It originates from the sport of baseball, where "going to bat" refers to taking one's turn to hit the ball, symbolizing the act of stepping forward and taking action to support or help someone else.
  • blind as a bat The idiom "blind as a bat" refers to someone who has extremely poor eyesight or is completely unable to see.
  • bat an eye or eyelash or eyelid The idiom "bat an eye or eyelash or eyelid" is used to describe someone's lack of reaction or surprise in a situation that would typically elicit a strong response. It means to remain calm, composed, or unaffected by something unexpected or shocking.
  • bat your eyes/eyelashes To "bat your eyes/eyelashes" means to blink or flutter your eyelashes in a flirtatious or seductive manner, often done to capture someone's attention or to convey interest or attraction. It is a gesture commonly associated with coquetry or flirtation.
  • an old bat The idiom "an old bat" typically refers to an elderly woman who is perceived as eccentric, odd, or difficult to deal with. It often implies that the person is outdated or out of touch with contemporary times.
  • bat an eyelash The idiom "bat an eyelash" means to react with surprise, concern, or worry. It is used to describe someone's lack of reaction or their indifference to a situation that would normally elicit a response. For example, if someone remains calm and unaffected when hearing shocking news, they are said to "not bat an eyelash."
  • bat an eyelid The idiom "bat an eyelid" means to show no emotional reaction or surprise to a situation, event, or shocking news. It is often used to describe someone who remains calm and composed in difficult or unexpected circumstances.
  • not bat an eyelash The idiom "not bat an eyelash" means to remain calm or unemotional in response to a surprising or shocking situation. It implies that the person does not show any outward signs of surprise or concern, maintaining a cool and composed demeanor.
  • bat (one's) eyelashes The idiom "bat one's eyelashes" refers to the act of fluttering or blinking one's eyelashes in a flirtatious manner, usually done to attract attention or manipulate others charmingly. It is typically used to describe someone using their physical appearance or charm to their advantage or get what they want.
  • bat (one's) eyes The idiom "bat (one's) eyes" refers to the act of fluttering or blinking one's eyelashes in a flirtatious or alluring manner.
  • bat a thousand The idiom "bat a thousand" means to achieve a perfect outcome or to be extremely successful in a particular endeavor. It is derived from the sport of baseball, where batting with a thousand means hitting the ball successfully every time one is at bat.
  • bat five hundred The idiom "bat five hundred" refers to achieving an average or mediocre performance or result. It originates from baseball, where a batting average of .500 means that a player has successfully hit the ball in half of their at-bats. In a broader sense, the idiom signifies achieving an average level of success in various endeavors.
  • bat for both sides
  • bat for the other team The idiom "bat for the other team" refers to someone who is perceived to be homosexual or having a sexual orientation different from their assumed or stated preference. It implies that the person is not interested in or does not engage in heterosexual relationships.
  • bat one thousand The idiom "bat one thousand" means to have a perfect or flawless record, usually referring to a series of successive achievements or successes with no failures or errors. It originates from baseball, where a batting average of 1.000 means a player has successfully hit the ball every time they have been at bat. Thus, "batting one thousand" has been metaphorically used to describe someone's perfect performance or accomplishment in various contexts outside of baseball.
  • bat the breeze The idiom "bat the breeze" means to engage in casual or idle conversation, typically characterized by talking at length without a specific purpose or goal. It is often used to describe light-hearted and informal discussions.
  • bat your eyelashes/eyes The idiom "bat your eyelashes/eyes" refers to the act of fluttering or blinking one's eyelashes or eyes in a flirtatious or seductive manner. It is often used to describe someone's attempt to gain attention, persuade, or manipulate others using their attractive features or charm.
  • carry your bat The idiom "carry your bat" refers to the act of being the last person in a team or group to leave or be dismissed. It is derived from the game of cricket, where "carrying your bat" signifies that a batsman has not been dismissed and has remained at the crease until the end of the innings. In a broader sense, the idiom is used to highlight someone who has persevered or succeeded when others have failed or given up.
  • go to bat for (one) The idiom "go to bat for (one)" means to support, defend, or advocate on behalf of someone during a difficult situation or when they are facing opposition. It originates from the sport of baseball, where one player steps up to bat to help their team score runs. Similarly, when someone goes to bat for another person, they take action to assist them or serve as their advocate.
  • go to bat for somebody The idiom "go to bat for somebody" means to stand up or support someone, especially when they are facing criticism, opposition, or in need of help. It originates from the sport of baseball, where the batter's teammates take turns going up to the plate to bat. Similarly, when someone "goes to bat" for another person, they are figuratively stepping forward to defend or advocate for them.
  • go to bat for someone The idiom "go to bat for someone" means to support, defend, or help someone in a difficult or challenging situation. It comes from baseball terminology, where a player steps up to bat to help their team score runs. So, going to bat for someone implies taking their side or advocating for them when they need assistance or protection.
  • off (one's) own bat The idiom "off (one's) own bat" means to do something without being prompted or encouraged by others, acting independently and on one's own initiative.
  • bat something around The idiom "bat something around" means to discuss or consider something informally by exchanging ideas, opinions, or suggestions. It often implies a back-and-forth exchange among a group of people in order to evaluate different perspectives or options.
  • not bat an eyelid (or eye) The idiom "not bat an eyelid" (or "not bat an eye") means to remain calm and unaffected, showing no visible reaction or surprise in a situation that would typically provoke a response from others. It implies being composed and maintaining composure, often in the face of unexpected or shocking events or information.

Similar spelling words for BAT

Plural form of BAT is BATS

Conjugate verb Bat

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have batted
you would have batted
he/she/it would have batted
we would have batted
they would have batted
I would have bat
you would have bat
he/she/it would have bat
we would have bat
they would have bat

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been batting
you would have been batting
he/she/it would have been batting
we would have been batting
they would have been batting

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would bat
you would bat
he/she/it would bat
we would bat
they would bat

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be batting
you would be batting
he/she/it would be batting
we would be batting
they would be batting

FUTURE

I will bat
you will bat
he/she/it will bat
we will bat
they will bat

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be batting
you will be batting
he/she/it will be batting
we will be batting
they will be batting

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have batted
you will have batted
he/she/it will have batted
we will have batted
they will have batted

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been batting
you will have been batting
he/she/it will have been batting
we will have been batting
they will have been batting

IMPERATIVE

you bat
we let´s bat

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to bat

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was batting
you were batting
he/she/it was batting
we were batting
they were batting

PAST PARTICIPLE

batted

PAST PERFECT

I had batted
you had batted
he/she/it had batted
we had batted
they had batted

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been batting
you had been batting
he/she/it had been batting
we had been batting
they had been batting

PRESENT

I bat
you bat
he/she/it bats
we bat
they bat

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am batting
you are batting
he/she/it is batting
we are batting
they are batting

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

batting

PRESENT PERFECT

I have batted
you have batted
he/she/it has batted
we have batted
they have batted

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been batting
you have been batting
he/she/it has been batting
we have been batting
they have been batting

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it bat

SIMPLE PAST

I batted
you batted
he/she/it batted
we batted
they batted

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