How Do You Spell BE?

Pronunciation: [bˈiː] (IPA)

The word "be" is spelled using only two letters, but its pronunciation can be tricky for non-native speakers. The IPA phonetic transcription for "be" is /bi/ which includes the short vowel sound /i/. This sound is made by lifting the tongue to the roof of the mouth and stretching the lips into a small smile. The spelling of "be" may seem simple, but its pronunciation can vary depending on the context and the speaker's accent.

BE Meaning and Definition

  1. Be is a verb that primarily functions as the copula or link verb in the English language. It is used to indicate existence, identity, or a state of being. The word "be" signifies the act of being, existing, or happening in a particular way.

    As an auxiliary verb, "be" is widely employed in forming tenses and moods of other verbs, such as the progressive tense (e.g., "I am running") or the passive voice (e.g., "The book was written"). It can also function as a standalone verb, indicating a continuous action (e.g., "He is always laughing") or as a main verb expressing a state of existence (e.g., "They are students").

    "Be" is also utilized to connect the subject of a sentence with a noun, pronoun, or adjective, either to identify or describe it (e.g., "He is a doctor," "She is intelligent"). Additionally, it finds usage in creating imperatives (e.g., "Be quiet!") or forming conditional statements (e.g., "If I were rich...").

    Furthermore, "be" can indicate the location or position of someone or something (e.g., "She is in the park," "The paper is on the table"). It often serves as a significant element in forming continuous verb forms, passive voice, ensuring correct subject-verb agreement, and expressing various grammatical structures.

    Overall, "be" is an essential and versatile verb that carries the fundamental meaning of existence, identity, or a state of being, playing a crucial role in constructing sentences and conveying information across multiple contexts.

  2. • Infin. of the verb am, denoting to exist, to become, to remain; used in hypothetical and secondary propositions-as "If I be," "If thou be:".
    • A prefix, signifying to make. When be is prefixed to a noun, the noun becomes a verb-thus, calm and friend are nouns, but becalm and befriend are verbs: be prefixed to a verb signifies about, over, for-thus, speak and think become bespeak and bethink: be in a preposition, an adverb, or a conjunction, has the force of by or in-thus.

    Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Top Common Misspellings for BE *

  • lbe 11.533052%
  • dbe 9.9156118%
  • ber 5.4149085%
  • ve 4.5007032%
  • bea 2.1800281%
  • bbe 2.1800281%
  • bve 2.883263%
  • bne 1.7580872%
  • bo 1.6174402%
  • tbe 1.4767932%
  • bew 1.4064697%
  • bwe 1.4064697%
  • bre 1.3361462%
  • beh 0.7735583%
  • abe 0.7032348%
  • bei 0.7032348%
  • bhe 0.5625879%
  • obe 0.4922644%
  • vbe 0.4922644%
  • mbe 0.4219409%
  • bu 0.3516174%
  • hbe 0.3516174%
  • bge 0.2812939%
  • rbe 0.2812939%
  • bes 0.2109704%
  • bec 0.1406469%
  • bde 0.1406469%
  • ibe 0.1406469%
  • bt 0.1406469%
  • bc 0.1406469%
  • beb 0.1406469%
  • bev 0.1406469%
  • bie 0.1406469%
  • wbe 0.0703234%
  • ue 0.0703234%
  • ebe 0.0703234%
  • bue 0.0703234%

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for BE

Etymology of BE

The word "be" originated from the Old English word "bēon" which had various forms and spellings like "beon", "bion", and "beom". This Old English word can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic word "beuną". The Proto-Germanic word, in turn, evolved from the Proto-Indo-European root word "bʰuH-" which means "to become", "to grow", or "to be". This root word has also given rise to related words in other languages such as "être" in French and "sein" in German.

Idioms with the word BE

  • let sb be The idiom "let sb be" means allowing or permitting someone to behave or act as they desire without interference or judgment, recognizing their right to have their own opinions, preferences, or way of doing things. It implies accepting someone as they are without trying to change or control them.
  • leave sb be The idiom "leave sb be" means to allow someone to be alone or undisturbed; to refrain from interfering with or bothering someone.
  • be past your sellby date The idiom "be past your sell-by date" refers to someone or something that is no longer useful, relevant, or effective. It suggests that the person or thing has reached a point of expiration or obsolescence and is no longer of value or interest.
  • be in/under sb's shadow The idiom "be in/under sb's shadow" means to exist or work in the less prominent position or overshadowed by someone else who is more successful, respected, or powerful. It implies being constantly compared or overshadowed by the accomplishments or influence of another person.
  • be quick/slow off the mark The idiom "be quick/slow off the mark" refers to someone's ability or speed in taking action or making a response. "Quick off the mark" means being prompt and alert, able to react swiftly to a situation or opportunity. On the other hand, "slow off the mark" indicates a delay or hesitation in taking action, showing a lack of alertness or readiness.
  • be not on The idiom "be not on" means to not be happening or occurring at a particular time or place. It can also refer to something that is not possible or feasible. It generally implies a lack of availability, suitability, or appropriateness in a given situation.
  • be past it The idiom "be past it" is used to describe someone or something as being too old or no longer capable of performing a certain task or function. It suggests that the person or thing has reached a stage where their skills, abilities, or relevance are diminished or outdated.
  • be/go off on one The idiom "be/go off on one" means to become excessively angry, agitated, or behave in an irrational or unrestrained manner, often involving outbursts of criticism, shouting, or argumentative behavior.
  • be out on your ear The idiom "be out on your ear" means to be abruptly dismissed or expelled from a place, especially from a job, with little or no warning or consideration. It implies being forced to leave in a disgraced or humiliating manner.
  • be the pride of smw/sth The idiom "be the pride of smw/sth" means to be a source of great pride, satisfaction, and admiration for someone or something. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is highly esteemed, celebrated, or considered an outstanding example within a particular context or group.
  • be under sb's spell The idiom "be under someone's spell" means to be completely captivated or charmed by someone, often to the point that their influence or control over you is very strong and you are unable to resist or think for yourself. It suggests being so infatuated or enchanted that one is almost hypnotized or under a magical spell.
  • be too clever by half To be too clever by half means to be excessively or unnecessarily clever or cunning, often resulting in self-defeat or unintended consequences. It implies that the individual's excessive intelligence or cleverness leads them to make mistakes or overlook simpler, more practical solutions. This idiom is often used to caution against overthinking or being overly complicated in an attempt to outsmart others.
  • be hot on sb's track/trail The idiom "be hot on sb's track/trail" means to closely follow or pursue someone, often with the intention of catching or finding them. It expresses the idea of relentless pursuit or determination in trying to locate or apprehend a particular person.
  • be under the gun The idiom "be under the gun" means to be under pressure or facing a deadline, usually in a stressful or critical situation where quick action or a decision is required. It often implies being in a difficult or challenging position with limited time or resources to fulfill expectations.
  • be dead in the water The idiom "be dead in the water" means to be completely unsuccessful, stagnant or without any chance of progress or success. It refers to a situation or endeavor that is unable to move forward or make any significant progress, similar to a boat that has stopped moving in the water and cannot continue.
  • boys will be boys The idiom "boys will be boys" is a phrase used to describe or excuse certain behavior that is typically associated with boys or young males, especially behavior that may be rough, mischievous, or impulsive. It suggests that such behavior is natural or expected. However, it is important to note that this phrase can perpetuate harmful stereotypes and may be used to justify or overlook negative actions.
  • be your own person/woman/man The idiom "be your own person/woman/man" means to have independence and individuality, not being easily influenced or controlled by others. It implies being true to oneself, making decisions based on personal values and beliefs rather than conforming to societal expectations or the opinions of others. It emphasizes finding and asserting one's unique identity and pursuing personal goals and desires without being overly influenced by external pressures.
  • be blowed if... The idiom "be blowed if..." is used to convey strong disagreement, refusal, or defiance. It implies that the speaker is resolute in their stance and will not comply or agree with something under any circumstances.
  • I'll be blowed! The idiom "I'll be blowed!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, disbelief, or astonishment. It is often used when someone is taken aback by something unexpected or shocking.
  • the powers that be The idiom "the powers that be" is often used to refer to the people or forces that have authority, control, or influence over a particular situation or organization. It typically implies a sense of higher powers or decision-makers who hold the ultimate responsibility or power in a given context.
  • not be sb's day The idiom "not be someone's day" means that someone is having a streak of bad luck or experiencing a series of unfortunate events within a particular day or timeframe. It implies that things are not going well for that person and they seem to be encountering obstacles or problems throughout the day.
  • be easy game/meat The idiom "be easy game/meat" means to be an easy target, easily defeated, or vulnerable to attack or exploitation. It suggests that a person, situation, or thing is weak, defenseless, or lacking in resistance.
  • be free with your favours The idiom "be free with your favours" typically means to readily or generously give help, assistance, or special treatment to someone. It implies being open-handed and willing to provide favors or benefits without hesitation or hesitation, often showing a kind or helpful nature.
  • be in/out of luck The idiom "be in/out of luck" means to have good or bad fortune respectively. It implies that one is either fortunate and likely to succeed, or unfortunate and unlikely to succeed in their endeavors.
  • be your own master The idiom "be your own master" means to be independent, self-reliant, and in control of one's own actions and decisions without being influenced or controlled by others. It entails being able to make choices and take responsibility for one's own life and outcomes.
  • be the new sth The idiom "be the new something" is typically used to describe someone or something that is the latest or most recent version or iteration of a certain thing or concept. It implies that the person or thing being referred to has taken over a specific role, position, or trend and is now considered the newest or most relevant. It often signifies a change or shift in the prevailing norms or standards.
  • be out on ear The idiom "be out on ear" means to be forcefully and abruptly dismissed or fired from a job or position. It implies being expelled or removed with no chance of return or reconciliation.
  • be easy on the ear The idiom "be easy on the ear" means that something, typically music or sounds, is pleasing or enjoyable to listen to. It refers to something that is melodious, harmonious, or pleasant in its auditory quality.
  • be the meat in the sandwich The idiom "be the meat in the sandwich" refers to a situation where someone is caught between two conflicting or opposing parties or forces, often feeling trapped or squeezed in the middle. It implies being in a difficult or uncomfortable position where one has to navigate and manage two opposing sides or situations.
  • be easy meat The idiom "be easy meat" means to be an easy target or someone who is easily defeated or taken advantage of. It suggests vulnerability, weakness, or lack of resistance.
  • be spoonfed To be spoonfed means to be provided with information or instructions in a very explicit, clear, or simple manner, often without having to put in much effort or think critically. It implies that someone is being given information in a manner that requires very little personal initiative or independent thought.
  • be going spare The idiom "be going spare" means to have an excess or surplus of something, usually something that is not needed or not being used. It suggests that the person or entity has more of that thing than required, resulting in it being available or "going spare" for others to use or take.
  • be broad in the beam The idiom "be broad in the beam" refers to someone or something that is wide or broad in the hips or buttocks. It is often used to describe individuals who have a wide or large physique, particularly in the lower body area.
  • be slow off the mark The idiom "be slow off the mark" means to be slow to react or respond to a situation, often implying a lack of alertness, quick thinking, or promptness in taking action.
  • better be going The idiom "better be going" means that it is time to leave or depart from a place or situation. It implies that the speaker must end their presence or participation and move on to another activity or location.
  • be bone idle The definition of the idiom "be bone idle" is to be extremely lazy or idle, showing no interest or willingness to work or make an effort.
  • be tightarsed The idiom "be tightarsed" refers to someone who is excessively stingy or unwilling to spend money or show generosity. It describes a person who is overly concerned about saving money and tends to be unwilling to indulge in any kind of expenditure.
  • be the toast of sb The idiom "be the toast of sb" means to be celebrated, praised, or admired by someone or a group of people. It implies that an individual or an accomplishment has gained widespread recognition and approval, resulting in being popular or highly regarded among others. Being the "toast" signifies being the subject of a toast or a public expression of admiration and goodwill.
  • be touchandgo The idiom "be touch-and-go" is used to describe a situation that is uncertain or risky, with an outcome that could go either way. It implies that the outcome is hanging in the balance, and success or failure is uncertain or dependent on a narrow margin.
  • be/go out on the town The idiom "be/go out on the town" means to socialize or enjoy oneself by participating in various activities or going to different places, especially at night. It often implies engaging in leisure and entertainment outside one's usual routine, such as going to parties, concerts, clubs, restaurants, or bars.
  • be offcolour The idiom "be off color" typically refers to a person not feeling well or being in poor health. It can also be used to describe someone who is acting unusual or behaving differently than their normal self.
  • be punchdrunk The idiom "be punchdrunk" refers to being mentally or physically exhausted, disoriented, or confused, particularly as a result of repeated blows or setbacks. It originated from boxing, where a boxer who has taken numerous blows to the head may become dazed, unsteady, or disoriented, resembling someone who is drunk. This idiom is often used to describe someone who is overwhelmed or worn out after facing a series of challenges or setbacks.
  • be your own man/woman/person The idiom "be your own man/woman/person" means to be independent and self-reliant, making decisions and living life according to one's own principles and values rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes the importance of being true to oneself and not conforming to societal expectations or pressures.
  • be halfcut The idiom "be halfcut" means to be intoxicated or inebriated, typically referring to a state of being half drunk or partially intoxicated by alcohol.
  • on head be it The idiom "on head be it" means taking full responsibility or bearing the consequences of one's actions or decisions. It implies that the individual is accepting the accountability or ownership of a certain matter, regardless of the outcome or potential negative consequences.
  • be dead on feet The idiom "be dead on feet" means to be extremely exhausted or physically drained to the point of extreme fatigue, where one can hardly continue or function.
  • be dead from the waist down The idiom "be dead from the waist down" is typically used to describe a lack of sexual desire or arousal in a person. It implies a complete absence or inability to experience sexual sensations or emotions. However, it is essential to note that this idiom is considered informal and potentially offensive, and should be used with caution.
  • will be the death of The idiom "will be the death of" means that something or someone is causing great worry, annoyance, or distress, and may ultimately lead to the downfall, harm, or demise of someone or something. It suggests that the particular thing or person in question is causing so much trouble that it could potentially lead to a disastrous or fatal outcome.
  • be kneedeep in The idiom "be kneedeep in" means to be heavily involved or overwhelmed with a specific activity, situation, or responsibility. It implies being deeply immersed or engrossed in something to the point where one may feel overwhelmed or have difficulty managing other aspects of their life.
  • What must be, must be. The idiom "What must be, must be" means that certain events or outcomes are inevitable and cannot be changed or prevented. It suggests accepting fate or accepting that some things are beyond one's control.
  • be wide open The idiom "be wide open" typically means to be vulnerable or unprotected, often referring to a person or situation that is easily accessible or easily taken advantage of. It suggests that there are no barriers or defenses in place, leaving it susceptible to potential threats or harm.
  • be hunkydory The idiom "be hunkydory" means that everything is going well or just fine. It is often used to describe a situation, an event, or someone's general state of affairs that is satisfactory and without any problems or issues.
  • let sb/sth be The idiom "let sb/sth be" means to allow or leave someone or something alone without interference or disturbance. It is often used when advising against intervening or taking action, suggesting that it is better to leave things as they are.
  • be the last person The idiom "be the last person" typically means that someone is the most unlikely or least expected individual to perform a particular action or be involved in a certain situation. They are considered to be the least likely candidate or the opposite of what was expected.
  • Let it be The idiom "Let it be" means to leave a situation as it is, without trying to change or intervene in it. It often suggests acceptance of the current circumstances or a decision to not take any action. It can also be seen as a way to encourage patience or to let go of worries and allow things to unfold naturally.
  • let be The idiom "let be" means to allow things to remain as they are, without interference or attempting to change them. It indicates acceptance or non-interference in a situation.
  • powers that be The idiom "powers that be" refers to the individuals or groups who hold authority, control, or influence over a particular situation or system. It often implies that these people are in high positions of power and decision-making.
  • be a/the model of sth The idiom "be a/the model of sth" typically means to be an excellent or perfect example of something. It refers to someone or something that embodies all the qualities, values, or behavior that is considered ideal or desirable in a particular situation or context. Being a model of something implies setting a high standard or ideal that others can aspire to or learn from.
  • be past sellby date The idiom "be past sell-by date" means that someone or something is no longer useful, effective, or relevant. It implies that a person or thing has become outdated or obsolete, similar to a product that has exceeded its expiration date and is no longer suitable for consumption or sale.
  • be pieeyed The idiom "be pie-eyed" refers to being extremely intoxicated or drunk to the point of having impaired vision or unsteady movement, often resulting from excessive consumption of alcohol.
  • far be it from me The idiom "far be it from me" means expressing humility or modesty by stating that one is in no position to make a judgment or interfere in a particular matter. It is often used to distance oneself from a suggested action, opinion, or responsibility.
  • be the last person (to do sth) The idiom "be the last person (to do sth)" means that someone is unlikely or very unwilling to do a particular thing. It implies that the person mentioned is the least likely or the most averse among a group of people to take a specific action.
  • be honourbound The idiom "be honourbound" means to have a moral or ethical obligation to fulfill certain duties or responsibilities, typically based on one's sense of honor or integrity. It implies a strong commitment to one's word or a promise made, often involving upholding principles and doing what is considered right.
  • Glory be! The idiom "Glory be!" is an expression used to convey surprise, astonishment, or awe, often in response to something remarkable or unexpected. It is an exclamation of enthusiasm or amazement, similar to saying "Wow!" or "Oh my goodness!"
  • be own man The idiom "be your own man" refers to being independent, self-sufficient, and making decisions or taking actions that are true to oneself, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes having one's individuality, autonomy, and the ability to think and act independently.
  • be game The idiom "be game" means to be willing or ready to do something, especially something challenging or risky. It implies being enthusiastic, eager, and determined to take on a particular task or participate in an activity without hesitation.
  • be kneedeep in sth The idiom "be kneedeep in sth" means to be fully involved or heavily immersed in a particular situation or activity. It describes being overwhelmed or occupied to the extent that it becomes difficult to manage or extricate oneself from the situation.
  • be fresh from swh The idiom "be fresh from" something refers to someone or something that has recently come from a particular place or experience. It suggests that the person or thing is still influenced or affected by that place or experience.
  • Be good. The idiom "Be good" is a common term used as a way of bidding farewell or parting, typically used between friends or family members. It is a casual expression that generally implies a wish or reminder for someone to behave well or act appropriately in their absence.
  • be under feet The idiom "be under feet" means to be in someone's way or constantly present and causing inconvenience or annoyance. It implies that the individual is overly present or hovering, making it difficult for others to easily move or complete tasks.
  • if need be The idiom "if need be" means that something will be done or take place if it is necessary, required, or deemed appropriate in a particular situation.
  • be no/nobody's fool The idiom "be no/nobody's fool" means to be intelligent, shrewd, or clever, and not easily tricked or deceived by others. It refers to someone who is wise and cautious in their decision-making, not falling for manipulations or deceitful tactics.
  • be hard on The idiom "be hard on" means to criticize or treat someone or something sternly, strictly, or harshly. It can also imply being demanding, unsympathetic, or rigorous when judging someone's performance or behavior.
  • be death on The idiom "be death on" means to strongly disapprove of or have a strong aversion towards something or someone. It implies being exceptionally strict, intolerant, or critical towards a particular behavior, action, or person.
  • be one's own man The idiom "be one's own man" typically means to be independent, self-reliant, and not easily influenced or controlled by others. It suggests that an individual has a strong sense of individuality and autonomy, making their own decisions and taking responsibility for their actions without being swayed by external pressures or opinions.
  • so be it The idiom "so be it" is a phrase used to indicate acceptance or agreement with a certain outcome or situation, even if it may not be the ideal or preferred outcome. It implies an acknowledgement and resignation to the existing circumstances, suggesting that no further action or discussion is necessary.
  • be (or get) in someone's face The idiom "be (or get) in someone's face" refers to aggressively confront or challenge someone, usually by invading their personal space or speaking directly and aggressively towards them. It implies getting physically close and creating an uncomfortable or confrontational atmosphere. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is being overly assertive, confrontational, or disrespectful towards another person.
  • be off! The idiom "be off!" is an informal command used to tell someone to leave or go away immediately. It is often used to express annoyance or impatience with someone's presence.
  • I’ll be damned! The idiom "I'll be damned!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, disbelief, or astonishment about something. It conveys a sense of shock or strong emotion, often in response to unexpected or incredible events or information.
  • I’ll be darned! The idiom "I'll be darned!" is an expression of surprise, disbelief, or astonishment. It is often used when something unexpected or inexplicable happens, causing the speaker to be amazed or caught off guard.
  • be somebody’s man The idiom "be somebody’s man" typically means to be a loyal and devoted supporter, ally, or subordinate of someone, particularly in a professional or personal context. It implies that one is dedicated to fulfilling the needs, wants, or desires of the other person. It can also suggest being under someone's authority or influence and carrying out their instructions or wishes.
  • be your own man/woman The idiom "be your own man/woman" means to be independent, self-reliant, and make decisions based on one's own judgment and principles, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It suggests taking ownership of one's actions and beliefs, and not conforming to societal expectations or yielding to external pressures.
  • be close to/near the mark The idiom "be close to/near the mark" means to be approximately correct or accurate in one's assessment, estimation, or judgement. It implies that the statement or opinion is not entirely precise, but it is in the general vicinity of being correct.
  • be your own master/mistress The idiom "be your own master/mistress" refers to the act of being independent, self-reliant, and in control of one's own actions and decisions. It means having the freedom to make choices without being dependent on others, and being responsible for one's own success or failure. It implies being in charge of one's own destiny and not being subservient to anyone else.
  • be quick/fast on the draw The idiom "be quick/fast on the draw" means to react or respond quickly and effectively in a situation, often involving making decisions or taking action promptly. It originates from the expression used in Westerns, describing somebody who is skilled at drawing a gun from a holster quickly during a confrontation. In a broader sense, it refers to someone who is rapid and efficient in their actions or responses.
  • be sick The idiom "be sick" typically refers to a physical condition where someone is unwell or experiencing an illness or ailment. It means to be feeling ill or vomiting.
  • be even The idiom "be even" typically means to have settled a debt, balanced accounts, or resolved a conflict, resulting in a state of equality or fairness between parties involved.
  • be fair! The idiom "be fair!" is an exclamation or statement used to urge someone to act impartially or justly in a particular situation. It is often used when expressing a desire or demand for equal treatment or fairness.
  • be no/nobody’s fool The idiom "be no/nobody’s fool" means to be intelligent, wise, or shrewd, and not easily deceived or taken advantage of by others. It implies that a person is not gullible or naïve, but rather astute and discerning in their judgment.
  • leave/let somebody/something be The idiom "leave/let somebody/something be" means to refrain from interfering with or disturbing someone or something. It suggests that it is better to leave someone or something alone in order to maintain the current state or to avoid causing any harm or inconvenience. It implies that it is important to respect personal boundaries or to refrain from unnecessary meddling or intervention.
  • -to-be The idiom "-to-be" is used to indicate that someone or something is destined or expected to become a particular thing in the future. It is often added to nouns to describe their upcoming state or role.
  • be child’s play The idiom "be child's play" means that something is very easy to do or accomplish, similar to how children's tasks or games tend to be simple and straightforward.
  • be the cat’s whiskers/pyjamas The idiom "be the cat's whiskers/pyjamas" is used to describe someone or something that is considered to be exceptional, outstanding, or superior in some way. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is highly regarded or of high social status.
  • that’ll be the day The idiom "that'll be the day" is typically used to express strong skepticism or disbelief towards the possibility of something happening. It can convey a sense of irony or doubt regarding a certain event, often used in a sarcastic or humorous manner.
  • be (a bit) on the large side The idiom "be (a bit) on the large side" refers to something being bigger or larger than usual or desired. It is often used to describe an object or a person's body shape that is slightly larger than what is considered to be average or ideal.
  • be (not) big on (something) The idiom "be (not) big on (something)" means to have a strong preference or inclination toward or against something. It is often used to express a personal liking or disliking for a particular thing, activity, or idea.
  • be (one's) own man/woman/person The idiom "be one's own man/woman/person" means to be independent and self-reliant, making one's own decisions and not being influenced or controlled by others. It implies that the person is confident and assertive in their choices, ideals, and actions, without being swayed by external pressures or opinions.
  • be beat The idiom "be beat" typically means to be extremely tired, exhausted, or worn out, usually as a result of physical or mental exertion. It implies a state of fatigue or being completely drained.
  • be easy on the eye(s) The idiom "be easy on the eye(s)" means that something or someone is visually attractive or pleasant to look at.
  • be fresh from The idiom "be fresh from" means to have recently experienced or come from a particular event, situation, or location. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is still influenced or affected by that recent experience.
  • be half-dead The idiom "be half-dead" refers to a state of extreme exhaustion, physical weakness, or feeling very close to death. It implies that the person is extremely tired or fatigued to the point where they can barely function or continue with their activities.
  • on the scene, be The definition of the idiom "on the scene, be" means to be present or in attendance at a particular event or location. It refers to being physically present at the place where something is happening or where an incident has occurred.
  • be tight-arsed The idiom "be tight-arsed" refers to someone who is overly strict, stingy, or inflexible, especially when it comes to spending money or following rules. This individual tends to be very careful and reluctant to let loose or be spontaneous.
  • be dead on (one's) feet The idiom "be dead on (one's) feet" means to be extremely exhausted or fatigued, to the point where one is barely able to remain upright or keep one's eyes open. It implies being physically or mentally drained after intense or prolonged activity.
  • be honor-bound The idiom "be honor-bound" means to feel a strong moral or ethical obligation to do something due to a sense of personal integrity or duty. It implies a commitment or responsibility that one feels compelled to fulfill, driven by principles of honesty, integrity, or loyalty.
  • (one had) better be going The idiom "(one had) better be going" means that it is advisable or necessary for someone to leave or depart from a place or situation. It implies that there is a sense of urgency or a need to leave due to various reasons such as time constraints, obligations, or other commitments.
  • (well,) I'll be hanged! The idiom "(well,) I'll be hanged!" is an exclamation used to express surprise, disbelief, or astonishment. It is similar to saying "Well, I'll be darned!" or "I can't believe it!" It originates from the practice of hanging as a form of capital punishment, suggesting that the speaker would be so shocked or dumbfounded by a situation that they would deserve to be hanged if they didn't believe it to be true. However, in modern usage, it is used figuratively without any literal connotations.
  • (well,) I'll be! The idiom "(well,) I'll be!" is an exclamation used to express surprise or astonishment about something unexpected or unusual. It often signifies that the person saying it is taken aback by a situation or revelation.
  • be (a/the) model of The idiom "be (a/the) model of" means to exemplify the characteristics or qualities of an ideal or perfect example of something. It refers to being a person, thing, or situation that sets a standard or serves as a role model for others to follow or imitate.
  • be (one's) own master The idiom "be one's own master" refers to the state of being independent and having control over one's own actions, decisions, and life, without being subject to the authority or influence of others. It implies having the freedom and autonomy to make choices and take responsibility for the consequences without needing approval or guidance from others.
  • be (sitting) on (one's) tail The idiom "be (sitting) on (one's) tail" typically means to be impatient or in a hurry, unable to wait for something or someone. It suggests that someone is eagerly anticipating or anxiously waiting for a desired outcome or result.
  • be (someone's) call The idiom "be (someone's) call" means to be someone's decision or choice to make. It implies that the responsibility or authority to decide something rests with a particular individual.
  • be a/the poor man's sb/sth The idiom "be a/the poor man's sb/sth" refers to a lesser or inexpensive alternative to someone or something that is considered to be of higher quality, prestige, or status. It implies that the mentioned person or thing is not as great or impressive as the one being compared to, but could still fulfill a similar purpose or function.
  • be below/under par The idiom "be below/under par" is usually used in sports and refers to someone or something performing below the expected or desired level of achievement or quality. It originates from golf, where par is the number of strokes a skilled player is expected to require to complete a hole or course. If someone or something is below or under par, it means they are not meeting expectations or not performing as well as they should be.
  • be brothers/sisters under the skin The idiom "be brothers/sisters under the skin" means to share a very close bond or similarity with someone, often despite outward differences or appearances. It implies that two individuals may seem different from the surface, but deep down, they have a strong connection or are very alike in their thoughts, feelings, or values.
  • be had The idiom "be had" typically means to be deceived, tricked, or fooled by someone or something. It implies that a person has been taken advantage of or made a fool of in a particular situation.
  • be not (oneself) The idiom "be not oneself" means to not behave or act in the usual or expected manner. It implies that the person is experiencing a change in behavior, mood, or demeanor that is uncharacteristic of their normal self.
  • be off-kilter The idiom "be off-kilter" means to be unbalanced, not functioning or working properly, or exhibiting irregularity or abnormality. It refers to something that is not in its usual or expected state, causing a sense of unease or discomfort.
  • be out on (one's) feet The idiom "be out on (one's) feet" means to be extremely exhausted or fatigued. It typically refers to someone who is so tired that they can barely stay awake or continue functioning.
  • be PO'd The idiom "be PO'd" is a colloquial expression that means to be extremely angry, mad, or infuriated about something. It is derived from the acronym "PO," which stands for "Pissed Off." So, when someone is "PO'd," it implies that they are highly aggravated or irate.
  • be the spice of life The idiom "variety is the spice of life" means that a diverse and varied range of experiences, activities, and people makes life more enjoyable, interesting, and fulfilling. It implies that monotony and routine can become tedious, while experiencing new things brings excitement and flavor to life.
  • be the toast of (the town) The idiom "be the toast of (the town)" refers to being the center of attention or admiration in a particular community or social circle. It means that someone has gained widespread recognition, popularity, and praise, making them highly celebrated or admired by others.
  • be toes up The idiom "be toes up" is an informal expression used to describe something or someone that is not functioning properly, broken, or dead. It implies that the item or person is no longer or temporarily out of operation.
  • be under (one's) feet The idiom "be under (one's) feet" refers to someone or something being in the way or obstructing one's movement or progress. It implies that the person or thing is causing inconvenience or annoyance by being too close or constantly present.
  • be under (someone's) spell The idiom "be under (someone's) spell" means to be completely enchanted, captivated, or influenced by someone, usually in a way that one cannot resist or escape their power or charm. It implies a state of being strongly and irresistibly drawn to someone, as if under a magical influence.
  • be under (someone's) wing The idiom "be under (someone's) wing" means to be under someone's protection, guidance, or mentorship. It suggests that the person being referred to is taking someone else under their care and providing support and guidance. It often implies a relationship based on trust and the willingness to help and nurture someone.
  • be under par The idiom "be under par" is a phrase derived from golf, where "par" refers to the expected number of strokes a skilled player should take to complete a hole or course. In a broader context, being "under par" means performing better than expected or exceeding the norm. It signifies surpassing the average or achieving a higher standard of excellence.
  • be under the cosh The idiom "be under the cosh" means to be under a lot of pressure or to be struggling with a difficult or demanding situation. It usually refers to a circumstance where someone feels overwhelmed and unable to cope with the challenges they are facing. The phrase is often used to describe situations where one is at a disadvantage or being dominated by external forces.
  • be under the pump The idiom "be under the pump" is a colloquial expression that means to be under pressure or in a stressful situation where one is required to work quickly and efficiently to meet deadlines or expectations. It implies feeling overwhelmed or burdened due to a heavy workload or demanding circumstances.
  • be under the spell of (someone) The idiom "be under the spell of (someone)" means to be mesmerized, influenced, or controlled by someone's charm, power, or charisma. It suggests that the person being referred to is unable to resist or think critically due to the captivating effect the other person has over them.
  • be under the wing of (someone) The idiom "be under the wing of (someone)" means to be under the protection, guidance, or care of someone who is more experienced, knowledgeable, or influential. It suggests being mentored or supported in one's endeavors by someone trusted and respected.
  • be up The idiom "be up" generally means to be awake and out of bed.
  • be past your/its best The idiom "be past your/its best" means to no longer be in one's or its prime or optimal condition. It refers to a decline or deterioration from a previously superior state, often pertaining to a person's physical abilities, attractiveness, or an object's overall function or quality.
  • bound to, be The idiom "bound to be" means extremely likely or certain to happen, unavoidable, or inevitable. It indicates a high degree of probability or a strong and predictable outcome.
  • be the butt of the joke The idiom "be the butt of the joke" refers to being the target or subject of a joke, often at one's own expense. It means being mocked, teased, or made fun of by others. The person who is the butt of the joke usually becomes the source of amusement or entertainment for others, typically because they are portrayed as foolish, gullible, or easily tricked.
  • be hard hit (by something) The idiom "be hard hit (by something)" means to be severely affected or impacted by a particular situation, event, or circumstance, often resulting in negative consequences. It implies that someone or something has experienced significant damage, loss, or hardship as a result of the mentioned factor.
  • out for, be The idiom "out for, be" means to be actively seeking or pursuing a particular goal or purpose. It implies that someone is determined and focused on achieving something.
  • crystal clear, be The idiom "crystal clear" means to be completely clear, evident, or easily understood. It refers to the level of clarity and transparency in communication or comprehension.
  • not be somebody's day The idiom "not be somebody's day" is used to express that someone is having a bad or unlucky day, where things do not go well for them.
  • that will be the day The idiom "that will be the day" is typically used to express strong doubt or disbelief about something happening or being possible, often in a sarcastic or dismissive tone. It implies that the event or circumstance mentioned is highly unlikely or completely improbable.
  • be dead on the vine The idiom "be dead on the vine" means that something is stagnant, unproductive, or unsuccessful, typically referring to a project, idea, or plan that has failed to progress or gain momentum. It implies that the situation is hopeless or unlikely to improve. The phrase draws its analogy from grapes that wither and die on the vine before they can fully ripen or be picked.
  • be the death of The idiom "be the death of" means that something or someone is causing great harm, stress, or annoyance, leading to one's downfall or demise. It suggests that the situation or individual is the cause of significant trouble or distress, potentially leading to detrimental consequences.
  • you'll be the death of me The idiom "you'll be the death of me" is an expression used to convey playful exasperation, frustration, or affectionate annoyance towards someone whose actions or behavior frequently cause distress, concern, or trouble for the speaker. It suggests that the person's actions or behavior may lead to the speaker's demise, usually in a figurative or exaggerated sense.
  • be done The idiom "be done" means to be finished or completed with a task, activity, or situation. It conveys the sense that the action is over and there is nothing more to be done regarding it.
  • be fast on the draw The idiom "be fast on the draw" refers to someone who is quick to react or respond to a situation, often implying the ability to think or act swiftly. Derived from the Old West, specifically the cowboy culture, it originally referred to the quickness of drawing a gun from its holster during a gunfight. In a broader sense, the phrase now denotes someone who is prompt, efficient, or decisive in their actions, generally in a competitive or challenging scenario.
  • be fast/quick on the draw The idiom "be fast/quick on the draw" means to react or respond quickly, particularly in a competitive or confrontational situation. It originated from the world of the American Old West, where a "draw" referred to the action of quickly pulling out a gun from its holster. Thus, someone who is "fast/quick on the draw" is ready to act swiftly and decisively.
  • be out on (one's) ear The idiom "be out on (one's) ear" means to be forcefully and abruptly expelled or dismissed from a place or situation, typically referring to losing a job, being evicted, or being officially rejected. It implies being expelled without any consideration or sympathy.
  • you, he, etc. will be lucky The idiom "you, he, etc. will be lucky" is used to express skepticism or doubt about the likelihood of someone's success or positive outcome in a given situation. It implies that the chances or probabilities are low, and luck would be the only means for them to accomplish or achieve what they desire.
  • you'll, he'll, etc. be lucky The idiom "you'll/he'll, etc. be lucky" is a sarcastic expression used to convey doubt or skepticism about the possibility of someone's success or good fortune. It implies that the chances of achieving something are very low or unlikely.
  • what(ever) will be, will be The idiom "what(ever) will be, will be" means that events or outcomes in life will happen as predetermined or inevitable, regardless of one's efforts or actions. It suggests acceptance and resignation to the unpredictability and uncontrollable nature of future events.
  • red in the face, be Being "red in the face" is an idiom that refers to someone feeling embarrassed, ashamed, or humiliated. It typically describes a person whose face turns red due to increased blood flow caused by these emotions.
  • far be it from The idiom "far be it from" is used to distance oneself or deny an association with a certain idea, action, or behavior, implying that it is completely opposite to one's beliefs or character.
  • be spoon-fed The idiom "be spoon-fed" means to be given information, instructions, or assistance in a very simplistic or basic manner, as if being fed by a spoon. It implies that the person receiving the information or help is not required to actively think or make an effort to understand or figure things out independently. It can also suggest a lack of self-sufficiency or independence.
  • put upon, be To "put upon" means to be taken advantage of, exploited, or imposed upon by others. It refers to a situation where someone is made to feel obligated or burdened with excessive demands or tasks. Being "put upon" implies a sense of unfairness or being taken for granted in various aspects of life, such as relationships, work, or social interactions.
  • on the fence, be The idiom "on the fence" means to be undecided or unsure about something. It refers to the act of being caught between two options or having difficulty making a decision.
  • be into The idiom "be into" means to have a strong interest in or enthusiasm for something. It implies being deeply involved in a particular activity, hobby, or subject matter.
  • be shot of (someone or something) The idiom "be shot of (someone or something)" means to get rid of or be free from someone or something, typically in a deliberate or decisive manner. It implies a desire to be rid of a burden, annoyance, or troublesome situation.
  • in good with, be The idiom "in good with, be" means to have a positive relationship or be on friendly terms with someone or a group of people, usually resulting in being favored, supported, or treated well by them. It implies having influence, connections, or a good reputation that leads to advantageous outcomes or benefits.
  • be on/off your guard To be on/off your guard means to be vigilant and watchful or to let down one's defenses and become less cautious. It refers to a person's state of readiness or preparedness for potential dangers or unexpected situations. When someone is on their guard, they are alert and cautious, anticipating possible risks. Conversely, when someone is off their guard, they are less attentive and exposed to potential problems.
  • be hard done-by The idiom "be hard done-by" means to be treated unfairly or poorly by others, usually in terms of being disadvantaged or not receiving what one deserves, leading to difficult circumstances or discontentment.
  • be hard on (one) The idiom "be hard on (one)" means to treat someone sternly or strictly, often being critical or demanding towards them. It denotes being tough or unsympathetic in one's judgment or expectations.
  • hard hit, be The idiom "hard hit, be" means to be severely affected or negatively impacted by something, often referring to a difficult or challenging situation or event. It indicates that the person or entity in question has experienced a significant blow or setback.
  • hard put, be The idiom "hard put, be" refers to a situation where someone is faced with extreme difficulty or struggling to find a solution to a problem. It implies that the person is in a challenging or tight spot, often implying that they are struggling to make a decision or find a way out of a difficult situation.
  • (one) will be lucky The idiom "(one) will be lucky" is typically used to convey skepticism or doubt about the possibility of something happening successfully or favorably. It implies that the chances of the desired outcome are low or slim.
  • on (one's) (own) head be it The idiom "on (one's) (own) head be it" is a phrase used to emphasize that a person will be solely responsible for the consequences of their actions or decisions. It signifies that the person will bear the full accountability and must accept any negative outcomes that may arise as a result of their choices.
  • on somebody's head be it The idiom "on somebody's head be it" typically means that someone should take full responsibility or face the consequences for their actions or decisions. It implies that the person will bear the burden or blame for whatever outcome or repercussions occur.
  • on your head be it The idiom "on your head be it" is used to express that someone takes full responsibility or accepts the consequences for a decision, action, or outcome. It implies that any negative consequences or effects resulting from that decision or action will be borne solely by the person making it.
  • be (not) (one's) type The idiom "be (not) (one's) type" is used to describe someone or something that is (not) a person's preferred or desired choice or match, particularly in terms of romantic or personal relationships. It implies that the person or thing does (not) possess the qualities or characteristics that one typically finds attractive or compatible.
  • be (one's) life The idiom "be (one's) life" typically refers to someone or something that plays a significant and integral role in a person's life. It signifies that the person's existence or daily routine revolves around that particular entity or activity.
  • be (one's) man/woman The idiom "be (one's) man/woman" refers to being a loyal and devoted supporter or follower of someone. It implies being committed to fulfilling their wishes or carrying out their orders. It often indicates a subordinate or subordinate-like relationship, where one person is completely devoted to another.
  • be (one's) place (to do something) The idiom "be (one's) place (to do something)" means to be someone's responsibility or duty to do a certain action or act in a particular way. It implies that it is appropriate or fitting for someone to fulfill a certain role or task based on their position or relationship to a situation.
  • be (well) on the/(one's) way to/towards (something) The idiom "be (well) on the/(one's) way to/towards (something)" means to be making significant progress or advancement in achieving a goal or reaching a particular destination. It suggests that someone is moving forward steadily and is likely to succeed or accomplish their objective.
  • be shut of (someone or something) The idiom "be shut of (someone or something)" means to successfully get rid of or be free from someone or something that is causing trouble, annoyance, or burden. It implies a sense of relief or liberation from a negative or unwanted presence.
  • be square (with one) The idiom "be square (with one)" means to be on good terms or to resolve any conflicts or disagreements with someone. It refers to being in a state of mutual understanding, agreement, or harmony with another person.
  • be the death of (one) The idiom "be the death of (one)" means that someone or something is causing extreme worry, anxiety, or frustration to someone. It implies that the situation may be detrimental to their well-being or causing them great distress.
  • be not (one's) day The idiom "be not (one's) day" means that a person is experiencing a series of misfortunes or a string of bad luck on a particular day. It suggests that everything seems to go wrong for someone on that specific day, leading to frustration or disappointment.
  • be past (someone's or something's) best The idiom "be past (someone's or something's) best" refers to a situation where someone or something is no longer in the prime of their abilities, performance, or quality. It suggests that their best days are behind them and that they are now in a state of decline or deterioration.
  • be scared of (one's) (own) shadow The idiom "be scared of (one's) (own) shadow" is used to describe someone who is excessively timid, fearful, or easily startled. It suggests that the person is constantly on edge and jumps at the slightest things, even something as harmless as their own shadow.
  • if needs be The idiom "if needs be" means if it is necessary or if the situation requires it. It implies that one is prepared to do something if there is a compelling need or demand for it, usually as a last resort.
  • be (with)in sight The idiom "be (with)in sight" means that something is visible or able to be seen. It implies that something is close enough to be observed or easily perceived.
  • be in The idiom "be in" has multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are three common definitions: 1. To be fashionable or trendy: If someone or something "is in," it means they are currently considered stylish, popular, or in vogue. This can apply to clothing, hairstyle, music, or any other aspect of popular culture. Example: "That new fashion style is really in right now." 2. To be present at a location or an event: When someone "is in," it means they are physically at a particular place or participating in a particular activity. Example: "I'll be in the office tomorrow." 3. To be involved or engaged in a particular situation, often a difficult or problematic one: If someone "
  • be (all) set (to do something) The idiom "be (all) set (to do something)" means to be fully prepared or ready to do something, often implying a strong determination or eagerness.
  • be a/the model of (something) The idiom "be a/the model of (something)" can be defined as a person or thing being an excellent example or embodiment of a particular quality or characteristic. It refers to someone or something that serves as a standard or ideal representation of a specific behavior, attitude, or trait.
  • be a/the poor man's (someone or something) The idiom "be a/the poor man's (someone or something)" refers to a person or thing that is considered to be a less expensive, less sophisticated, or less impressive version or alternative to someone or something else. It implies that the individual or object being compared is of lower quality, value, or status when compared to the more desirable or respected counterpart.
  • in touch, be The idiom "in touch, be" refers to someone actively maintaining communication or staying connected with others, typically through regular contact. It implies being accessible, responsive, and updated with current information, either personally or professionally. Being "in touch" conveys the idea of being connected or in communication with others, often indicating a level of involvement or engagement.
  • in with, be The idiom "in with, be" means to be on friendly or favorable terms with a particular group, organization, or influential individuals. It implies having a good relationship or being accepted within a specific social circle.
  • kids will be kids The idiom "kids will be kids" means that children behave in a certain way or engage in certain activities because it is a natural part of their age and development. It suggests that some behaviors considered immature or mischievous should be expected and tolerated to a certain extent as they are characteristic of children's behavior.
  • be the final straw The idiom "be the final straw" refers to a situation or action that becomes the last in a series of events or problems, ultimately causing someone to reach a breaking point or make a drastic decision. It implies that the cumulative weight of preceding issues is too much to bear, making the final event the tipping point.
  • leave it be The idiom "leave it be" means to not interfere with or attempt to change a situation or a person, and to let things remain as they are. It suggests accepting things as they are without further involvement or intervention.
  • let it/(one) be The idiom "let it/(one) be" means to allow something or someone to remain as they are, without interference or disturbance. It suggests leaving things or individuals in their current state or condition without trying to change or control them.
  • let there be light The idiom "let there be light" is a reference to a phrase from the Bible (Genesis 1:3) and is commonly used to express the idea of bringing forth illumination, brightness, or understanding in a situation or context. It is often used metaphorically to signify the initiation of something new or the arrival of knowledge, clarity, or enlightenment.
  • be somebody's life To be someone's life means to be extremely significant, important, or influential to someone. It implies being an essential part of someone's existence and having a profound impact on their happiness, well-being, or purpose.
  • be the (absolute) limit The idiom "be the (absolute) limit" is used to describe a situation, behavior, or event that is considered the maximum level of acceptability or endurance. It implies that something or someone has reached or exceeded the level of what is tolerable, appropriate, or reasonable.
  • be better off The idiom "be better off" means to be in a more favorable or advantageous position or situation. It implies that someone or something would be more successful, happier, or financially secure if certain circumstances were different.
  • be in the/sb's blood The idiom "be in the/sb's blood" means that a particular skill, talent, interest, or characteristic is inherent or innate to someone. It suggests that the person has a natural inclination or affinity for something due to their genetic or familial background. It implies that the person's behavior or abilities are deeply rooted in their nature, and they are likely to possess those traits throughout their life.
  • be (as) tough as nails The idiom "be (as) tough as nails" means to be extremely strong, resilient, and unyielding in the face of adversity or challenges. It describes someone who is not easily affected by difficulties and has a relentless determination to overcome obstacles.
  • be as clear as mud The idiom "be as clear as mud" means that something is very unclear, confusing, or difficult to understand. It implies that the information or communication being presented lacks clarity and is similar to trying to make sense of muddy water.
  • be in bad shape The idiom "be in bad shape" means to be in a poor or deteriorated condition, whether in terms of physical health, emotional well-being, or any other aspect. It implies that someone or something is not functioning or performing well and may require immediate attention or intervention.
  • be good friends The idiom "be good friends" refers to having a close and amiable relationship with someone, often implying a deep level of trust, support, and mutual understanding. It describes a strong bond between individuals who enjoy each other's company and share a harmonious connection.
  • be a slave to (something) To be a slave to something means to be completely controlled or dominated by it, unable to break free or resist its influence. It implies a lack of freedom or autonomy, as if one were bound to the thing or concept in question.
  • I'll be damned The idiom "I'll be damned" is an expression used to convey shock, surprise, or disbelief. It implies being extremely astonished or unable to believe something.
  • be queer for The idiom "be queer for" refers to someone having a strong or intense interest, admiration, or attraction towards something or someone unusual, unconventional, or different from the norm. It implies a sense of being captivated by or fascinated with something outside of the mainstream.
  • be in the black The idiom "be in the black" means to be financially profitable or to have a positive balance in one's financial accounts. It originates from the practice of using black ink to record profits in accounting books, whereas losses or negative balances were recorded in red ink. Therefore, being "in the black" signifies a favorable financial situation.
  • be long for this world The idiom "be long for this world" means that someone is not expected to live much longer or that their death is imminent. It implies that the person's health is deteriorating or they are in a dire condition that suggests they will not survive for an extended period.
  • be nothing to get excited about The idiom "be nothing to get excited about" means that something is unremarkable, ordinary, or not particularly impressive or interesting. It implies that the subject or situation being discussed does not warrant enthusiasm or excitement.
  • be up the pole The idiom "be up the pole" is an informal expression that means to be in a state of confusion, befuddlement, or disorganization. It refers to being mentally or conceptually lost, unsure of what to do or think, or having misguided ideas or beliefs. It signifies a situation where someone is unable to find clarity or direction in their thoughts or actions.
  • What's done cannot be undone. The idiom "What's done cannot be undone" means that once an action has been taken or a decision has been made, it cannot be reversed or changed. It emphasizes the finality and irreversibility of past events.
  • be in full swing The idiom "be in full swing" typically means that something is operating or happening at its highest level of productivity, activity, or intensity. It implies that an event, activity, or process is fully underway and functioning smoothly.
  • be/live on the breadline The idiom "be/live on the breadline" refers to living in a state of poverty or financial hardship, where one's income is barely enough to cover basic necessities such as food and housing. It implies a precarious and constrained lifestyle wherein people are often struggling to make ends meet.
  • be climbing the walls The idiom "be climbing the walls" refers to a state of extreme restlessness, agitation, or frustration. It describes a feeling of being trapped or confined, as if one needs to escape from a situation or environment.
  • not be on speaking terms The idiom "not be on speaking terms" refers to a situation where two individuals, usually friends, family members, or colleagues, are not communicating with each other due to a disagreement, misunderstanding, or conflict. It indicates a strained or broken relationship characterized by a lack of verbal interaction.
  • be in a transport of delight The idiom "be in a transport of delight" means experiencing extreme happiness, joy, or excitement. It signifies being deeply and ecstatically pleased or thrilled about something.
  • be different sides of the same coin The idiom "be different sides of the same coin" is used to describe two things, people, or concepts that may seem opposite or contradictory, but are actually closely related or interconnected in some way. It highlights the idea that though they may appear distinct, they share common characteristics or are part of a larger whole.
  • like a (real) bear, at be like a bear with a sore head The idiom "like a bear, at be like a bear with a sore head" refers to someone who is in a particularly bad or grumpy mood, exhibiting irritable or unpleasant behavior similar to that of an irritated bear. It suggests a state of extreme annoyance or irritability.
  • be marked out as sth The idiom "be marked out as sth" means to be singled out or recognized as something specific or distinct. It refers to being distinguished or identified for certain qualities, characteristics, or achievements that set someone or something apart from others.
  • be floating on air The idiom "be floating on air" means to feel ecstatically happy or euphoric. It suggests a state of immense joy or elation, as if one were literally floating above the ground.
  • be pressed for time The idiom "be pressed for time" means to have a limited amount of time or be in a hurry to complete a task or meet a deadline.
  • (I’ll) be seeing you The idiom "(I'll) be seeing you" is a phrase used to say goodbye to someone with the intention of meeting or seeing them again in the future. It is a friendly and hopeful way to part ways, implying that the speaker anticipates seeing the other person again soon or in the near future.
  • be hell-bent on The idiom "be hell-bent on" means to be determined or strongly committed to achieving a particular goal or outcome, often regardless of the consequences or obstacles. It implies a relentless, single-minded determination to pursue something, even if it may be difficult, dangerous, or against common sense.
  • be under a microscope The idiom "be under a microscope" means to be closely observed, scrutinized, or monitored, with all actions, behavior, or decisions meticulously analyzed and studied. It implies being in a situation where even minor errors or faults are easily noticed or criticized.
  • be watching the clock The idiom "be watching the clock" means to be constantly checking the time or eagerly waiting for a specific event or activity to end. It implies a sense of impatience or boredom with the current situation and a strong desire for time to pass quickly.
  • be joined in marriage/matrimony To be joined in marriage/matrimony means to enter into the state or ceremony of being married. It refers to the act of two individuals legally and formally becoming spouses, usually through a wedding ceremony and the acknowledgment of their commitment to each other.
  • be (as) fit as a fiddle The idiom "be (as) fit as a fiddle" means to be in excellent physical health and fitness. It suggests that someone is in a condition comparable to that of a well-tuned and perfectly functioning musical instrument, indicating their overall good health, energy, and vitality.
  • be cut to the bone The idiom "be cut to the bone" means to be reduced to the most essential or basic level, often referring to cutting costs, expenses, or resources to a minimum. It implies that something has been significantly reduced or eliminated, leaving only the bare minimum or necessities. This can be used to describe various situations where major reductions have been made, such as in business operations, personal finances, or even creative or artistic works.
  • be a one-way street The idiom "be a one-way street" typically refers to a situation, relationship, or arrangement where the benefits or actions flow in only one direction, with one party giving or contributing significantly more than the other, without receiving anything in return. It implies an unequal or unreciprocated nature, often highlighting an imbalance or unfairness.
  • (one) might be forgiven for (doing something) The idiom "(one) might be forgiven for (doing something)" means that someone could be pardoned or understood if they were to do a particular action, even if it is not entirely acceptable or expected. It suggests that the action is understandable given the circumstances or context.
  • be to blame (for something) The idiom "be to blame (for something)" means to be responsible or accountable for a mistake, wrongdoing, or negative outcome. It implies that the person played a role in causing the problem or is at fault for it.
  • be a shining example (of someone or something) The idiom "be a shining example (of someone or something)" means to serve as a positive or exemplary model for others to follow or emulate. It implies being exceptionally good, successful, or virtuous in a way that sets a high standard for others.
  • be tearing (one's) hair out The idiom "be tearing (one's) hair out" means to be extremely frustrated, anxious, or stressed about a situation or problem. It implies a sense of feeling overwhelmed or helpless, to the point where one figuratively wants to pull out their own hair as a sign of distress.
  • be up (one's) ass The idiom "be up (one's) ass" is considered vulgar and derogatory. It usually means that someone is deeply involved or attached to someone else, often in an intrusive or annoying manner. It suggests that the person being described is excessively clingy, intrusive, or overly attentive to another person, to the point of being bothersome or irritating.
  • be at odds with sth The idiom "be at odds with something" means to strongly disagree or have a conflicting opinion or position with something or someone. It implies being in a state of conflict, discord, or disagreement with a particular situation, belief, or individual.
  • be gone on The idiom "be gone on" is a colloquial expression that means to be strongly infatuated or obsessed with someone or something. It suggests a deep and intense attachment or attraction towards a person or object.
  • be like taking candy from a baby The idiom "be like taking candy from a baby" means that a task or action is extremely easy or effortless to do. It implies that achieving success or winning in a situation requires little to no effort, just as taking candy from a baby would be an incredibly simple task.
  • be taken under the wing of (someone) To be taken under the wing of someone means to be guided, protected, or mentored by that person. It suggests that the person takes someone else under their care, providing support, guidance, or assistance in their personal or professional development.
  • be center stage The idiom "be center stage" means to be in the spotlight or the focus of attention. It is often used to describe someone or something that is receiving the most attention or is the main attraction in a particular situation or event.
  • be in the club The idiom "be in the club" typically means to belong to a particular group or organization, to be a member of that group, or to be included in a specific social circle. It suggests being part of a community or having shared interests with a certain group of people.
  • be at pains to do something The idiom "be at pains to do something" means to make a special effort or take great care to do something. It implies that someone is putting in a lot of effort or going out of their way to ensure that a particular action or task is done properly or thoroughly.
  • be/come down on sb like a ton of bricks The idiom "be/come down on someone like a ton of bricks" means to criticize, reprimand, or punish someone severely and without mercy, typically for making a mistake or engaging in unacceptable behavior. It implies a forceful and heavy-handed approach in holding someone accountable for their actions.
  • force to be reckoned with "Force to be reckoned with" is an idiom that refers to a person, group, or thing that is powerful, influential, or highly capable and should not be underestimated. It suggests that the individual or entity in question possesses significant strength, skills, or resources, making them difficult to oppose or ignore.
  • be (caught) between a rock and a hard place The idiom "be (caught) between a rock and a hard place" means to be in a difficult and challenging situation where one has to make a decision between two equally unfavorable options, with no easy or ideal solution available. It implies feeling trapped or stuck, often resulting from circumstances beyond one's control.
  • have to be seen to be believed The idiom "have to be seen to be believed" is used to describe something that is so extraordinary or unbelievable that witnessing it firsthand is necessary in order to fully comprehend or accept its reality.
  • be of unsound mind The idiom "be of unsound mind" refers to the condition of a person who is mentally unstable or mentally impaired. It suggests that the person is not mentally balanced or rational in their thoughts or actions.
  • be up sb's ass The idiom "be up sb's ass" is an informal expression that is considered vulgar and offensive. It refers to someone being overly attentive, intrusive, or excessively involved in another person's business or personal affairs. It conveys the idea of being excessively close or intimate with someone, often to the point of being intrusive or annoying.
  • be baying for blood The idiom "be baying for blood" means to be demanding or seeking revenge or punishment for someone. It implies a strong desire for justice or retribution against a person who is perceived to have wronged or harmed others. The phrase "baying for blood" originates from the imagery of a pack of hunting dogs howling or baying loudly in anticipation of catching and attacking their prey.
  • be at/on the receiving end (of something) The idiom "be at/on the receiving end (of something)" refers to being on the receiving side of an action, often referring to negative consequences, criticism, or mistreatment. It implies being the target or recipient of something, whether it be physical, emotional, or verbal. This idiom suggests being subjected to the effects or consequences of someone else's actions or behavior.
  • be born with a silver spoon in (one's) mouth The idiom "be born with a silver spoon in (one's) mouth" means to be born into a wealthy or privileged family, where one enjoys a life of luxury and privilege from birth. It suggests that the person has inherited wealth and a high social status without having to work for it.
  • be done to death The idiom "be done to death" means that something has been used, discussed, or repeated excessively to the point of becoming boring, cliché, or unoriginal. It implies that the subject or idea has been thoroughly exhausted, and there is nothing new or fresh about it anymore.
  • be short of a bob or two The idiom "be short of a bob or two" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or mentally lacking. It suggests that the person is missing a few coins (bobs) in their mental capacity, drawing a comparison to being financially short. This idiom is primarily used in British English.
  • be the new rock and roll The idiom "be the new rock and roll" typically means to be the latest trend or popular movement that captures the attention and excitement of people in a similar way to how rock and roll music did when it first emerged. It refers to something that is seen as cool, rebellious, and cutting-edge in popular culture.
  • be worth your while The idiom "be worth your while" means that something is valuable, beneficial, or important enough to justify the time, effort, or expense required.
  • be down on like a ton of bricks The idiom "be down on like a ton of bricks" means to intensely criticize, reprimand, or punish someone in a harsh and unforgiving manner. It implies that the person's actions or behavior have incurred strong disapproval or wrath from others. The phrase conveys the seriousness and weight of the negative consequences the person may face.
  • be chasing your tail The idiom "be chasing your tail" means to spend a lot of time and effort on something without making any progress or achieving the desired outcome. It implies a sense of futility or being stuck in a repetitive and unproductive cycle, akin to a dog chasing its own tail without ever catching it.
  • be left to (one's) own resources The idiom "be left to (one's) own resources" means to be in a situation where one has to rely solely on their own abilities, skills, or available means to resolve a problem, accomplish a task, or achieve a goal. It implies being without external help or support and necessitates self-reliance and resourcefulness.
  • be falling over yourself to do something To be falling over yourself to do something means to be extremely eager and enthusiastic about doing something. It implies a great amount of eagerness, sometimes to the point of seeming excessive or unnecessary.
  • be up the spout The idiom "be up the spout" typically means to be in a difficult or precarious situation, often implying that one's plans or prospects have gone awry or are in jeopardy.
  • be as fast etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast as all get out" is typically used to describe someone or something that is exceptionally fast, quick, or speedy. It emphasizes a high level of speed or efficiency.
  • be of the same mind The idiom "be of the same mind" means to have the same opinion, viewpoint, or agreement on a particular matter among a group of individuals. It indicates a sense of unity, consensus, and shared understanding among people.
  • be in at something The idiom "be in at something" typically means to be present or involved in an event, activity, or situation, often suggesting timeliness or participation. It often implies being present at the beginning or during a significant moment.
  • be hoist/hoisted by/with your own petard The expression "be hoist/hoisted by/with your own petard" is a Shakespearean idiom that means to be caught or harmed by the schemes or devices one had intended to use against others. It refers to a literal mishap where someone is blown up by their own bomb (petard is an explosive device used in warfare). Metaphorically, it signifies the irony of someone experiencing the negative consequences of their own actions or plans.
  • be up to your ears/eyeballs/eyes in sth The idiom "be up to your ears/eyeballs/eyes in sth" means to be extremely busy or deeply involved in a particular activity, usually to the point of being overwhelmed or having too much of it. It conveys a sense of being completely immersed or surrounded by something, whether it be work, responsibility, or a particular situation.
  • be torqued off The idiom "be torqued off" means to be extremely angry or irritated about something.
  • be lightheaded The idiom "be lightheaded" refers to the feeling of dizziness or a slight state of confusion typically caused by various factors such as lack of oxygen, low blood pressure, fatigue, or a sudden change in body position. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a state of being mentally or emotionally disoriented or bewildered.
  • be on (one's) ass The idiom "be on (one's) ass" typically means to be in a state of failure, defeat, or adversity. It implies that someone is experiencing significant challenges or setbacks and is struggling to overcome them.
  • be staring sb in the face The idiom "be staring someone in the face" means that something is extremely obvious or evident, often referring to a problem, solution, or truth that is easily observable or apparent. It implies that the person should be able to see or understand it without much effort or analysis.
  • be on the mark The idiom "be on the mark" means to be accurate or correct in what you say, do, or predict. It refers to being precise and hitting the intended target or achieving the desired outcome.
  • be clued in The idiom "be clued in" means to be well-informed or knowledgeable about something, often implying being privy to secret or confidential information. It suggests that the person is aware of the facts, details, or inside information related to a specific situation or topic.
  • be your own worst enemy The idiom "be your own worst enemy" means to unintentionally undermine or sabotage oneself through one's own actions, attitudes, or decisions, leading to negative consequences or hindering personal growth and success. It refers to being one's own biggest obstacle or opponent in achieving desired outcomes.
  • be meat and drink to The idiom "be meat and drink to" means to be something that is greatly enjoyed or satisfying to someone, providing them with pleasure, satisfaction, or entertainment. It refers to something that someone finds highly enjoyable or fulfilling, comparable to the essential nourishment of food and drink.
  • be/take centre stage The idiom "be/take centre stage" refers to someone or something becoming the main focus or attracting the most attention in a particular situation or event. It implies that the person or thing is in the spotlight and dominating the attention and interest of others.
  • be just as well The idiom "be just as well" means that a particular outcome or situation would be equally good, acceptable, or preferable to another option. It suggests that there is no significant advantage or difference between the options being considered.
  • be all over The idiom "be all over" refers to someone being heavily involved in or having great control over a situation or person. It suggests that the person is present or influential in every aspect or aspect of someone's life or the situation in question.
  • be gone on sb The idiom "be gone on sb" means to have a strong and deep infatuation or crush on someone. It implies being strongly attracted to that person or having intense feelings of admiration or love for them.
  • be au fait with The idiom "be au fait with" means to be knowledgeable or well-informed about a particular subject or situation. It implies having a thorough understanding or familiarity with something.
  • be breathing fire The idiom "be breathing fire" means to be extremely angry or furious. It implies intense anger and the display of aggressive behavior or strong verbal attacks.
  • be in deep shit The idiom "be in deep shit" is a colloquial expression that means finding oneself in a significant amount of trouble, difficulty, or a problematic situation. It typically implies being in a situation with severe consequences or repercussions.
  • be a piece of cake The idiom "be a piece of cake" means that something is very easy to do or accomplish. It is often used to describe a task or situation that requires little effort or difficulty.
  • be cooking on gas The idiom "be cooking on gas" means that something or someone is operating or progressing very effectively, efficiently, or successfully. It implies that everything is going smoothly and as planned.
  • Be there with bells on The idiom "Be there with bells on" means to eagerly and enthusiastically attend an event or gathering. It implies that the person is excited and fully committed to participating in a particular activity or meeting.
  • be hot and cold The idiom "be hot and cold" refers to someone's inconsistent or unpredictable behavior, often characterized by alternating between enthusiasm or excitement and disinterest or apathy. It can also describe fluctuations between liking and disliking something or someone.
  • be ten a penny The idiom "be ten a penny" means that something is very common or easily found. It implies that the thing being referred to is not unique or special, but rather abundant or easily obtainable. It can also suggest that the item or person in question has little value or is not particularly impressive or remarkable.
  • come/be a poor second, third, etc. The idiom "come/be a poor second, third, etc." is used to describe a situation where someone or something is significantly inferior or not as good as the one in first place. It implies that the person or thing in second, third, etc. position falls short in terms of quality, performance, or achievement compared to the leader or winner.
  • be put behind bars The idiom "be put behind bars" means to be arrested and confined in a prison or jail. It refers to the act of being incarcerated for committing a crime or engaging in unlawful activities.
  • Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. The idiom "Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed" means that having low or no expectations can lead to a more content and fulfilling life. By not anticipating specific outcomes or having high hopes, one will avoid disappointment and be more easily satisfied with whatever they receive or experience. It suggests that by not constantly hoping for more or being let down by unmet expectations, one can find happiness in the present moment.
  • be sb's department The idiom "be sb's department" means the person being referred to is responsible for or knowledgeable about a specific subject or task. It implies that the individual is an expert or has authority in that particular area.
  • be in the driver’s seat The idiom "be in the driver's seat" means to be in control or in a position of power and influence. It originates from the literal act of driving a car, where the driver is in control of the vehicle's direction and speed. In a figurative sense, being in the driver's seat implies being the one who is leading or in charge of a situation.
  • be no love lost between (two people) The idiom "be no love lost between (two people)" refers to a situation where two individuals have a strong mutual dislike or animosity towards each other. It implies that there is a complete lack of affection or positive feelings between them.
  • be pressed/pushed for money, space, time, etc. The idiom "be pressed/pushed for money, space, time, etc." means to be in a situation where one lacks an adequate amount of money, space, time, or any other resource. It implies that the person is under pressure or experiencing a strong demand for that particular resource and is struggling to meet the required quantity or fulfill the obligations.
  • be the making of sb The idiom "be the making of sb" means that a certain experience or opportunity has a transformative effect on someone's life or career, positively shaping their future success or achievements. It implies that the particular situation or event played a crucial role in developing and enhancing the person's skills, abilities, or character.
  • be banging your head against a brick wall The idiom "be banging your head against a brick wall" means to persistently and fruitlessly attempt to achieve something, despite facing repeated obstacles or resistance. It implies that one's efforts are futile or ineffective, similar to the physical act of repeatedly hitting one's head against an impenetrable barrier like a brick wall.
  • be in a time warp The idiom "be in a time warp" refers to being in a situation or environment that seems to be from a different era, often characterized by outdated or old-fashioned elements. It suggests being out of touch with modern trends, advancements, or changes in society, as if one is stuck in the past.
  • be gasping for sth The idiom "be gasping for something" means to have a strong desire or longing for something, usually due to a specific need or a strong want. It suggests a feeling of desperation or intense craving.
  • be blowing in the wind The idiom "be blowing in the wind" means to be uncertain, unresolved, or undecided. It refers to a situation where the answer or solution is unclear, much like a leaf being blown around aimlessly by the wind.
  • be shitting bricks The idiom "be shitting bricks" is a colloquial phrase used to express extreme anxiety, fear, or nervousness about a situation. It implies a feeling of being extremely scared or worried to the point where it is as if one is metaphorically manufacturing or defecating bricks due to the high level of stress.
  • be the last straw The idiom "be the last straw" refers to a situation or event that becomes the final and decisive factor that pushes someone to their breaking point or beyond their tolerance level. It implies that a series of issues or problems may have accumulated, and when this final event occurs, it becomes the ultimate cause for someone to take action or reach a breaking point.
  • be backed into a corner The idiom "be backed into a corner" means to be put in a difficult or disadvantageous position where one has no alternative or escape; to be forced to confront a difficult situation with limited options or resources.
  • be up the duff The idiom "be up the duff" is a slang expression primarily used in British English to describe someone who is pregnant. It is a colloquial and informal way of referring to a woman expecting a child.
  • be glued to sth The idiom "be glued to something" means to be completely engrossed or fixated on something, often to the point of being unable to move or look away. It implies a strong and intense focus or concentration on a particular object, activity, or situation.
  • You had to be there The idiom "You had to be there" is used to convey that an experience, event, or situation is difficult or impossible to fully grasp or understand without having directly witnessed or been present for it. It implies that the descriptions or explanations provided may fall short in capturing the true essence, impact, or humor of what occurred.
  • be (in) the nature of the beast The idiom "be (in) the nature of the beast" refers to the inherent characteristics or behavior of a particular thing or person. It suggests that these traits are essential and unchangeable due to the nature or innate qualities of the subject. It implies that certain actions, outcomes, or behaviors are a natural or unavoidable consequence of the situation or individual involved.
  • be curtains for (someone or something) The idiom "be curtains for (someone or something)" means that it will bring about the end, ruin, or downfall of a person or thing. It suggests that the situation or event will result in a final and irreversible outcome, similar to the closing of curtains at the end of a play.
  • be wreathed in smiles The idiom "be wreathed in smiles" means to have a broad or full smile on one's face, often indicating great happiness, joy, or contentment. It implies that someone's face is completely covered by a smile, resembling a wreath of flowers encircling their expression.
  • be on the side of the angels The idiom "be on the side of the angels" means to act in a morally right or virtuous manner. It refers to someone's stance or actions that align with righteousness, goodness, or justice in a particular situation.
  • be (something) to the good The idiom "be (something) to the good" means to have a surplus or gain of something, especially in terms of money or resources. It implies that one's situation or position has improved or that they have benefited in some way.
  • not be as black as you are/it is painted The idiom "not be as black as you are/it is painted" means that something is not as negative or evil as it may seem or as it has been described. It suggests that appearances or initial judgments may be deceptive, and the situation or person in question might be more favorable or innocent than portrayed.
  • be in the throes of The idiom "be in the throes of" refers to being deeply involved in or experiencing intense or challenging circumstances, often related to a difficult or complex situation or emotion. It implies being completely engulfed or overcome by a particular state or process, often characterized by turmoil, struggle, or turmoil.
  • be yours for the taking The idiom "be yours for the taking" means that something is readily available or easily attainable for someone to take or possess. It implies that there are no obstacles or difficulties in obtaining what is being referred to.
  • be on sb's back The idiom "be on someone's back" means to constantly criticize or nag someone, to constantly bother or pester someone, or to put pressure on someone to do something. It implies that someone is monitoring, supervising, or pressuring another person in a persistent and annoying manner.
  • be all one to The idiom "be all one to" means to be indifferent or unconcerned about something or someone. It implies that no particular choice or preference is held, as everything is considered equal.
  • couldn't be happier The idiom "couldn't be happier" means that someone is extremely happy or satisfied with a situation or outcome. It implies that the level of happiness cannot be increased or exceeded, indicating a high degree of contentment.
  • be (really) sth The idiom "be (really) sth" means to exhibit or embody a specific quality or characteristic to a high degree. It implies that the person or thing being described possesses a notable or exceptional level of the stated attribute.
  • be scratching your head The idiom "be scratching your head" means to be confused or perplexed by something. It refers to the act of scratching one's head as a gesture of puzzlement or deep thought.
  • be a load/weight off your mind The idiom "be a load/weight off your mind" means to feel relieved or unburdened after removing a worry, concern, or problem from your thoughts or to have a sense of relief and peace by resolving a troubling issue or situation. It expresses the feeling of lightness and release that comes with overcoming a significant source of stress or anxiety.
  • If you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned. The idiom "If you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned" is used to convey the idea that if someone is destined to experience a particular negative fate or outcome, all other attempts to avoid it will be futile. It suggests that one's destiny or fate cannot be altered or avoided, and that no matter what precautions or actions one takes, their predetermined fate will eventually catch up with them.
  • be on song The idiom "be on song" means to be performing exceptionally well, usually in reference to a person, team, or organization functioning at their best and achieving excellent results. It signifies a state of being in perfect harmony, coordination, or synchronization.
  • be brain dead The idiom "be brain dead" refers to a state of extreme mental or intellectual incompetence or incapacitation. It implies that someone is completely lacking in intelligence, rational thinking, or common sense.
  • be etched on/in sb's memory The idiom "be etched on/in someone’s memory" means that a particular event, experience, or image is deeply ingrained and remembered vividly. It implies that the memory is enduring and indelible, possibly even haunting or impactful in some way.
  • I wasn't brought up in the woods to be scared by owls The idiom "I wasn't brought up in the woods to be scared by owls" means that the speaker is saying they are not easily intimidated or frightened by something that others find scary or intimidating. It implies that the person has faced tougher or more challenging situations in their life and is accustomed to handling them confidently.
  • be on, show, prove, etc. your mettle The idiom "be on, show, prove, etc. your mettle" means to demonstrate one's true abilities, courage, resilience, or strength in a challenging situation or under difficult circumstances. It implies the need to prove oneself or reveal one's real character and capabilities when faced with a demanding test or task.
  • be unable to hear (oneself) think The idiom "be unable to hear (oneself) think" means being in a noisy or chaotic environment that makes it difficult to concentrate or have coherent thoughts. It describes a situation where external distractions or excessive noise hinder one's ability to think or focus on their thoughts or ideas.
  • be coining it The idiom "be coining it" refers to someone or something gaining a substantial amount of money or profit quickly and easily, often implying a lucrative or successful endeavor. It suggests that the person or entity is making money at a remarkable rate, figuratively "minting" their own currency.
  • be shaking in boots The idiom "be shaking in boots" means to be extremely frightened or scared, often characterized by visible trembling or shaking. It emphasizes a deep sense of fear or anxiety that causes one's confidence or composure to falter.
  • be well, ideally, better, etc. placed for something/to do something The idiom "be well, ideally, better, etc. placed for something/to do something" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position or circumstance for a particular situation or task. It implies that a person or thing has the appropriate qualifications, resources, or characteristics that make them better suited for a specific purpose or objective.
  • be light years away The idiom "be light years away" means to be very far apart or to be far ahead in terms of progress or development, typically indicating a significant difference in distance, time, or achievement. It is often used metaphorically to emphasize the vast difference between two things or the immense progress made in a particular area.
  • be fresh out of sth The idiom "be fresh out of something" means to have completely run out of something, typically an item or resource. It indicates that there is none of it left.
  • be pushing at an open door To be pushing at an open door means to be pursuing an idea or goal that is very likely to be accepted or supported by someone or a group of people. It implies that the effort required to convince or persuade others is minimal because they are already inclined to agree or go along with the idea.
  • be carved (or set or written) in stone The idiom "be carved (or set or written) in stone" means that something is fixed, permanent, or unchangeable, often referring to a decision, rule, or plan that cannot be altered. It implies that the stated information or statement is rigid and cannot be revised or modified.
  • be the day hell freezes over The idiom "be the day hell freezes over" is a metaphorical expression used to convey an extremely unlikely or impossible event that is unlikely to happen in any conceivable circumstances. It emphasizes the notion that the stated event is so unlikely that it would require an inconceivable scenario, such as the literal freezing of hell, which is typically considered impossible.
  • be on (one's) shit list The idiom "be on (one's) shit list" means to be in a state of disfavor or displeasure with someone. Essentially, it refers to being on the receiving end of someone's anger, frustration, or resentment, typically after having done something to upset or offend them. Being on someone's "shit list" implies being treated with hostility or subjected to negative consequences due to a strained relationship.
  • be (stuck) in a rut The idiom "be (stuck) in a rut" means to be in a situation where one feels bored, unsatisfied, or trapped due to repetitive and unchanging routines or patterns. It refers to being stuck in a monotonous or unproductive cycle from which it is difficult to escape or make progress.
  • be the life and soul of the party The idiom "be the life and soul of the party" means to be the person who is lively, energetic, and entertaining at a social gathering or event. This individual is typically the center of attention, engaging and interacting with everyone, and often creates a fun and enjoyable atmosphere for others.
  • be not worth the paper it's printed on The idiom "be not worth the paper it's printed on" refers to something that is useless, of little or no value, or lacking practical worth despite its physical existence. It suggests that even if something is documented or formally printed, it does not make it credible or worthwhile.
  • be licking your lips The idiom "be licking your lips" refers to a state of anticipation or eagerness for something, typically when one expects to gain an advantage or benefit from it. It suggests that one is eagerly looking forward to something enjoyable, often with a sense of satisfaction or greed.
  • be left hanging (in the air/in midair) The idiom "be left hanging (in the air/in midair)" means to be left in a state of uncertainty or suspense, without any resolution or conclusion. It refers to a situation where someone is expecting an answer, response, or clarification, but is left without any closure, leaving them feeling unsettled or unresolved.
  • be running around like a chicken with its head cut off The idiom "be running around like a chicken with its head cut off" means to be behaving in a frenzied, disorganized, or panicked manner, similar to how a chicken would move aimlessly after its head is severed. It implies a lack of focus, direction, or control in a person's actions or behavior.
  • be playing with fire The idiom "be playing with fire" means to engage in a dangerous or risky activity or behavior that could potentially lead to negative consequences or harm.
  • be on a par with (someone or something) To be on a par with someone or something means to be equal or at the same level in terms of quality, skill, importance, or status. It suggests that both parties or things are comparable or on an equal footing.
  • be like Fort Knox The idiom "be like Fort Knox" typically means something is extremely secure or tightly guarded. It is derived from Fort Knox, a highly secure United States Army post located in Kentucky, which primarily houses the United States Bullion Depository holding a significant portion of the country's gold reserves. Therefore, when something is described as being "like Fort Knox," it suggests that it is difficult or nearly impossible to gain access to or breach its security.
  • be just a question of time The idiom "be just a question of time" means that something is inevitable and will happen eventually, it is only a matter of time before it occurs. It implies that the outcome or occurrence is certain, but the exact timing may be unknown.
  • It'll be a long day in January (when sth happens). The idiom "It'll be a long day in January" is used to express extreme doubt or skepticism about the likelihood of something happening. It suggests that the mentioned event is highly improbable or almost impossible, as January is typically associated with being in the midst of winter and having short days. Thus, the idiom implies that if something were to happen under such unlikely circumstances, it would require a significant and unlikely change in the normal order of things.
  • be over and done with The idiom "be over and done with" means to complete or finish something quickly or without delay, often to get rid of a task or situation that is burdensome or unpleasant. It suggests a desire to move on from something, putting an end to it.
  • be mixed up with/in sth The idiom "be mixed up with/in sth" means to be involved or associated with something, often in a negative or complicated way. It suggests a state where someone is connected to or tangled up in a situation, event, or group that may be confusing or problematic.
  • be a matter of something/doing something The idiom "be a matter of something/doing something" is used to suggest that something depends on or is related to a particular course of action, decision, or concern. It implies that the outcome or resolution hinges on the specific circumstances or choices involved.
  • acknowledge to be right The idiom "acknowledge to be right" means to admit or recognize that someone else's statement or position is correct or accurate. It involves accepting the truth or validity of someone's point of view or argument.
  • be over the hump The idiom "be over the hump" means to have passed the most difficult or challenging part of a task, project, or situation and be on a path towards progress or completion. It refers to the moment when the most significant obstacles or challenges have been overcome, and the rest becomes relatively easier.
  • be up to your eyeballs in something The idiom "be up to your eyeballs in something" means to be extremely busy or deeply involved in a particular task, activity, or situation to the point of being overwhelmed or fully occupied. It implies being fully submerged or immersed in something, often with a negative connotation of being overloaded or in over one's head.
  • be tickled to death The idiom "be tickled to death" means to be extremely pleased, amused, or delighted to the point of great joy or satisfaction.
  • be (as) thick as thieves The idiom "be (as) thick as thieves" means to have a very close and strong friendship or alliance, often implying a connection that involves secretive or potentially unlawful activities. It describes a bond between two or more individuals who trust each other completely and work closely together, often sharing secrets or engaging in plans that others may find questionable.
  • be taken down a peg (or two) The idiom "be taken down a peg (or two)" means to be humbled, brought back to a lower status or position, usually as a result of arrogance, pride, or self-importance. It suggests someone being reminded of their limitations or being cut down to size.
  • be green with envy The idiom "be green with envy" means to feel intense jealousy or envy towards someone or something. It suggests that jealousy or envy has become so extreme that it has turned one's complexion a pale green color.
  • be no great shakes The idiom "be no great shakes" means to not be highly skilled, exceptional, or impressive in a specific activity or area. It implies that someone or something is only average or mediocre, lacking notable qualities or achievements.
  • be for The idiom "be for" can have different meanings depending on the context. Generally, it means to support, advocate, or be in favor of someone or something. It implies being on the side of a person, idea, or action. It can also suggest being in agreement with, endorsing, or approving of a particular course of action.
  • be another story The idiom "be another story" means that a situation or aspect of something is different or more complicated than what was previously discussed or understood. It suggests that there is more to consider or a change in circumstances that may alter the perceived outcome or perspective.
  • be no match for sth/sb The idiom "be no match for sth/sb" means to be unable to compete or to be inferior in comparison to something or someone.
  • (It's) good to be here. The idiom "(It's) good to be here" is an expression used by someone to convey their pleasure or satisfaction of being present at a particular place or event. It generally implies a sense of appreciation and contentment with the current surroundings or situation. This idiom can be used in various contexts, such as social gatherings, meetings, performances, or simply when someone feels grateful for their presence in a specific location.
  • be knocked down a notch (or two) The idiom "be knocked down a notch (or two)" means to experience a humbling or ego-deflating moment that causes someone to become less arrogant, conceited, or self-assured. It implies that someone's confidence or sense of superiority has been diminished or undermined, often as a result of a setback, criticism, or failure.
  • be remembered as/for something The idiom "be remembered as/for something" means to be remembered or recognized for a particular quality, action, or achievement. It refers to leaving a lasting impression in people's minds due to a noteworthy or significant aspect of your life.
  • be that as it may The idiom "be that as it may" is used to acknowledge a point or statement that has been made, but then to continue the conversation or argument with a different perspective, opinion, or consideration. It suggests that despite accepting or acknowledging the previous point, there is still a need to move forward with one's own thoughts or arguments.
  • be on the mend The idiom "be on the mend" means to be recovering after an illness, injury, or a difficult situation. It implies that the person or thing is improving and getting better.
  • be on acid The idiom "be on acid" generally refers to a state of being under the influence of the psychedelic drug LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide). It is commonly used to describe someone who appears to be acting in a strange, hallucinogenic, or unconventional manner, often characterized by vivid and distorted perceptions of reality. In a broader sense, the phrase can also be used metaphorically to describe a person's behavior or perspectives as unusually eccentric, surreal, or bizarre.
  • be one of the lads The idiom "be one of the lads" refers to someone, usually a woman, who behaves, interacts, or fits in comfortably with a group of men or a predominantly male social circle. It implies that the individual is accepted, respected, and considered an equal among the group of men.
  • be batting a thousand The idiom "be batting a thousand" means to have a perfect or flawless record or to consistently succeed at something without any failures or mistakes. It originated from the game of baseball, where batting a thousand refers to a player successfully hitting the ball every time they are at bat.
  • be out of humour The idiom "be out of humour" refers to being in a bad or irritable mood. It means feeling unhappy, displeased, or having a generally negative disposition.
  • be miles away The idiom "be miles away" means to be mentally or emotionally detached or distracted from one's surroundings or the current situation, often being lost in deep thoughts or daydreaming.
  • be just the job The idiom "be just the job" means that something is perfect or well-suited for a particular purpose or need. It implies that the thing in question fits the requirements or desires exactly and satisfies the intended purpose effectively.
  • be cooked The idiom "be cooked" typically means that a situation or plan is doomed or unlikely to succeed. It implies that something is in a state of irreparable damage or failure.
  • not be your brother's keeper The idiom "not be your brother's keeper" means that someone is not responsible for the actions, well-being, or welfare of another person, especially when that person is a family member or close relative. It suggests that someone should not feel obligated or burdened to constantly monitor or take care of another individual's choices, decisions, or problems.
  • be (just/right) up (one's) street The idiom "be (just/right) up (one's) street" means that something is exactly suited to someone's interests, abilities, or preferences. It implies that the person is highly likely to enjoy or excel at that particular thing because it aligns perfectly with their skills or interests.
  • be an actor, cook, etc. in the making The idiom "be an actor, cook, etc. in the making" means to have the potential or qualities to become a successful actor, cook, or any other profession mentioned. It implies that the person is currently developing their skills, talents, or abilities in that particular field and shows promise of future success.
  • be in full flow/spate The idiom "be in full flow/spate" refers to a situation or occurrence that is happening vigorously, intensely, or continuously. It suggests that something is progressing or flowing at its maximum capacity, strength, or speed. It often implies a state of abundance, rapidity, or intensity.
  • be alive with sth The idiom "be alive with something" typically means that a place or environment is filled with or bustling with a particular thing or activity. It indicates a lively, energetic, or animated atmosphere associated with the mentioned element.
  • be bringing up the rear The idiom "be bringing up the rear" refers to being in the last or final position in a group, line, or sequence. It means to be the last or the slowest in a procession or order.
  • it can't be helped The idiom "it can't be helped" is used to express resignation or acceptance of a situation that cannot be changed or altered. It conveys the idea that there is no possible solution or remedy available, and one must simply accept and endure the circumstances.
  • be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat The idiom "be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat" means to be assuming or adopting the role, characteristics, or mindset associated with a specific profession or expertise. It suggests that a person is using their knowledge, skills, or authority from a particular field in a given context or situation, even if they are not actually practicing that profession. This idiom highlights the ability to adapt and utilize relevant expertise as needed.
  • be off (one's) guard The idiom "be off (one's) guard" means to be unprepared or unsuspecting, usually referring to a situation where someone is caught by surprise or not fully attentive. It implies being in a relaxed state, not expecting any threat or danger.
  • not be cut out for something The idiom "not be cut out for something" means that someone lacks the necessary skill, ability, or temperament to succeed or perform well in a particular activity, job, or role. It implies that they are not naturally suited or fit for that specific task.
  • be a sign of the times The idiom "be a sign of the times" means that something is indicative or representative of the current era or prevailing attitudes, values, or beliefs of a specific period in history. It suggests that a particular event, occurrence, or phenomenon is in accordance with the prevalent mindset or circumstances of a given time.
  • be on at The idiomatic expression "be on at" typically refers to someone nagging or constantly reminding someone else about something, typically a task or responsibility that needs to be done. It suggests a persistent and sometimes annoying nature in which someone is urging or pressuring another person to take action.
  • be coming apart at the seams The idiom "be coming apart at the seams" means that something is in a state of extreme disorganization, chaos, or failure. It refers to a situation or an object that is falling apart or breaking down, often due to internal issues or stresses. It implies that things are no longer functioning properly and are on the verge of complete collapse.
  • be a (something) in the making The idiom "be a (something) in the making" refers to someone or something that is in the process of becoming or developing into a specific thing or achieving a particular state. It implies that while the person or thing may not currently exemplify the desired qualities or characteristics, they have the potential to reach that state in the future. It indicates an ongoing progress or transformation toward the defined outcome.
  • be as tough as old boots The idiom "be as tough as old boots" refers to someone or something that is extremely resilient, strong, enduring, or hardy. It implies that the person or object being referred to can withstand difficult or challenging situations without getting easily affected or worn down.
  • be a pretty sight The idiom "be a pretty sight" refers to something or someone that looks visually appealing, attractive, or pleasing to the eye.
  • be as good as gone The idiom "be as good as gone" means that someone or something is very likely or certain to leave or disappear soon, usually implying a sense of imminent departure or loss. It suggests that the person or thing in question is already mentally or practically out of the current situation or will be in the near future.
  • be rotten to the core The idiom "be rotten to the core" is used to describe someone or something that is completely corrupt, morally bankrupt, or thoroughly bad in nature. It signifies a situation or a person's character that is deeply flawed or morally compromised at their very foundation.
  • be (batting) on a losing wicket The idiom "be (batting) on a losing wicket" refers to being in a situation where one is unlikely to succeed or achieve a favorable outcome. It originated from the game of cricket, where a "wicket" refers to the place where the batsman stands and tries to score runs. When someone is "batting on a losing wicket," it means they are playing under unfavorable circumstances, facing challenges that make it difficult for them to win or be successful.
  • be out in left field The idiom "be out in left field" means to be completely clueless, confused, or mistaken about something. It often refers to someone who holds a bizarre or nonsensical opinion or idea that is different from what is generally accepted or understood. This idiom draws a parallel to the position of "left field" in baseball, which is the farthest from the action and can represent being detached from reality or the mainstream.
  • be a man/woman of his/her word The idiom "be a man/woman of his/her word" means to be someone who consistently keeps their promises and follows through with what they say they will do. It refers to a person who is trustworthy, reliable, and true to their word, always fulfilling their commitments and obligations.
  • be (sitting) in the catbird seat To be "sitting in the catbird seat" means to be in a highly advantageous or favorable position. It implies having control or power over a situation, often with little or no opposition or competition. This idiom refers to being in a position of advantage, similar to a bird perched safely and comfortably in a high spot, with a clear view of everything happening around it.
  • be in a sticky situation To be in a sticky situation means to be in a difficult or uncomfortable predicament, typically due to a problem or obstacle that is challenging to resolve or escape from. It implies being caught in an unfavorable or troublesome circumstance where finding a solution or making progress is challenging.
  • be at an end The idiom "be at an end" means that something has finished, completed, or concluded. It refers to the point where there is no further continuation or development of a particular situation or event.
  • be for someone or something The idiom "be for someone or something" means to be in favor of or supportive of someone or something. It implies that someone is on the side of another person or a particular cause, policy, idea, or belief.
  • be no ball of fire The idiom "be no ball of fire" means to lack enthusiasm, motivation, or skill in a particular activity or endeavor. It suggests that someone is not particularly impressive or successful in their actions or achievements.
  • be able to count (someone or something) on one hand The idiom "be able to count (someone or something) on one hand" means that there are very few of them, typically less than five, making it easy to enumerate or remember them all. It implies a small or limited number.
  • be set in your ways The idiom "be set in your ways" refers to someone who is resistant to change or unwilling to adopt new ideas, habits, or preferences. It implies that the person is deeply ingrained in their established patterns, routines, or beliefs, often being inflexible or closed-minded.
  • be at a loose end The idiom "be at a loose end" means to have nothing to do or to be without any plans or commitments. It refers to a state of being idle or having spare time with no specific tasks or activities to engage in.
  • be riding high The idiom "be riding high" means to be in a state of success, happiness, or confidence. It suggests that someone or something is experiencing a peak or pinnacle moment, often referring to a positive or fortunate situation.
  • be etched on (one's) memory The idiom "be etched on (one's) memory" means something that is deeply engraved or permanently imprinted in one's mind. It refers to a vivid or lasting memory that is difficult to forget or erase.
  • be new to this game The idiom "be new to this game" means that someone is inexperienced or unfamiliar with a particular activity, job, or situation. It implies that the person lacks knowledge or understanding in the given context and may need guidance or time to learn and become proficient.
  • be (still) going strong The idiom "be (still) going strong" means to continue to be successful, active, or in good condition for a prolonged period of time, often longer than expected or anticipated. It implies durability and resilience in the face of challenges or the passage of time.
  • be getting on The idiom "be getting on" is often used to refer to someone's age and implies that they are becoming old or advancing in years. It can also suggest that someone has been engaged in a particular activity for a long time and is ready to conclude it or move on to something else.
  • be (as) green as a gooseberry The idiom "be (as) green as a gooseberry" typically refers to someone who is inexperienced, naive, or gullible. It suggests that the person lacks knowledge or understanding in a particular area or situation, similar to how an unripe gooseberry is green and immature.
  • be down to somebody The idiom "be down to somebody" refers to attributing a certain outcome, decision, or responsibility to a specific person or individual. It implies that the final decision or outcome is in the hands of that person, and they are responsible for it.
  • be off your head The idiom "be off your head" refers to someone being mentally or emotionally unstable, irrational, or behaving in a crazy or ridiculous manner. It suggests that the person is not thinking clearly or displaying sensible behavior.
  • be in clover The idiom "be in clover" means to be living in a state of prosperity, abundance, or luxury. It implies that someone is experiencing a comfortable and enjoyable lifestyle, free from difficulties or hardships.
  • be (as) thin as a rail The idiom "be (as) thin as a rail" means to be extremely thin or skinny. It suggests that the person or object being described is so thin that they resemble the thinness of a rail - a long, narrow, and slender track used for trains.
  • be barking mad The idiom "be barking mad" is used to describe someone who is completely crazy or insane. It suggests that the person's behavior or actions are irrational and unreasonable.
  • far be it from me to The idiom "far be it from me to" is an expression used to show that the speaker is not claiming authority or expertise on a particular topic or situation. It is often used to introduce a humble or cautious opinion or suggestion, emphasizing that the speaker does not want to impose or interfere.
  • be cast in concrete The idiom "be cast in concrete" means that something is fixed or settled and cannot be changed or altered. It refers to an idea, plan, or decision that is unyielding and not open to revision or modification.
  • Caesar's wife must be above suspicion The idiom "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion" means that individuals in positions of power or authority should ensure that their conduct is beyond reproach or any hint of wrongdoing. It implies that people in influential roles, like Caesar's wife in ancient Rome, should always maintain an untarnished reputation to avoid any potential scandal or accusations of impropriety.
  • be drugged up to the eyeballs The idiom "be drugged up to the eyeballs" means to be heavily or excessively under the influence of drugs or medication. It suggests that the person is heavily sedated or experiencing intense effects from the drugs, often to the point of impaired consciousness or cognitive function.
  • be as (something) as all get-out The idiom "be as (something) as all get-out" is typically used to emphasize or intensify a certain characteristic or quality. It suggests being extremely, exceptionally, or to an extreme degree of that particular attribute. For example, if someone says, "He was as stubborn as all get-out," it means that the person was incredibly stubborn, surpassing any usual level of stubbornness.
  • be beside the point The idiom "be beside the point" refers to a statement or an argument that is irrelevant or not pertinent to the current discussion or topic at hand. It indicates that the point being made does not contribute to the main issue or does not address the heart of the matter.
  • be whistling Dixie To "be whistling Dixie" means to be engaging in idle talk, wishful thinking, or expressing unrealistic expectations. It implies that someone is not being serious or realistic about a situation or its potential outcome.
  • you should be so lucky!, at you'll be lucky! The idiom "you should be so lucky!" or "at you'll be lucky!" is used sarcastically to dismiss or express skepticism about the possibility of something happening. It implies that the person being addressed is unlikely to experience the described event or outcome and is somewhat delusional for even thinking so. It often suggests that someone's hopes or desires are far-fetched or unrealistic.
  • be on the prowl The idiom "be on the prowl" means to be actively searching for something or someone, often with the intention of causing mischief or engaging in predatory behavior. It suggests a sense of hunting or seeking with a determined focus. This expression is often used figuratively to describe someone who is actively and eagerly seeking an opportunity, a romantic partner, or any desired outcome.
  • be a mixed blessing The idiom "be a mixed blessing" means that something has both positive and negative aspects or outcomes. It refers to a situation or event that brings both advantages and disadvantages at the same time.
  • I might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "I might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb" is an expression used to convey the idea of taking a significant risk when the potential consequences are already severe. It suggests that if one is going to be punished or face negative outcomes for a lesser offense (a sheep), they may as well engage in a more serious or daring action (a lamb) since the outcome would essentially be the same. The phrase is often used to justify or rationalize taking a greater risk, as the consequences would not be significantly worse than the initial scenario.
  • be ruled by sb To be ruled by someone means to be under their control, guidance, or authority. It suggests that a person or a group follows the decisions, instructions, or leadership of another individual, often without questioning or challenging their authority.
  • be off (one's) chump The idiom "be off (one's) chump" refers to someone who is acting in a delusional, crazy, or irrational manner. It suggests that the person is not thinking or behaving sensibly or logically. It can often imply that the person is behaving unusually or strangely.
  • be descended from The idiom "be descended from" means being a direct genetic or ancestral descendant of a particular individual or group. It implies having inherited certain traits, characteristics, or lineage from one's ancestors.
  • If you would be well served, serve yourself The idiom "If you would be well served, serve yourself" means that if you want to achieve your own goals or make progress in life, you should take the initiative and work hard for your own success. It suggests that relying solely on others or expecting others to provide everything for you may not lead to the best outcome.
  • be/come up against a brick wall To be or come up against a brick wall means to encounter an obstacle or a situation where no progress is possible, and further efforts or attempts to achieve something are met with resistance or failure. It implies a sense of being stuck or unable to make any headway in a particular situation or problem.
  • be half bad The idiom "be half bad" means not completely bad, partially good, or at least somewhat acceptable. It suggests that although something may have negative aspects or flaws, it also possesses some positive qualities or merits.
  • be in a tight corner/spot The idiom "be in a tight corner/spot" refers to being in a difficult or challenging situation where one has limited options or resources. It implies feeling trapped or having no room for maneuvering, often requiring quick thinking or assistance to overcome the predicament.
  • be none of (one's) business The idiom "be none of (one's) business" means that something is not someone's concern or responsibility, and they should not get involved or meddle in it. It implies that the matter does not affect or involve them, and they should respect the privacy or autonomy of the person or situation in question.
  • be as scarce as hen's teeth The idiom "be as scarce as hen's teeth" is used to describe something that is extremely rare or hard to find. It implies that the given thing is as uncommon as the existence of teeth in hens, which is non-existent since hens do not have teeth. Thus, the idiom emphasizes the rarity or scarcity of something.
  • be all dressed up and nowhere to go The idiom "be all dressed up and nowhere to go" refers to a situation where someone is fully prepared or dressed appropriately for a particular event or occasion, but there is no opportunity or purpose for them to fulfill or make use of their preparations. It expresses a sense of frustration or disappointment when one's efforts or plans do not materialize or have a chance to be put into action.
  • be a bundle of laughs The idiom "be a bundle of laughs" means that someone or something is very funny, amusing, or entertaining. It is often used sarcastically to describe someone or something that is not enjoyable or entertaining at all.
  • be knocked out cold The idiom "be knocked out cold" refers to being rendered unconscious, usually as a result of a powerful blow or impact to the head or body. It suggests complete and immediate loss of consciousness.
  • be a toss-up The idiom "be a toss-up" means that a situation or outcome is uncertain or difficult to predict. It suggests that the chances of one option or outcome happening are equal to the chances of another. It is often used when there is little to no clear advantage or preference between two choices.
  • be in two minds about something/about doing something The idiom "be in two minds about something/about doing something" means to be uncertain or indecisive about a particular matter or action. It implies having conflicting opinions, desires, or hesitations that make it difficult to make a clear choice or decision.
  • be a tall order The idiom "be a tall order" means a task or request that is particularly difficult, challenging, or demanding to fulfill. It implies that the requirement or expectation is onerous and possibly beyond someone's capabilities or resources.
  • be a recipe for disaster/happiness/success etc. The idiom "be a recipe for disaster/happiness/success etc." means that a certain combination of factors or actions is very likely to result in the mentioned outcome or consequence. It suggests that the specific elements or ingredients being used will inevitably lead to the indicated result, whether negative or positive.
  • be a shadow/ghost of your/its former self The idiom "be a shadow/ghost of your/its former self" refers to something or someone that has significantly declined in quality, strength, or vitality compared to how it used to be. It implies that the present state or condition is far less impressive, powerful, or influential than it once was. It commonly describes people, organizations, places, or anything else that has lost its former greatness or relevance.
  • be fighting for your life The idiom "be fighting for your life" means to be engaged in a fierce struggle or contest where one's survival or continued existence is at stake. It typically implies facing extreme or life-threatening circumstances and exerting all efforts to survive or overcome the challenges and obstacles.
  • be worth its weight in gold The idiom "be worth its weight in gold" means that something or someone is extremely valuable or highly prized. It suggests that the thing or person being referred to is so valuable that it could be compared to the worth of an equivalent amount of gold.
  • be up to your ears in sth To be up to your ears in something means to be extremely overwhelmed or deeply involved in some activity or situation. It implies being completely absorbed or completely preoccupied with something to the point of being overloaded or swamped.
  • look to be "Look to be" is an idiomatic expression used to describe something or someone's appearance or behavior, indicating that they seem to be a certain way or have a specific quality, without providing a definite confirmation or certainty. It implies that the observation is based on a judgment made from an external perspective, rather than any confirmed information.
  • be hot to trot The idiom "be hot to trot" means to be eager, enthusiastic, or ready to do something, especially in a sexual or romantic context. It often refers to someone who is ready and willing to engage in intimate or sexual activities.
  • be in the lap of the gods The idiom "be in the lap of the gods" refers to a situation where the outcome or resolution is uncertain and beyond one's control. It implies that the decision or fate lies in the hands of a higher power or external forces, and one can do nothing but wait and see how things unfold.
  • be like a dog with two tails The idiom "be like a dog with two tails" is typically used to describe someone who is extremely happy, excited, or ecstatic about something. It implies a state of overwhelming joy or excitement, similar to how a dog wags its tail when it is happy.
  • Everything's going to be all right The idiom "Everything's going to be all right" means that the current situation is expected to turn out well or to be resolved in a positive manner. It offers reassurance or comfort during challenging or uncertain times.
  • be set on something/on doing something The idiom "be set on something/on doing something" means to have a strong determination or desire to achieve or accomplish a particular thing or goal. It implies being fixed or resolved in one's intention, often with a sense of persistence or perseverance.
  • be art and part of (something) The idiom "be art and part of (something)" means to be deeply involved or engaged in a particular activity or endeavor, often in a cooperative or collaborative manner. It implies that the person is an integral part of the undertaking, actively contributing and being responsible for its success or failure.
  • be more to this than meets the eye The idiom "be more to this than meets the eye" means that there is a deeper or hidden meaning or aspect to a situation or person that may not be immediately apparent or easily understood. It suggests that there could be additional layers or complexities that require further investigation or consideration to fully comprehend.
  • be carried away The idiom "be carried away" means to become overly excited, emotional, or enthusiastic about something, often leading to excessive behavior or losing control of oneself in the process.
  • be dying of something The idiom "be dying of something" means to be extremely desperate or eager for something, whether it be a physical need, a desire, or a strong craving. It is often used figuratively to emphasize the intensity of the feeling or the urgency of the situation.
  • be shitting a brick The idiom "be shitting a brick" is a colloquial expression typically used to describe extreme fear, anxiety, or nervousness. It implies feeling so overwhelmed or frightened that one's state of mind is comparable to the physical act of defecating a solid object (brick), which emphasizes the intensity of the emotion being experienced.
  • be as sharp as a tack The idiom "be as sharp as a tack" means to be very intelligent, quick-witted, or mentally astute. It refers to someone who is exceptionally sharp and quick in their thinking or understanding of things.
  • be in the pipeline The idiom "be in the pipeline" refers to something that is currently being planned, worked on, or developed, but has not yet been completed or released. It indicates that the project or process is still in progress and will be completed or implemented at a later time.
  • be behind sb The idiom "be behind sb" means to provide support, assistance, or encouragement to someone or to be in agreement or support of someone's ideas, actions, or goals. It implies that one is standing by someone, offering help or solidarity.
  • be grateful/thankful for small mercies The idiom "be grateful/thankful for small mercies" can be defined as expressing appreciation or gratitude for even the slightest or most modest of positive outcomes or blessings in a difficult or challenging situation. It implies finding solace or contentment in the little things, rather than dwelling on the larger problems or disappointments.
  • be fading away/fast The idiom "be fading away/fast" generally means to gradually lose strength, significance, or relevance. It can refer to a person, thing, or idea losing impact or becoming less influential over time. The phrases "fading away" or "fading fast" imply a diminishing or weakening state.
  • be on somebody’s back The idiom "be on somebody's back" means to constantly criticize, nag, or pester someone. It refers to someone being overly involved with someone else's actions or constantly monitoring and scrutinizing their behavior or work.
  • be (as) old as the hills The idiom "be (as) old as the hills" means that something or someone is very old or ancient. It is often used to emphasize the age of something, emphasizing the long existence or longevity of a particular person, thing, or concept.
  • you can't be a little bit pregnant The idiom "you can't be a little bit pregnant" is a figurative expression used to convey that a situation or condition cannot be partially, or halfway true or possible. Just like being pregnant, which is an all-or-nothing state, it means that something is either true or false, possible or impossible, without any gray area or middle ground.
  • be in the land of the living The idiom "be in the land of the living" means to be alive or to be in existence. It is often used to express surprise or relief that someone is still alive or present after a period of absence or silence.
  • be quits (with someone) The idiom "be quits (with someone)" means to be in a situation where two parties no longer owe anything to each other, typically in terms of debts, favors, or obligations. It implies that a mutually balanced or equal state has been achieved, and both individuals are free from any obligations towards each other.
  • be up to much The idiom "be up to much" means to be involved in or occupied with something worthwhile or productive. It suggests that a person is engaging in meaningful activities or having a significant impact in their pursuits.
  • be in cloud-cuckoo land The idiom "be in cloud-cuckoo land" means to be unrealistic, delusional, or completely detached from reality. It suggests that the person's thoughts or ideas are fanciful, impractical, or impossible.
  • be a slave of (something) The idiom "be a slave of (something)" refers to being completely dominated or controlled by a specific thing or situation. It implies a loss of personal freedom or autonomy, as if one is bound to follow the commands or demands of that particular thing. It suggests being trapped or subservient to a certain influence or circumstance, often implying a negative or burdensome connotation.
  • be in the pocket The idiom "be in the pocket" refers to being in a state of perfect synchronization, coordination, or control. It usually applies to musical contexts, specifically when a musician or band is playing with exceptional unity and groove. It implies that the performers are perfectly attentive to one another and the rhythm, resulting in a harmonious and smooth performance.
  • not be the marrying kind The idiom "not be the marrying kind" refers to an individual who does not have a desire or inclination to get married or settle down into a committed relationship. It implies that person may be more interested in personal freedom and independence rather than entering into a lifelong partnership or establishing a traditional family.
  • be no/without rhyme or reason The idiom "be no/without rhyme or reason" means that something does not have a clear or understandable explanation or purpose. It implies that there is no logical or sensible justification behind a particular action, decision, or situation. It suggests randomness or lack of order in a given context.
  • be a bed of nails The idiom "be a bed of nails" typically means to be a situation or circumstance that is extremely challenging, difficult, or uncomfortable. It implies that dealing with that particular situation is akin to lying on a bed made of nails, representing pain, discomfort, and hardship.
  • be after doing something The idiom "be after doing something" means to have just completed or finished doing something. It implies that the action has recently taken place or is still ongoing, indicating a current state or condition.
  • be in fear of (one's) life The idiom "be in fear of (one's) life" means to feel extreme terror or apprehension for one's safety. It implies that a person is afraid of an imminent threat that could cause harm or even death.
  • be mixed up with (someone) The idiom "be mixed up with (someone)" typically means to be involved or associated with someone, often in a negative or problematic manner. It implies being connected to someone who may bring trouble, complications, or undesirable consequences.
  • be as safe as houses The idiom "be as safe as houses" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely secure, safe, or reliable. It implies a high level of protection and is often used to convey a feeling of confidence or assurance.
  • be coining it (in) The idiom "be coining it (in)" means to earn or make a significant amount of money quickly and easily. It implies that someone is generating wealth effortlessly or reaping substantial financial rewards from a particular venture or endeavor.
  • be near to impossible The idiom "be near to impossible" means that something is extremely difficult or unlikely to happen. It suggests that the achievement of a particular goal or outcome is almost impossible, although not completely out of the realm of possibility.
  • be with (one) in spirit The idiom "be with (one) in spirit" means to offer support, encouragement, or companionship to someone, even if one cannot physically be there with them. It signifies that although someone may not be physically present, their thoughts, emotions, and well-wishes are directed towards another person to provide support or comfort.
  • be of service (to somebody) The idiom "be of service (to somebody)" means to help or assist someone. It refers to providing aid, support, or assistance in any way that could be beneficial to someone else's needs or goals.
  • be ripe for the picking The idiom "be ripe for the picking" means that something or someone is ready or well-suited to be taken advantage of, exploited, or seized upon. It often refers to a situation or opportunity that is easily attainable due to favorable conditions or circumstances.
  • be a thorn in flesh The idiom "be a thorn in flesh" refers to someone or something that is a persistent source of annoyance, frustration, or difficulty. It implies that the person or thing causes ongoing discomfort or irritation, similar to a thorn embedded in one's skin.
  • be/go heavy on sth The idiom "be/go heavy on sth" means to use, apply, or include a large or excessive amount of something, usually referring to ingredients, substances, or aspects in a certain situation or action. It implies a significant emphasis, quantity, or intensity of the specified element.
  • be a dab hand The idiom "be a dab hand" refers to someone who is highly skilled or proficient in a particular task, activity, or skill. It suggests that the person is not just experienced but also has a natural talent or knack for it.
  • be snatched from the jaws of death The idiom "be snatched from the jaws of death" means to narrowly escape a dangerous or life-threatening situation at the last moment. It refers to someone being saved or rescued from a situation that seemed certain to result in their death.
  • be doing a land-office business The idiom "be doing a land-office business" refers to a situation where someone or something is experiencing a high volume of sales, transactions, or activity. It implies that the business is brisk, thriving, or operating highly successfully, much like a land office during a period of rapid land sales or acquisition.
  • be packed like sardines The idiom "be packed like sardines" means to be in a crowded or confined space with very little room to move. It describes a situation where people or objects are tightly packed together, reminiscent of how sardines are tightly packed in a tin can.
  • be on (one's) shoulder The idiom "be on (one's) shoulder" refers to an imaginary presence or feeling of someone constantly watching or monitoring one's actions. It implies that someone's judgment, expectations, or criticisms are constantly influencing or pressuring an individual.
  • be a fair bet "Be a fair bet" is an idiom that means something is likely to happen or occur. It implies that the odds or chances of the specified outcome are decent or reasonable.
  • you must be kidding (me) The idiom "you must be kidding (me)" refers to a phrase used to express disbelief or astonishment in response to something that seems too surprising or absurd to be true. It implies that the speaker thinks the statement or situation mentioned is not serious or credible.
  • not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other The idiom "not know/not be able to tell one end of something from the other" means to have absolutely no understanding or knowledge about a particular subject or topic. It implies being completely ignorant or clueless about distinguishing any basic aspects or elements of that thing.
  • be light on your feet The idiom "be light on your feet" means to be physically agile, nimble, or quick in movement. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone who is mentally or emotionally flexible, adaptable, or responsive. It can imply being quick to react, think, or adjust to changing circumstances.
  • not anywhere to be found The idiom "not anywhere to be found" means that a person or thing cannot be located or found in any given place or situation. It refers to the complete absence or lack of presence, suggesting that the subject being sought after is nowhere in sight or unable to be discovered.
  • be no spring chicken The idiom "be no spring chicken" refers to someone who is no longer young or in their prime. It implies that the person is not as agile, energetic, or youthful as they used to be.
  • be on the wing The idiom "be on the wing" refers to being in motion or being on the move, often referring to birds or airplanes. It suggests being active, busy, or constantly in a state of travel or activity.
  • be in a tearing hurry The idiom "be in a tearing hurry" means to be in an extreme rush or hurry, often indicating a sense of urgency or the need to complete a task quickly.
  • be on about (something) The idiom "be on about (something)" means to continuously talk or complain about a particular topic or subject, often in a repetitive or excessive manner. It implies that the person is fixated on this topic and is constantly discussing or obsessing over it.
  • be hit for six The idiom "be hit for six" originates from the game of cricket and is used to describe a situation when someone is shocked, surprised, or extremely distraught by an unexpected event or information that completely overwhelms them. It suggests that the impact of the event or news is so significant that it is analogous to being struck by a powerful and unexpected shot in cricket that sends the ball out of the playing area for a maximum score of six runs.
  • be alive and well/kicking The idiom "be alive and well/kicking" refers to a person or thing being in good health, active, or functioning as expected. It suggests that someone or something is robust, lively, and thriving.
  • leave much (or a lot) to be desired The idiom "leave much (or a lot) to be desired" means that something is not satisfactory or does not meet expectations. It implies that there is room for improvement or that the quality or outcome falls short of what is desired or expected.
  • be banging/hitting your head against a brick wall The idiom "be banging/hitting your head against a brick wall" means to engage in a repetitive or futile action that will not achieve any desired outcome despite one's efforts. It suggests a sense of frustration, exasperation, or futility in attempting to make progress or convey one's point of view in a situation where one is not being heard or understood.
  • be running on fumes The idiom "be running on fumes" means to be running on very little energy, fuel, or resources, typically implying that the person or thing is barely able to continue functioning or operating. It conveys the idea of being exhausted, depleted, or at the point of running out completely.
  • be written all over your face The idiom "be written all over your face" means that someone's emotions, thoughts, or intentions are clearly displayed or evident through their facial expressions. It suggests that someone's true feelings are easily visible or impossible to hide.
  • be on the move The idiom "be on the move" means to be constantly active or in motion, frequently changing locations or taking action. It implies someone who is busy, restless, or involved in various activities and not staying in one place for long.
  • be under the microscope The idiom "be under the microscope" refers to a situation where someone or something is being closely observed, scrutinized, or examined in a meticulous or critical manner. It implies that the person or thing is subject to intense scrutiny or examination, leaving no room for errors or mistakes. This idiom often conveys a sense of pressure or accountability.
  • not be carved/etched in stone, at not be set/carved in stone The idiom "not be carved/etched in stone" or "not be set/carved in stone" means that something is not final, definite, or unchangeable. It suggests that a decision, plan, or agreement can still be modified, altered, or subject to further discussion. It emphasizes the idea that there is flexibility or room for adjustment before making a final commitment.
  • be (not) as black as (someone or something) is painted The idiom "be (not) as black as (someone or something) is painted" means that someone or something is (not) as bad or evil as they have been described or perceived to be. It implies that the negative qualities, actions, or reputation attributed to the person or thing might be exaggerated or unfairly emphasized.
  • you don't have to be a rocket scientist The idiom "you don't have to be a rocket scientist" means that something is not complicated or difficult to understand or figure out. It implies that no advanced knowledge or specialized skills are required to comprehend or solve a particular situation or problem.
  • be in the know The idiom "be in the know" means to be informed or knowledgeable about something, especially private or insider information. It refers to being aware of facts, details, or events that others may not be aware of. It implies being well-connected or having special access to information.
  • be of sound mind The idiom "be of sound mind" refers to having a rational and clear state of thinking, being mentally capable and competent, usually in reference to making important decisions or legal matters.
  • wouldn't be seen dead (doing something) The idiom "wouldn't be seen dead (doing something)" is used to express a strong aversion or unwillingness to be associated with or engage in a particular activity or behavior. It emphasizes a sense of pride or self-respect, suggesting that the person would rather die than be caught doing that specific action.
  • be badly turned out The idiom "be badly turned out" refers to someone's appearance or presentation being disheveled, untidy, or poorly dressed. It implies that a person's grooming, attire, or overall look is not deemed neat or proper.
  • be walking/treading on eggshells The idiom "be walking/treading on eggshells" refers to being extremely cautious and sensitive, as if stepping on fragile eggshells that might break at any moment. It is often used to describe a situation where one is trying to avoid saying or doing something that might upset or offend someone else.
  • be ringing off the hook The idiom "be ringing off the hook" means that a telephone is receiving a large number of calls or that there is a high level of activity or demand for something. It implies a situation where the phone is constantly ringing due to an overwhelming influx of calls.
  • be all that The idiom "be all that" refers to someone or something that is considered exceptional, outstanding, or possessing all the desired qualities or characteristics. It implies that the individual or object is highly capable, successful, or impressive.
  • be wiped off the face of the earth, at disappear off the face of the earth The idiom "be wiped off the face of the earth" or "disappear off the face of the earth" figuratively means to completely disappear or be eradicated, leaving no trace behind. It suggests a sudden and thorough vanishing or elimination from existence. This phrase is often used to emphasize the extent or completeness of someone's disappearance.
  • be baying for someone's blood The idiom "be baying for someone's blood" means to be extremely angry and demanding punishment or revenge for someone. It implies a strong desire to see harm come to a particular individual as a result of their actions or perceived wrongdoing. The phrase "baying" refers to the loud and persistent cries of hounds on the hunt, symbolizing the fervent and relentless pursuit of justice or retribution.
  • be as dull as dishwater/ditchwater The idiom "be as dull as dishwater/ditchwater" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely boring, uninteresting, or lacking excitement. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to is devoid of any liveliness, creativity, or engaging qualities, similar to the lackluster nature of dishwater or ditchwater.
  • be dead from the neck up The idiom "be dead from the neck up" refers to someone who is entirely lacking in intelligence, common sense, or mental acuity. It suggests that the person is mentally empty or devoid of any substantial thoughts.
  • on the ball, be The idiom "on the ball" means to be alert, competent, and capable. It is often used to describe someone who is highly skilled, efficient, and attentive in their work or in specific situations.
  • be worried sick; be sick with worry The idiom "be worried sick; be sick with worry" means to be extremely anxious or concerned about something to the point of making oneself physically ill. It describes a state of excessive distress or worry that strongly impacts a person's well-being and health.
  • be worth the paper it's're printed on The idiom "be worth the paper it's printed on" means that something or someone has no or very little value or importance. It suggests that the written or official document has no worth and holds no credibility or trust.
  • be neither one thing nor the other The idiom "be neither one thing nor the other" is used to describe something or someone that does not clearly belong to or fit into a specific category or group. It implies a state of ambiguity, uncertainty, or being in between two distinct alternatives or identities.
  • I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb. The idiom "I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb" means that since one is already facing or taking a great risk or punishment, they might as well take an even greater risk or commit a more serious offense, as the consequences will be equally severe. It implies that if the punishment or outcome will be the same regardless of the magnitude of the offense, one should go for the bigger opportunity or take more chances.
  • at pains, be at The idiom "at pains, be at" means to make a deliberate effort, often with great care or difficulty, to achieve or do something. It suggests that someone is investing considerable time, energy, and attention to accomplish a particular task or goal.
  • be a good bet The idiom "be a good bet" means that something or someone is likely to succeed, be reliable, or be a wise choice. It suggests that the option being considered is the most probable or sensible one.
  • will be along The idiom "will be along" refers to the assurance or expectation that someone or something will arrive or appear shortly, usually after a period of wait or delay. It conveys the idea that the person or thing in question is on its way or will show up in due course.
  • be at beck and call The idiom "be at beck and call" means to be readily available and obedient to someone's every command or request. It implies that a person is constantly at the disposal of another, always ready to respond to their needs or desires. This idiom often suggests a position of subservience or a relationship where one person has a significant level of control over another.
  • be over the top The idiom "be over the top" means to be excessive, exaggerated, or theatrical in behavior, actions, or appearance, often with a negative connotation. It refers to someone going beyond what is considered reasonable or appropriate.
  • be out of bounds The idiom "be out of bounds" means to be beyond the acceptable limits or outside the permitted area or subject matter. It refers to something inappropriate, forbidden, or in violation of rules or standards.
  • be glad/happy/pleased etc. to see the back of sb/sth The idiom "be glad/happy/pleased etc. to see the back of (someone or something)" means to feel relieved and content when someone or something departs or leaves. It implies that their presence or influence was negative or bothersome, and the speaker is now relieved that they are gone.
  • be up to/above par The idiom "be up to/above par" means to be at or exceed the expected or desired standard, quality, or level of performance. It originated from the game of golf, where "par" refers to the specified number of strokes a skilled golfer should normally require to complete a hole or a course. Thus, being "up to par" means meeting or surpassing the anticipated level of proficiency or adequacy.
  • be rained out To be rained out is an idiom that means an event or activity has been canceled or postponed due to heavy rain or inclement weather. It implies that the rain has prevented the event from taking place as planned.
  • be no skin off sb's nose The idiom "be no skin off someone's nose" means that something does not affect or bother someone in any way. It implies that a particular situation or outcome does not have any personal or emotional impact on a person.
  • be in the air The idiom "be in the air" typically refers to a sense or feeling that something is happening or about to happen, even if it is not yet obvious or confirmed. It implies that there is a general awareness or anticipation of a certain event, trend, mood, or atmosphere. It can also suggest that there are signs or indications of a particular occurrence or change.
  • be on the run The idiom "be on the run" means to be constantly moving, hiding, or evading capture in an attempt to escape or elude someone or something, often authorities or the law. It implies a state of being pursued or chased, typically due to illegal activities or wrongdoing.
  • be riveted to the spot/ground The idiom "be riveted to the spot/ground" means to be completely motionless or unable to move due to fear, shock, surprise, or fascination. It describes a state where someone is so captivated or overwhelmed that they are rooted to a particular location.
  • be at the end of something The idiom "be at the end of something" is used to describe being at the most extreme or final point of a situation, condition, or task. It signifies reaching the conclusion or culmination of something, typically implying that there are no further options, choices, or progress to be made.
  • be not just another pretty face The idiom "be not just another pretty face" means that someone should not rely solely on their physical appearance to be considered valuable or worthwhile. It implies that there should be substance or skill accompanying their attractiveness to avoid being dismissed as superficial or unremarkable.
  • be brought to account To be brought to account means to be held responsible for one's actions or to face consequences for one's behavior. It implies being held accountable for something done, usually in a negative sense, and facing judgment or retribution.
  • all it's cracked up to be The idiom "all it's cracked up to be" means that something or someone has lived up to the high expectations or positive reputation that has been created for them. It implies that the actual experience or quality matches the exaggerated claims or praises that have been made.
  • be like watching paint dry The idiom "be like watching paint dry" is used to describe something that is extremely tedious, boring, or uninteresting. It implies that an activity or situation is so dull that it feels as though time is passing very slowly, similar to the slow drying process of paint.
  • not be lost on (someone) The definition of the idiom "not be lost on (someone)" is when someone understands or appreciates something, recognizing its significance, meaning, or implication. It implies that the person is aware of the value or message conveyed and does not overlook or fail to comprehend it.
  • be as clear as crystal The idiom "be as clear as crystal" means that something is very clear, easy to understand, and free from any ambiguity or confusion. It implies that the information or situation in question is so transparent and apparent that there is no room for doubt or misunderstanding.
  • be hitting on all cylinders The idiom "be hitting on all cylinders" is used to describe someone or something that is functioning at the highest level of capability or efficiency. It refers to the optimal performance of an individual, a team, or a machine, usually in terms of physical or mental abilities. Much like a car engine running smoothly when all cylinders are firing, it suggests that everything is operating in harmony and producing exceptional results.
  • you’ve got to be kidding The idiom "you've got to be kidding" is an exclamation used to express disbelief or astonishment at something that is difficult to believe or seems ridiculous or unlikely. It implies that the speaker cannot seriously accept or comprehend what has been said or done.
  • it remains to be seen The idiom "it remains to be seen" means that something is yet to be determined or proven. It implies that the outcome or truth of a particular situation or statement is uncertain and requires further observation or evidence.
  • be taken by surprise The idiom "be taken by surprise" means to be unexpectedly startled or caught off guard by an event or situation that was not anticipated. It refers to being taken unawares or being surprised by something unexpected or sudden.
  • be breathing down (one's) neck The idiom "be breathing down (one's) neck" means to be closely monitoring or watching someone's every move, often causing feelings of pressure, stress, or discomfort. It suggests someone's constant presence and scrutiny, creating a sense of being observed or controlled.
  • be joined at the hip The idiom "be joined at the hip" means to be closely connected or inseparable from someone or something else. It implies a strong and constant bond, emphasizing the close proximity or strong attachment between two people or entities.
  • be flat broke The idiom "be flat broke" means to have no money or be completely without any financial resources.
  • be head over heels (in love) The idiom "be head over heels (in love)" is used to describe a state of being deeply and madly in love with someone. It signifies intense romantic feelings and being completely infatuated with another person.
  • be in a spot of bother The idiom "be in a spot of bother" means to be in a difficult or troublesome situation. It implies being in trouble or experiencing difficulties that may require assistance or a resolution.
  • be on your deathbed The expression "be on your deathbed" refers to a person being seriously ill or very close to dying. It implies that the individual's condition is severe to the extent that their life may be coming to an end soon.
  • not be all beer and skittles The idiom "not be all beer and skittles" means that a situation or experience is not entirely enjoyable or without difficulties. It refers to the fact that life cannot always be full of fun, pleasure, and ease, but also includes challenges and hardships.
  • be one of the girls The idiom "be one of the girls" refers to a person, typically a male, who is comfortable and accepted in the company of a group of women. This person is able to connect with women on a personal level and is often seen as a trusted companion or confidant. It implies that the individual has overcome barriers or stereotypes that might exist between genders and can seamlessly fit in with a female group.
  • be out for the count The idiom "be out for the count" means to be completely and deeply asleep or unconscious, usually as a result of being tired or exhausted. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone who is completely defeated or unable to continue due to exhaustion or defeat.
  • be in blossom The idiom "be in blossom" typically refers to the state of something being at its peak or fully developed stage. It originated from the imagery of a flower in full bloom, representing the moment of greatest beauty or the fruition of potential. It is often used metaphorically to describe a person, project, or situation that is flourishing, thriving, or experiencing success.
  • be struck dumb The idiom "be struck dumb" means to be rendered speechless or unable to speak due to extreme shock, surprise, or astonishment.
  • cracked up to be The idiom "cracked up to be" means that someone or something is not as good, impressive, or successful as they were believed or described to be. It implies that the reality falls short of the expectations or hype.
  • be in the pay of (someone or something) The idiom "be in the pay of (someone or something)" refers to being controlled or influenced by a person, organization, or interest in exchange for financial gain or loyalty. It implies that a person is loyal to the person or organization paying them, often suggesting a lack of independence or integrity in their actions or decisions.
  • be blasted to smithereens The idiom "be blasted to smithereens" means to be completely destroyed or shattered into tiny fragments as a result of an explosion or intense force. It is often used to depict something being utterly and irreversibly annihilated.
  • be music to (one's) ears The idiom "be music to (one's) ears" means that something is extremely pleasing or delightful to hear. It typically refers to hearing something that brings great joy, satisfaction, or relief to the person.
  • be on the gravy train The idiom "be on the gravy train" means to be in a situation where one is making a lot of easy money or benefits without much effort or deserving it. It implies being in a fortunate position where one is enjoying generous rewards or profits effortlessly.
  • be treading on eggshells The idiom "be treading on eggshells" means to be extremely cautious or sensitive in dealing with a person or situation, as if one's slightest actions or words might lead to offense, conflict, or trouble. It implies a feeling of walking on fragile ground, similar to how one would tread carefully to avoid breaking eggshells.
  • be as well The idiom "be as well" typically means to have the same outcome or result. It implies that one option is just as good or appropriate as another. It suggests that there is no significant difference or advantage in choosing one over the other.
  • be in bad odor The idiom "be in bad odor" means to be viewed unfavorably or be held in disrepute by others. It suggests that one's reputation or actions have caused them to be disliked, doubted, or mistrusted.
  • be lost without sb/sth The idiom "be lost without sb/sth" means to feel completely helpless or unable to function properly without someone or something. It implies a strong dependence or reliance on someone or something for guidance, support, or assistance, and suggests that the person would struggle or be unable to cope without the presence or help of that person or thing.
  • be laughing your head off The idiom "be laughing your head off" means to be laughing uncontrollably and hysterically. It is used to describe a situation where someone finds something extremely amusing or funny to the point of being unable to control their laughter.
  • be in (or out of) the frame The idiom "be in (or out of) the frame" typically refers to being included or excluded from a particular situation, group, or decision-making process. It implies whether someone is involved and considered as part of what is happening or not. It can also indicate whether someone is visible or noticeable in a certain context.
  • be smiling like a Cheshire cat The idiom "be smiling like a Cheshire cat" means to have a broad, mischievous, or enigmatic smile. It refers to a character in Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," where the Cheshire Cat's grin remains visible even after its body has disappeared. This idiom typically describes a person who is delighted, secretive, or concealing some hidden knowledge or amusement.
  • be a dead ringer for somebody The idiom "be a dead ringer for somebody" means that someone looks extremely similar to another person, to the point of being almost identical in appearance.
  • be no joke The idiom "be no joke" means that something is serious, difficult, or not to be taken lightly. It implies that the situation or task requires sincere effort, attention, or consideration.
  • be in sb's pocket To be in someone's pocket means to be under their control or influence, usually due to their power, authority, or financial support. It implies that the person being referred to has a significant hold or sway over the actions, decisions, or behavior of another individual.
  • be all Greek to someone The idiom "be all Greek to someone" means that something is completely incomprehensible or unintelligible to a person. It implies that the person cannot understand or make sense of something, much like how one may find the Greek language confusing if they are not familiar with it.
  • be bursting at the seams The idiom "be bursting at the seams" means to be extremely full or overcrowded, often with people or objects. It implies a situation or place that has reached its capacity or limit and can no longer sustain any additional elements.
  • be dressed up to the nines The idiom "be dressed up to the nines" means to be dressed very elegantly or impeccably, usually for a formal or special occasion. It implies that the person is wearing their finest clothes and is impeccably groomed from head to toe.
  • you have got to be kidding (me) The idiom "you have got to be kidding (me)" is an expression used to convey surprise, disbelief, or incredulity when something seems too absurd, outrageous, or unbelievable to be true. It implies that the situation or statement being discussed is so unexpected or preposterous that it cannot be taken seriously.
  • be nervous of (one's) (own) shadow The idiom "be nervous of (one's) (own) shadow" refers to being excessively timid, fearful, or easily scared. It means to be constantly on edge or anxious, perceiving even harmless or insignificant things as potential threats or danger. This expression suggests that someone is extremely lacking in confidence, overreacting to minor situations, and always feeling vulnerable or insecure.
  • be at each other's throats The idiom "be at each other's throats" means to be engaged in a heated or relentless conflict or argument with someone. It suggests intense hostility or animosity between two or more individuals or groups.
  • be somebody's baby The idiom "be somebody's baby" typically means to be someone's favorite or beloved person. It implies that the person is cared for and cherished in a special way.
  • be engraved in (one's) memory The idiom "be engraved in (one's) memory" means that something is permanently and vividly remembered or etched into one's mind. It refers to a distinct and lasting memory that remains with a person and is not easily forgotten.
  • be up with the lark The idiom "be up with the lark" means to wake up or be awake very early in the morning, typically at or before dawn. It refers to someone who starts their day early and is active or alert during those early hours. The phrase is derived from the lark's habit of singing and being very active during the early morning hours.
  • be on the scrounge (for something) The idiom "be on the scrounge (for something)" means to actively search or beg for something, usually with the intention of getting it for free or by relying on the generosity of others. It implies a sense of opportunism and a willingness to find and obtain things without spending money.
  • be out of line The idiom "be out of line" means to behave inappropriately or to act in a way that violates acceptable standards or boundaries. It implies that someone is acting improperly or exceeding their authority in a specific situation.
  • be talking through (one's) hat The idiom "be talking through (one's) hat" means that someone is speaking or expressing opinions confidently, but without having a deep knowledge or understanding of the subject matter. It implies that the person is making things up or speaking nonsense.
  • be boxing clever The idiom "be boxing clever" refers to being strategic, cunning, or resourceful in handling a situation or problem. It is often used to suggest employing clever tactics or methods to gain an advantage or outsmart an opponent, similar to how a boxer strategically plans their moves in the ring.
  • be touch-and-go The idiom "be touch-and-go" means a situation that is uncertain or precarious, with a very unpredictable or uncertain outcome. It refers to a scenario where the result could go either way, and success or failure hangs in the balance.
  • be shaking in your boots/shoes The idiom "be shaking in your boots/shoes" means to be very scared or trembling with fear, usually in anticipation of something threatening or intimidating. It expresses a state of extreme nervousness or anxiety.
  • be nothing short of (something) The idiom "be nothing short of (something)" means to be completely or undeniably a particular quality or characteristic. It implies that the thing being described is so outstanding, impressive, or extreme that it surpasses any expectations or falls into the category without any doubt. It highlights that the thing being mentioned is absolute or unequivocal in its nature or attributes.
  • be bitten by the bug The idiom "be bitten by the bug" means to develop a strong enthusiasm or obsession for something, often an activity or a hobby. It implies that someone is deeply and passionately interested or involved in a particular pursuit or interest.
  • be put through the mangle The idiom "be put through the mangle" means to go through a difficult or challenging situation that causes physical or emotional strain, often leaving one feeling exhausted or worn out. It refers to the process of being squeezed or pressed in a mangle, which was a machine used to wring out moisture from fabric, involving intense pressure and twisting. In a figurative sense, it implies going through a demanding experience or being subjected to severe stress and hardship.
  • be caught in the middle The idiom "be caught in the middle" means to be in a difficult or uncomfortable position where one is stuck between two conflicting parties or situations, often being forced to pick sides or make difficult decisions.
  • can’t be bothered (to do something) The idiom "can't be bothered (to do something)" means that someone is not willing or motivated to make the effort to do a particular task or activity. They are indifferent or uninterested in putting in the necessary energy or time.
  • be not up to much The idiom "be not up to much" means to not be very impressive, talented, or capable. It typically describes someone or something as being mediocre, average, or lacking in skill or quality.
  • be coining money The idiom "be coining money" refers to someone or something that is making a lot of money or generating substantial wealth, often with ease or at a remarkable rate. It implies a high level of financial success or profit-making.
  • be several/many removes (away) from sth The idiom "be several/many removes (away) from sth" means to be far removed or distant from something in terms of connection, relationship, or relevance. It implies that there are numerous steps, degrees, or levels of separation between two concepts or ideas.
  • be one thing after another The idiom "be one thing after another" means to experience a series of continuous or overlapping problems or difficulties, without any respite or relief. It suggests a relentless succession of negative events or challenges happening consecutively.
  • be cocksure of (oneself) The idiom "be cocksure of (oneself)" means to be overly confident or self-assured to the point of being arrogant or conceited. It refers to someone who is extremely confident in their opinions, abilities, or knowledge, often displaying a lack of humility or open-mindedness.
  • be down on luck The idiom "be down on luck" means to be experiencing a period of misfortune or bad luck. It refers to a situation where someone is facing difficulties or setbacks in various aspects of life, such as work, relationships, or personal circumstances.
  • be knocking on heaven's door The idiom "be knocking on heaven's door" means to be very close to death or nearing the end of one's life.
  • be tied to mother's apron strings The idiom "be tied to mother's apron strings" means to be overly dependent or excessively attached to one's mother, usually referring to someone who lacks independence or cannot make decisions without their mother's involvement or consent.
  • be at somebody's command To be at somebody's command means to be completely obedient and ready to carry out someone's orders or requests without question or hesitation. It implies that someone is under the complete control or authority of another person and would do whatever they are asked or instructed to do.
  • be the butt of something The idiom "be the butt of something" means to be the target of ridicule, ridicule, or jokes among a group of people. It refers to being the subject or recipient of humor or mockery.
  • be (all) the rage The idiom "be (all) the rage" refers to something that is currently extremely popular or fashionable. It is used to describe a trend or phenomenon that is widely embraced and highly sought after by many people.
  • be in the right place at the right time The idiom "be in the right place at the right time" means to be fortunate or lucky enough to find oneself in the perfect circumstances for success, opportunity, or other positive outcomes. It suggests being present or situated appropriately when something favorable or advantageous happens.
  • not be all moonlight and roses The idiom "not be all moonlight and roses" means that a situation is not entirely positive or perfect, as it might initially appear. It implies that there are difficulties, challenges, or negative aspects involved, even though it may seem idyllic or desirable on the surface.
  • be bound together by/in something "Be bound together by/in something" is an idiom that refers to a strong connection or relationship between people or things. It implies a close and inseparable connection which cannot easily be broken or separated. It suggests that the individuals or components involved are united and dependent on each other due to a shared experience, common interest, or a strong bond.
  • be laughing all the way to the bank The idiom "be laughing all the way to the bank" means to be very pleased or satisfied by a financial gain or profit. It implies that a person is enjoying their success and finds it amusing or pleasurable to accumulate wealth or receive a large sum of money.
  • be heavily into sth The idiom "be heavily into sth" is used to describe someone who is very enthusiastic, deeply involved or passionate about something. It implies a strong and intense level of interest or dedication towards a particular activity, hobby, or subject matter.
  • be not worth a hill of beans The idiom "be not worth a hill of beans" means having little or no value or worth. It suggests that something or someone is considered insignificant, trivial, or worthless.
  • be the dead spit of sb The idiom "be the dead spit of sb" means to closely resemble someone in appearance or mannerisms, to the point where they could be mistaken for each other. It implies an extremely close similarity between two individuals, often used to describe a striking resemblance between family members or siblings.
  • be just the thing The idiom "be just the thing" means something is ideal, appropriate, or exactly what is needed or desired in a particular situation.
  • be still my heart The phrase "be still my heart" is an idiom used to express an intense emotional reaction, typically to someone or something that is highly appealing, captivating, or moving. It conveys a sense of overwhelmed admiration or astonishment, causing one's heart to beat faster.
  • be soft on (someone) The idiom "be soft on (someone)" refers to having a lenient or forgiving attitude towards a person, often implying a lack of strictness or punishment. It can also suggest being overly gentle or indulgent towards someone's actions or behavior, even if they may warrant stricter treatment.
  • be struck on (someone or something) Being "struck on" someone or something is an idiom that means to be completely infatuated or enchanted with someone or something, typically in a romantic or admiring sense. It suggests a strong attraction or fascination towards the person or object in question.
  • be out of this world The idiom "be out of this world" means to be outstanding, exceptionally good, or extraordinary. It is often used to describe something or someone that is beyond comparison or exceeds expectations in terms of quality, taste, beauty, or performance.
  • be on the books The idiom "be on the books" refers to something that is officially recorded or documented, typically referring to a law, rule, or regulation. It means that something is legally established and recognized, and can be found in official records or publications.
  • be on (one's) back The idiom "be on (one's) back" refers to someone constantly nagging, criticizing, or pressuring someone else, causing them to feel overwhelmed or burdened by their demands or expectations. It suggests a persistent and unrelenting nature of criticism or scrutiny.
  • be young at heart The idiom "be young at heart" means to maintain a youthful or childlike outlook on life, regardless of one's age. It implies a positive and vibrant attitude, full of enthusiasm, curiosity, and a sense of wonder. It suggests that despite growing older, one continues to embrace joy, spontaneity, and a zest for life.
  • be out of sb's league The idiom "be out of someone's league" means that a person is considered too skilled, attractive, or successful to be a suitable romantic or competitive match for someone else. It suggests that the person being referred to is in a different, higher category or level.
  • meant to be The idiom "meant to be" refers to the belief or perception that something is destined, preordained, or fated to happen or exist in a specific way. It implies that there is a higher purpose or plan behind events or relationships, suggesting that they naturally align or unfold as they should, irrespective of any obstacles or uncertainties.
  • be a double-edged weapon The idiom "be a double-edged weapon" refers to something that has both positive and negative consequences or effects. Just like a double-edged weapon can cut two ways, this idiom indicates that a particular thing or situation can have advantages as well as disadvantages.
  • be in the (right) ballpark The idiom "be in the (right) ballpark" means to have a reasonably accurate estimate or approximation of something, usually in terms of quantity or value. It suggests that the given answer or guess may not be completely precise, but it comes close enough to the correct answer to be considered acceptable or relevant.
  • be laughing up your sleeve The idiom "be laughing up your sleeve" means to secretly or quietly find amusement or delight in a situation, often at someone else's expense, without showing it openly. It implies a concealed or smug form of enjoyment.
  • be sth of a sth The idiom "be something of a something" is used to describe a person or thing that possesses some but not all of the qualities typically associated with that something, or that is somewhat like that something. It implies that while the person or thing is not a perfect example of the something being referred to, there are some resemblances or characteristics present.
  • be put to rights The idiom "be put to rights" means to correct or fix something that is not functioning properly or is in a disordered state. It implies restoring order or improving a situation to its desired or rightful state.
  • be in a tizz(y) The idiom "be in a tizz(y)" refers to being in a state of extreme excitement, nervousness, or agitation. It implies a feeling of being flustered, unsettled, or overwhelmed by a particular situation or event.
  • be grateful for small mercies The idiom "be grateful for small mercies" means to appreciate or be thankful for the little positive aspects or blessings in a situation, even if they are not significant or ideal. It suggests finding contentment or solace in small, positive occurrences rather than focusing on the overall negative or difficult circumstances.
  • Youth must be served The idiom "Youth must be served" means that young people should be given opportunities and responsibilities because they have energy, enthusiasm, and fresh ideas that can contribute positively to society or a particular situation.
  • be under sb's thumb The idiom "be under sb's thumb" means to be under the complete control or influence of someone else, usually in a submissive or subordinate position. It implies that the person being described is dominated, obedient, and has very little independence or power in the relationship.
  • be on the fiddle The idiom "be on the fiddle" typically means to be engaged in dishonest or fraudulent activities, often pertaining to financial matters. It implies engaging in deceitful or illegal practices for personal gain or advantage.
  • be as quiet as a mouse The idiom "be as quiet as a mouse" means to be extremely silent or make little to no noise.
  • be in a good, bad, dark, etc. space The idiom "be in a good, bad, dark, etc. space" refers to someone's emotional or mental state or condition. It signifies being in a particular state of mind, feeling or situation, which can be positive (good space), negative (bad space), troubled (dark space), or any other variation. It is often used to convey someone's overall emotional well-being or mindset at a given time.
  • be a martyr to sth The idiom "be a martyr to sth" means to suffer or endure something unpleasant or difficult, usually due to a sense of duty, obligation, or selflessness. It implies sacrificing one's own well-being or comfort for the sake of others or a cause. It can also suggest a willingness to bear hardships without complaint or seeking sympathy.
  • be like a bull in a china shop The idiom "be like a bull in a china shop" refers to someone who is clumsy, careless, or reckless in their actions or behavior, often causing damage or disruption in a fragile or delicate situation. It implies that the person lacks finesse or tact in handling delicate matters, much like a bull would in a shop filled with fragile china.
  • be dancing in the streets The idiom "be dancing in the streets" means to be extremely happy, excited, and celebrating something joyously. It conveys a sense of immense joy and public jubilation that can't be contained, as if people were literally dancing in the streets to express their happiness.
  • old enough to be mother The idiom "old enough to be mother" refers to someone who is significantly older or more experienced than another person, typically implying that they possess more knowledge or maturity. It suggests that the age difference is substantial enough to assume a parental or mentor-like role.
  • be going strong The idiom "be going strong" means to be in a successful or thriving state, often referring to an ongoing activity, event, or relationship that is continuing with energy, enthusiasm, or effectiveness. It suggests that something is operating or progressing optimally, without any signs of decline or weakening.
  • be in over (one's) head The idiom "be in over (one's) head" means to be involved in a situation or task that is beyond one's ability, knowledge, or understanding, usually resulting in feeling overwhelmed or unable to handle it.
  • be light on (one's) feet The idiom "be light on one's feet" means to be quick, nimble, or agile in movement. It suggests being able to move effortlessly or with ease, often implying a sense of grace or agility. It can refer to a physical ability or metaphorically describe someone who is mentally alert and ready to respond quickly.
  • be a happy camper The idiom "be a happy camper" means to be content, satisfied, or pleased with a situation or circumstance. It typically refers to someone who is happy and content in their current situation or situation they are referring to. The phrase is derived from the idea that someone who enjoys camping and the outdoors is usually in a good mood and content with their experiences.
  • be on an upward/downward trajectory The idiom "be on an upward/downward trajectory" is used to describe a situation or trend that is either improving and heading towards success (upward trajectory) or deteriorating and heading towards failure (downward trajectory). It signifies the direction or path that something is taking, typically in terms of progress, growth, or success.
  • be the spit (and image) of sb, at be the spitting image of sb The idiom "be the spit (and image) of someone" or "be the spitting image of someone" means that a person closely resembles another person, often a close family member, in terms of physical appearance. It suggests that there is a strong resemblance or likeness between the two individuals. The phrase "spit and image" or "spitting image" comes from the notion that the person is so similar to the other that they could be their exact duplicate or a perfect representation, as if they were spat out and subsequently created an image of the other person.
  • be a bit much The idiom "be a bit much" means to be excessive, overwhelming, or too demanding in a way that is difficult to handle or tolerate.
  • be good for something The idiom "be good for something" means to have some value, usefulness, or capability in a certain situation or task. It implies that a person or thing has a specific skill, ability, or quality that can be put to practical or beneficial use.
  • be on the threshold of sth The idiom "be on the threshold of something" means to be at the point of beginning or entering a new stage or phase in one's life, career, or any other significant aspect. It implies being on the verge of experiencing a change, transition, or accomplishment.
  • be gimleteyed, at have gimlet eyes The idiom "be gimleteyed" or "have gimlet eyes" is used to describe someone who has sharp, piercing, or penetrating eyesight. It suggests that the person's gaze is intense and can see through or take in details that might be easily missed by others. It implies that the individual is observant, perceptive, and able to analyze situations or people thoroughly.
  • be into (something) The idiom "be into (something)" refers to having a strong interest in or enthusiasm for a particular activity, hobby, topic, or person. It implies a deep engagement and involvement with the subject, often resulting in a passionate desire to learn, participate, or explore further.
  • be caught between two stools The idiom "be caught between two stools" means to find oneself in a dilemma or difficulty, often due to inability to choose between two options or conflicting situations. It suggests a state of indecision or being in an uncertain middle ground.
  • be another kettle of fish The idiom "be another kettle of fish" means to be a different matter or situation compared to what was previously discussed or considered. It refers to something that is distinct or unrelated, often used when the original topic or subject is being shifted or changed.
  • be going gangbusters The idiom "be going gangbusters" means to be functioning or operating extremely energetically, successfully, or with great enthusiasm. It implies that someone or something is performing exceptionally well and making considerable progress or achieving outstanding results.
  • be on hand The idiom "be on hand" means to be present or available in a specific place or at a specific time to provide assistance, support, or services if needed. It implies being ready and accessible when necessary.
  • be news to (one) The idiom "be news to (one)" means to be unknown or unfamiliar information to someone. It implies that the information being presented is surprising or unexpected, catching the person off guard.
  • old enough to be someone's mother The idiom "old enough to be someone's mother" refers to a significant age difference between two individuals, suggesting that one person is considerably older than the other, to the extent that they could potentially be the other person's parent if they had them at a young age.
  • be afraid of your own shadow The idiom "be afraid of your own shadow" means to be excessively fearful or easily frightened by even the slightest or most harmless things. It implies that a person is overly timid, lacking confidence, or overly cautious in everyday situations.
  • be on nodding terms (with someone) The idiom "be on nodding terms (with someone)" refers to a casual acquaintance or a relationship where two individuals are familiar enough to acknowledge each other with a nod or brief greeting, but have not developed a deep or close connection. It implies that the level of interaction between the two individuals is polite and cordial, but not more than surface-level pleasantries.
  • be hitting (one's) head against a (brick) wall The idiom "be hitting (one's) head against a (brick) wall" refers to a situation where someone is repeatedly attempting or striving to achieve something, but with no success or progress. It implies that the person's efforts are futile or ineffective, similar to the futility of physically hitting one's head against a solid wall.
  • not be worth a dime The idiom "not be worth a dime" means that something or someone has little or no value or worth. It implies that the thing or person in question is considered worthless or insignificant.
  • be (like) water off a duck's back The idiom "be (like) water off a duck's back" is an expression that means to be unaffected or unbothered by criticism, negative remarks, or unfavorable situations. It implies that just like water slides off a duck's feathers without penetrating or disturbing them, the person being referred to remains calm, unruffled, and unperturbed by any adverse or disapproving circumstances.
  • be as bright as a button The idiom "be as bright as a button" means to be very intelligent, quick-witted, or sharp. It is often used to describe someone who is intellectually sharp or clever.
  • be all talk (and no action) The idiom "be all talk (and no action)" means someone who frequently or loudly speaks about what they will do or want to do, but never actually follows through or takes any concrete steps towards it. It implies that the person lacks action or ability to deliver on their promises or intentions.
  • be not much to look at The idiom "be not much to look at" means that someone or something does not have an attractive or impressive appearance. It suggests that the person or object may not be visually appealing or stand out in terms of beauty or charm.
  • be in a minority of one The idiom "be in a minority of one" means to have a viewpoint or opinion that is different or divergent from everyone else. It describes a person who holds an uncommon or unpopular belief, often suggesting that they are isolated or alone in their perspective.
  • be gagging for (something) The idiom "be gagging for (something)" means to be extremely eager or desperate for something. It implies a strong desire or craving for a particular thing or experience.
  • be not worth a plug nickel The idiom "be not worth a plug nickel" means that something or someone is completely worthless or of no value. It implies that the item or person in question holds no significance or worth and holds little to no value for any purpose or trade. The term "plug nickel" refers to a coin that is worth very little or nothing at all.
  • be scratching (one's) head The idiom "be scratching (one's) head" means to be confused, perplexed, or struggling to understand something. It refers to the act of physically scratching one's head as a gesture of puzzlement or deep thought.
  • leave sth to be desired The idiom "leave something to be desired" is used to indicate that something is not of high quality or does not meet expectations. It means that there are aspects or elements that are lacking or unsatisfactory.
  • be blown off course The idiom "be blown off course" is used to describe a situation in which something or someone deviates from their intended path, plan, or goal due to unexpected circumstances or external influences. It often implies being diverted or redirected by unforeseen events, hindering progress or desired outcomes.
  • be all go The idiom "be all go" means to be very busy, active, or in full operation. It often implies a high level of productivity and continuous activity.
  • be asking for it The idiom "be asking for it" typically means behaving in a way that is likely to provoke a negative or unwanted reaction or consequence. It suggests that someone's actions or behavior have set them on a course to experience trouble, criticism, or difficulty.
  • be out of mind with boredom etc. The idiom "be out of mind with boredom (etc.)" means to be extremely bored or overwhelmed to the point of feeling mentally or emotionally drained. It suggests being in a state of frustration or restlessness caused by a lack of stimulation or interest in the current situation.
  • be no object The idiom "be no object" means that cost or expense is not a consideration or hindrance. It implies that one's willingness or ability to pay for something is not an issue, allowing them to obtain or fulfill a desire or need without concern for financial constraints.
  • be in bondage to sth The idiom "be in bondage to something" means to be under the control or influence of something or someone, typically in a negative or restrictive manner. It implies being enslaved, trapped, or unable to escape from a particular situation, habit, or addiction. It suggests being completely subjected to and controlled by a certain force or circumstance.
  • be cursed with The idiom "be cursed with" refers to being burdened, afflicted, or plagued by something undesirable or unfortunate. It implies having to deal with a persistent problem, condition, or characteristic that causes difficulty or suffering.
  • be alive and well The idiom "be alive and well" means that someone or something is thriving, in good health, or progressing positively. It indicates that despite potential doubts or concerns, the person or subject in question is doing fine or is successful.
  • be sick and tired of The idiom "be sick and tired of" is used to express extreme dissatisfaction, frustration, or annoyance with someone or something. It signifies being thoroughly fed up and exhausted by a particular situation or person.
  • be running around like a headless chicken The idiom "be running around like a headless chicken" means to be behaving in a frantic or disorganized manner, often due to stress or confusion. It suggests that someone is extremely busy, rushing around without a clear sense of direction or purpose, similar to the way a chicken might run in circles if its head were cut off.
  • be on familiar terms The idiom "be on familiar terms" means to have a friendly or intimate relationship with someone, characterized by ease, comfort, and a level of familiarity. It suggests having a close rapport or a good understanding with another person or group.
  • be (one's) for the taking The idiom "be (one's) for the taking" means that something or someone is available, free, or up for grabs. It implies that someone has the opportunity to easily obtain or acquire the mentioned thing or person without any hindrance or competition.
  • deem it (to be) necessary The idiom "deem it (to be) necessary" means to consider or judge something as essential, required, or important. It refers to the act of making a strong personal judgment or opinion about the necessity of a particular action, decision, or outcome.
  • no one will be any the wiser The idiom "no one will be any the wiser" means that nobody will become aware or knowledgeable about a particular situation or secret. It suggests that an action or event will go unnoticed or unnoticed by others, allowing the person involved to avoid any consequences or detection.
  • be nothing/not much/very little in it The idiom "be nothing/not much/very little in it" is used to describe a situation or comparison where there is a minimal or insignificant difference between two options or alternatives. It suggests that the choices being compared are nearly identical in terms of quality, value, importance, or outcome.
  • be comprised of The idiom "be comprised of" means to be composed or made up of certain parts or elements. It suggests that something is formed or organized by several individual components or elements that come together to create a whole.
  • be common/public knowledge The idiom "be common/public knowledge" refers to information or facts that are widely known or easily accessible to the general public. It implies that the information is not secretive or confidential, but rather something that most people already know or can easily find out.
  • be a dead ringer for The idiom "be a dead ringer for" means that someone or something looks exactly like someone else or something else. It implies a strong resemblance in appearance or characteristics.
  • be (one's) (own) lookout The idiom "be (one's) (own) lookout" means to be responsible for one's own actions, decisions, or safety. It suggests that the person should not rely on others for guidance, protection, or assistance, and should instead be self-reliant and accountable for the consequences of their choices.
  • be (only) a matter of time The idiom "be (only) a matter of time" means that something is inevitable or certain to happen in the future, although the exact timing may be uncertain. It implies that it is just a question of when, rather than if, an event or outcome will occur.
  • be in the mood The idiom "be in the mood" refers to one's emotional state or disposition at a given time, indicating whether an individual feels inclined or receptive to engage in a particular activity or behavior. It signifies being mentally or emotionally prepared or attuned to enjoy or participate in something willingly.
  • be at pains to do sth The idiom "be at pains to do something" means to make a concerted effort or take great care to do something. It implies that someone is going out of their way or going to great lengths to ensure that a task is done correctly or to meet a certain standard.
  • not be for the fainthearted The idiom "not be for the fainthearted" means that a particular situation, task, or activity is demanding, intense, or difficult and therefore requires courage, bravery, or a strong will to handle or endure. It suggests that only those who are mentally or emotionally strong enough can confront or handle it successfully.
  • be hearing/imagining/seeing things The idiom "be hearing/imagining/seeing things" typically refers to someone experiencing perception or sensory hallucinations that are not based on reality. It suggests that the person may be hearing, imagining, or seeing something that does not actually exist, often indicating a state of confusion or mental instability.
  • be all smiles The idiom "be all smiles" means to appear happy or pleased, displaying an expression of joy or contentment. This idiomatic expression is often used to describe someone who is cheerful, friendly, or particularly pleasant in their demeanor.
  • be in line to do sth The idiom "be in line to do something" means to be in a position or situation where it is likely or expected for someone to have the opportunity or be chosen to do something. It suggests that someone is in a queue or sequence of people, waiting for their turn or chance to do a particular activity or take on a specific role.
  • be out of the picture The idiom "be out of the picture" means to be no longer involved or relevant in a situation or plan. It implies that someone or something has been removed, excluded, or is no longer a factor.
  • be so bold as to The idiom "be so bold as to" means to have the audacity or courage to do or say something that is considered daring, impolite, or unconventional. It implies taking a risk or going against societal norms or expectations.
  • all in, be The idiom "all in, be" means to be fully committed or invested in something, usually with a high level of determination and certainty. It is often used in the context of giving one's maximum effort or taking a decisive action without hesitation. In card games like poker, it specifically refers to a player wagering all of their chips in a single bet, indicating a strong belief in their hand or a willingness to take a significant risk.
  • be blown away by something The idiom "be blown away by something" means to be extremely impressed, astonished, or overwhelmed by something. It conveys a sense of being greatly surprised or moved by the power, strength, or quality of something.
  • be a (great/firm) believer in something The idiom "be a (great/firm) believer in something" means to have a steadfast and strong conviction or faith in a particular belief, idea, or concept. It implies that the person strongly supports and trusts in the value or truth of that particular thing.
  • be damned if you do and damned if you don't The idiom "be damned if you do and damned if you don't" means that regardless of the decision or action taken, the outcome will be negative or disadvantageous. It implies being caught in a lose-lose situation where the choices or actions available are equally undesirable or lead to unfortunate consequences.
  • be knocked sideways The idiom "be knocked sideways" refers to being greatly surprised, shocked, or astonished by something. It implies that the person's emotions or thoughts have been completely disrupted or thrown off balance.
  • not be just a pretty face The idiom "not be just a pretty face" means that someone is not only good-looking but also has intelligence, skill, or other qualities that may not be immediately apparent. This phrase suggests that there is more to a person's abilities and capabilities beyond their physical appearance.
  • be in the short strokes The idiom "be in the short strokes" means to be in the final stages or in the final details of a task or project. It refers to a situation where one is reaching the last part of a process or nearing completion.
  • be off your chump The idiom "be off your chump" means to be insane, crazy, or mentally unstable. It is often used to describe someone behaving in a foolish or irrational manner.
  • be half-cut The idiom "be half-cut" refers to being somewhat intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol. It implies that someone has consumed a substantial amount of alcohol but is not completely drunk.
  • be out of sorts The idiom "be out of sorts" refers to feeling unwell, irritable, or not in one's usual state of mind or physical condition. It suggests a temporary state of discomfort or dissatisfaction.
  • be firing on all cylinders The idiom "be firing on all cylinders" means to be operating or performing at full capacity; to be functioning at one's highest level of effectiveness or productivity. It can be used to describe a person, a team, or even a machine that is operating optimally and giving its best performance.
  • be in/go into free fall The idiom "be in free fall" or "go into free fall" is a metaphorical expression that describes a sudden and significant decline, loss of control, or a situation rapidly deteriorating. It often implies a decline or situation that is difficult to recover from. The term is derived from the idea of an object falling freely in the absence of any external forces, representing a state of rapid descent or a lack of stability.
  • be made of sterner stuff The idiom "be made of sterner stuff" means having a strong and resilient character, being mentally or emotionally tough, and being capable of enduring hardship or difficult situations without giving up or getting discouraged. It implies having a firm resolve and a determination to overcome obstacles or challenges.
  • be caught (or taken) short The idiom "be caught (or taken) short" means to be unexpectedly in a situation where one urgently needs to use the restroom or relieve oneself. It refers to being caught off guard or unprepared when nature calls.
  • can't be doing with sth The idiom "can't be doing with sth" means that someone has no tolerance or patience for something, or has no interest or inclination to engage in a particular activity or accept a certain behavior. It implies a strong dislike or aversion towards something.
  • be not all there The idiom "be not all there" is used to describe someone who is mentally or emotionally lacking or unstable. It suggests that the person's thinking or behavior is incomplete or not fully rational.
  • be lost on sb The idiom "be lost on someone" means that someone fails to understand or appreciate something, usually due to a lack of knowledge, interest, or comprehension. It suggests that the person does not grasp the meaning or significance of something being said or done.
  • be short notice The idiom "be short notice" is used to describe a situation where something is arranged or requested with very little time in advance, often implying that there is not enough time to adequately prepare or make necessary arrangements. It suggests that something is sudden or unexpected, leaving little room for pre-planning.
  • be set in concrete The idiom "be set in concrete" refers to something that is firmly established or determined and cannot be changed easily. It implies that a decision, plan, or belief is fixed and unalterable.
  • be behind the eight ball To be behind the eight ball means to be in a difficult or disadvantaged position, often due to one's own mistakes or circumstances beyond one's control. It implies being in a situation where it is challenging to recover or make progress.
  • be engraved on sb's memory/mind The idiom "be engraved on someone's memory/mind" refers to a vivid and lasting memory or experience that is deeply ingrained in someone's mind. It suggests an event or information that is impossible to forget or be erased from one's memory.
  • be about The idiom "be about" means to be focused on or concerned with a particular topic, activity, or purpose. It implies that someone or something is engaged in or involved with a specific matter or situation.
  • be bursting/bulging at the seams The idiom "be bursting/bulging at the seams" is used to describe a situation or place that is extremely full or overcrowded. It suggests that something or somewhere is filled to its utmost capacity and is possibly on the verge of bursting or overflowing due to excessiveness.
  • be on somebody’s side The idiom "be on somebody’s side" means to support, defend, or agree with someone in a disagreement or conflict. It implies being loyal and advocating for someone's interests or viewpoint.
  • be cast in a mold The idiom "be cast in a mold" means to be created or shaped in a particular way, usually referring to conformity or fitting into a pre-established pattern or standard. It implies that someone or something is designed or shaped to adhere to a certain set of characteristics, expectations, or behaviors.
  • be in league with sb The idiom "be in league with someone" means to be working together with someone, often in a secretive or dishonest manner, towards a common goal or purpose. It implies a close and often unethical collaboration between individuals or groups.
  • be nothing much to write home about The idiom "be nothing much to write home about" is used to describe something or someone that is ordinary, unremarkable, or lackluster. It implies that the subject being discussed is not worth mentioning or does not warrant excitement or praise. It originates from the idea that when sending letters to loved ones, people tend to write about interesting or noteworthy events, whereas mundane or unimpressive occurrences would not be worth discussing.
  • be on the breadline The idiom "be on the breadline" means to be living in poverty or experiencing extreme financial hardship. It refers to the state of being so poor that a person or family can barely afford enough food to survive, with the notion of relying on cheap staple foods like bread.
  • be (as) fit as a flea, at be (as) fit as a fiddle The idiom "be (as) fit as a flea" or "be (as) fit as a fiddle" both mean to be extremely healthy and physically fit. It implies being in excellent condition, both physically and mentally, with a strong level of vitality and energy. It often signifies someone who is in great shape and has robust overall health.
  • be taken down a notch (or two) The idiom "be taken down a notch (or two)" means to have someone's superiority, ego, or arrogance reduced or humbled. It refers to a situation where someone's high opinion of themselves or their overconfidence is challenged or corrected, often resulting in a more realistic or humble perspective.
  • be as good as one's word The idiom "be as good as one's word" means that someone is dependable and trustworthy, consistently keeping their promises and following through on their commitments.
  • be on full alert The idiom "be on full alert" means to be extremely attentive, vigilant, and ready for any possible danger or emergency situation. It implies being alert or aware of one's surroundings and prepared to respond quickly and decisively.
  • be knee-high to a grasshopper The idiom "be knee-high to a grasshopper" means to be very young or small in size. It is often used to describe someone when they were very young or to emphasize that someone has known each other since childhood or for a long time.
  • old enough to be sm's mother The idiom "old enough to be someone's mother" is used to describe a substantial age difference between two individuals, implying that the person being referred to is significantly older than the other person. It implies that the age difference is large enough for them to potentially be a parent to the other person.
  • be rubbing (one's) hands (with glee) The idiom "be rubbing (one's) hands (with glee)" means to show visible satisfaction, excitement, or anticipation about something that is going to happen or has happened. It implies a sense of delight, often tinged with a bit of mischief or cunning. It can also suggest that someone is feeling triumphant or pleased about a situation that may bring them personal gain or advantage.
  • be a far cry from The idiom "be a far cry from" refers to something that is significantly different or inferior when compared to another thing. It implies that there is a significant difference in quality, level, or expectation between two things or situations.
  • be up to your eyes in something The idiom "be up to your eyes in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a task or situation.
  • be the dead spit of The idiom "be the dead spit of" means to closely resemble someone or something in appearance, mannerisms, or characteristics. It suggests that the similarity between two individuals or things is so striking that they could be considered identical or nearly indistinguishable from each other.
  • Be just before you're generous The idiom "Be just before you're generous" means that it is important to ensure fairness and uphold justice before being overly charitable or generous towards others. It emphasizes the importance of taking into account what is fair and equitable before being too giving in order to maintain a balanced and just approach in dealing with others.
  • be spitting in/into the wind The idiom "be spitting in/into the wind" means to engage in a futile or pointless activity or effort. It refers to the act of spitting into the wind, which is useless as the wind will simply blow the spit back in the direction of the person spitting.
  • be greater/more than the sum of its parts The idiom "be greater/more than the sum of its parts" means that when individual elements or components are combined, the resulting whole entity or system is superior or more valuable than if considered separately. It implies that the collective effect or synergy of the parts creates something exceptional or remarkable beyond what could be achieved individually.
  • be down on (one's) luck The idiom "be down on one's luck" refers to being in a period of unfortunate circumstances or bad luck. It indicates that someone is experiencing a string of negative events or facing difficulties that have resulted in a decline in their overall situation or fortune.
  • be ill at ease The idiom "be ill at ease" means to feel uncomfortable, anxious, or uneasy in a particular situation or with a specific person. It denotes a state of unease or discomfort that is often visible through someone's body language or behavior.
  • be of one mind, at be of the same mind The idiom "be of one mind" or "be of the same mind" means to have the same opinion, viewpoint, or understanding on a particular topic or issue. It suggests that a group of people or individuals are in agreement and think alike.
  • be devoured by sth The idiom "be devoured by something" means to be consumed or overwhelmed by a particular emotion, feeling, or thought. It implies being completely engrossed or consumed by something to the point where it dominates one's thoughts or actions.
  • be hard at it The idiom "be hard at it" typically means to be heavily engaged or intensely focused on a task or activity. It implies that someone is working diligently or putting great effort into something.
  • be/get in on the ground floor The idiom "be/get in on the ground floor" means to become involved in a venture, project, or organization from its earliest stages or at the beginning. It refers to having the opportunity to participate or invest at a starting point that potentially has significant growth or success potential.
  • be good news The idiom "be good news" refers to someone or something that brings positive or beneficial information or tidings. It suggests that the subject of the statement is comforting, uplifting, or capable of improving a situation.
  • be of two minds The idiom "be of two minds" refers to being undecided or uncertain about a particular matter. It describes the state of being torn between two options or having conflicting thoughts or opinions about a situation, making it difficult to make a clear decision.
  • be beyond hope The idiom "be beyond hope" means to be in a situation where there is no chance or possibility of improvement or success. It implies that the situation, object, or person is considered to be beyond help or rescue.
  • be at daggers drawn The idiom "be at daggers drawn" means to be in a state of intense hostility or deep conflict with someone. It describes a situation where two or more people are in a bitter dispute or irreconcilable disagreement, often with strong animosity towards each other, ready to engage in a fight or confrontation.
  • be all dressed up and/with nowhere to go The idiom "be all dressed up and/with nowhere to go" is used to describe a situation where someone is prepared, ready, or anticipating an event or activity, but it does not end up happening or there is no opportunity to participate. It implies feeling or looking impressive without having a purpose or outlet for it.
  • be there for the taking The idiom "be there for the taking" means that something is readily available or accessible, and can be obtained or seized easily without much effort or competition. It implies that the opportunity or advantage is within reach and waiting to be capitalized on.
  • be on (one's) Pat Malone The idiom "be on (one's) Pat Malone" is commonly used in Australian slang, particularly in Sydney. It means to be alone or to be by oneself. The phrase originates from the Australian radio program "Pat Malone's Singing Garden," which aired in the early 1940s. The host, Pat Malone, would often sign off with the statement "And I'll be on me Pat Malone," emphasizing his solitude. Over time, the phrase "on Pat Malone" transformed into the idiom we know today.
  • be as thin as a stick The idiom "be as thin as a stick" is used to describe someone or something that is extremely thin or skinny. It implies that the person or object resembles a stick in its lack of width or substantiality.
  • be going great guns The idiom "be going great guns" means that something or someone is progressing or performing exceptionally well. It implies that there is a high level of success or effectiveness in a particular endeavor or situation.
  • be tickled pink/to death The idiom "be tickled pink/to death" means to be extremely pleased, excited, or delighted about something. It conveys a sense of great satisfaction and happiness.
  • be up the creek (without a paddle) The idiom "be up the creek (without a paddle)" is an expression used to convey a situation where someone is in a difficult or challenging predicament with no obvious or easy solution. It implies being stuck or stranded in a problem without any means to overcome it or make progress.
  • be up to neck in The idiom "be up to neck in" means to be extremely busy or deeply involved in a particular situation or activity. It implies being overwhelmed or fully engaged in something, to the point where it may be difficult to handle or find time for anything else.
  • be in on the act The idiom "be in on the act" means to be involved or participating in a scheme, activity, or plan, often with a sense of collaboration or knowledge of the situation. It implies that the person is part of the action or aware of what is happening and actively contributing to it.
  • sb cant be bothered to do sth The idiom "sb can't be bothered to do sth" refers to a situation where someone is unwilling or lacks the motivation to complete a specific task or activity. This person may feel indifferent, lazy, or simply uninterested in exerting the effort necessary to carry out the action.
  • be asleep at the wheel The idiom "be asleep at the wheel" means to fail in one's duties or responsibilities due to inattentiveness, negligence, or lack of awareness. It refers to being unaware, unobservant, or not actively participating when one should be actively involved or in control of a situation.
  • be taken for granted The idiom "be taken for granted" means to be undervalued, not appreciated, or not acknowledged for one's efforts or contributions. It refers to a situation where someone assumes that others will always be there or things will always go a certain way, without giving proper recognition or thanks.
  • be more than (something) The idiom "be more than (something)" generally means to exceed or surpass a particular requirement, expectation, or standard. It implies going beyond the usual or expected level of a specific attribute or quality.
  • be in for The idiom "be in for" typically means to anticipate or expect something, usually something negative or challenging. It implies that the person is going to experience or endure a specific situation or consequence, usually as a result of their actions or choices.
  • be (a bit) on the heavy side The idiom "be (a bit) on the heavy side" refers to someone who is slightly overweight or has a larger body size than what is considered average or desirable. It suggests that the person may have a few extra pounds or be somewhat obese.
  • be kept on a tight leash The idiom "be kept on a tight leash" means to be closely monitored or controlled, typically by someone in a position of authority. It suggests having limited freedom, with restrictions placed upon one's actions or behavior.
  • be good with your hands The idiom "be good with your hands" refers to being skilled or adept at working with one's hands to perform manual tasks or crafts. It implies having excellent practical abilities, dexterity, or craftsmanship in activities such as craftsmanship, artistry, repair work, or other physical tasks.
  • be in no mood for sth/to do sth The idiom "be in no mood for sth/to do sth" means that a person is not interested or not willing to engage in or experience something. It indicates a lack of enthusiasm, readiness, or desire to participate or undertake a particular action or situation.
  • be bitter and twisted The idiom "be bitter and twisted" refers to someone who is resentful, vindictive, or filled with anger and having a negative outlook on life due to past experiences or disappointments. It suggests a person who holds grudges and has a pessimistic attitude towards others and the world.
  • be on (one's) soapbox The idiom "be on one's soapbox" means to passionately express one's opinions, beliefs, or ideas, often in a forceful or persistent manner, often in a public setting. It refers to a metaphorical image of standing on a soapbox, which historically was a raised platform or box used by speakers in public areas to elevate themselves and be heard by larger crowds. When someone is on their soapbox, they are usually advocating for a cause or voicing their strong views about a particular subject.
  • be up and about The idiom "be up and about" means to be active, moving around, and engaging in one's usual daily activities after being ill, injured, or recovering from something. It implies a return to normal health, energy, and vitality.
  • be in hands The idiom "be in hands" typically means that someone or something is under the control or responsibility of someone else. It suggests that the person or entity being referred to is being managed, guided, or taken care of by someone in a position of authority or influence.
  • be in floods The idiom "be in floods" means to uncontrollably burst into tears or to cry heavily. It refers to a situation where someone is overwhelmed with emotions and is unable to hold back their tears.
  • be riding/on the crest of a wave The idiom "be riding/on the crest of a wave" means to be experiencing a period of great success, popularity, or good fortune, often referring to a point where things are at their very best. It suggests being in a dominant or advantageous position, with everything going smoothly and as desired.
  • If ifs and ands were pots and pans (there'd be no work for tinkers' hands). The idiom "If ifs and ands were pots and pans (there'd be no work for tinkers' hands)" is used to convey the idea that if only talking or dreaming about things could make them come true, then life would be effortless and there would be no need for hard work or practical skills. It suggests that mere speculation or wishful thinking is not enough to achieve desired outcomes, and that action and effort are necessary to bring about real results.
  • be nuts about (or on) The idiom "be nuts about" (or "be nuts on") means to be extremely enthusiastic or passionate about someone or something. It implies a deep and intense liking or obsession.
  • be the picture of health, happiness, etc. The idiom "be the picture of health, happiness, etc." is used to describe someone who appears to be in an extremely good or ideal state of health, happiness, or any other desirable trait. It suggests that the person embodies or represents the desired quality perfectly and visibly.
  • nuts about, be To be "nuts about" something or someone means to have a great passion or enthusiasm for them. It describes a strong liking or obsession towards a person, thing, or activity.
  • be a far cry from sth The definition of the idiom "be a far cry from sth" means to be very different from something in terms of quality, appearance, or distance. It implies a significant deviation or contrast from what is being compared.
  • be ahead of the pack The idiom "be ahead of the pack" means to be in a leading or advantageous position compared to others. It refers to being ahead of one's competitors or peers in terms of success, accomplishments, or skills. It implies being at the forefront or ahead of the crowd in a particular field or area.
  • be as brown as a berry The idiom "be as brown as a berry" means to have a deep, dark tan or sun-kissed skin, usually resulting from spending a significant amount of time in the sun.
  • be like rearranging the deckchairs on the Titanic The idiom "be like rearranging the deckchairs on the Titanic" refers to a futile or pointless action. It suggests that someone is expending effort on small or insignificant tasks while completely ignoring or failing to address a much larger, more serious problem or impending disaster. The reference to the Titanic, which famously sank after hitting an iceberg, emphasizes the futility of trying to fix minor issues when the overall situation is already dire.
  • not to be outdone The idiom "not to be outdone" means to respond or act in a way that achieves an equal or greater level of accomplishment or recognition as someone else, particularly when one feels challenged or in competition with another person. It expresses a determination not to be surpassed or overshadowed by someone else's achievements or actions.
  • be at cross purposes The idiom "be at cross purposes" means to have conflicting or contradictory goals, intentions, or understandings. It usually refers to a situation where two or more people or groups misunderstand each other or work towards different objectives, resulting in a lack of cooperation or miscommunication.
  • be a matter of record The idiom "be a matter of record" means that something is officially documented or recorded as a fact or event that can be verified or referred to in the future. It implies that there is evidence or proof available to support or validate the stated information.
  • be born to be/do something The idiom "be born to be/do something" means to have a natural inclination or aptitude for a particular activity or role, indicating that someone is destined or meant to pursue or excel in it from the moment of their birth. It implies that the person possesses inherent qualities or talents that make them well-suited for a specific task or career.
  • be on the ragged edge The idiom "be on the ragged edge" means to be on the brink of exhaustion, emotional breakdown, or being overwhelmed by stress or difficulties. It refers to someone being on the verge or extremely close to reaching their limit or breaking point.
  • be with child The idiom "be with child" refers to a woman being pregnant or expecting a child.
  • be bright and breezy The idiom "be bright and breezy" typically means to appear cheerful, energetic, and full of enthusiasm. It refers to someone who is lively, positive, and exudes a buoyant attitude or demeanor.
  • not be up to scratch The idiom "not be up to scratch" or "not up to scratch" means that something or someone is not of the expected or required standard of quality or performance. It implies that something falls short of what is considered adequate, acceptable, or satisfactory.
  • be on the move, at make a move The idiom "be on the move" refers to someone or something being actively engaged in activities or operations, constantly moving or progressing from one place or task to another. It typically implies a state of being busy or active. The phrase "make a move" commonly means to take action or initiate a specific course of action in a situation. It suggests making a decision or beginning a process that can lead to progress or change.
  • be at/on the receiving end The idiom "be at/on the receiving end" means to be the recipient or target of something, usually negative or harmful, such as criticism, aggression, or unfair treatment. It implies being in a position of vulnerability or disadvantage, where one is subjected to the actions or consequences inflicted upon them by others.
  • not be in sb's vocabulary The idiom "not be in someone's vocabulary" means that a particular word, phrase, concept, or action is unfamiliar or does not exist for that person. It suggests that the person is not accustomed to or does not possess knowledge or understanding of the mentioned word or concept.
  • be off for sth The idiom "be off for something" means to have a sufficient or satisfactory supply of something, most commonly referring to a particular resource or item. It implies that one has enough or an appropriate amount of the thing they need or desire.
  • be a pain in the arse The idiom "be a pain in the arse" is an informal expression used to describe someone or something that is excessively bothersome, irritating, or difficult to deal with. It implies that the person or thing is causing frustration or inconvenience, often through their actions, behavior, or demands.
  • be all very well The idiom "be all very well" means that something is acceptable or satisfactory in certain circumstances, but it may not be completely suitable or effective in the given context. It implies that there are limitations or drawbacks associated with the situation being discussed.
  • be floating/walking on air To be floating/walking on air means to feel extremely happy or elated, as if one is buoyed up and effortlessly gliding along. It refers to an overwhelming sense of joy or excitement that makes a person feel light and euphoric.
  • there's little to be said for sth The idiom "there's little to be said for something" means that there are few or no favorable qualities or advantages to be mentioned or acknowledged about a particular thing or situation. It implies that the topic in question lacks merit, value, or convincing arguments to support it.
  • what has been seen cannot be unseen The idiom "what has been seen cannot be unseen" means that once someone has witnessed something disturbing, shocking, or unpleasant, it is impossible to forget or erase that memory from their mind. It emphasizes the lasting impact of certain experiences or images.
  • be beside yourself The idiom "be beside yourself" means to be extremely upset, agitated, or overwhelmed, typically due to a strong emotion such as anger, shock, or excitement. It implies a state of being not in control of one's emotions or actions.
  • might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is going to be punished for doing something, they might as well go all the way and do something even worse. It suggests that since the consequences are already severe, there is no point in holding back or playing it safe. The idiom often implies that taking a greater risk or committing a more significant offense would not make a significant difference in the punishment received.
  • be going on something The idiom "be going on something" typically means to approximate, approach, or be close to a certain age, length, size, or amount. It can also refer to the duration of a particular event, activity, or situation.
  • be tied (up) in knots The idiom "be tied (up) in knots" means to be extremely tense, worried, or anxious about something. It refers to a state of mental or emotional distress where one feels captivated by tension or confusion, as if their thoughts and emotions are twisted into knots.
  • be even (with someone) The idiom "be even (with someone)" means to be at the same level or in a balanced state regarding a situation, usually in terms of settling accounts, debts, or emotions. It implies achieving a state of equality or fairness between two parties.
  • be raining cats and dogs The idiom "be raining cats and dogs" means that it is raining very heavily.
  • be in the market for sth The idiom "be in the market for something" means to be interested in buying something or in search of something to purchase. It implies that the person or entity is actively considering or exploring options for a particular product or service.
  • be pipped at/to the post The idiom "be pipped at/to the post" means to be narrowly defeated or beaten in a race or competition, especially at the very last moment or just before reaching the finish line. It suggests that someone was very close to achieving victory but ultimately fell short.
  • be behind sb (all the way) The idiom "be behind sb (all the way)" means to fully support or endorse someone's ideas, actions, or decisions, often implying unwavering loyalty and commitment. It indicates standing with someone through thick and thin, regardless of any challenges or obstacles they might face.
  • be the end of the line The idiom "be the end of the line" is typically used to refer to a situation where someone or something has reached a final or irreversible point, often signifying that there are no more options or possibilities remaining. It can imply the termination of a process, initiative, or the ultimate extent of someone's patience, tolerance, or ability to continue.
  • be (only) flesh and blood The idiom "be (only) flesh and blood" refers to the understanding that someone is human and thus susceptible to physical and emotional limitations. It emphasizes the inherent fallibility, vulnerability, and mortality of individuals.
  • be tarred with the same brush (as somebody) The idiom "be tarred with the same brush (as somebody)" means to be considered similar to or grouped together with someone else, often in a negative or disapproving way. It implies that both individuals share the same negative characteristics or behavior, regardless of whether it is true or fair.
  • be one in the eye for sb The idiom "be one in the eye for someone" means to deliver a setback or defeat to someone, causing embarrassment or humiliation. It refers to an action or event that undermines or challenges someone's position or reputation.
  • be banging, etc. your head against a brick wall The idiom "banging your head against a brick wall" means to persistently try to accomplish something but without making any progress or achieving success. It implies that one's efforts are futile and ineffective, akin to physically hitting one's head against an immovable obstacle like a brick wall.
  • be nothing short of... The idiom "be nothing short of..." means to emphasize that something is extremely or significantly. It suggests that there is no doubt or ambiguity about the intensity, quality, or extent of something.
  • be backward in coming forward The idiom "be backward in coming forward" is used to describe someone who is shy, hesitant, or reluctant to speak up, share opinions, or take action in a situation. It implies that the person is not actively participating or putting themselves forward, often due to a lack of confidence or assertiveness.
  • be a figment of (one's/the) imagination The idiom "be a figment of (one's/the) imagination" refers to something that is not real or does not exist, but is merely a creation of one's mind. It implies that a person has imagined or invented something that is not based on reality.
  • be a athlete/star/writer etc. in the making The phrase "be a athlete/star/writer etc. in the making" refers to someone who is displaying early talents, abilities, or potential in a particular field. It suggests that the person has the foundations or qualities necessary to become successful and achieve greatness in that area.
  • could be better The idiom "could be better" is typically used to express disappointment or dissatisfaction with a particular situation, event, or outcome. It implies that the current circumstances or results are not as good as desired or expected.
  • be straining at the leash The idiom "be straining at the leash" means to be eager, impatient, or restless to take action or get something started. It often describes someone's strong desire to begin a project, pursue a goal, or unleash their potential but being held back or restrained. It implies a feeling of excitement and readiness to go beyond limitations or constraints.
  • be knocking on the door The idiom "be knocking on the door" refers to being very close to achieving or attaining a particular goal, opportunity, or outcome. It implies that someone or something is on the brink of success and just needs a little more effort, time, or luck to reach their desired result.
  • be into somebody for something The idiom "be into somebody for something" means to owe someone a certain amount of money or to be indebted to them. It implies that the person has borrowed money or received goods or services on credit and has not yet repaid their debt.
  • be (as) dull as ditchwater The idiom "be (as) dull as ditchwater" means to be extremely boring or uninteresting. It suggests that something or someone lacks any excitement, liveliness, or engaging qualities, similar to the dullness of water accumulated in ditches.
  • be not a bed of roses The idiom "not be a bed of roses" means that something is not easy or enjoyable, but rather challenging or difficult. It suggests that a particular situation or endeavor is demanding and requires effort to navigate, instead of being comfortable or smooth.
  • be done to a turn The idiom "be done to a turn" refers to the ideal state of completeness or perfection, often used to describe perfectly cooked food or a task that has been done exactly as required or desired. It implies that the item or the work has reached the exact point of being fully and skillfully achieved, leaving no room for improvement.
  • be storming mad The idiom "be storming mad" means to be extremely angry or furious. It suggests that someone's anger is intense and powerful, like a raging storm.
  • be cut out for The idiom "be cut out for" means to possess the necessary qualities, abilities, or aptitude required for a particular task, role, or occupation. It implies being well-suited or naturally inclined towards something.
  • be dressed to kill The idiom "be dressed to kill" means to be wearing clothes that are extremely stylish, fashionable, and attractive, often with the intention to impress or gain attention.
  • be speaking out of both sides of (one's) mouth The idiom "be speaking out of both sides of (one's) mouth" refers to someone who is being deceitful or contradictory in their words or actions. It suggests that the person is saying different things to different people, often with the intention of deceiving or manipulating others. It implies a lack of sincerity or honesty.
  • be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out" is an informal expression used to emphasize extreme or exceptional qualities or characteristics, often in a positive sense. It suggests that someone or something possesses the highest level or degree of the mentioned attribute, surpassing all others. For example, "He runs as fast as all get out" means he runs as fast as humanly possible or exceptionally quick. The phrase emphasizes a remarkable level of the given quality or trait.
  • be in the balance The idiom "be in the balance" means that something is undecided or uncertain, and could go either way. It refers to a situation where the outcome or outcome is still unresolved or uncertain, and there are factors or variables that will determine the final result.
  • be ahead of (someone or something's) time The idiom "be ahead of (someone or something's) time" means to have ideas, concepts, or innovations that are too advanced or progressive for the current period or society's understanding or acceptance. It suggests that the person or thing is visionary in terms of ideas and actions, but they may face resistance, skepticism, or lack of appreciation in their time.
  • be caught in a time warp To be caught in a time warp means to be in a situation or condition that is no longer relevant or up-to-date, often due to being trapped or stuck in the past. It implies being unable to adapt or move forward with the times.
  • be as American as apple pie The idiom "be as American as apple pie" refers to something that is regarded as quintessentially American in nature, customs, traditions, or values. It represents a deeply ingrained symbol of American culture, evoking notions of patriotism, simplicity, and traditional values.
  • be a law unto yourself The idiom "be a law unto yourself" means to act or behave independently, disregarding societal norms, rules, or expectations. It implies that someone refuses to conform to established guidelines or authority, choosing to make their own decisions and follow their own moral code.
  • be set to rights The idiom "be set to rights" means to be corrected or rectified, often referring to fixing a situation, resolving a problem, or restoring something to its proper or original state.
  • be nothing to shout about The idiom "be nothing to shout about" means that something or someone is not particularly impressive, exceptional, or noteworthy. It implies mediocrity or lack of excitement.
  • be honored The idiom "be honored" means to feel privileged or greatly respected for being given a particular opportunity or being shown special recognition.
  • be well rid of (someone or something) The idiom "be well rid of (someone or something)" means to be glad or fortunate to be free from someone or something that was causing trouble, difficulty, or harm. It implies a sense of relief and satisfaction in having removed the person or thing from one's life.
  • be up to (one) The idiom "be up to (one)" means to be the responsibility or decision of a particular person. It implies that someone has the freedom, authority, or power to take action or make a choice about something. It can also suggest that someone is planning or scheming something, indicating a hidden motive or intent.
  • be (as) cold as ice The idiom "be (as) cold as ice" means to have a distant and unemotional demeanor or lacking in warmth, empathy, or compassion. It refers to someone who is emotionally detached or indifferent to others.
  • be/take a weight off your mind The idiom "be/take a weight off your mind" means to relieve oneself of a burden or worry that has been causing stress or anxiety. It refers to the feeling of having a mental burden lifted, bringing a sense of relief or release.
  • be on good, friendly, etc. terms (with sb) The idiom "be on good, friendly, etc. terms (with someone)" refers to having a positive and cordial relationship with someone. It implies that both parties are amicable, mutually respectful, and maintain a harmonious connection with each other.
  • be in line for The idiom "be in line for" means to be likely or expected to receive or achieve something. It implies that someone is in a favorable position or situation that makes them a strong candidate for a particular outcome or opportunity.
  • be big of (one) The idiom "be big of (one)" is typically used to describe someone's generosity, kindness, or magnanimity. It means to have a large-hearted or generous attitude towards others, often by displaying forgiveness, understanding, or empathy in difficult or challenging situations. It implies that the person is capable of rising above pettiness, resentments, or personal interests to prioritize the greater good or the well-being of others.
  • be all in the/ mind The idiom "be all in the mind" refers to something that is solely a mental or psychological perception or belief, rather than a physical or tangible reality. It suggests that a particular experience or understanding exists only within one's thoughts or imagination, rather than being a genuine or concrete occurrence.
  • be the exception that proves the rule The idiom "be the exception that proves the rule" means that when there is an exception to a generally accepted rule, it validates or demonstrates the existence of that rule. It implies that the exception is rare or unusual but further supports the idea that the rule generally holds true.
  • be/have sth to do with sth The idiom "be/have something to do with something" means that there is a connection or association between two things. It usually implies involvement, influence, or relevance.
  • be putty in (one's) hands The idiom "be putty in (one's) hands" means to be easily manipulated, controlled, or influenced by someone. It implies that a person is highly susceptible to another person's persuasion, charm, or authority, to the extent that they can mold or shape the individual's actions or decisions according to their own desires.
  • be on top of the world The idiom "be on top of the world" means to feel extremely happy, joyful, or elated. It is often used to describe a state of euphoria or a feeling of great success or achievement.
  • be no/little love lost between The idiom "be no/little love lost between" is used to describe a situation in which two or more people have a strong dislike or animosity towards each other. There is little or no affection or fondness between them.
  • be cooking with gas The idiom "be cooking with gas" means to be doing something successfully or efficiently, often making significant progress or achieving desired results. It implies that things are going exceptionally well and smoothly, just like cooking with a gas stove, which is known for its instant and precise heat control.
  • be taken aback (by somebody/something) The idiom "be taken aback (by somebody/something)" means to be surprised, shocked, or startled by someone or something. It refers to a sudden reaction of unexpected astonishment or confusion.
  • be down on sb The idiom "be down on sb" means to harbor negative feelings or animosity towards someone or to have a strong dislike or disapproval of someone.
  • be one over (the) eight The idiom "be one over (the) eight" means to be slightly intoxicated or drunk. It suggests that someone has consumed just a bit more alcohol than is advisable, causing them to become mildly intoxicated.
  • be hanging on by your fingertips The idiom "be hanging on by your fingertips" means to be in a very precarious or desperate situation, struggling to maintain control or survival with minimal resources, options, or support. It indicates that someone is barely holding on or barely managing to cope with a difficult circumstance.
  • be footloose and fancyfree The idiom "be footloose and fancy-free" means to be free from responsibilities, commitments, or worries; enjoying a carefree and unrestricted lifestyle.
  • be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind" refers to an extreme state of a certain emotion or condition. When someone is "out of their mind," it means they are experiencing an overwhelming level of that emotion or condition to the point where it feels as if their mind is being dominated by it. For example, if someone is "bored out of their mind," it implies they are extremely uninterested and lacking any form of entertainment or engagement. Similarly, being "frightened out of your mind" suggests an intense level of fear, "pissed out of your mind" signifies extreme anger, and "stoned out of your mind" refers to being heavily under the influence of
  • be up for grabs The idiom "be up for grabs" means that something is available or accessible for anyone to obtain or acquire. It suggests that the item or opportunity is not yet claimed or assigned to someone specific, and therefore can be taken or pursued by anyone interested.
  • be past the/(one's) sell-by date The idiom "be past the/(one's) sell-by date" means to be no longer effective, relevant, or valuable, often implying that one is too old or outdated for a particular task or role. It is often used to describe people, products, ideas, or practices that have surpassed their prime and are no longer considered useful or in demand.
  • be along The idiom "be along" means to arrive or come in a short while. It is often used to indicate that someone will come or arrive soon.
  • be far and away the best/greatest/worst etc. The idiom "be far and away the best/greatest/worst etc." implies that someone or something is significantly superior or inferior to others in a particular category or aspect. It emphasizes the vast difference or distance between the subject and its closest competitors or alternatives.
  • be left holding the baby The idiom "be left holding the baby" refers to a situation where someone is unexpectedly made responsible for a problem, task, or situation that no one else wants to deal with or take responsibility for, often resulting in inconvenience or difficulty for that person. It implies being left with a burden or responsibility that was not originally theirs.
  • be as ugly as sin The idiom "be as ugly as sin" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely unattractive, repulsive, or displeasing to look at. It emphasizes the idea that the appearance is so unpleasant that it can be compared to sin itself, which is often associated with moral wrongdoing.
  • be put through the hoop To be put through the hoop means to be subjected to a difficult or rigorous test, evaluation, or challenge. It often implies going through a series of demanding tasks or trials in order to prove one's abilities or worthiness.
  • be sorry for (someone) The idiom "be sorry for (someone)" means to empathize or feel sympathy for someone due to a difficult or unfortunate situation they are experiencing. It implies understanding their pain, sorrow, or challenges and feeling a sense of compassion towards them.
  • be at loggerheads The idiom "be at loggerheads" means to be in a state of strong disagreement or conflict with someone, especially when both parties refuse to compromise or reach a resolution.
  • be out to do something The idiom "be out to do something" means to be determined or have a strong intention or purpose to accomplish or achieve a particular goal or outcome. It implies a focused effort towards a specific objective.
  • be at the end of your rope The idiom "be at the end of your rope" means to be in a state of desperation, exhaustion, or helplessness. It refers to a situation where someone has exhausted all possible options or solutions and feels unable to continue or find a way out.
  • be quick off the mark The idiom "be quick off the mark" means to react or respond swiftly and immediately, often referring to being fast or prompt in taking action or seizing an opportunity. It emphasizes the importance of being proactive, alert, and ready to act without delay.
  • be a ghost of (someone or something's) former self The idiom "be a ghost of (someone or something's) former self" typically means that someone or something has significantly declined or deteriorated from their previous state or condition. It implies that they have lost their former vitality, strength, or characteristics, leaving only a faint resemblance to what they used to be.
  • be somebody's for the asking The idiom "be somebody's for the asking" means to be readily available or easily attainable for someone. It refers to someone being very willing or eager to help another person, and being ready to fulfill their requests or wishes without any hesitation. It implies that the person is always at the disposal of the person asking for their assistance or favor.
  • be not right in the head The idiom "be not right in the head" means to be mentally unstable, eccentric, or crazy. It implies that the person's state of mind or thinking is abnormal or irrational.
  • be in the firing line The idiom "be in the firing line" means to be in a position where one is exposed to criticism, blame, danger, or direct confrontation. It refers to being at the forefront of a difficult or challenging situation, often receiving the full force of negative consequences or facing direct attacks.
  • not all it's cracked up to be The idiom "not all it's cracked up to be" means that something is not as good or fulfilling as it was claimed or expected to be.
  • be dripping with sth The idiom "be dripping with sth" is typically used to describe a situation or someone who has an excessive or abundant amount of something, often referring to a tangible object or quality. It implies that there is a visible or noticeable overflow or profusion of that particular thing.
  • be in mint condition The idiom "be in mint condition" means to be in perfect or pristine condition, typically referring to an object or item that appears new and flawless, without any signs of wear or damage. It implies that the item is well-preserved and has been taken care of.
  • be gathered to one's fathers The idiom "be gathered to one's fathers" is an expression that refers to someone's death. It implies the notion of joining or reuniting with one's deceased ancestors or family members in the afterlife. It is often used in a somber or respectful context.
  • be (as) tough as shoe leather The idiom "be (as) tough as shoe leather" means to be very resilient, enduring, or resistant to hardship, challenges, or difficult circumstances. It refers to someone or something's ability to withstand tough conditions or endure without easily giving up or succumbing to adversity.
  • I'll be hanged if... The idiom "I'll be hanged if..." is an expression used to convey a strong belief or assurance that something is absolutely unlikely or impossible to happen. It is often used to emphasize skepticism or doubt towards a statement or proposition.
  • be on a short fuse The idiom "be on a short fuse" refers to someone who is easily provoked or likely to get angry or explode with anger quickly. It implies that the person's patience or tolerance is limited, and they are quick to react or become irritated.
  • be knee-deep in The idiom "be knee-deep in" means to be deeply involved or fully immersed in a particular situation or activity. It implies being heavily committed or having a significant amount of work, responsibilities, or challenges related to a specific task, project, or problem. The phrase often suggests being overwhelmed or fully occupied by something to the extent that it may be difficult to handle or escape from.
  • live/be in clover "Live/be in clover" is an idiom that means to live a luxurious or comfortable life, typically characterized by abundance, wealth, and ease.
  • be all thumbs, at be all fingers and thumbs The idiom "be all thumbs" or "be all fingers and thumbs" means to be clumsy or awkward, especially when handling objects or performing tasks that require manual dexterity. It suggests a lack of skill or coordination in using one's hands.
  • be in sb's face The idiom "be in someone's face" means to annoy, bother, or confront someone in a persistent or aggressive manner. It typically implies being too close for comfort and invading someone's personal space physically or metaphorically.
  • be raking over the coals To be raking over the coals means to be subjected to severe criticism, scrutiny, or punishment for one's actions or mistakes. It implies a thorough investigation or examination of past events or behavior, often with negative consequences.
  • be a nasty piece of work The idiom "be a nasty piece of work" refers to someone who is unpleasant, malicious, or unkind in their behavior, attitude, or actions. They may be deceitful, manipulative, or cruel, causing distress or harm to others. This phrase is often used to emphasize someone's negative traits or character.
  • be like oil and water The idiom "be like oil and water" means that two things or people are unable to mix or get along with each other. It signifies an incompatible or antagonistic relationship, similar to how oil and water do not combine when mixed together.
  • be the light of (one's) life The idiom "be the light of (one's) life" typically refers to someone or something that brings immense joy, happiness, or inspiration to someone. It means to be the most important or cherished person or thing in someone's life.
  • be out of place The idiom "be out of place" means to feel uncomfortable or not belong in a certain situation or environment. It often implies that something or someone doesn't fit in, is incongruous, or is in a setting where they are not expected or appropriate.
  • be as right as rain The idiom "be as right as rain" means to feel completely well, healthy, or in good condition. It implies a state of physical or emotional well-being and positivity.
  • be het up The idiom "be het up" means to be extremely agitated, upset, or anxious about something. It describes a state of being highly emotional or severely worked up over a particular issue, often to an excessive or unnecessary degree.
  • would not be seen dead The idiom "would not be seen dead" means that someone strongly dislikes or disapproves of something and would never be associated with or involved in it under any circumstances. It expresses the idea that the person considers the thing in question to be highly undesirable or offensive.
  • be on the look out The idiom "be on the lookout" means to be watchful, observant, or vigilant in order to spot or recognize something or someone. It implies being aware of one's surroundings and being prepared or ready to respond, often used in the context of anticipating potential dangers, threats, or opportunities.
  • (one) should be so lucky The idiom "(one) should be so lucky" is used sarcastically to express disbelief or skepticism towards a statement or suggestion, implying that the mentioned outcome or opportunity is highly unlikely or unrealistic. It implies that the person being referred to is not fortunate enough to experience such a desirable situation.
  • be caught with (one's) pants down The idiom "be caught with one's pants down" means to be caught in a humiliating, embarrassing, or compromising situation, usually due to being unprepared, unaware, or indiscreet. It often implies being caught off-guard or being discovered doing something inappropriate or inappropriate. This figurative expression can be used in various contexts, both literal and metaphorical.
  • go/be run to ground The idiom "go/be run to ground" refers to the act of being pursued or searched for relentlessly until caught or found. It implies that someone or something is determinedly hunted down or tracked until located or captured.
  • be the (living/spitting) image of sb The idiom "be the (living/spitting) image of someone" means to strongly resemble or closely resemble someone in terms of physical appearance or characteristics. It implies that the person being referred to has such a striking resemblance to another person that they could be mistaken for being the same or closely related.
  • be up to (one's) eyeballs in (something) The idiom "be up to one's eyeballs in something" means to be extremely busy or deeply involved in a particular situation or task. It implies being overwhelmed or fully occupied to the point where it feels suffocating or excessive.
  • be turfed out The idiom "be turfed out" refers to the act of being forced to leave a place or location, often abruptly or without warning. It suggests being expelled, evicted, or removed from a position, organization, or premises.
  • be in at the kill The idiom "be in at the kill" means to be present or involved in the decisive or final stage of a task, activity, or event, especially one where success or victory is achieved. It implies being directly involved or witnessing the culmination or conclusion of something significant.
  • be (not) all moonlight and roses The idiom "be (not) all moonlight and roses" means that a situation or experience is not as pleasant or perfect as it may initially appear. It implies that there are difficulties, challenges, or negative aspects involved, despite an initial impression of ease or happiness.
  • be on your mettle The idiom "be on your mettle" means to be alert, focused, and ready to exhibit one's highest level of performance or skill in order to meet a challenge or prove oneself. It implies being prepared to give one's best effort and show one's capabilities.
  • be afraid of (one's) (own) shadow The idiom "be afraid of (one's) (own) shadow" means to be excessively timid, fearful, or easily scared. It implies that someone is so fearful or anxious that even harmless or imaginary things can trigger their fear.
  • be a sure thing The idiom "be a sure thing" refers to something that is extremely likely to happen or be successful. It suggests a high level of certainty or confidence in the outcome of a particular situation or event.
  • be nutty about The idiom "be nutty about" means to have a strong or obsessive liking or enthusiasm for someone or something. It suggests a deep passion or dedication towards a particular person, activity, or object.
  • be in at the death The idiom "be in at the death" typically means to be present or involved until the very end of a difficult or challenging situation, often referring to witnessing or participating in a decisive event or the final outcome. It is often used in contexts where people are determined to see something through to its conclusion, regardless of the difficulty or potential risks involved.
  • be on the razor’s edge To be on the razor's edge means to be in a highly delicate or precarious situation, where a slight misstep or mistake could have severe consequences. It suggests being in a state of danger, uncertainty, or extreme tension, often characterized by a need for caution, precision, and careful decision-making.
  • be like looking for a needle in a haystack The idiom "be like looking for a needle in a haystack" means that it is extremely difficult or nearly impossible to find something or someone because they are lost or hidden among a large and disorganized group. It implies that the task requires a tremendous amount of effort, time, and patience.
  • be a moot point The idiom "be a moot point" means that a certain issue or question under discussion is irrelevant or has little or no practical significance. It suggests that further debate or consideration of the matter is ineffective or unnecessary due to its lack of importance or inability to be resolved.
  • be bored to death The idiom "be bored to death" means being extremely uninterested, disengaged, or lacking excitement to the point of extreme boredom. It signifies a feeling of profound dullness or a complete lack of enthusiasm.
  • unto thine own self be true The idiom "unto thine own self be true" means to be authentic and honest with oneself, to stay true to one's own beliefs, ideals, and values, even when faced with challenges or pressure to conform. It emphasizes the importance of staying true to one's own identity and not compromising on one's principles or integrity. The phrase originates from William Shakespeare's play "Hamlet" and is spoken by the character Polonius as advice to his son, Laertes.
  • be pulled down a notch (or two) The idiom "be pulled down a notch (or two)" means to experience a decrease in status, confidence, or superiority. It refers to a situation where someone's arrogance, ego, or overconfidence is humbled or diminished, often by facing a setback, criticism, or failure.
  • be hanging over (one's) head The idiom "be hanging over (one's) head" means to have a pending or looming problem or responsibility that causes worry, guilt, or unease. It refers to a situation or task that has not been resolved or addressed, but remains as a constant source of concern or pressure.
  • be no good/use to man or beast The idiom "be no good/use to man or beast" means that something or someone is completely useless or ineffectual in any situation. It implies a complete lack of value or utility, indicating that the person or thing has no value or purpose for either humans or animals.
  • be as clean as a whistle The idiom "be as clean as a whistle" means to be very clean or spotless, often used to describe someone or something that is free from dirt, impurities, or any negative associations. It can also refer to someone being innocent, transparent, or completely honest in their actions. The phrase originates from the fact that a whistle produces a clear and sharp sound when blown, therefore suggesting that something clean is pure and devoid of any defects or harm.
  • Promises are like piecrust, made to be broken. The idiom "Promises are like piecrust, made to be broken" means that promises are often easily made, but just as easily broken. It likens promises to the delicate crust of a pie, which is often fragile and easily crumbles under pressure, suggesting that promises are not always reliable and may not be fulfilled.
  • be looking for trouble The idiom "be looking for trouble" means to behave or act in a way that invites or seeks problems, conflicts, or challenges. It refers to intentionally or unintentionally doing something that may provoke others or lead to unfavorable situations or consequences.
  • be on the horns of a dilemma The idiom "be on the horns of a dilemma" refers to being in a difficult situation where one is faced with two equally undesirable choices or options. It implies feeling trapped or torn between two conflicting decisions, often with no obvious or satisfactory solution.
  • be none the wiser The idiom "be none the wiser" means to remain unaware or uninformed about something, usually after an event or situation has occurred. It suggests that despite witnessing or being involved in a particular situation, one has not gained any additional knowledge or understanding as a result.
  • be no match for somebody/something The idiom "be no match for somebody/something" means to be unable to compete or contend with someone or something due to being significantly inferior or lacking the necessary skills, strength, or resources. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is easily overpowered or outperformed by the other.
  • have (or be a) butterfingers The idiom "have (or be a) butterfingers" is used to describe someone who is clumsy or has a tendency to drop or fumble things. It implies that their hands are slick like butter, making it difficult for them to hold onto objects securely.
  • be bleeding red ink The idiom "be bleeding red ink" means to be in significant financial debt or operating at a substantial financial loss. It refers to a situation where expenses surpass income, resulting in a continuous deficit, represented by the color red in accounting records.
  • be looking over (one's) shoulder The idiom "be looking over one's shoulder" means to constantly feel anxious or fearful about potential threats or consequences, often due to guilt, suspicion, or the presence of someone who may pose a danger or challenge to one's position or authority. It involves a sense of being continuously watchful or alert, as if someone is monitoring or judging one's actions.
  • may the Force be with you The idiom "may the Force be with you" is a phrase often used in the science fiction franchise Star Wars, created by George Lucas. It is a sentiment of good luck or well-wishes, often said by characters as a form of encouragement or farewell. In the context of the franchise, the "Force" refers to a mystical energy that permeates the universe and can be harnessed by certain characters, usually Jedi knights, for various abilities. The phrase has gained cultural significance and is often used outside of the Star Wars context to convey support, goodwill, or hope for success in a task or endeavor.
  • be the image of somebody/something The idiom "be the image of somebody/something" means to closely resemble or strongly resemble someone or something else in appearance or characteristics. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is very similar or identical to the person or thing being compared to.
  • be cruel to be kind The idiom "be cruel to be kind" means that sometimes it is necessary to be harsh or unkind in order to help someone in the long run or for their own good. It suggests that tough love or unpleasant actions can sometimes be necessary for the betterment of someone's well-being or to teach them an important lesson.
  • be all the same to (one) The idiom "be all the same to (one)" means that someone does not have a preference or any particular preference for a given situation or outcome. It signifies that one is indifferent or unconcerned about the different options or possibilities.
  • be tearing your hair out The idiom "be tearing your hair out" means to be extremely frustrated, stressed, or anxious about a situation. It suggests a level of desperation and exasperation, as if one's frustration is so intense that they are metaphorically pulling their own hair out in frustration.
  • be fed up/sick to the back teeth To be fed up/sick to the back teeth is an idiom used to express extreme frustration, irritation, or annoyance with a particular situation or person. It implies that one's patience or tolerance has been completely exhausted.
  • be champing at the bit The idiom "be champing at the bit" means to be eagerly impatient, restless, or eager to start or do something. It is often used to describe a person who is eager or ready to take action or engage in a particular activity. The idiom originates from the behavior of horses that, when held back or restrained, would chew on the bit in their mouth out of anticipation or impatience to start running.
  • be (one's) pigeon The idiom "be (one's) pigeon" means to be someone's responsibility or something that someone is responsible for. It suggests that someone is the appropriate or designated person to take care of a particular task or situation.
  • be swept off (one's) feet The idiom "be swept off (one's) feet" means to be greatly and unexpectedly attracted to someone or something, often resulting in feeling intense emotions or being completely enamored. It is often used to describe being overwhelmed by infatuation or falling in love suddenly and deeply.
  • be up to ears in The idiom "be up to ears in" means to be heavily involved or overwhelmed with a particular task, responsibility, or situation. It suggests being deeply engrossed, fully occupied, or completely submerged in something.
  • be up there with sb The idiom "be up there with sb" means to be equal to or on par with someone in terms of skill, achievement, or reputation. It suggests that the person being referred to is at the same level or highly regarded in a certain area or field.
  • be on record, at go on record The idiom "be on record, at go on record" means to state or declare something officially, publicly, or formally so that it is documented and can be referenced or used as evidence later. It refers to making a statement or expressing an opinion in a public manner, often through an official record or document.
  • be out of the question The idiom "be out of the question" means that something is not possible, cannot be considered, or is not open for discussion or consideration.
  • be dead set against (someone or something) The idiom "be dead set against (someone or something)" means to strongly oppose or have a firm and unwavering stance against someone or something. It implies being completely determined and resolute in one's opposition, leaving no room for compromise or negotiation.
  • fit to be tied The definition of the idiom "fit to be tied" is to be extremely angry, agitated, or upset.
  • good to be here The idiom "good to be here" means that the person expressing it is happy or content with their current situation or location. It implies that they are enjoying their present circumstances and are grateful for the opportunity to be present in that particular place or event.
  • be up your alley, at be up your street The idioms "be up your alley" and "be up your street" are similar in meaning and share the same definition. They both refer to something that is well-suited to your interests and preferences. When something is "up your alley" or "up your street," it means it aligns perfectly with your tastes, skills, or preferences, making it a great fit for you.
  • be in bed with somebody/something The idiom "be in bed with somebody/something" is a figurative expression typically used to describe a situation where two entities, individuals, or organizations are working closely together, often with hidden motives or in a dishonest or unethical manner. It implies a close, often secretive, and potentially corrupted partnership where the parties involved collaborate for personal gain or mutual benefit, disregarding moral principles or conflicts of interest.
  • no better than (one) should be The idiom "no better than (one) should be" refers to someone's behavior or actions being morally or ethically unacceptable, reflecting poorly on their character or values. It implies that the person's behavior is below the expected or appropriate standards.
  • not be a bundle of laughs The idiom "not be a bundle of laughs" means that someone or something is not particularly entertaining, amusing, or enjoyable. It refers to a person or situation that lacks humor, excitement, or any source of fun.
  • be pushing up (the) daisies The idiom "be pushing up (the) daisies" is a colorful and humorous way to describe someone who is deceased, meaning they are buried in the ground and have flowers (daisies) growing above their grave.
  • be pissed off The idiom "be pissed off" means to be extremely angry, displeased, or frustrated about something.
  • be on to a good thing The idiom "be on to a good thing" means to have found or discovered something that is advantageous, beneficial, or promising. It often refers to a situation or opportunity that is believed to bring success, happiness, or other desirable outcomes.
  • he, she, etc. could/might be forgiven for doing something The idiom "he, she, etc. could/might be forgiven for doing something" refers to excusing or understanding someone's actions or behavior due to the circumstances or reasons involved. It suggests that the person's actions are reasonable or justifiable considering the situation.
  • not be wearing a stitch The idiom "not be wearing a stitch" means to be completely naked or not wearing any clothes at all.
  • be in the red The idiom "be in the red" means to have a negative financial balance or to be in debt. It is often used to describe a situation where expenses exceed income, resulting in a deficit.
  • be in apple-pie order The idiom "be in apple-pie order" means that something is very neat, organized, and in perfect condition.
  • be (all) shot to hell The idiom "be (all) shot to hell" means that something has been ruined, damaged, or destroyed beyond repair. It implies that the initial state or condition of something has been completely and irreversibly lost or deteriorated. It can be used to describe various situations, such as plans, dreams, or expectations that have been severely undermined or rendered futile.
  • be hellbent on sth The idiom "be hellbent on sth" means to be extremely determined or resolute about achieving or pursuing something, often disregarding any obstacles or consequences. It implies a strong and unwavering commitment towards a particular goal or course of action.
  • be first out of the box The idiom "be first out of the box" means to be the first one to take action or to be quick in responding to a situation or opportunity. It refers to someone who is proactive, decisive, and gets ahead of others in taking initiatives or seizing chances.
  • be sb's own flesh and blood The idiom "be sb's own flesh and blood" refers to someone who is closely related to another person, typically a family member. It indicates a strong bond and connection, often emphasizing familial ties and kinship.
  • there will be the devil to pay The idiom "there will be the devil to pay" means that there will be serious trouble or consequences for a particular person or group. It implies that a difficult or chaotic situation will arise, often due to a person's actions or neglect. Its origins can be traced back to the nautical term "devil," which refers to the seam between the deck planks on a ship. "Paying the devil" meant sealing or caulking the seam, a difficult and arduous task. Hence, the idiom suggests that a difficult and troublesome situation is inevitable.
  • be bursting to do something The idiom "be bursting to do something" means to have a strong desire or urge to do something, usually because of excitement, anticipation, or enthusiasm. It implies a feeling of being eager and having an overwhelming urge to engage in a particular action.
  • be poles/worlds apart The idiom "be poles/worlds apart" means that two things or people are completely different or have very contrasting opinions, beliefs, or behaviors. It implies a significant and noticeable difference between two entities.
  • wouldn't be seen dead The idiom "wouldn't be seen dead" is used to express a strong aversion or unwillingness to do or be associated with something, typically to the extent that one would rather die than engage in the activity or be seen in a certain manner. It conveys a vehement rejection or disapproval of the mentioned idea or situation.
  • be all for something/for doing something The idiom "be all for something/for doing something" means to strongly support or advocate for something or be in favor of a particular idea, course of action, or plan. It implies enthusiasm and wholeheartedness in one's support or endorsement.
  • be across something The idiom "be across something" means to have a comprehensive knowledge or understanding of a particular subject, topic, or situation. It implies being well-informed and familiar with the details, key points, or intricacies of something.
  • let bygones be bygones The idiom "let bygones be bygones" means to forget about past disagreements, conflicts, or grievances and move forward without holding any resentment or ill feelings. It suggests forgiving and letting go of past events or conflicts, allowing relationships to heal or starting anew with a clean slate.
  • be chilled/frozen to the marrow The idiom "be chilled/frozen to the marrow" means to be extremely cold or freezing to the core. It implies that someone or something is experiencing such intense coldness that even their innermost parts, metaphorically referred to as the marrow (found in bones), are affected by the extreme cold. It conveys a sense of discomfort, physical numbness, or a feeling of being thoroughly frozen.
  • be chomping at the bit The idiom "be chomping at the bit" means to be eager, anxious, or impatient to do something. It originates from the behavior of horses, specifically when they are restrained by a bit in their mouth, and they become restless and start chewing or grinding their teeth in anticipation of being freed to run or gallop. This idiom is often used to express someone's strong desire or excitement to begin a task or activity.
  • be an apology for The idiom "be an apology for" is used to describe something or someone that is considered to be of poor or inadequate quality, usually in a humorous or disapproving manner. It implies that the thing being referred to is a sorry or insufficient representation of what it should ideally be.
  • be hard put to The idiom "be hard put to" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation where one struggles or finds it difficult to accomplish or achieve something. It implies facing hurdles or obstacles that make a task or goal seem almost impossible or highly unlikely to be achieved.
  • be the last (person) to (do something) The idiom "be the last (person) to (do something)" refers to expressing one's strong disapproval or opposition to an action or behavior, emphasizing that they would never engage in that particular activity under any circumstances. It conveys a sense of indignation or contempt towards the action being described.
  • be staring someone in the face The idiom "be staring someone in the face" means that something is obvious or very apparent, often suggesting that the person should be able to see or understand it without much effort. It implies that the answer or solution is right in front of the person, but they may be overlooking or ignoring it.
  • be in fine fettle The definition of the idiom "be in fine fettle" is to be in excellent physical or mental condition; to be in good health or spirits.
  • be in the process of doing sth The idiom "be in the process of doing something" means to be actively engaged or involved in carrying out a particular action or task, which is currently ongoing or underway but has not yet been completed. It suggests that the person is midway or at a certain stage of accomplishing something, showing that it is still in progress rather than finished.
  • be above suspicion The idiom "be above suspicion" means to be completely innocent and free of any doubts or suspicions regarding one's actions or behavior. It refers to someone who is considered trustworthy, reliable, and beyond any doubt regarding their integrity or honesty.
  • be no contest The idiom "be no contest" means a situation in which there is no chance of a fair or equal competition because one side is clearly superior or dominant. It implies that the outcome is certain and uncontested.
  • be heading/riding for a fall The idiom "be heading/riding for a fall" means that someone is taking actions or making choices that will likely result in a negative outcome or failure. It implies that the person's current path or decisions are leading them towards a harmful or detrimental situation.
  • be in a tight spot The idiom "be in a tight spot" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation where there are limited options or resources available, making it hard to find a solution or resolve the problem. It implies being in a tight or uncomfortable position metaphorically, with potential consequences or unfavorable outcomes.
  • be (just) good friends The idiom "be (just) good friends" refers to a situation where two people maintain a platonic relationship rather than pursuing a romantic or intimate one. It suggests that there is no romantic involvement or deeper feelings between the individuals involved, and they are content with being close companions or confidants without any romantic expectations or desires.
  • not be a barrel of laughs The idiom "not be a barrel of laughs" means that someone or something is not enjoyable, entertaining, or amusing. It refers to a person or situation that is dull, boring, or lacking in humor.
  • be as stiff/straight as a ramrod The idiom "be as stiff/straight as a ramrod" refers to someone or something being extremely upright, rigid, and unyielding in posture or behavior. It implies a high level of discipline, strictness, or formality.
  • be in doubt The idiom "be in doubt" means to be uncertain or unsure about something. It implies that there is a lack of confidence or clarity in making a decision or forming an opinion.
  • be in trim The idiom "be in trim" means to be in good physical condition, fit, or well-prepared for a particular task or activity. It signifies being in optimal shape, both mentally and physically, to perform well or achieve success.
  • be in a (pretty/right) pickle The idiom "be in a (pretty/right) pickle" means to be in a difficult or problematic situation that is challenging to resolve or escape from. It implies being stuck or facing a dilemma that is causing distress or trouble.
  • be glad to see the back of someone or something The idiom "be glad to see the back of someone or something" means to be relieved or happy when someone or something finally leaves or goes away. It implies that the person or thing has been troublesome, irritating, or unwelcome and their departure is a cause for celebration or contentment.
  • be up yourself The idiom "be up yourself" is a colloquial expression primarily used in Australia and New Zealand. It means to have an excessively high opinion of oneself or to be arrogant and self-absorbed. It refers to someone who is overly confident, self-centered, or believes they are superior to others.
  • be a weight off your shoulders The idiom "be a weight off your shoulders" means to feel a sense of relief or liberation from a burden or responsibility that has been causing stress or worry. It implies the feeling of being freed from a heavy load, both physically and metaphorically, and experiencing a lightness or ease as a result.
  • be bulging at the seams The idiom "be bulging at the seams" means that something or someone is very full, crowded, or overflowing with people, objects, or activities. It implies that the entity being described has reached or surpassed its maximum capacity, causing it to appear excessively full or bursting.
  • be an item The idiom "be an item" refers to a romantic relationship between two people. It implies that the individuals are dating or involved romantically with each other.
  • be (dead) set against something/against doing something The idiom "be (dead) set against something/against doing something" means to be strongly opposed to or resistant towards something or to refuse to do something. It implies a firm and unwavering stance or determination against a particular idea, action, or proposal.
  • be stuck on sb/sth The idiom "be stuck on sb/sth" means to be infatuated or deeply attracted to someone or something. It implies being strongly attached or having a strong desire for a particular person or thing, often to the point of obsession.
  • be back on your feet The idiom "be back on your feet" means to be in a healthy and stable condition again after an illness, setback, or difficult situation. It refers to the ability to function normally and independently, both physically and emotionally.
  • be in good shape The idiom "be in good shape" means to be in good physical or mental condition. It implies that someone or something is healthy, fit, or functioning well.
  • be blown out of the water The idiom "be blown out of the water" means to be completely defeated or overwhelmed, often in a surprising or unexpected manner. It originates from naval terminology, where a ship could be destroyed or incapacitated by being hit with powerful artillery fire that caused it to sink or be severely damaged. Therefore, when something or someone is "blown out of the water," they face a similarly decisive and crushing defeat or setback.
  • be friends with The idiom "be friends with" refers to having a friendly and harmonious relationship with someone. It typically implies a mutual bond, trust, and understanding between two individuals.
  • be no oil painting The idiom "be no oil painting" means that someone or something is not physically attractive or aesthetically pleasing. It is often used to describe someone who is not conventionally good-looking. The phrase draws an analogy to a painting created using oil paints, which are known for producing detailed and stunning images. Thus, if someone is said to "be no oil painting," it implies that they are not visually appealing.
  • be on sb's tail The idiom "be on someone's tail" means to closely follow or pursue someone, usually in order to monitor or track their activities. It implies being vigilant and persistent in keeping up with someone's actions, movements, or whereabouts.
  • be (not) comme il faut The idiom "be (not) comme il faut" refers to behaving in a proper and socially acceptable manner (or not). It implies conforming to the standards and conventions of good behavior or decorum in a given situation or society.
  • be after/out for somebody's blood The idiom "be after/out for somebody's blood" means to have a strong desire for revenge or to be determined to harm or punish someone. It indicates a vengeful or hostile intention towards a particular person.
  • cracked up to be sth The idiom "cracked up to be sth" means that something or someone has been hyped or advertised as being exceptional, impressive, or outstanding, but fails to live up to those expectations once experienced or encountered.
  • be cast in cement The idiom "be cast in cement" means to be firmly and permanently established or fixed, with no possibility of change or alteration. It is often used to describe a decision, plan, or belief that is considered final and binding, without any room for negotiation or reconsideration.
  • be glad to see the back of (someone) The idiom "be glad to see the back of (someone)" means to be relieved when someone leaves or departs because their presence or actions were bothersome or undesirable.
  • be as poor as church mice The idiom "be as poor as church mice" refers to being extremely poor or having very little money or resources. It emphasizes a level of financial hardship comparable to that of mice living in a church building, where there may be limited sources of food or shelter.
  • not be getting any younger The idiom "not be getting any younger" means that a person is becoming older and time is passing quickly, implying that they should take action or make decisions before it's too late. It emphasizes the idea that one's age is advancing, and there is a sense of urgency to accomplish certain goals or fulfill one's desires.
  • be sacrificed on the altar of sth The idiom "be sacrificed on the altar of sth" means to be willingly or unwillingly given up or harmed in order to achieve or maintain something else, often emphasizing the imbalance of the sacrifice made. It implies sacrificing one's own well-being, interests, or values for the sake of a particular cause, goal, or belief.
  • be there for somebody The idiom "be there for somebody" means to provide emotional support, comfort, or assistance to someone during a difficult or challenging time. It implies being available, reliable, and dependable for the person in need, offering help, understanding, and a listening ear.
  • be on the wrong track The idiom "be on the wrong track" means to be pursuing an incorrect or misguided course of action or idea. It suggests that someone is going in the wrong direction or making incorrect assumptions or decisions.
  • be (of) no use to man or beast The idiom "be (of) no use to man or beast" is used to describe something or someone that is completely useless or unhelpful in any situation. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is incapable of serving any purpose or adding any value.
  • be near the knuckle The idiom "be near the knuckle" means that something, usually a joke or comment, is close to being offensive, vulgar, or inappropriate. It suggests that the statement is on the edge of being acceptable in terms of social norms, often pushing the boundaries of good taste or politeness.
  • be as mad as a March hare The idiom "be as mad as a March hare" means to be completely insane or crazy. It comes from the erratic and frenzied behavior observed in hares during their breeding season in March.
  • be on automatic pilot The idiom "be on automatic pilot" means to perform a task or activity without thinking or being fully conscious of one's actions, usually due to repetition or habit. It implies that the person is doing something in a mechanical or robotic manner, as if their mind is elsewhere or not fully engaged.
  • be not much between the ears The idiom "be not much between the ears" is used to describe someone who lacks intelligence or common sense. It suggests that the person's mental capacity or level of understanding is very limited.
  • be in eclipse The idiom "be in eclipse" means to be overshadowed or temporarily diminished in importance, influence, or popularity. It is a metaphorical expression derived from the astronomical phenomenon of an eclipse, where a celestial body is obscured by another.
  • be tipping (it) down The idiom "be tipping (it) down" is used to describe heavy or torrential rain. It implies a continuous and substantial rainfall, often accompanied by a considerable downpour.
  • be like a child in a sweetshop The idiom "be like a child in a sweetshop" is used to describe someone who is extremely excited, enthusiastic, or overwhelmed by a wide variety of choices or opportunities. It refers to the joy and wonder that children often experience when they enter a sweetshop, where they are surrounded by numerous options and can't decide what to choose due to the abundance of tempting treats.
  • be damned if do and damned if don't The idiom "be damned if you do and damned if you don't" is typically used to express a situation where no matter what course of action one takes, they will face negative consequences or criticism. It signifies a lose-lose situation where there are no desirable outcomes, creating a feeling of helplessness or frustration.
  • be the last word in The idiom "be the last word in" means to be the ultimate or most advanced example or embodiment of something. It suggests that the thing being referred to is the best, most impressive, or most up-to-date of its kind. It implies that nothing can surpass or improve upon it.
  • be the wrong side of 30 etc The idiom "be the wrong side of 30 (or any other age)" refers to someone being older than a particular age, usually considered a milestone or turning point, which may bring various changes, challenges, or limitations. It implies that someone has crossed a threshold where expectations or circumstances may be different or more difficult compared to being younger.
  • be a waste of space The idiom "be a waste of space" refers to someone who is considered useless, unproductive, or having no value or purpose. It is generally used to express disappointment or frustration towards someone's lack of contribution or usefulness in a particular situation.
  • your ears must be burning The idiom "your ears must be burning" means that someone is talking about you or discussing your actions or behaviors, often in a negative or critical way, and gives the impression that the person being talked about is aware of it, even without hearing the conversation directly.
  • be at The idiom "be at" typically means to be engaged in or occupied with a particular activity or task. It implies involvement or participation in something specific.
  • be mutton dressed as lamb The idiom "be mutton dressed as lamb" refers to a person, typically an older one, who is dressed in a style or manner that is more suitable for a younger person. It implies that the individual is trying to appear younger or more fashionable than their age would typically allow, often resulting in an unflattering or inappropriate appearance.
  • be as mad as a hatter The idiom "be as mad as a hatter" means to be completely insane or crazy. It originated from the character of the Mad Hatter in Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," who was depicted as being mentally unstable. The phrase is often used to describe someone's irrational or eccentric behavior.
  • be running a fever The idiom "be running a fever" is used to describe someone who has an elevated body temperature as a result of an illness or infection. It implies that the person's body temperature is higher than the normal range, which typically indicates the presence of a fever.
  • be (as) easy as one-two-three The idiom "be (as) easy as one-two-three" means that something is very simple or straightforward to understand or do, similar to the ease and simplicity of counting from one to three.
  • wouldn't be caught/seen dead The idiom "wouldn't be caught/seen dead" is used to express a strong dislike or aversion towards doing or being associated with something. It implies that a person is so opposed to a particular activity, situation, or object that they would rather die than be involved or seen in such a circumstance. It emphasizes a strong negative sentiment or refusal towards the mentioned subject.
  • be hot off the press The idiom "hot off the press" means that something is very new or fresh, especially when it comes to news or information that has just been printed or published. It refers to something that is so recent that it has just been released and is still warm from the printing press.
  • be (one's) spiritual home To say that something is "one's spiritual home" means that it is a place, group, or institution where one feels the most connected, at ease, and spiritually fulfilled. It refers to a deep sense of belonging and alignment with the values, beliefs, or practices of that particular entity or environment. It is a metaphorical expression emphasizing the profound emotional and spiritual connection one experiences in that specific place or with that specific group.
  • be flying high The idiom "be flying high" refers to being in a state of great success, happiness, or exhilaration. It typically portrays someone who is achieving their goals, enjoying a period of triumph or contentment, or experiencing a high level of confidence and pride in their achievements.
  • be full of beans The idiom "be full of beans" means to be full of energy, enthusiasm, or excitement. It describes someone who is lively, animated, and bursting with vigor or vigorousness.
  • in bad with, be The definition of the idiom "in bad with, be" is to be in a state of disfavor or in a negative relationship with someone. It means being in a situation where someone is not on good terms or well-regarded by another person or a group of people.
  • be in a stew The idiom "be in a stew" typically means to be worried, anxious, or troubled about something. It suggests a state of mental or emotional turmoil.
  • be much cop The idiom "be much cop" means to be of good quality, worthwhile or impressive. It is often used in a negative sense to express something or someone is not satisfactory, effective or competent.
  • wouldn’t be caught dead The idiom "wouldn't be caught dead" is an expression used to convey that someone strongly dislikes or has a strong aversion towards something, to the point where they would never be seen or associated with it under any circumstances. It is often used humorously or with exaggeration to emphasize one's disdain or unwillingness to participate or be associated with certain things.
  • be one flesh The idiom "be one flesh" refers to a deep emotional and physical connection between two individuals, usually used to describe a strong and intimate bond between spouses or partners. It implies a sense of unity, closeness, and deep understanding between two people.
  • be a hard/tough act to follow The idiom "be a hard/tough act to follow" means to be difficult to succeed or match in terms of performance, achievement, or excellence. It refers to a situation where a person or thing has set a high standard that others find challenging to emulate or surpass.
  • be like a deer caught in the headlights The idiom "be like a deer caught in the headlights" refers to a state of being frozen or startled, usually due to surprise, fear, or being overwhelmed by a situation. It implies a state of confusion or indecision, where a person is unable to react or respond appropriately. The idiom is derived from the behavior of deer, which may freeze when they see the bright lights of a vehicle approaching them, rendering them temporarily immobile.
  • be thankful for small mercies The idiom "be thankful for small mercies" means to be grateful or appreciative for even the smallest or least significant positive things or gestures in a difficult or challenging situation. It emphasizes finding and acknowledging small, positive aspects amidst hardship or adversity, rather than focusing on the negatives or larger problems.
  • be done for The idiom "be done for" is used to express someone's impending or inevitable downfall or defeat, often due to a difficult or dangerous situation they are facing. It implies that there is no hope or way out of the situation, and that negative consequences are imminent.
  • be on the receiving end The idiom "be on the receiving end" means to be the recipient or target of something, usually referring to negative or undesired actions, behaviors, or consequences inflicted upon someone. It implies being on the passive or receiving side of a situation or action.
  • be at death's door The idiom "be at death's door" is used to describe someone who is extremely ill or close to dying. It implies that the person's health and vitality have deteriorated to such an extent that death seems imminent.
  • be chilled to the marrow The idiomatic expression "be chilled to the marrow" means to be extremely cold or chilled to the very core of one's being. It describes a state where someone feels deeply and intensely cold and often implies feeling a sense of discomfort or unease.
  • be an artist/patriot/professional/etc. to your fingertips The idiom "be an artist/patriot/professional/etc. to your fingertips" is used to describe someone who possesses an extraordinary level of skill, expertise, or dedication in a particular field or role. It conveys the idea that the person is deeply committed, knowledgeable, and proficient, with every part of them exemplifying the qualities associated with that specific endeavor. Their proficiency and dedication extend to the literal fingertips, symbolizing their complete mastery and passion for what they do.
  • be after (one's) blood The idiom "be after (one's) blood" means that someone is relentlessly pursuing or antagonizing another person. It suggests that someone is seeking revenge or is determined to cause harm or trouble for the individual in question. It often implies a deep and intense animosity or hostility towards someone.
  • be swinging the lead The idiom "be swinging the lead" is an informal expression that means someone is deliberately pretending to be working or exaggerating their efforts in order to avoid doing their actual duties or responsibilities. It implies laziness or a lack of productivity.
  • be far and away the (something) The idiom "be far and away the (something)" means to be clearly or significantly the best or most superior in a particular aspect or category. It expresses a sense of undeniable dominance or excellence.
  • be somebody's spiritual home The idiom "be somebody's spiritual home" is a metaphorical expression used to convey a strong connection or sense of belonging that a person feels towards a particular place, idea, or person. It implies that the mentioned entity serves as a source of comfort, inspiration, and understanding for someone on a deeper emotional or spiritual level.
  • be in a funk The idiom "be in a funk" means to be in a state of sadness, depression, or a generally low or gloomy mood. It refers to feeling down or having a lack of motivation, often without an easily identifiable cause.
  • be on the expensive etc. side The idiom "be on the expensive side" means that something is relatively costly or more expensive than the average or expected price. It implies that the price of the item or service in question is higher than what one might consider reasonable or affordable.
  • no better than (one) ought to be The idiom "no better than (one) ought to be" means that someone's behavior or actions are not as good or moral as they should be. It implies that the person is failing to meet the expected standards of conduct or behaving inappropriately.
  • be an open book The idiom "be an open book" means to be very transparent and honest, revealing all aspects about oneself or a particular situation without any reservations or secrets. It implies that there are no hidden motives or information, and that everything is readily available for others to understand or interpret.
  • be (living) on borrowed time The idiom "be (living) on borrowed time" means to continue to live or exist despite being expected to die or come to an end soon. It suggests that the person or thing has exceeded the expected or predicted lifespan and is essentially living on borrowed or extra time before its inevitable demise.
  • be breaking a butterfly on a wheel The idiom "be breaking a butterfly on a wheel" means to use excessive force or efforts to deal with a minor or insignificant problem. It refers to the act of using unnecessary or disproportionate measures to address a situation that does not warrant such magnitude of effort.
  • be shot to hell The idiom "be shot to hell" typically means to be severely damaged or ruined. It signifies a situation, thing, or person being in very poor or deteriorated condition.
  • be (like) a bird in a gilded cage The idiom "be (like) a bird in a gilded cage" refers to someone who is living in luxurious or opulent surroundings, yet feels trapped or restricted despite the outward appearance of comfort. It suggests the idea that external appearances can be deceiving and that true freedom and fulfillment may be lacking, even in seemingly perfect circumstances.
  • be in (one's) element The idiom "be in (one's) element" means to be in a situation or environment where one feels completely comfortable, confident, and happy, often because it aligns with their natural abilities, talents, or interests.
  • be having none of (something) The idiom "be having none of (something)" means to completely reject or refuse to accept or engage in something. It indicates a strong resistance or unwillingness to comply with a particular idea, situation, or behavior.
  • be the best of a bad bunch/lot The idiom "be the best of a bad bunch/lot" is used to describe a situation where none of the available options or choices are particularly good, but one option is comparatively better than the others. It refers to being the most favorable or least unsatisfactory option among a group of unsatisfactory options.
  • be bulging/bursting at the seams The idiom "be bulging/bursting at the seams" is used to describe something or someone that is extremely full, crowded, or overflowing to the maximum capacity. It conveys a sense of being overwhelmed or unable to contain any more.
  • be minting it The idiom "be minting it" typically means to be making a lot of money or having great financial success. It suggests that someone is earning or accumulating wealth at a rapid rate, similar to a mint or a printing press producing money.
  • not be beyond the wit of man/sb The idiom "not be beyond the wit of man/sb" means that something is not too complex or difficult for humans to understand or achieve. It implies that the task or problem is within the capabilities or intelligence of people.
  • be born with a silver spoon in mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family, usually having access to abundant resources and opportunities from birth. It signifies being born into a life of luxury, comfort, and advantages.
  • be ideally placed The idiom "be ideally placed" refers to a person or thing being in the perfect or most advantageous position or situation for a particular purpose or outcome. It suggests that the individual or object is well-suited or perfectly situated to take advantage of an opportunity or to fulfill a specific role.
  • be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "be laughing on the other side of your face" means that a person will have a change in fortune, usually from a confident or arrogant position to a much less favorable one. It suggests that someone who is overly optimistic or smug will eventually experience disappointment or regret.
  • be just talk, at be all talk (and no action) The idiom "be just talk" or "be all talk (and no action)" means that someone frequently makes promises or claims about doing something or accomplishing a task but fails to follow through with any concrete actions or results. It implies that the person is more focused on talking or boasting about their abilities rather than taking actual steps to achieve their goals.
  • be (skating/walking) on thin ice The idiom "be (skating/walking) on thin ice" means to be in a risky or precarious situation where one’s actions or decisions could have severe consequences or lead to trouble. It implies that one is in a delicate position, treading carefully to avoid making a mistake or causing harm.
  • be brother's keeper The idiom "be brother's keeper" means to take responsibility for the welfare and wellbeing of others, especially those who are close to you or those who depend on your support. It highlights the importance of looking out for and assisting others, particularly in terms of their physical, emotional, or financial needs.
  • be dead meat The idiom "be dead meat" means to be in serious trouble or facing harsh consequences for one's actions or behavior. It implies that the person is in a position where they are likely to face severe punishment or negative repercussions.
  • be waiting in the wings The idiom "be waiting in the wings" means to be ready and prepared to take action or succeed someone, usually referring to someone who is in a position to assume a role, responsibility, or opportunity as soon as it becomes available. It suggests being on standby or in a state of readiness for an imminent event or occurrence.
  • be wearing teacher's etc. hat The idiom "to be wearing teacher's hat" or "to wear teacher's hat" means to assume or take on the role and responsibilities of a teacher or instructor. It implies acting as an authority figure, guiding others, and imparting knowledge or instruction.
  • be cutting it fine The idiom "be cutting it fine" means to complete or arrive at something just in time, usually with very little margin for error or delay. It suggests that the person is performing a task or meeting a deadline with only a narrow margin of time remaining.
  • You have to be cruel to be kind. The idiom "You have to be cruel to be kind" means that sometimes, in order to help someone or to do what is ultimately best for them, you may need to be strict or harsh with them, even if it initially appears unkind or unpleasant.
  • be shouting (one's) head off The idiom "be shouting (one's) head off" means to be screaming or yelling loudly, expressing intense emotions or frustration. It implies exhibiting excessive or exaggerated vocal outbursts.
  • be before time The idiom "be before time" means to arrive or be ready earlier than the expected or agreed upon time. It implies being punctual or early for an appointment, meeting, or event.
  • be up and around The idiom "be up and around" means to have recovered from an illness, injury, or surgery and be able to move and function normally again. It implies being out of bed, active, and resuming daily activities.
  • be (not) (one's) brother's keeper The idiom "be (not) (one's) brother's keeper" is derived from a biblical reference and means that one should (not) take responsibility for the actions, well-being, or whereabouts of others. It suggests that individuals should (not) be held accountable for the choices or behavior of their relatives or those within their community.
  • be (down) on your uppers The idiom "be (down) on your uppers" means to be in a state of extreme financial hardship or poverty, having little or no money or resources to support oneself. It typically implies that a person is financially destitute and struggling to make ends meet.
  • be as pure as the driven snow The idiom "be as pure as the driven snow" means to be completely innocent, virtuous, or faultless. It refers to someone or something that is morally impeccable, having no blemishes or wrongdoing. The phrase often highlights a person's or an object's pristine and untarnished nature.
  • be flesh and blood The idiom "be flesh and blood" means to be a normal human being with emotions, weaknesses, and limitations. It implies that someone cannot be expected to be perfect or superhuman.
  • be glad, etc. to see the back of somebody/something The idiom "be glad, etc. to see the back of somebody/something" means to feel relieved or pleased when someone or something is finally gone or has left. It typically signifies a desire for someone or something to be out of one's presence or life.
  • be sb's pigeon The idiom "be sb's pigeon" refers to a situation where someone is the person delegated or assigned to take responsibility for a particular task, problem, or situation on behalf of someone else. It implies that the person is chosen or volunteered to face the consequences or difficulties of the situation.
  • be shot down in flames The definition for the idiom "be shot down in flames" is to be harshly and decisively rejected or defeated, typically in a public or humiliating manner. It implies a strong and forceful opposition or criticism that completely undermines the person or their ideas.
  • There will be hell to pay The idiom "There will be hell to pay" means there will be serious consequences or severe punishment for someone's actions or behavior. It implies that the situation will lead to great trouble, difficulty, or strong reaction from those in authority.
  • be steeped in something The idiom "be steeped in something" means to be completely immersed or saturated in a particular quality, characteristic, or state. It suggests a deep involvement or extensive knowledge in a particular subject or culture.
  • be out of control The idiom "be out of control" means that a situation or a person's behavior has become chaotic, disorderly, or uncontrollable.
  • children should be seen and not heard The idiom "children should be seen and not heard" means that children should remain quiet and not interrupt or actively participate in adult conversations or activities. It suggests that children should be well-behaved and obedient, usually in formal or adult-dominated settings.
  • be on the hush-hush The idiom "be on the hush-hush" means to keep something a secret or to do something quietly without drawing attention. It implies a need for discretion or confidentiality.
  • be within hailing distance of smw The idiom "be within hailing distance of someone or something" means to be close enough to someone or something to be able to communicate or interact with them easily or effectively. It implies being in a proximity that allows for easy reach or contact.
  • beggars can't be choosers The idiom "beggars can't be choosers" means that someone who is in a position of disadvantage or is dependent on others cannot afford to be selective or picky about what they receive or are given. It implies that when one is dependent on the generosity of others, they should not complain or have high expectations but should accept what is offered with gratitude.
  • be in (one's) cups The idiom "be in (one's) cups" means to be drunk or intoxicated. It refers to someone who has consumed a significant amount of alcohol and is thus under its influence.
  • leave a great deal to be desired The idiom "leave a great deal to be desired" means that something is far from satisfactory or does not meet one's expectations. It implies that there are many aspects or qualities that can be improved or are lacking in the subject being discussed.
  • be ripped to shreds The idiom "be ripped to shreds" means to be heavily criticized or harshly attacked, whether it is in a literal or figurative sense. It implies being severely scrutinized, dismantled, or discredited by others.
  • be thrown into the scale (of something) The idiom "be thrown into the scale (of something)" refers to the act of adding something (such as an argument, evidence, or a factor) that can influence or impact a decision or judgment. It implies that the added element can tip the balance in favor of one side or the other, potentially affecting the outcome or conclusion of a situation.
  • be two/ten a penny, at be a dime a dozen The idiom "be two/ten a penny" or "be a dime a dozen" refers to something or someone that is very common, easily available, or abundant. It suggests that the particular thing or person is not unique, special, or valuable, but rather commonplace and easily found.
  • be hot stuff The idiom "be hot stuff" refers to someone or something that is highly impressive, successful, talented, or attractive. It suggests that the person or thing in question is regarded as outstanding or exceptional in their respective field or context.
  • be no go The idiom "be no go" means that something is not possible or feasible, usually due to certain circumstances or conditions. It indicates that there is no way or likelihood of achieving or accomplishing something.
  • be of one mind The idiom "be of one mind" means to have a unanimous or shared agreement or opinion on a particular matter among a group of people. It implies that everyone involved is in complete harmony or unity of thought.
  • be a loud mouth To "be a loud mouth" means that someone talks too much and often speaks loudly and inappropriately, often without considering the consequences of their words. It can also imply that they are opinionated and assertive in expressing their viewpoints, sometimes interrupting or dominating conversations.
  • be all brawn and no brains The idiom "be all brawn and no brains" means to be physically strong or powerful but lacking intelligence or mental capabilities. It describes someone who relies solely on their physical ability or strength, while lacking intellectual or problem-solving skills.
  • be in good odor with (one) The idiom "be in good odor with (one)" means to be highly esteemed or respected by someone. It implies that the person speaking of someone has a favorable opinion of them and holds them in high regard.
  • be armed to the teeth The idiom "be armed to the teeth" means to be heavily armed or equipped with an excessive amount of weapons or defensive measures. It suggests that the person or group is well-prepared and ready for any situation requiring force or a strong defense.
  • be kept in the loop The idiom "be kept in the loop" means to be informed or included in the latest updates, developments, or discussions about a particular situation or topic. It implies being kept aware of ongoing events, decisions, or changes so that one remains up to date and has relevant information.
  • be run/rushed off your feet The idiom "be run/rushed off your feet" means to be extremely busy and overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities. It implies a situation where a person has so much to do that they have no time to rest or take a break.
  • be caught napping To be caught napping means to be caught off guard or unprepared for a situation or event. It implies that someone has been taken by surprise due to their lack of attention or vigilance.
  • be carved in stone The idiom "be carved in stone" refers to something that is fixed, permanent, or unchangeable. It suggests that a decision, plan, rule, or principle is rigid and cannot be altered easily.
  • be at it again The idiom "be at it again" is used to convey the idea that someone is engaged in a familiar or repetitive behavior, often something negative or troublesome. It implies that the person is once again involved in a particular activity or action that has been observed or experienced before.
  • be (one's) baby The idiom "be (one's) baby" means to be someone's most cherished or prized possession, or the person or thing that they love and care for the most. It often implies that someone is deeply attached to or protective of the object or person referred to as their "baby."
  • be without equal The idiom "be without equal" means to be unrivaled or unparalleled. It refers to something or someone that is the best or superior to anything or anyone else in a specific respect or aspect.
  • be half the (something) (one) used to be The idiom "be half the (something) (one) used to be" means that someone or something has declined in quality, performance, or ability compared to their previous state. It implies a significant decrease in the level of attributes or achievements that were once present.
  • leave a lot, much, etc. to be desired The idiom "leave a lot, much, etc. to be desired" means that something is not satisfactory or does not meet expectations. It refers to a situation, object, person, or outcome that is lacking in some way or falls short of what is desired or expected. It implies that there is room for improvement or that something else would be preferred.
  • be champing/chomping at the bit The idiom "be champing/chomping at the bit" is used to describe someone who is impatiently eager or ready to do something. It originates from the behavior of horses that tend to chew on the bit in their mouth when they become restless or excited, indicating their strong desire to start running.
  • be put out of business The idiom "be put out of business" means the act of ceasing operations or being forced to close down a business or company due to various reasons, such as financial losses, stiff competition, technological advancements, or changing market demands. It signifies the end of an enterprise's ability to continue operating and generating profit.
  • be the bee's knees The idiom "be the bee's knees" refers to something or someone that is excellent, outstanding, or highly impressive. It is used to describe something or someone as being top-notch or of extraordinary quality.
  • be put through the wringer The idiom "be put through the wringer" means to go through a difficult or challenging experience that causes a great deal of stress, exhaustion, or emotional strain. It stems from the process of putting clothes through a mechanical device called a wringer, which squeezes out water by pressing garments tightly between two rollers, implying a metaphorical inelegant or extreme pressure on a person.
  • be the best of a bad bunch The idiom "be the best of a bad bunch" means that out of a group of mediocre or undesirable options, one option is the least bad or the most favorable. It suggests that while the options may not be ideal, the mentioned option is relatively superior.
  • can't be doing with something The idiom "can't be doing with something" means to have a strong dislike or aversion towards something, or to not tolerate or accept it. It suggests a lack of interest or patience for a particular situation, activity, or behavior.
  • be (not) on speaking terms The idiom "be (not) on speaking terms" refers to the state of having (or not having) a friendly or amicable relationship with someone where communication is still maintained or severed, respectively. It suggests that the individuals involved, despite being acquainted or related, are unable (or unwilling) to engage in casual or cordial conversation.
  • be worth its/your weight in gold The idiom "be worth its/your weight in gold" means that someone or something is extremely valuable or helpful. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is highly regarded and considered indispensable due to their exceptional qualities or contributions. Just as gold has significant worth and is highly sought after, this idiom emphasizes the high value or importance of a person or object in a particular context.
  • be as/like oil and water The idiom "be as/like oil and water" means that two or more things or people do not mix well or have a difficult time being together harmoniously. It refers to a situation where there is a fundamental difference or constant conflict between them, making it nearly impossible for them to cooperate or get along. This idiom is often used to describe relationships or situations where two opposing forces or personalities clash frequently.
  • be caught off (one's) guard The idiom "be caught off (one's) guard" means to be taken by surprise or caught unprepared for something unexpected or unforeseen. It implies being in a state of vulnerability or lacking readiness to respond effectively to a situation or event.
  • be in the hole The idiom "be in the hole" typically means to be in a difficult or unfavorable situation, often referring to being in debt or facing financial troubles. It can also be used to describe being behind schedule or facing challenges with no immediate solution.
  • be pie-eyed The idiom "be pie-eyed" refers to being drunk or intoxicated, usually to a point where one's vision becomes blurry or unfocused, much like the appearance of someone with their eyes fixed on a pie. It signifies a state of being heavily under the influence of alcohol.
  • be struck by/on/with somebody/something To be struck by/on/with somebody/something most commonly means to be deeply influenced, affected, or captivated by someone or something. It can denote being surprised, amazed, or profoundly impressed.
  • be hoist with one's own petard The idiom "be hoist with one's own petard" means to be harmed or defeated by one's own plans or actions. It originates from Shakespeare's play "Hamlet," in which a character named Hamlet constructs a trap using explosives called petards, but ends up being blown up by his own device. Thus, the idiom implies that someone's own schemes or strategies can backfire and cause them harm.
  • be in the pink The idiom "be in the pink" means to be in excellent health, feeling lively, and full of energy. It often refers to someone who is physically and mentally well, with a vibrant and positive outlook on life.
  • be brought/called to account To be brought/called to account means to be held responsible or to face consequences for one's actions or decisions. It implies being required to explain or justify one's behavior or be held accountable for any wrongdoing.
  • be past its sell-by date The idiom "be past its sell-by date" means that something or someone has reached a point where it is no longer useful, effective, relevant, or attractive. It implies that the item or situation has exceeded its prime or expiration date and is now considered outdated, outmoded, or past its period of maximum value or usefulness.
  • be/go on at sb The idiom "be/go on at someone" refers to the act of repeatedly criticizing, nagging, or urging someone in a persistent and annoying manner to do something or to change their behavior. It implies continuous pressure or insistence.
  • be under the weather The idiom "be under the weather" means to feel somewhat unwell or in poor health, experiencing mild illness or discomfort. It is often used to describe feeling slightly sick or having low energy due to a minor illness or fatigue.
  • be (right) on the money The idiom "be (right) on the money" means to be completely accurate, correct, or precise, especially regarding a prediction, statement, or estimation. It implies being exact and without any errors or deviations.
  • be as stubborn as a mule The idiom "be as stubborn as a mule" means to be extremely obstinate, unyielding, or unwilling to change one's opinion, position, or behavior. It refers to the characteristic strong-willed and inflexible nature associated with mules, known for their unwillingness to move or be easily influenced.
  • be laughing (one's) head off The idiom "be laughing (one's) head off" means to be laughing uncontrollably or in an exaggerated manner. It implies that someone is finding something extremely amusing or hilarious.
  • be asleep on the job The idiom "be asleep on the job" means to be negligent or not paying attention to one's duties or responsibilities. It implies that someone is not actively or efficiently performing their tasks.
  • be on the bum The idiom "be on the bum" typically means to be homeless, unemployed, or generally lacking direction or purpose in life. It refers to someone who is experiencing a period of instability or difficulty, often characterized by a lack of steady income or a settled living situation.
  • be/hang in the balance The idiom "be/hang in the balance" refers to a situation where the outcome or resolution of something is uncertain and could go either way. It suggests that the result is delicately poised or undecided and may be influenced by various factors.
  • be (all) part of life's rich tapestry/pageant The idiom "be (all) part of life's rich tapestry/pageant" refers to the concept that each individual, event, or experience contributes to the overall beauty, diversity, and complexity of life. It emphasizes that every aspect, regardless of its significance or role, plays a part in shaping the overall narrative and the richness of human existence.
  • be a shoo-in The idiom "be a shoo-in" refers to a situation or person that is highly likely or almost certain to succeed or win. It means that there is a strong expectation or conviction that something or someone will easily achieve a desired outcome or victory.
  • be mixed up in (something) To be mixed up in something means to be involved or associated with a complicated or confusing situation, often implying that one's involvement might be questionable, suspect, or risky.
  • be around The idiom "be around" typically refers to being present, available, or existing in a particular situation or place. It implies someone's availability or presence for a certain purpose or need.
  • be shaking in (one's) shoes The idiom "be shaking in (one's) shoes" means to be extremely frightened, nervous, or intimidated by something or someone. It implies that someone is so scared that their whole body is trembling, akin to their shoes shaking.
  • be a licence to print money The idiom "be a licence to print money" means to have an extremely profitable or lucrative opportunity or venture, often referring to a business or investment that generates significant wealth with relatively little effort or risk. It implies that the person or entity involved is in a highly advantageous position to make vast amounts of money easily, as if they possessed a legal permit or authorization to create wealth continuously.
  • be in the throes of sth/doing sth The idiom "be in the throes of sth/doing sth" refers to being deeply involved or engrossed in a particular activity, situation, or experience, often a difficult or intense one. It implies being fully committed or caught up in something, usually to the point where it is hard to escape or remove oneself from the situation.
  • be in good/bad odour The idiom "be in good/bad odour" is used to describe someone's reputation or standing in society. - "Be in good odour" means that someone enjoys a positive reputation or is held in high esteem by others. They are seen as trustworthy, respectable, and have a good standing in society. Example: After winning the Nobel Prize, the scientist has been in good odour with the scientific community. - "Be in bad odour" means that someone has a negative reputation or is seen unfavorably by others. They may be perceived as dishonest, unreliable, or generally disreputable. Example: After being caught in a series of scandals, the politician is in bad odour with the public.
  • be snowed in/up The idiom "be snowed in/up" means to be unable to leave a place or travel due to an excessive amount of snowfall. It typically refers to being trapped indoors or unable to access roads or transportation due to heavy snow accumulation.
  • be the power behind the throne The idiom "be the power behind the throne" refers to a person who holds significant influence and control behind the scenes, typically operating covertly or unofficially, while someone else holds a position of authority or leadership. This individual usually wields power and makes important decisions without necessarily being in the public eye or formally recognized for their influence.
  • be in the clear The idiom "be in the clear" means to be free from danger, trouble, or suspicion. It refers to a state where there are no obstacles or risks present, suggesting that one can proceed without any negative consequences or interference.
  • be pushing 40, 50, etc. The idiom "be pushing 40, 50, etc." means that someone is close to or approaching the age of 40, 50, or any specified age. It suggests that the person is getting older and nearing a significant milestone age.
  • be on the rampage The idiom "be on the rampage" means to behave in a wild, violent, or unrestrained manner, causing damage or destruction. It refers to someone or something acting aggressively and without control, often resulting in chaos or havoc.
  • there’s something, not much, etc. to be said for something/doing something The idiom "there's something, not much, etc. to be said for something/doing something" means that although a particular thing or action may have some merit or advantages, it is not significant or convincing enough to be fully endorsed or considered noteworthy. It implies a moderate level of acknowledgement or acknowledgment without strong endorsement or enthusiasm.
  • be on the way to sth The idiom "be on the way to sth" means to be in the process or making progress towards achieving something or reaching a certain goal. It implies being on a path or journey towards a desired outcome.
  • too good to be true The idiom "too good to be true" refers to something that is seemingly perfect, ideal, or favorable, but is unlikely or improbable, leading to skepticism or doubt about its authenticity or genuineness.
  • be at one The idiom "be at one" means to be in harmony or agreement with someone or something. It refers to a state of unity, understanding, or alignment between individuals or things.
  • I'm/I'll be damned if... The idiom "I'm/I'll be damned if..." is used to express strong determination or disbelief about something happening or not happening. It indicates a strong assertion that someone will not allow or accept certain circumstances or outcomes. It often conveys a sense of defiance or determination against the odds.
  • be (not) a patch on The idiom "be (not) a patch on" means that something or someone is (not) nearly as good, impressive, or competent as another person or thing. It suggests that the object being compared falls short in comparison to the other.
  • be rolling in wealth The idiom "be rolling in wealth" means to be extremely rich or having an abundance of wealth or money. It implies that the person is living a luxurious and financially comfortable life.
  • be sweet on sb The idiom "be sweet on sb" means to have a strong romantic or affectionate attraction towards someone. It implies feeling enamored or infatuated with another person.
  • be first past the post The idiom "be first past the post" refers to being the first to finish or succeed in a competition or race, where the winner is determined by crossing a specific finish line or achieving a particular goal. It is derived from horse racing, where only the horse that reaches the finish line first, regardless of the margin of victory, is declared the winner. Similarly, in various contexts, being "first past the post" implies being the winner or achieving victory by a narrow margin.
  • be (not) as black as (someone/something) is painted The idiom "be (not) as black as (someone/something) is painted" means that a person or thing is (not) as bad, evil, or negative as they are often described or perceived to be. It suggests that the negative portrayal or reputation is exaggerated or unfair.
  • be economical with the truth The idiom "be economical with the truth" means to tell only part of the truth or to deliberately withhold or manipulate information in order to give a biased or misleading impression while technically avoiding lying outright. It suggests a level of dishonesty or deception in the way information is presented.
  • be in at the death/kill The idiom "be in at the death/kill" typically refers to being present or involved in a decisive or final moment, often related to the culmination or conclusion of a particular situation or event. It can be used in various contexts, such as sports, competitions, negotiations, or even metaphorically in real-life situations. Being "in at the death/kill" implies being there to witness or contribute to the decisive outcome or final act.
  • not be all it's cracked up to be The idiom "not be all it's cracked up to be" means that something or someone does not live up to the expectations or hype that were associated with it. It implies that the reality or quality of the thing or person falls short of what was anticipated or portrayed.
  • be in the pudding club The idiom "be in the pudding club" is an old-fashioned and informal way to say that someone is pregnant.
  • be fresh out of The idiom "be fresh out of" means to have completely run out of something, typically a product, resource, or supply, indicating that there is none or very little left.
  • be as honest as the day The idiom "be as honest as the day" means to be completely truthful and sincere, without any intention of deception or dishonesty.
  • be tailormade The idiom "be tailormade" means something that is perfectly suited or customized to fit a particular purpose, situation, or individual's preferences or characteristics. It implies that something has been specifically designed or made to meet someone's unique needs or requirements.
  • be near to (one's) heart The idiom "be near to (one's) heart" means something or someone that is very important and deeply cherished by someone. It refers to something that is personally significant and holds great sentimental value or emotional connection.
  • be expecting The idiom "be expecting" refers to the act of anticipating or waiting for something to happen or someone to arrive. It often implies a state of readiness or preparedness for a future event or the arrival of a specific person or thing.
  • be in seventh heaven The idiom "be in seventh heaven" means to be extremely happy, joyful, or content. It expresses a state of great satisfaction or blissful happiness.
  • be in two minds To be in two minds means to be uncertain or undecided about something, often torn between two options or opinions. It reflects a state of indecision or conflicting thoughts, where someone is unable to make a clear choice or commitment.
  • be in the groove The idiom "be in the groove" refers to being in a state of optimal performance, productivity, or enjoyment in a particular activity or task. It means to be in a rhythm or flow where one is operating smoothly and effectively. It often implies being focused, comfortable, and confident in one's abilities.
  • be few and far between The idiom "be few and far between" refers to something that is infrequent, rare, or scarce. It implies that something doesn't happen often, or there is only a small number of occurrences. It is often used to describe situations or events that occur with significant gaps or long intervals.
  • be etched on (one's) heart When we say that something is "etched on one's heart," it means that a particular memory, experience, or emotion has deeply impacted and is permanently engrained in a person's heart or mind. It's a metaphorical way of describing something that has left a lasting and unforgettable impression.
  • be out of your league The idiom "be out of your league" refers to a situation where someone is considered to be superior or more skilled than another person, making a romantic or competitive relationship between them unlikely or impossible due to a significant difference in social status, attractiveness, ability, or accomplishment. It implies that the person is beyond one's reach or capability.
  • be raking over the ashes The idiom "be raking over the ashes" means to revisit or dwell on a past event or situation, typically a negative one, and re-examine it in great detail or with great intensity. It often implies a sense of going through old records, memories, or emotions associated with the event, usually to seek closure, understanding, or to learn from the past.
  • somebody wouldn't be seen/caught dead... The idiom "somebody wouldn't be seen/caught dead..." is used to express a strong aversion or unwillingness towards a particular action, place, or situation. It implies that the person being referred to is so opposed to or repulsed by something that they would rather not be associated with it under any circumstances, even if it meant risking their life.
  • not be a bed of roses The idiom "not be a bed of roses" means that a situation or task is difficult, challenging, or unpleasant, and it requires effort, patience, and endurance to overcome or succeed in it. It signifies that something is far from being easy or enjoyable.
  • be off (one's) nut The idiom "be off (one's) nut" means to be insane, crazy, or mentally unstable. It refers to someone who is behaving or thinking in a peculiar or irrational manner.
  • be big on sth The idiom "be big on sth" means to have a strong liking or enthusiasm for something. It refers to someone who values or prioritizes a particular thing or activity highly.
  • to be wise after the event The idiom "to be wise after the event" means to possess knowledge or understanding about a situation or problem only after it has already occurred or been resolved. It refers to when someone gains insight, understanding, or wisdom about what could have been done differently or better in hindsight, but it is no longer useful or relevant since the event has already taken place.
  • not be a patch on sb/sth The idiom "not be a patch on sb/sth" means that something or someone is not as good or as skillful as another person or thing. It suggests that the subject being referred to is inferior in comparison to another.
  • be out of (one's) shell The idiom "be out of (one's) shell" refers to someone who is becoming more sociable, outgoing, or confident, often after being shy or reserved for a period of time. It describes a person breaking free from their inhibitions and exhibiting a more extroverted or open behavior.
  • be nothing short of astonishing/miraculous etc. The idiom "be nothing short of astonishing/miraculous, etc." means that something is extremely surprising, extraordinary, or remarkable. It emphasizes that whatever is being described exceeds expectations or goes beyond what could be imagined.
  • be six feet under The idiom "be six feet under" is a metaphorical expression meaning to be dead or to have passed away. It refers to the common burial practice of burying bodies six feet below the ground.
  • be beyond/past caring The idiom "be beyond/past caring" means to have reached a point where one no longer has any interest, concern, or willingness to be bothered or involved in a particular situation or issue. It suggests a state of indifference or apathy towards something.
  • be in bad taste The idiom "be in bad taste" means that something is considered to be offensive, inappropriate, or insensitive. It refers to actions, jokes, remarks, or any behavior that is socially unacceptable or lacking in decorum.
  • get into hot water, at be in hot water The idiom "get into hot water" or "be in hot water" means to find oneself in trouble or facing a difficult situation due to one's actions or decisions. It implies being in a predicament or facing consequences as a result of doing something wrong or irresponsible.
  • be a chip off the old block The idiom "be a chip off the old block" means that someone closely resembles or behaves in a similar way to one of their parents. It suggests that they have inherited or acquired similar traits, qualities, or skills from a specific parent or family member.
  • be all fun and games The idiom "be all fun and games" means that a particular situation or activity seems enjoyable and entertaining, but it may also have serious or negative consequences or outcomes if not handled carefully or taken seriously. It suggests that behind the initial enjoyment, there can be underlying risks or consequences that should be acknowledged.
  • be written all over somebody's face The idiom "be written all over somebody's face" means that someone's thoughts, emotions, or intentions are clearly and visibly displayed on their face, making it easy to understand what they are feeling or thinking, often without them needing to explicitly say it.
  • be all over (someone) The idiom "be all over (someone)" typically means to show excessive affection, attention, or interest in someone. It implies strong and overwhelming emotions or actions directed towards another person.
  • be (not) the marrying kind The idiom "be (not) the marrying kind" refers to someone who is (not) inclined or suitable for marriage. It implies that the person either does not have a desire or ability to settle down and commit to a long-term relationship. It suggests a reluctance or disinterest in entering into matrimonial bonds.
  • be able to count somebody/something on one hand The idiom "be able to count somebody/something on one hand" means that there are very few instances or examples of a particular person or thing. It emphasizes a small or limited number, typically not exceeding five, implying rarity or scarcity.
  • be at the helm The idiom "be at the helm" refers to being in a position of leadership or control. It originates from the nautical term "helm," which is the steering mechanism of a ship. Being at the helm implies being in charge or having the responsibility for making important decisions and guiding others.
  • be no skin off (one's) back The idiom "be no skin off (one's) back" means that something does not bother or affect someone at all. It implies that a situation or outcome has no impact or consequence on the person mentioned.
  • be all eyes The idiom "be all eyes" typically means to be fully attentive, observant, and focused on something or someone. It implies being eager and interested in not missing any detail or moment.
  • be (dead) set against sth The idiom "be (dead) set against something" means to strongly oppose or resist something, often with a fixed and unwavering determination. It implies a strong dislike or unwillingness to accept or support a particular idea, decision, or action. The term "dead set" intensifies the opposition, emphasizing the firmness and resoluteness of the opposition.
  • nothing could be further from my mind, the truth, etc. The idiom "nothing could be further from my mind, the truth, etc." is used to express that something is not even remotely on one's mind or is entirely opposite to what one believes to be true. It highlights a significant contrast between what is being discussed and the thoughts or beliefs of the speaker.
  • be to blame The idiom "be to blame" means to be responsible or at fault for something that has gone wrong or caused a negative outcome. It implies accountability or being the cause of a problem or mistake.
  • be above par The idiom "be above par" typically means to be of higher quality or better than average in comparison to the usual standard or expectations. It originated from golf, where "par" refers to the predetermined number of strokes a skilled golfer is expected to take to complete a hole or the entire course. Being "above par" in this context implies performing exceptionally well or exceeding the anticipated level of performance. Consequently, when used figuratively, the idiom indicates excelling or surpassing the norm in any given situation.
  • be sleeping on the job The idiom "be sleeping on the job" means to be neglectful, careless, or not attentive to one's responsibilities or tasks while at work. It refers to a lack of focus, effort, or awareness of one's duties, similar to actually sleeping instead of actively working.
  • be as thin as a rake The idiom "be as thin as a rake" means to be extremely thin or skinny, often referring to a person's physical appearance. It implies that the person is noticeably underweight or lacking in flesh, resembling the slimness of a garden tool called a rake, which has long, narrow prongs.
  • be laid up The idiom "be laid up" refers to being unable to work, participate in activities, or carry out daily tasks due to an illness, injury, or physical condition. It usually implies a temporary state of being unable to function normally and needing rest or medical care to recover.
  • be (or be caught) in a cleft stick The idiom "be (or be caught) in a cleft stick" means to be in a difficult or dilemma situation with limited or no options for escape or resolution. It refers to being trapped or caught between two equally unpleasant choices or circumstances, with no clear way out. It implies a feeling of being stuck and unable to find a favorable or satisfactory solution.
  • sth be damned The idiom "something be damned" is an expression used to convey complete disregard or defiance towards a particular thing or idea. It implies a strong determination to ignore or dismiss the consequences, criticism, or negative effects that may result from a certain action or decision. It often signifies a rebellious attitude or a refusal to give importance to a specific matter.
  • be (as) easy as rolling off (of) a log The idiom "be (as) easy as rolling off (of) a log" means that something is extremely easy or effortless to do. It implies that a particular task or action requires little to no effort, just like how rolling off a log would be an effortless and natural motion.
  • be a matter of opinion The idiom "be a matter of opinion" refers to the idea that different people can have varying viewpoints or judgments on a particular matter or topic, indicating that there is no right or wrong answer or preference. It highlights the subjective nature of opinions and the lack of consensus.
  • be on the wagon The idiom "be on the wagon" refers to abstaining from the consumption of alcohol or other addictive substances. It signifies someone who is choosing to live a sober lifestyle or has temporarily quit drinking.
  • be a (fully) paid-up member of something The idiom "be a (fully) paid-up member of something" refers to someone who is a committed and active participant in a particular group, organization, or ideology. It implies that the individual wholeheartedly supports and adheres to the principles, values, and goals of the group they are associated with. The inclusion of "paid-up" suggests that the person has fulfilled any necessary requirements, dues, or obligations to become a recognized and official member.
  • be cut out for somebody/something The idiom "be cut out for somebody/something" means to possess the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities that are suited for a particular person or situation. It implies that someone is naturally suited or well-suited for a specific role, task, job, or relationship.
  • be/go round the twist The idiom "be/go round the twist" means to be or become crazy, insane, or extremely frustrated. It is often used to describe someone who is suffering from mental distress or a state of intense agitation.
  • Yesterday wouldn't be too soon. The idiom "Yesterday wouldn't be too soon" is an expression used to convey a sense of urgency or impatience regarding a specific event or action. It suggests that the desired event or action should have already occurred and any slight delay is frustrating. It emphasizes the importance of having the event or action happen immediately, preferably in the past, to alleviate the speaker's impatience or dissatisfaction.
  • be a great one for (doing something) The idiom "be a great one for (doing something)" refers to a person who has a strong inclination or preference for engaging in a particular activity or behavior. It implies that the person frequently participates in or enjoys that specific action.
  • be spick and span The idiom "be spick and span" means to be clean, neat, and well-organized. It refers to something or someone that has been tidied up completely, leaving no trace of dirt, disorder, or untidiness.
  • chance would be a fine thing The idiom "chance would be a fine thing" is a sarcastic expression that conveys skepticism or doubt about the possibility of something happening. It implies that the chances of a desired or expected outcome occurring are highly unlikely or nearly impossible.
  • be in a hole The idiom "be in a hole" typically means to be in a difficult or troublesome situation, often related to financial or personal problems. It implies being stuck or trapped with no apparent way out.
  • be (or get) wise to The idiom "be (or get) wise to" means to become informed or aware of something, typically involving a hidden motive or deception. It refers to gaining understanding or knowledge about a particular situation or person, often realizing someone's true intentions or motives. It can also imply being cautious or skeptical about someone or something.
  • be money for old rope The idiom "be money for old rope" means to have an easy and effortless way of earning money or obtaining something, often by exploiting or taking advantage of a situation. It implies that a task or endeavor requires little skill or effort, yet yields a high return or reward.
  • be up to (one's) chin in (something) The idiom "be up to one's chin in something" means being extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular task, responsibility, or problem. It suggests that someone is fully immersed in or completely engrossed in a situation, often to the point of being overwhelmed or unable to handle anything else.
  • be not cut out for something The idiom "be not cut out for something" means that someone is not suited or naturally talented for a particular task, role, or activity. It implies that the person lacks the necessary abilities or characteristics to succeed or excel in that specific area.
  • be in a tough spot The idiom "be in a tough spot" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation, often without any easy solutions or alternatives. It refers to being trapped or caught in a predicament that is hard to navigate or overcome. It implies experiencing stress, pressure, or uncertainty due to circumstances beyond one's control.
  • be all over sb The idiom "be all over sb" typically means to show excessive interest, attention, or affection towards someone. It can imply that a person is constantly pursuing, clinging to, or smothering someone else with their actions or emotions.
  • be too many for (someone) The idiom "be too many for (someone)" means to overpower or overwhelm someone, usually due to an excessive amount or difficulty of something. It implies that a person cannot handle or cope with a specific situation, task, or challenge.
  • be laughed out of court The idiom "be laughed out of court" refers to a situation where someone's argument, excuse, or explanation is considered so ridiculous or lacking in credibility that it is dismissed and ridiculed by others, particularly in a legal or formal setting such as a courtroom. It implies that the person's defense or case is so weak that it is unlikely to be taken seriously or to have any chance of success.
  • be on the point of (doing) sth The idiom "be on the point of (doing) sth" means to be very close to doing something or to be about to do something. It implies that the action or event is imminent and likely to happen in the near future.
  • be hanging over The idiom "be hanging over" is often used to describe a situation where something threatening or worrisome is imminent or impending, causing a feeling of suspense, anxiety, or anticipation. It suggests that a particular event or outcome is looming overhead, ready to have a significant impact or influence on a person or a situation.
  • be half the dancer etc. used to be The idiom "be half the dancer/etc. used to be" is used to describe a person who is not as skilled, talented, or accomplished in a particular area as they once were. It implies a decline in their abilities or performance compared to their previous state.
  • be as well, at be just as well The idiom "be as well" or "be just as well" is used to indicate that something might be a good or wise decision, even though it may not have been the original plan or expectation. It implies that a particular outcome or action would be beneficial or advantageous under the given circumstances.
  • be the best of a bad lot The idiom "be the best of a bad lot" means to be the least objectionable or the most decent option among a group of undesirable or unsatisfactory choices. It implies that although the available options may not be ideal, one option stands out as comparatively better than the others, even if not perfect.
  • be in somebody’s debt The idiom "be in somebody's debt" means to owe someone gratitude, favor, or a debt of gratitude for something they have done for you. It implies being indebted to another person for their assistance, kindness, or support in a way that creates a sense of obligation or indebtedness.
  • be off your nut The idiom "be off your nut" is a slang expression used to describe someone who is acting foolishly, irrationally, or in an eccentric manner. It implies that the person's behavior is unusual, irrational, or "crazy."
  • be stuck in a time warp The idiom "be stuck in a time warp" refers to a situation where someone or something is fixed in the past, refusing to adapt or change with the times. It implies a lack of progress, growth, or modernization, as if being trapped in a bygone era.
  • be a question of doing sth The idiom "be a question of doing something" means that something is necessary or required to be done, or that a particular action or decision needs to be taken. It implies that there is an issue or problem that needs to be resolved or addressed, and the specific action being referred to is the solution or resolution.
  • be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc. The idiom "be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc." means that a particular action, situation, or combination of factors is likely to result in an intended or expected outcome, whether positive or negative. It implies that the elements involved are necessary components that, when combined, create a specific result or consequence, just like following a recipe in cooking.
  • be on welfare The idiom "be on welfare" refers to the state of depending on financial assistance provided by the government or a social welfare program due to a lack of income or ineligibility to work. It describes a situation where an individual or a family receives monetary support or other benefits for meeting their basic needs from the government to alleviate financial hardship.
  • be run off feet The idiom "be run off feet" means to be extremely busy, overwhelmed, or inundated with various tasks or responsibilities. It suggests a state of being overwhelmed to the point of feeling rushed or unable to keep up with the workload.
  • be going to The idiom "be going to" refers to future intention or plans, indicating that someone has decided and made a firm decision to do something in the near future. It implies a strong sense of certainty or determination about a future action or event.
  • be in someone's good graces The idiom "be in someone's good graces" means to be highly regarded, favored, or liked by someone. It suggests enjoying a positive and favorable standing or relationship with another person.
  • be on the edge of (something) The idiom "be on the edge of (something)" means to be very close to experiencing or reaching a particular state, situation, or condition. It suggests being at the brink or verge of something significant about to happen or occur.
  • Judge not, lest ye be judged. The idiom "Judge not, lest ye be judged" is a biblical phrase derived from the Bible verse Matthew 7:1. It cautions individuals against being quick to judge or criticize others, as they may themselves be subjected to similar criticism or judgment. The phrase implies that one should refrain from being judgmental towards others as it may result in facing similar judgment or criticism in return.
  • be brought low The idiom "be brought low" means to experience a significant decline in fortune, status, or power. It signifies a sudden and substantial fall from a position of success, influence, or pride to a lower or unfavorable state. It can refer to both literal and metaphorical situations where someone or something is humbled, defeated, or reduced in importance.
  • be holed up The idiom "be holed up" typically means to stay in a secluded or hidden place, often for protection or to evade something or someone. It implies being confined or trapped in a place.
  • be as easy as pie The idiom "be as easy as pie" means that something is very easy or effortless to do. It is derived from the fact that eating pie is often considered pleasurable and requires little effort.
  • be on course for sth The idiom "be on course for sth" refers to being on track or making progress towards a particular goal or outcome. It suggests that one's actions or progress align with the desired target or result, giving a sense of being on the right path.
  • be meat and drink to sb The idiom "be meat and drink to someone" means that something brings great pleasure or enjoyment to a person, often referring to their particular interests or preferences. It implies that the person finds immense satisfaction or delight in a certain activity, topic, or situation.
  • be the end of the world The idiom "be the end of the world" is used to describe an exaggerated or dramatic response to a negative situation or event. It suggests that the person believes that the situation is so awful or devastating that it feels like the world is coming to an end. However, it is not meant to be understood literally.
  • be under control The idiom "be under control" means to be managed or restrained effectively, usually referring to a situation that is not chaotic or out of hand. It implies that things are being handled in an organized, calm, and orderly manner.
  • get (or be given) the gate The idiom "get (or be given) the gate" means to be rejected, dismissed, or excluded from a particular situation or opportunity. It implies being abruptly and unceremoniously told to leave or being denied entry into something.
  • can't be shagged The phrase "can't be shagged" is a colloquial expression primarily used in British English. Although it may have different variants and interpretations, it generally refers to a state of extreme exhaustion, lack of motivation, or unwillingness to expend effort for a particular task or activity. It can also imply a refusal or inability to engage in sexual activity. Overall, the phrase signifies a person's strong disinclination or reluctance towards a specific action.
  • be pissing in(to) the wind The idiom "be pissing in(to) the wind" is a vulgar expression that means to engage in a futile or pointless effort. It refers to the act of urinating into a strong wind, which will ultimately result in the urine being blown back in one's direction rather than achieving the desired target. It conveys the idea of wasted energy and lack of effectiveness in attempting something that is bound to fail.
  • be out of the ark The idiom "be out of the ark" typically refers to someone or something being outdated, old-fashioned, or obsolete. It implies that the person or thing belongs to a time period long ago, similar to the story of Noah's Ark in the Bible. It can also suggest being behind the times or not keeping up with current trends and advancements.
  • be sb's middle name The idiom "be someone's middle name" is used to emphasize that a particular characteristic or quality is strongly associated with someone or is a defining aspect of their personality. It suggests that the person possesses this trait to a great extent.
  • be shaking in (one's) boots The idiom "be shaking in (one's) boots" means to be extremely afraid or frightened. It implies a heightened level of fear where someone's legs or whole body is shaking as a result of being scared.
  • be struck with (someone or something) The idiom "be struck with (someone or something)" means to be deeply impressed, affected, or captivated by someone or something. It suggests being taken by surprise or being emotionally moved by the person or thing in question.
  • be way off beam The idiomatic phrase "be way off beam" means to be completely wrong or mistaken in one's beliefs, assumptions, or conclusions about a particular situation or topic. It suggests being far from the correct or accurate path or understanding. It implies a significant deviation from the truth or reality.
  • be like a dog with a bone The idiom "be like a dog with a bone" means to be extremely determined or persistent in achieving something, even when faced with obstacles or resistance.
  • be ahead of the game The idiom "be ahead of the game" means to be in a advantageous position or to possess an advantage over others in a particular situation. It refers to having superior knowledge, skills, or preparation that allows someone to lead or succeed before others have the chance to catch up.
  • be brought to bed (of) The idiom "be brought to bed (of)" means to give birth to a child or to have a baby. It refers to the process of a woman going into labor and delivering a child.
  • be in the catbird seat The idiom "be in the catbird seat" refers to being in a highly advantageous or favorable position, where one has control or power over a situation. It suggests being in a position of dominance or advantage, often in a competitive setting.
  • be like a cat on a hot tin roof The idiom "be like a cat on a hot tin roof" means to be extremely agitated, restless, or nervous. It suggests a state of heightened anxiety or discomfort, often due to anticipation or unease about a specific situation or event. The comparison to a cat on a hot tin roof is used to convey the image of someone being unable to find comfort or relaxation, constantly shifting or moving in response to the uncomfortable circumstances.
  • be on the brink of doing sth The idiom "be on the brink of doing something" means to be on the verge or edge of taking a particular action or reaching a significant point or decision. It suggests being in a state of readiness or nearness to do something, often implying that any further push or event could prompt the action or outcome.
  • go/be back to square one The idiom "go/be back to square one" means to return to the beginning or starting point, usually due to a failure or setback that nullifies previous progress or effort.
  • be trapped in a time warp The idiom "be trapped in a time warp" refers to someone or something being stuck in the past or unable to adapt to or move forward with the changes happening around them. It suggests a sense of being out of touch or outdated in their thinking, behavior, or lifestyle.
  • be ready to do sth The idiomatic expression "be ready to do something" means to be prepared or willing to undertake a specific action or task. It implies that an individual is poised and mentally or physically equipped to accomplish something without delay or hesitation.
  • be somebody’s strong suit The idiom "be somebody's strong suit" refers to someone's specific area of expertise, ability, or skill in which they excel or perform exceptionally well. It implies that this particular aspect is their greatest strength or advantage. It can also suggest that this skill or ability is superior to their other qualities or abilities.
  • be at a crossroads Being at a crossroads is an idiom that refers to being at a critical or decisive point in one's life or a situation where one must make an important decision or choice between different options or paths. It reflects the image of standing at a literal crossroads or intersection, where one must choose which direction to take.
  • be just a pretty face The idiom "be just a pretty face" is used to describe someone, particularly a woman, who is valued solely for their physical appearance and lacking intelligence, skills, or talents that would justify their attention or admiration. It implies that the person does not have much substance beyond their attractiveness.
  • be in for a shock The idiom "be in for a shock" means to be unprepared or surprised by something unexpected or surprising. It implies that the person will experience a sudden and possibly unsettling or disturbing revelation or event.
  • be in the money The idiom "be in the money" means to be in a favorable financial situation, usually referring to having a substantial amount of money or being wealthy. It implies being financially secure or successful.
  • be off (one's) dot The idiom "be off (one's) dot" is typically used to describe someone who is acting strangely, bizarrely, or irrationally. It suggests that the person's behavior is at odds with rational thinking or societal norms.
  • be beating a dead horse The idiom "beating a dead horse" is used to describe a situation where someone continues to waste time, effort, or energy on something that is already concluded or resolved, resulting in no further benefit or progress. It implies that attempting to revive or fix something that is already dead or cannot be changed is pointless and futile.
  • be pennywise and poundfoolish The idiom "be pennywise and pound foolish" means to be thrifty or frugal when dealing with small, insignificant expenses or decisions (pennywise), but to be wasteful or negligent when it comes to larger, more important matters (pound foolish). It refers to the tendency of someone who meticulously saves small amounts of money but then ends up losing or spending a large amount due to poor judgment or lack of foresight.
  • be in holy orders The idiom "be in holy orders" refers to someone who is ordained as a member of the clergy, typically involving a religious organization or denomination. It means that the person has taken the vows and commitments necessary to serve as a priest, minister, or other religious official.
  • be doing OK/okay The idiom "be doing OK/okay" means to be in a satisfactory or acceptable state, especially in terms of one's overall well-being, progress, or performance. It implies a sense of being fine, relatively successful, or content with one's current circumstances or situation.
  • be not worth a dime The idiom "be not worth a dime" means that something or someone has little or no value or worth. It suggests that the item or person being referred to is considered unimportant or of little significance.
  • be a matter of (doing something) The idiom "be a matter of (doing something)" means that something is dependent on or requires a certain action or effort to be accomplished or resolved.
  • be quaking in (one's) boots The idiom "be quaking in (one's) boots" means to be extremely frightened or terrified about something. It expresses a level of fear or anxiety that is so intense that it causes one's legs or whole body to shake as if wearing boots.
  • be dead on your feet The idiom "be dead on your feet" refers to a state of extreme exhaustion or fatigue. It means to be so tired that one can barely remain upright or continue functioning.
  • be a world away The idiom "be a world away" means to be in a completely different place or situation, often emotionally or mentally detached from one's surroundings. It suggests a significant distance or disconnect from the present reality.
  • be scared/bored witless The idiom "be scared/bored witless" means to be extremely frightened or bored to the point of being completely devoid of interest, excitement, or enthusiasm. It implies a state of extreme fear or boredom that leaves a person feeling utterly unengaged or unstimulated.
  • be (all) downhill The idiom "be (all) downhill" refers to a situation that becomes easier, less challenging, or more successful over time. It implies that the hardest part has been already done, and from that point onwards, things will progressively become smoother or less complicated.
  • be staring somebody in the face The idiom "be staring somebody in the face" means that something is very obvious or apparent, often referring to a solution, answer, or conclusion that is right in front of someone, but they are failing to recognize or acknowledge it. It implies that the person should easily see or understand the situation, but they are somehow missing it.
  • be every inch a/the (something) The idiom "be every inch a/the (something)" means to fully embody or completely fulfill the qualities, characteristics, or expectations associated with a particular role, position, or identity. It signifies that someone perfectly represents or exemplifies a specific trait, profession, or ideal in every aspect.
  • be as (something) as they come The idiom "be as (something) as they come" is used to describe someone who perfectly, or to an extreme degree, embodies a particular quality or characteristic. It signifies that the person is the epitome of that quality and cannot be surpassed in that aspect.
  • know what it is to be (something) The idiom "know what it is to be (something)" means to have personal experience or understanding of a particular situation, often one that is challenging, difficult, or painful. It implies that the person has firsthand knowledge and empathy for others who have gone through similar circumstances.
  • be put to death The idiom "be put to death" refers to the act of being executed or killed as a punishment for a crime or offense.
  • be no laughing matter The idiom "be no laughing matter" means that a situation or problem is serious, important, or not to be taken lightly.
  • be worth a hill of beans The idiom "be worth a hill of beans" means that something or someone is considered to be of little or no value or significance. It implies that the thing or person in question is not worthy of importance or attention.
  • be just another pretty face The idiom "be just another pretty face" means to be someone who is attractive or good looking but lacks other significant qualities or talents.
  • be as plain as the nose on (one's) face The idiom "be as plain as the nose on (one's) face" means something that is very obvious or evident, something that is clearly and easily noticeable or apparent. It emphasizes that there is no need to search or look further to understand or perceive something because it is blatantly obvious.
  • prove to be sth The idiom "prove to be sth" means to demonstrate or show that something is a particular way or has a particular quality or attribute, usually after a period of time or scrutiny. It implies that initial expectations or assumptions about something or someone were confirmed by subsequent evidence or circumstances.
  • be flogging a dead horse The idiom "be flogging a dead horse" means to persistently pursue or continue with a task or course of action that is futile, pointless, or unproductive. It implies wasting time, effort, or resources on something that has no chance of success or achieving the desired outcome.
  • be hung out to dry The idiom "be hung out to dry" means to be abandoned, left exposed, or placed in a vulnerable situation with no support or protection. It refers to a situation where someone is left to face the consequences or endure the blame for something, often without assistance or backup from others.
  • be carved/set in stone The idiom "be carved/set in stone" means that something is fixed or unchangeable. It refers to an idea, plan, or decision that has been firmly established and cannot be easily altered.
  • be up to your neck in sth The idiom "be up to your neck in something" means to be excessively or heavily involved or overwhelmed by a particular situation or activity. It conveys a sense of being deeply immersed or fully occupied with something, often in a negative or challenging way.
  • be a weight off (one's) mind The idiom "be a weight off (one's) mind" means to feel relieved or freed from a burden or worry. It refers to the sense of relief or lightness one experiences when a problem or concern has been resolved or removed.
  • be a moot question The idiom "be a moot question" means that a point or issue under consideration is irrelevant, no longer significant, or has already been resolved, making it unnecessary to continue discussing or debating it further.
  • be a tissue of lies, at be a pack of lies The idiom "be a tissue/pack of lies" is used to describe a statement, story, or information that is completely false or filled with deception. It implies that the information being presented is not only untrue but also shallow and insubstantial, like a fragile tissue or a bundle of lies.
  • be the done thing The idiom "be the done thing" refers to a behavior or action that is considered proper, socially acceptable, or expected in a particular situation or context. It implies conformity to societal norms or customs.
  • far be it from me to do something (but…) The idiom "far be it from me to do something (but…)" is used to express humility or a disclaimer before stating an opinion or making a suggestion. It indicates that the speaker recognizes their own limitations or lacks authority, but they still have something to contribute or a point to make.
  • be in the driving seat The idiom "be in the driving seat" means to be in control or have the power to make decisions and take action in a particular situation. It often signifies being in a dominant or advantageous position.
  • be as dead as a dodo The idiom "be as dead as a dodo" means to be completely extinct, non-existent, or no longer relevant. It refers to the dodo, a flightless bird that became extinct in the late 17th century, symbolizing something that is long gone and cannot be revived.
  • be as pleased as Punch The idiom "be as pleased as Punch" means to be extremely delighted or overjoyed about something. It refers to the character Punch from the traditional puppet show called Punch and Judy, where Punch is known for his exuberant and gleeful behavior.
  • be shacked up The idiom "be shacked up" refers to the act of living together with a romantic partner or someone else in an intimate relationship without being married. It implies cohabitation and sharing a domestic space, often without legal commitment.
  • be beyond ken The idiom "be beyond ken" means that something is unable to be understood, comprehended, or fathomed by someone. It refers to a situation or concept that is beyond the range of one's knowledge or understanding.
  • be scared shitless The idiom "be scared shitless" means to be extremely terrified or frightened. It is a vulgar expression used to describe an intense level of fear or apprehension.
  • be curtains The idiom "be curtains" is an informal expression that means to be imminent or inevitable, usually referring to a negative outcome or a forthcoming event that is expected to happen soon and cannot be avoided. It implies that someone or something is nearing its end or about to face a final result or conclusion.
  • if truth be told The idiom "if truth be told" means that what is about to be said is the honest or true statement, regardless of whether it is what people would expect or want to hear. It suggests the speaker's intention to reveal the truth, even if it may be uncomfortable or unpopular.
  • be hard put to (do something) The idiom "be hard put to (do something)" means to find something extremely difficult or challenging to accomplish, to be in a difficult or tight situation where it is hard to achieve a particular task, or to struggle to do something due to unfavorable circumstances or lack of ability.
  • be as stiff as a ramrod The idiom "be as stiff as a ramrod" is used to describe someone who is physically or emotionally rigid, lacking flexibility or relaxation. It implies that the person appears stiff, uptight, or tense, often maintaining a strict or rigid posture.
  • might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is going to be punished or face consequences for a certain action, they might as well take an even greater risk or commit a larger offense since the punishment will be the same. It implies that if the outcome or punishment will be severe regardless, one might choose to take more daring or significant actions to potentially gain a greater reward or satisfaction.
  • be on the back foot The idiom "be on the back foot" means to be in a defensive or disadvantageous position in a situation, typically in a conflict or competition. It implies that someone is being forced to react and defend themselves rather than being in control or taking proactive action.
  • be at home The idiom "be at home" means to feel comfortable, relaxed, or familiar in a particular situation or environment. It can also imply being proficient or skilled in a specific activity or field.
  • be kept in the dark (about something) To be kept in the dark (about something) means to be intentionally kept uninformed or unaware of certain information or knowledge. It suggests being deliberately excluded from knowing important details, plans, or developments related to a specific situation. This phrase implies a lack of transparency or sharing of information, often resulting in feelings of confusion, uncertainty, or being left out.
  • to be safe The idiom "to be safe" typically means to take precautions or make choices that minimize risk or harm in a particular situation. It refers to acting in a way that ensures one's well-being, security, or protection.
  • be well off for something The idiom "be well off for something" means to possess a sufficient or abundant amount of something, often referring to material possessions or resources. It suggests being in a comfortable or advantageous position in terms of having enough of what is needed or desired.
  • be there for sb The idiom "be there for someone" means to offer support, assistance, or companionship to someone in need or during challenging times. It implies being emotionally available, physically present, or providing help when someone requires it the most.
  • there's sth to be said for The idiom "there's something to be said for" is used to acknowledge and recognize the merit or value in a particular idea, viewpoint, or action. It indicates that while there may be flaws or drawbacks, there are valid arguments or advantages worth considering. It emphasizes that a certain perspective or approach has its own valid points or positive aspects worth appreciating.
  • be on game The idiom "be on game" typically refers to being alert, focused, or prepared for a particular task or situation. It implies being mentally sharp, attentive, and ready to perform at one's best.
  • be none of sb's business The idiom "be none of sb's business" means that something is not the concern or responsibility of a particular person. It implies that the matter does not involve or affect them, and they should not interfere or intervene in it.
  • be hanging over you The idiom "be hanging over you" means to be looming or causing a sense of worry, pressure, or anticipation. It refers to a situation or problem that is unresolved or pending, but feels like a burden or an impending threat. It implies a sense of unease or anxiety, as if something is constantly looming over one's head.
  • be (strictly) for the birds The idiom "be (strictly) for the birds" means that something is worthless, unimportant, or insignificant. It often refers to something that is considered a waste of time or effort. It implies that the thing mentioned is only relevant or interesting to birds, highlighting its lack of value to other people.
  • be an easy mark, at be easy game/meat The idiom "be an easy mark" or "be easy game/meat" refers to someone who is considered an easy target or vulnerable to exploitation or trickery. It suggests that the person lacks the awareness, strength, or ability to defend themselves against others who may take advantage of their weaknesses or naivety.
  • be between the devil and the deep blue sea The idiom "between the devil and the deep blue sea" means being in a difficult or challenging situation where one is faced with two equally undesirable or unfavorable choices, making it difficult to decide which option to choose. It implies being trapped or caught between two equally problematic or dangerous options.
  • be music to sb's ears The idiom "be music to someone's ears" means to be pleasing, joyful, or highly welcomed news or information to someone. It suggests that the information is like beautiful music that brings delight and happiness to the person hearing it.
  • be laughing The idiom "be laughing" means to be in a very positive and advantageous situation, often resulting in amusement, satisfaction, or success. It implies that everything is going well, and the person is experiencing a sense of ease and enjoyment.
  • at someone's feet, be The idiom "at someone's feet, be" means to be completely devoted or submissive to someone, typically due to admiration, respect, or infatuation. It implies a willingness to fulfill their desires or follow their lead without question.
  • be man enough to do sth "To be man enough to do something" is an idiom that means to have the courage or strength to perform a particular action or take responsibility for one's actions. It implies being brave, honest, and able to face challenges or difficult decisions without fear or hesitation.
  • be blind to The idiom "be blind to" means to be unaware or oblivious to something, usually referring to an issue, problem, or truth. It implies a lack of knowledge or understanding and often suggests a deliberate or willful ignorance.
  • be all things to all men The idiom "be all things to all men" means attempting to please or satisfy everyone, often by trying to meet their different expectations or needs.
  • be taken ill The idiom "be taken ill" refers to the sudden onset of illness or becoming sick. It means that someone has fallen ill or become unwell unexpectedly or without prior knowledge or anticipation.
  • be an easy touch The idiom "be an easy touch" typically refers to someone who is easily persuaded, convinced, or manipulated, especially when it comes to giving or lending money or other resources. It implies that the person is generous, gullible, or lacks the ability to say no when approached for assistance.
  • be here to stay The idiom "be here to stay" means that something or someone is expected to remain or endure for a long time, and is not likely to go away or be replaced easily or quickly. It implies a sense of permanence or stability.
  • be rushed/run off your feet The idiom "be rushed/run off your feet" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a lot of work or tasks to do.
  • be dead to the world The idiom "be dead to the world" means to be completely sound asleep or unconscious, unaware of one's surroundings and impervious to external stimuli or disturbances.
  • be (living) in a dream world The idiom "be (living) in a dream world" means that someone is not being realistic or is overly idealistic in their thinking or beliefs. It suggests that the person's perception of reality is not in line with the actual situation or facts. It often implies that the person is naive or impractical in their expectations or ideas.
  • what sm or sth is cracked up to be The idiom "what sm or sth is cracked up to be" means that something or someone does not live up to the high expectations or hype surrounding them. It suggests that the actual experience or quality of something is not as impressive or remarkable as it was described or believed to be.
  • be (walking) on thin ice The idiom "be (walking) on thin ice" means to be in a risky, dangerous, or precarious situation where one's actions or decisions could have serious consequences or lead to trouble. It implies that one is treading carefully and cautiously to avoid making a mistake or causing harm.
  • be (as) solid as a rock The idiom "be (as) solid as a rock" means to be extremely reliable, steadfast, and unwavering in one's actions, beliefs, or character. It implies a strong and unshakeable foundation, often suggesting dependability or resilience in the face of challenges or adversity.
  • be blown to smithereens The idiom "be blown to smithereens" means to be completely destroyed, shattered, or disintegrated into tiny pieces by an explosion or powerful force. It conveys the idea of extreme devastation or annihilation.
  • be after sb's blood The idiom "be after sb's blood" means to relentlessly pursue someone in order to seek revenge or harm them in some way. It implies a strong, intense desire to hold someone accountable or make them suffer for their actions.
  • be out of the way The idiom "be out of the way" means to be removed, eliminated, or no longer in someone's or something's path or obstructing their progress. It can also refer to being free from interference or distraction.
  • be for the fainthearted The idiom "not for the fainthearted" or "not for the faint of heart" is used to describe something that is challenging, difficult, dangerous, or extreme. It implies that the task, activity, or situation requires a strong constitution, courage, or resilience, and is not suitable for those who are easily intimidated, discouraged, or lacking in determination.
  • be like a kid in a candy store The idiom "be like a kid in a candy store" means to be extremely excited, delighted, or overwhelmed by a plethora of choices, opportunities, or desirable things. It is often used to describe someone's reaction or behavior when they are surrounded by numerous enticing options or when their desires are abundantly fulfilled.
  • be in the loop The definition of the idiom "be in the loop" is to be informed or included on the latest information, updates, or decisions about a particular situation or topic. It suggests being part of a group or network that has access to relevant knowledge or being kept in the know about important matters.
  • be at pains The idiom "be at pains" means to make a deliberate and concerted effort to do something or to take great care in achieving or explaining something. It implies a willingness to go to great lengths or endure hardship to accomplish a particular task or to convey a specific message.
  • be (a bit) on the expensive side The idiom "be (a bit) on the expensive side" means that something is relatively costly or more expensive than what is considered reasonable or affordable. It suggests that the particular item or service is not within the expected or desired price range.
  • be heading for a fall The idiom "be heading for a fall" means that someone is likely to experience a significant failure or downfall in the near future due to their actions, decisions, or circumstances. It indicates that the individual is on a course that is bound to lead to negative consequences or disaster.
  • be tight-assed The idiom "be tight-assed" typically refers to a person who is excessively strict, rigid, or uptight in their behavior, actions, or attitudes. It implies a lack of flexibility, openness, or willingness to relax or have a good time.
  • be one sandwich short of a picnic The idiom "be one sandwich short of a picnic" is used to describe someone who is not quite mentally or intellectually capable. It implies that the person is lacking some common sense or appears to be a bit foolish or eccentric.
  • be a blessing in disguise The idiom "be a blessing in disguise" means that an initially negative or unfortunate event or situation turns out to have unforeseen positive consequences or benefits.
  • be long in the tooth The idiom "be long in the tooth" is used to describe someone who is old or aging. It implies that the person has a lot of experience or has been around for a long time. The phrase originated from the practice of estimating a horse's age by examining the length of its teeth.
  • be miles apart The idiom "be miles apart" means to have significant differences or disagreements between two or more things or people. It implies a great distance or divide in opinions, ideas, behavior, or understanding.
  • be left in the lurch The idiom "be left in the lurch" means to be abandoned or left in a difficult or unfavorable situation, typically by someone who was supposed to provide support or assistance. It describes the feeling of being stranded or left without help when it was expected or needed.
  • be as sober as a judge The idiom "be as sober as a judge" means to be completely and entirely sober, particularly referring to someone who does not consume alcohol or drugs. It highlights the idea of being serious, clear-headed, and responsible, just like a judge is expected to be in a courtroom setting.
  • be calculated to do something The idiom "be calculated to do something" means that something is intended or designed to achieve a specific outcome or effect. It implies that careful consideration or planning has gone into ensuring that the desired result will be achieved.
  • be a howling success The idiom "be a howling success" means to be extremely successful or popular, often accompanied by loud and enthusiastic approval or recognition from others. It implies that something or someone has achieved great success, usually beyond expectations, and is met with overwhelming praise or admiration.
  • be worlds apart The idiom "be worlds apart" means that two things or people are very different or have opposing views, opinions, or characteristics. It emphasizes a significant distance or contrast between them.
  • be walking on eggshells The idiom "be walking on eggshells" means to be extremely cautious or sensitive in one's actions or speech, usually due to a fear of causing offense or triggering a negative reaction. It implies a heightened level of tension, uncertainty, or delicacy of a situation or relationship.
  • be caught with your pants/trousers down The idiom "be caught with your pants/trousers down" means to be caught or surprised while in a situation that is embarrassing, inappropriate, or unprepared for. It often refers to being caught in a compromising, deceitful, or vulnerable position, either literally or figuratively.
  • be at it The idiom "be at it" means to be engaged in or actively involved in a particular activity or task, often implying perseverance, dedication, or an ongoing commitment to achieving something. It can also refer to constant or repeated actions or behaviors.
  • be far removed from sth The idiom "be far removed from sth" means to be very different or distant from something else, either in terms of characteristics, ideas, or circumstances. It implies a significant contrast or lack of connection.
  • be in the wrong To be in the wrong means to be at fault or in error in a particular situation. It implies that someone has made a mistake, taken the incorrect action, or is holding the incorrect viewpoint. It suggests that the person's stance or behavior is incorrect or unjustified in relation to the situation or circumstances at hand.
  • be not in Kansas anymore The idiom "be not in Kansas anymore" is a phrase originating from the classic film "The Wizard of Oz," and it means that someone is in an unfamiliar or strange environment that is very different from what they are used to. It signifies being in a situation where everything seems unusual, strange, or surreal.
  • be the brains behind (something) The idiom "be the brains behind (something)" refers to a situation where someone is recognized or responsible for providing the ideas, intelligence, or strategy behind a particular project or endeavor. This person is often the one who plans and directs the operations, demonstrating a high level of intelligence or innovative thinking. They are considered to be the mastermind or the person with the intellectual prowess behind the success or effectiveness of the venture.
  • be below par The idiom "be below par" refers to something or someone performing at a level that is lower than expected or desired. It commonly implies a lack of quality, efficiency, or proficiency. The term "par" is originally from golf, where it represents the expected standard score for a hole or a round of play. When something is "below par," it means it falls short of meeting the usual and satisfactory level.
  • Be happy to The idiom "be happy to" means to feel great pleasure or satisfaction in doing something willingly or gladly. It expresses enthusiasm and willingness to do something without hesitation or reluctance.
  • wouldn't want to be in shoes The idiom "wouldn't want to be in someone's shoes" means that you wouldn't want to be in the same situation or have the same problems as another person. It expresses a sentiment of sympathy or empathy towards someone who is facing a difficult or undesirable circumstance.
  • be out of (one's) tree The idiom "be out of (one's) tree" means to be crazy, insane, or mentally unstable. It describes someone who is exhibiting bizarre or irrational behavior, often to an extreme degree.
  • be head over heels The idiom "be head over heels" means to be deeply or madly in love with someone or to be intensely infatuated with someone.
  • be in (one's) confidence To be in someone's confidence means to be trusted by that person with personal or confidential information. It suggests that the person feels comfortable sharing their private thoughts, emotions, or secrets with another individual. Being in someone's confidence often implies a close and trusted relationship between two people who have a deep level of mutual understanding and confidentiality.
  • be/go (out) on the razzle The idiom "be/go (out) on the razzle" refers to someone going out to enjoy themselves, often in a wild and lively manner. It implies engaging in activities such as partying, drinking, and having a good time, usually in a boisterous and energetic way.
  • be tired of (something) The idiom "be tired of (something)" means to feel bored, fed up, or annoyed with something. It suggests a lack of interest, enthusiasm, or patience towards a particular situation, activity, or object due to repetitive experiences or dissatisfaction.
  • be it as it may The definition of the idiom "be it as it may" is to accept or acknowledge a particular situation or fact, despite objection or disagreement. It implies that regardless of one's opinion or preference, the reality must be accepted.
  • be one of the lads/boys/girls The idiom "be one of the lads/boys/girls" refers to someone being accepted and included as a member of a specific group, typically consisting of friends or colleagues of the same gender. It suggests that the person is seen as an equal, fitting in comfortably and sharing the same interests, humor, or activities as the rest of the group. It implies a sense of camaraderie and belonging.
  • not be about to do something The idiom "not be about to do something" means someone is not willing or inclined to do a particular action under any circumstances, regardless of pressure or persuasion. It implies a strong determination to refuse or avoid the suggested action.
  • be the bomb The idiom "be the bomb" typically means to be extremely impressive, outstanding, or exceptional in some way. It is often used to describe something or someone that is the best, most exciting, or most superior among others.
  • be out for blood The idiom "be out for blood" means to be extremely determined and eager to seek revenge or to harm someone. It implies a strong desire for justice or retribution and suggests that the person is merciless and driven in their pursuit.
  • be meat and drink The idiom "be meat and drink" means to be a source of great enjoyment, pleasure, or sustenance. It suggests that something is extremely satisfying or fulfilling, like food and drink are essential for nourishment and satisfaction.
  • be built like a brick shithouse The idiom "be built like a brick shithouse" is a colorful expression used to describe someone who is strongly built, muscular, or physically imposing. It suggests that the person has a physique that is sturdy, solid, and impressive in terms of physical strength or stature.
  • be a shadow of your former self The idiom "be a shadow of your former self" means to be significantly weaker, less successful, or less impressive than one used to be. It implies that a person or thing has declined or deteriorated over time.
  • be none the worse The idiom "be none the worse" means to not be negatively affected or harmed by a particular situation or experience. It suggests that despite the circumstances, someone or something remains the same or unaffected, and there are no negative consequences.
  • be knocked down a peg (or two) The idiom "be knocked down a peg (or two)" means to be humbled or brought down from a position of arrogance, superiority, or self-importance. It refers to being reminded of one's limitations or having one's ego diminished through criticism, failure, or a challenging experience.
  • be in sb's shoes The idiom "be in someone's shoes" means to imagine oneself in the same situation or circumstances as another person, typically to understand their feelings, perspective, or experiences better. It involves empathizing with someone by mentally placing oneself in their position.
  • be put out of sorts The idiom "be put out of sorts" means to feel irritable, agitated, or generally not one's usual self. It implies a state of being emotionally or physically unsettled, often due to external factors or circumstances that have caused discomfort or inconvenience.
  • you can’t be too careful The idiom "you can't be too careful" means that one should always be cautious and take all necessary precautions, even if it seems excessive or unnecessary. It emphasizes the importance of being vigilant and avoiding any potential risks or dangers.
  • be wise after the event The idiom "be wise after the event" means recognizing or understanding the correct course of action or decision only after an event has occurred, often when it is too late to benefit from that knowledge. It implies hindsight and the ability to analyze and understand a situation better in retrospect.
  • be packing (heat) The idiom "be packing (heat)" typically means to carry a firearm or to be armed with a weapon, usually a gun. It implies that someone is carrying a concealed weapon and is ready to use it if necessary.
  • be out of it The idiom "be out of it" means to be in a state of confusion, disorientation, or unresponsiveness. It refers to a situation where someone is mentally or physically disconnected from their surroundings, often due to fatigue, illness, intoxication, or emotional distress.
  • be (the) devil's advocate The idiom "be (the) devil's advocate" means to take a position or argue against something, even if you do not necessarily agree with it, in order to stimulate thinking, challenge assumptions, or provoke discussion. It involves adopting a contrary or skeptical perspective for the purpose of testing or exploring the validity of an idea or argument. In essence, being the devil's advocate involves presenting the opposing viewpoint and raising objections or counter-arguments to facilitate a more robust examination of a particular topic or issue.
  • be in someone's debt The idiom "be in someone's debt" means to owe someone a favor, gratitude, or a significant amount of money. It implies being indebted to someone for their assistance, kindness, or support, and feeling obliged to repay them in some way.
  • to blame, be The idiom "to blame, be" means to be responsible for a mistake, wrongdoing, or undesirable outcome. It indicates the act of attributing or holding someone accountable for a particular action or situation.
  • be curtains (for somebody) The idiom "be curtains for somebody" means that something is going to lead to the end, downfall, or demise of someone or something. It implies that the outcome will be disastrous or irreversible.
  • be on the square The idiom "be on the square" means to be honest, fair, and genuine in one's actions and intentions. It refers to someone who operates with integrity and sincerity, adhering to principles of honesty and moral correctness.
  • be somebody’s department The idiom "be somebody’s department" means to be someone's responsibility, area of expertise, or jurisdiction. It refers to a specific domain or field that someone has authority or control over. If something falls within a person's department, they are accountable for its management or resolution.
  • be rid of The idiom "be rid of" means to finally get rid of or be free from someone or something undesirable or bothersome. It implies a sense of relief or liberation from a troublesome situation or person.
  • be beside (oneself) To be beside oneself means to be extremely upset, agitated, or overwhelmed with emotion or anger. It refers to a state of being unable to control or manage one's emotions or actions due to extreme distress or frustration.
  • be fair game The idiom "be fair game" refers to being a legitimate target or subject of criticism, ridicule, or scrutiny. It implies that someone or something is open to being treated without restraint or fairness.
  • be spoilt for choice The idiom "be spoilt for choice" means to have so many options or possibilities that it becomes difficult to make a decision. It implies being overwhelmed by the abundance of choices available.
  • be not all it's cracked up to be The idiom "be not all it's cracked up to be" means that something or someone is not as good or impressive as it seemed or was expected to be. It implies that the actual experience or reality is somewhat disappointing or falls short of the high expectations initially set.
  • cut out to be The idiom "cut out to be" means to be suited for or destined for a particular role, task, or situation. It implies that someone possesses the necessary skills, qualities, or characteristics for success in a specific endeavor.
  • be going cheap The idiom "be going cheap" means that something is being sold at a low price or is available at a discounted rate.
  • be talking out of your arse The idiom "be talking out of your arse" is a colloquial expression often used in informal or slang contexts. It means to be speaking or expressing oneself in an absurd, nonsensical, or uninformed manner. It implies that the person is making exaggerated claims, talking nonsense, or providing false information without any basis or knowledge.
  • be soaked through The idiom "be soaked through" means to be completely drenched or thoroughly wet, often referring to clothing or objects that have absorbed a significant amount of moisture. It conveys a state of being soaked to the point where the item is saturated, leaving no dry areas.
  • be burning a hole in (one's) pocket The idiom "be burning a hole in (one's) pocket" means to have a strong desire to spend money or to feel impatient about having money that one wants to use or spend quickly. It implies a sense of urgency and restlessness when it comes to spending money.
  • be in (or of) two minds The idiom "be in (or of) two minds" means to be uncertain or indecisive about something, unable to make a choice or come to a decision because of conflicting thoughts or feelings. It refers to being torn between two different options or opinions, experiencing a state of ambiguity or hesitation.
  • be on edge The idiom "be on edge" means to be tense, anxious, or nervous, typically due to anticipation or unease about a particular situation or event. It implies a state of being easily startled or jumpy.
  • be music to ears The idiom "be music to ears" means that something said or heard is pleasing, enjoyable, or gratifying to hear. It implies that the information or words bring delight, satisfaction, or positive emotions to the person receiving them.
  • be on a tight leash The idiom "be on a tight leash" means to be under close control or supervision, with limited freedom or autonomy. It suggests that someone is being closely monitored or restricted in their actions or behavior, usually by a person in authority. This expression is often used to describe individuals who have little independence or decision-making power.
  • be put to the sword The idiom "be put to the sword" refers to being violently killed or executed, often in a brutal or merciless manner. It signifies an individual or a group being subjected to death by wielding a sword, typically during times of war, rebellion, or punishment.
  • be in cahoots The idiom "be in cahoots" means to be in secret partnership or collaboration with someone, typically for a dishonest or illegal purpose. It refers to a situation where two or more people conspire together to engage in deceitful or suspicious activities.
  • be/stay/keep one jump ahead The idiom "be/stay/keep one jump ahead" means to stay ahead or ahead of others, particularly in terms of avoiding trouble or staying one step ahead in a competitive situation. It suggests being more informed, prepared, or quick-witted than others.
  • not be short of a bob or two The idiom "not be short of a bob or two" means that someone is wealthy or financially comfortable. It implies that the person has an abundance of money and does not have any financial difficulties.
  • be in (one's) dotage The idiom "be in (one's) dotage" refers to the state of being in old age, especially being senile or mentally impaired due to advanced age. It suggests a condition where a person's mental faculties have deteriorated, often leading to forgetfulness, confusion, or a decline in cognitive abilities.
  • be tied to something's apron strings The idiom "be tied to something's apron strings" means to be excessively dependent on someone or something, usually in reference to a person being overly controlled or influenced by another person or entity. It implies a lack of independence or autonomy. The phrase can be used to describe individuals who have a difficult time making decisions or taking actions without the involvement or approval of someone else.
  • be dead set against something The idiom "be dead set against something" means to be strongly opposed or completely against something. It implies having a firm and unwavering stance, showing a strong determination to resist or disagree with a particular idea, plan, or course of action.
  • not be up to much The idiom "not be up to much" means that something or someone lacks in quality, importance, or impressiveness. It implies mediocrity or a lack of noteworthy attributes.
  • be half the dancer, writer, etc. you used to be The idiom "be half the dancer, writer, etc. you used to be" means that a person's skills, ability, or performance in a particular domain has significantly declined or diminished compared to their previous level of expertise or proficiency. It implies that their current abilities are only half as good as they once were. This expression is often used to highlight a person's decline or deterioration in a specific area of talent or skill.
  • be at (one's) disposal The idiom "be at (one's) disposal" means to be available and ready to help or serve someone whenever they need or want something. It implies that the person or thing referenced is completely at the disposal or control of the individual, to be used, utilized, or accessed as desired.
  • be scattered to the four winds The idiom "be scattered to the four winds" means to be dispersed or spread out in various directions, often referring to people or objects being scattered without any order or specific direction. It implies a lack of organization or cohesion.
  • be in the same ballpark When someone says "be in the same ballpark," it means that two or more things or values are relatively similar or closely related in terms of quantity or quality. This expression often refers to being within a reasonable or acceptable range or having comparable characteristics. It suggests that the compared items or values are not identical but are approximately close enough to be considered in the same category or level of comparison.
  • be off base The idiom "be off base" means to be incorrect or mistaken in one's thinking or understanding about something. It implies that someone's opinion, statement, or belief is not based on accurate information or does not align with the truth. It can also suggest that someone is making an unreasonable assumption or judgment.
  • be sick of the sight of (someone or something) The idiom "be sick of the sight of (someone or something)" means to feel extreme annoyance, disgust, or exhaustion towards a particular person or thing due to prolonged exposure or overfamiliarity. It implies a strong desire or need for a break or separation from that person or thing.
  • be dropping like flies The idiom "be dropping like flies" means that a large number of people or things are dying, becoming injured, or failing rapidly and in great numbers. It is often used to describe a situation or event where there is a high rate of casualties, failures, or losses.
  • be engraved in (one's) mind The idiom "be engraved in (one's) mind" means that a particular memory, image, or idea has become deeply ingrained and unforgettable in someone's thoughts or memory. It implies that the information or experience has made a lasting impression that cannot easily be forgotten.
  • be locked together The idiom "be locked together" typically refers to two or more things or people being closely connected or intertwined and unable to be separated easily or without difficulty. It implies a strong bond or dependency between the entities involved.
  • be soaked to the skin The idiom "be soaked to the skin" means to be extremely wet, usually due to being completely drenched by rain, water, or any other liquid, to the point where the person's clothing and skin are completely saturated.
  • be in the shithouse The idiom "be in the shithouse" is an informal expression that means to be in a problematic or unfavorable situation. It often suggests being in a difficult or unpleasant predicament where one may face criticism, trouble, or trouble from others. It can also imply being in a state of disfavor or being in a place where one's actions are under scrutiny causing discomfort or hardship.
  • be going places The idiom "be going places" means to have a promising future, to be highly successful or have great potential for success or progress in one's personal or professional life. It suggests that the person is on track to achieve noteworthy accomplishments or reach significant milestones.
  • be the envy of somebody/something The idiom "be the envy of somebody/something" means to possess something that others desire or feel jealous about. It indicates that someone or something is in a superior, desirable, or admirable position that others wish they were in.
  • be in bad, poor, the worst possible, etc. taste The idiom "be in bad, poor, the worst possible, etc. taste" refers to something that is considered offensive, disrespectful, or morally unacceptable. It signifies a lack of sensitivity or appropriateness in words, actions, or choices, often causing discomfort or disapproval among others.
  • be treading water To be treading water means to be working hard but not making any progress or advancing in a particular situation. It often refers to a situation where one is just managing to stay afloat or maintain their current position without any significant change or improvement.
  • be as bald as a coot The idiom "be as bald as a coot" means to have no hair on one's head, completely bald. It is often used humorously to describe someone who has lost all their hair or has a very noticeable lack of hair.
  • I'll be jiggered The idiom "I'll be jiggered" is an expression of surprise, disbelief, or astonishment. It is typically used when someone is caught off guard or amazed by something unexpected. It can also be used to convey a sense of frustration or confusion.
  • be at large The idiom "be at large" means to be free or not confined, typically referring to someone who is missing or not captured. It can also imply that someone is avoiding responsibility or accountability for their actions.
  • be all (the) one (to someone) The idiom "be all (the) one (to someone)" means to be the person that someone entirely relies on, confides in, or depends on for emotional or practical support. It implies being the most important or significant person in someone's life, often with the connotation of being irreplaceable or indispensable.
  • be as hard as nails The idiom "be as hard as nails" means to have a strong, tough, or unyielding character or personality. It suggests that someone is not easily influenced, emotionally detached, resilient, and does not show vulnerability easily.
  • be doped to the gills To be "doped to the gills" means to be heavily under the influence of drugs or narcotics. It implies being highly intoxicated or intoxicated to an extreme degree. The phrase "to the gills" is an idiomatic expression that means completely or fully, while "doped" refers to being under the influence of drugs or narcotics. Therefore, the phrase captures the idea of being heavily or completely intoxicated.
  • be nuts about The idiom "be nuts about" means to have a strong and enthusiastic liking or love for something or someone. It signifies a high level of interest, passion, or obsession.
  • be over the hills and far away The idiom "be over the hills and far away" means to be physically or metaphorically distant from a specific place or situation. It suggests being out of reach or beyond someone's control, often referring to a desired or idealized state that is far off.
  • be in line to the throne The idiom "be in line to the throne" means being next in succession for a royal position, typically referring to the next eligible heir to a monarchy or a royal family. It implies that the individual is positioned to inherit the throne or take on a prominent role within the royal lineage.
  • be wringing your hands The idiom "be wringing your hands" means to display extreme worry, anxiety, or distress about a situation. It usually indicates a sense of helplessness or frustration in dealing with a problem. The phrase originates from the physical act of twisting or squeezing one's hands together in a state of agitation or nervousness.
  • be frightened to death The idiom "be frightened to death" means to be extremely scared or terrified. It implies being so afraid that it feels as though one's life is in danger or that one might die from fear.
  • You've got to be kidding! The idiom "You've got to be kidding!" is an expression of disbelief or astonishment towards a statement or situation that seems too ridiculous, unlikely, or absurd to be true. It is often used rhetorically to convey a sense of incredulity or to express that something is hard to believe.
  • be no good to man or beast The idiom "be no good to man or beast" means to be completely useless, ineffective, or unproductive to anyone or anything. It describes a state or condition where someone or something is of no value or benefit to society or even to oneself.
  • be easy on the eye The idiom "be easy on the eye" refers to something or someone that is visually appealing or attractive. It suggests that the object or person being referred to is pleasant to look at, often due to its physical appearance or visual qualities.
  • be part and parcel of something The idiom "be part and parcel of something" means to be an essential or integral component of something, inseparable from it, and cannot be separated or excluded from it. It refers to elements or aspects that are essential to the whole and cannot be separated or isolated.
  • be burnt to a crisp The idiom "be burnt to a crisp" means to be completely charred or overly cooked, often referring to food that has been left too long in heat or fire and is now burnt and inedible. It can also be used metaphorically to describe something that is extensively damaged or ruined.
  • be out of (one's) element The idiom "be out of one's element" refers to a situation where someone feels uncomfortable or unsuited to their surroundings or circumstances. It implies that a person may be lacking confidence, skills, or familiarity in a particular setting, leading to them feeling out of place or unable to perform at their usual level.
  • be in poor voice The idiom "be in poor voice" refers to someone's ability to speak, sing, or perform in a weak or unfavorable manner. It suggests that the person's voice sounds strained, weak, or lacks its usual quality or ability. It can be used both literally to describe someone's physical vocal condition, or figuratively to represent a lack of confidence or clarity in someone's expression or communication.
  • be in your face The idiom "be in your face" refers to someone or something that is aggressive, confrontational, or very obvious in their actions or behavior. It usually implies that whatever is being presented or communicated is direct, extreme, and perhaps even offensive or annoying to the recipient.
  • be all in somebody’s/the mind The idiom "be all in somebody’s/the mind" refers to a situation where someone is preoccupied or constantly thinking about something or someone. It implies that the thoughts or presence of that person or thing dominate someone's thinking and fill their mind.
  • be like ships that pass in the night The definition of the idiom "be like ships that pass in the night" refers to two individuals who encounter each other briefly or fleetingly, often without truly connecting or getting to know each other. It suggests a missed opportunity for a meaningful connection or relationship, resembling two ships briefly crossing paths in the darkness of the night without any lasting impact.
  • be in full flow The idiom "be in full flow" means to be speaking or performing with great energy, enthusiasm, or fluency.
  • Be there or be square. The idiom "Be there or be square" is an invitation or encouragement to attend a particular event or gathering. It implies that if someone chooses not to participate or be present, they will be considered ordinary, uncool, or not part of the group. The "be square" portion is a play on words, as "square" can mean someone who is conventional, boring, or not hip.
  • be as sick as a dog The idiom "be as sick as a dog" means to be extremely ill or feeling very unwell. It conveys the idea of being very sick, often associated with symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or fever.
  • be in high/low spirits The idiom "be in high/low spirits" refers to a person's state of mood or emotional well-being. It indicates whether someone is feeling cheerful, positive, and enthusiastic (high spirits) or sad, downcast, and lacking energy (low spirits). It is often used to describe someone's overall attitude or outlook on a particular day or in a specific situation.
  • be barking up the wrong tree The idiom "be barking up the wrong tree" means to pursue a mistaken or misguided course of action, or to direct one's efforts or inquiries in the wrong direction or toward an unhelpful source.
  • be two a penny The idiom "be two a penny" means that something is very common or easily found, usually implying that it is not valuable or unique. It suggests that the item or person being referred to is abundant and readily available, just like something that is sold in large quantities for a cheap price.
  • be down on your luck The idiom "be down on your luck" means to be experiencing a period of unfortunate circumstances or bad luck, often resulting in financial difficulties or personal hardships.
  • be stark raving mad The idiom "be stark raving mad" means to be completely insane or crazy, exhibiting irrational or deranged behavior. It emphasizes the extreme and uncontrollable nature of someone's madness.
  • be chafing at the bit The idiom "be chafing at the bit" is used to describe someone who is feeling impatient, restless, or eager to do something, especially when they are feeling constrained or held back. It originates from the literal act of a horse chafing against the metal bit placed in its mouth while being restrained from running.
  • be set fair The idiom "be set fair" means to be in a favorable or advantageous situation, where the circumstances are conducive to success or the achievement of one's goals. It implies that the conditions are favorable and likely to remain so in the foreseeable future.
  • be plenty more where sb/sth came from The idiom "be plenty more where sb/sth came from" means that there are many other similar people or things available, and the loss or absence of one person or thing is not significant because it can easily be replaced or there are numerous alternatives.
  • be down to something The idiom "be down to something" means to have only a limited number of choices, usually as a result of running out of options or resources. It signifies being left with only one or a few alternatives. It can also imply having reached a point where a decision or action is necessary. The phrase is often used to convey a sense of urgency or finality in a particular situation.
  • not be the end of the world The idiom "not be the end of the world" means that a situation or event is not as catastrophic, distressing, or significant as it may initially seem. It implies that although there may be difficulties or disappointments, life will go on and it is not the most extreme or devastating outcome.
  • be in (one's) debt The idiom "be in (one's) debt" means to owe someone a great deal of gratitude or favor, usually for a specific act or assistance provided. It implies that someone has done something for which they are deeply grateful and feel obligated to reciprocate or express their gratitude in some way.
  • be a firm believer in (something) The idiom "be a firm believer in (something)" means to strongly support or have a deep conviction in something, often referring to a belief, principle, or concept. It implies a steadfast belief or unwavering confidence in the validity or importance of a particular idea or belief.
  • be in somebody’s shoes The idiom "be in somebody's shoes" means to imagine oneself in another person's situation or perspective, trying to understand their feelings, thoughts, or experiences. It emphasizes the act of empathizing and gaining insight through putting oneself in someone else's position.
  • be at a disadvantage The idiom "be at a disadvantage" means to be in an unfavorable or inferior position compared to someone else, or to face difficulties or hindrances that make success or accomplishment more challenging.
  • be like jelly The idiom "be like jelly" is used to describe someone or something that is weak, unstable, or lacking in firmness or strength. It suggests a physical or emotional state of being easily influenced, impressionable, or vulnerable.
  • not to be sneezed at The idiom "not to be sneezed at" means something that should not be disregarded or underestimated. It refers to something that is significant or important, and shouldn't be taken lightly.
  • be the matter (with someone or something) The idiom "be the matter (with someone or something)" means to ask or inquire about the problem, issue, or cause of concern regarding a person or thing. It suggests expressing curiosity or seeking clarification about what might be wrong or troubling. It implies an intention to understand and address the underlying issue.
  • be the creature of sb/sth To be the creature of someone or something means to be completely under their control or influence, without having any independent thoughts or actions. This phrase implies that a person is submissive or completely subservient to another individual or thing. It suggests a lack of personal autonomy or agency.
  • be in applepie order The idiom "be in apple-pie order" means that something is neat, tidy, or well-organized. It refers to a state of orderliness and cleanliness, often used to describe a well-kept home, a meticulously arranged room, or an efficiently organized space.
  • be shaking like a leaf The idiom "be shaking like a leaf" means to be trembling or shaking uncontrollably due to fear, nervousness, or extreme anxiety. It often describes a person who is visibly and noticeably trembling, resembling the movement of leaves on a tree in the wind.
  • be in attendance The idiom "be in attendance" means to be present, to attend an event or gathering, or to be there in a physical or official capacity. It refers to actively participating and being present at a particular place or occasion.
  • be next door to sth The idiom "be next door to something" means to be very close or adjacent to something, either physically or metaphorically. It implies a proximity, proximity in terms of location or characteristics.
  • be caught on the wrong foot The idiom "be caught on the wrong foot" means to be caught or surprised in an unfavorable or disadvantageous situation, typically due to a lack of preparation or misunderstanding. It refers to starting a task or engagement in an inappropriate or unprepared manner, thereby hindering one's ability to navigate or perform well.
  • be all the same to sb The idiom "be all the same to someone" means that someone doesn't have a preference or doesn't care about the different options or choices available. It implies that they have no particular preference and are indifferent to the outcome.
  • be on the watch (for someone or something) The idiom "be on the watch (for someone or something)" means to be vigilant, observant, or alert in order to notice or anticipate the presence or actions of a specific person or thing. It implies being cautious, attentive, and prepared for any potential threat, danger, or opportunity.
  • be bitten by something The idiom "be bitten by something" typically means to become intrigued, obsessed, or affected by something, often in a negative or unfavorable way. It signifies being deeply impacted or influenced by a particular idea, concept, experience, or desire. It implies that the person has developed a strong interest or fascination, often to the point of being unable to let go or think of anything else.
  • be as dry as a bone The idiom "be as dry as a bone" refers to something that is completely devoid of moisture or liquid. It suggests that a person, place, or thing is extremely dry, often used to describe arid climates or objects lacking any moisture content. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation or conversation that lacks excitement, emotion, or any form of interest.
  • be on the warpath The idiom "be on the warpath" means to be angry, aggressive, or looking for a fight. It is often used to describe someone who is extremely upset or in a state of great agitation, ready to confront or attack others. This phrase originates from Native American culture, specifically referring to the path that warriors would take when going on a military campaign.
  • be no match for The idiom "be no match for" means to be completely unable to compete with or defeat someone or something. It suggests a significant difference in skill, strength, or ability, where one party is clearly superior and the other stands no chance of succeeding.
  • be on thin ice The idiom "be on thin ice" means to be in a precarious or risky situation, where one wrong move or mistake could result in trouble or negative consequences. It implies that someone is in a delicate position and needs to be cautious in order to avoid getting into trouble or losing favor.
  • come out to be The idiom "come out to be" means that something or someone turns out or is revealed to be a particular way or have a specific outcome, often in a surprising or unexpected manner. It refers to the end result or outcome of a situation, event, or analysis.
  • leaves of three, let it be The idiom "leaves of three, let it be" is a cautionary phrase often used to warn individuals about plants that have three-leaf structures and may be poisonous or cause an allergic reaction upon direct contact. By adhering to this idiom, one is advised to avoid touching or coming into contact with plants that exhibit this characteristic to prevent any potential harm or negative consequences.
  • be in a transport of delight/joy The idiom "be in a transport of delight/joy" means to experience an overwhelming feeling of happiness, excitement, or pleasure. It refers to a state of extreme bliss or euphoria.
  • be in (someone's) shoes The idiom "be in (someone's) shoes" refers to the act of imagining oneself in another person's situation or circumstances in order to understand their feelings, experiences, or perspective. It is a figurative way of empathizing with someone and gaining insight into their point of view.
  • be given to something/to doing something The idiom "be given to something/to doing something" refers to someone having a tendency or inclination to engage in a particular behavior or habit regularly. It suggests that the person is prone to doing or having a specific characteristic.
  • be as white as a sheet The idiom "be as white as a sheet" is used to describe someone who appears extremely pale, usually due to fear, shock, or illness. It suggests that the person's complexion resembles the color of a white sheet, emphasizing their lack of natural color or vitality.
  • be set aback The idiom "be set aback" means to be surprised, puzzled, or taken off guard by something unexpected or shocking. It is often used to describe a person's reaction to an unforeseen event or news that leaves them momentarily stunned or confounded.
  • be laughing up sleeve The idiom "be laughing up one's sleeve" refers to the act of privately feeling amused, amused or smug about something while concealing it from others. It implies that someone is secretly enjoying their own success, knowledge, or advantage in a situation.
  • be after The idiom "be after" means to be in pursuit of or seeking something or someone. It suggests a desire or intention to obtain or achieve a particular object or goal.
  • old enough to be somebody’s father/mother The idiom "old enough to be somebody's father/mother" refers to a significant age difference between two individuals, implying that the older person is significantly older than the younger person. It suggests that the age gap is large enough for the older person to potentially be the parent of the younger person.
  • be better off dead The idiom "be better off dead" is a figurative expression used to convey extreme despair or hopelessness, suggesting that someone's life has reached such a low point that death may be preferable to their current circumstances. It implies that the individual believes their life is so miserable or unbearable that dying would be a relief or improvement.
  • be out of (one's) face The idiom "be out of (one's) face" refers to being under the influence of drugs or alcohol to an extreme degree. It implies being heavily intoxicated or high, often to the point of being unable to function or communicate coherently.
  • be a different kettle of fish The idiom "be a different kettle of fish" means that something is entirely different or distinct from what was previously mentioned or being discussed. It implies that the subject or situation being referred to is unrelated, disparate, or contrasting in nature.
  • be on your guard The idiom "be on your guard" means to be cautious, vigilant, and extremely careful in order to detect potential dangers, threats, or risks. It implies being watchful and alert in order to prevent any harm or negative consequences.
  • that'll be the day The idiom "that'll be the day" is used to express disbelief or cynicism toward a proposed or anticipated event, indicating that it is highly unlikely or impossible to happen.
  • be all in a day's work The idiom "be all in a day's work" refers to a task or action that is considered normal, routine, or expected for someone in a particular job or role. It implies that the task is not unusual or challenging and is simply part of one's regular responsibilities or daily routine.
  • be as nice as pie The idiom "be as nice as pie" means to be extremely pleasant, friendly, or kind.
  • (something) be damned The idiom "(something) be damned" is an expression used to convey strong disregard or disregard for something or someone. It expresses a willingness to ignore or dismiss the consequences or negative outcomes that may result from a particular action or decision. It signifies a firm determination to proceed regardless of any potential negative consequences.
  • be on/at the receiving end The idiom "be on/at the receiving end" refers to being the recipient or target of something, usually negative or harmful actions, words, or treatment. It implies being at the disadvantage or bearing the brunt of someone else's actions or behavior.
  • be on the same wavelength The idiom "be on the same wavelength" means to have a similar understanding or mindset as someone else. It suggests a state of mutual understanding, agreement, or shared perspective between individuals.
  • be all right (by/with somebody) The idiom "be all right (by/with somebody)" means to be acceptable, satisfactory, or agreeable to someone. It implies that someone is pleased or content with a situation or decision. It can also convey that someone is okay or comfortable with another person's actions, choices, or behavior. The phrase often emphasizes a sense of approval or consent.
  • enough to be going on with The idiom "enough to be going on with" means having or receiving an adequate or sufficient amount of something, usually in a temporary or preliminary manner. It suggests there is enough of what is needed for the time being, although more may be required later.
  • can't be helped. and couldn't be helped The idiom "can't be helped" or "couldn't be helped" is often used to accept or acknowledge a situation that is beyond one's control or cannot be changed. It implies that there is nothing that can be done to alter or improve the circumstances. It conveys a sense of resignation or acceptance of the situation, indicating that it is futile to try to find a solution or remedy.
  • be written all over sb's face The idiom "be written all over sb's face" means that someone's facial expression clearly displays their emotions or thoughts, making it evident to others what they are feeling or thinking.
  • be at (one's) beck and call The idiom "be at (one's) beck and call" means to be readily available and constantly ready to respond to someone's requests or demands. This phrase implies that the person being referred to is subservient to another and is expected to fulfill their wishes promptly and without question.
  • be brought down a notch (or two) The idiom "be brought down a notch (or two)" refers to the act of being humbled or having one's pride, ego, or self-importance diminished. It suggests that someone's confidence or arrogance is reduced, often by a humbling experience or criticism, causing them to become more grounded or less self-assured.
  • be like ships in the night The idiom "be like ships in the night" means to pass by someone or something quickly and without making any contact or meaningful interaction. It implies a missed opportunity for connection or communication.
  • May I be excused? The phrase "May I be excused?" is not typically considered an idiom, but more commonly a polite question or request. When someone asks, "May I be excused?", they are seeking permission or approval from someone, usually in a social or formal setting, to leave or be dismissed. It is often used in situations such as excusing oneself from a table after a meal, temporarily leaving a meeting or event, or requesting permission to leave a classroom or other organized gathering.
  • be in over your head The idiom "be in over your head" means to be involved in a situation or project that is too difficult or complex to handle. It refers to being overwhelmed or out of one's depth in a particular task or responsibility.
  • be looking to do something The idiom "be looking to do something" typically means to be actively seeking or intending to do something. It suggests that someone is actively exploring or pursuing a particular action or goal.
  • be as clever, stupid, etc. as they come The idiom "be as clever, stupid, etc. as they come" means to be extremely clever, stupid, or any other quality in the highest degree imaginable. It implies that the person being described possesses an exceptional level of the mentioned characteristic, surpassing others in their field or area of expertise.
  • be done like a (dog's) dinner The idiom "be done like a (dog's) dinner" typically means to be thoroughly defeated, humiliated, or outperformed in a certain situation or competition. It implies being completely overmatched or overshadowed, often with a sense of humiliation or embarrassment. The comparison to a dog's dinner suggests a complete and utter inability to succeed or perform well, likening the person or object to a poorly executed or unsuccessful meal.
  • be no mistaking sth The idiom "be no mistaking something" means that something is very clear, obvious, or certain and cannot be misunderstood or misinterpreted. It implies that there are no doubts or confusion about a particular situation, statement, or fact.
  • be several cards short of a (full) deck The idiom "be several cards short of a (full) deck" is used to describe someone who is not mentally or emotionally competent, someone who lacks intelligence or common sense. It implies that the person is missing essential qualities or attributes, just like a deck of cards missing some of its cards is incomplete.
  • be one of the boys The idiomatic expression "be one of the boys" refers to a situation where a person, typically a female, becomes accepted and treated as an equal member among a group of male friends or colleagues. It implies that the person has assimilated into the group, adopting typical behavior, attitudes, and interests associated with the male group members.
  • be knocking (on) 60, 70, etc. The idiom "be knocking (on) 60, 70, etc." means to be approaching or getting close to a certain age, usually referencing someone's age in their 60s, 70s, or beyond. It implies that the person is advancing in years and may be nearing a milestone age. The phrase "knocking on" suggests being at the doorstep or on the verge of reaching that specific age.
  • be in touch The idiom "be in touch" means to maintain communication or contact with someone. It implies staying connected or in regular correspondence with another person, either through meetings, phone calls, emails, or other forms of communication.
  • be well placed The idiom "be well placed" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position, context, or circumstance. It implies the idea of having an advantageous or suitable location or situation that increases the chances of success or positive outcomes.
  • be bound and determined The idiom "be bound and determined" means to be very determined and committed to achieving a specific goal or outcome, often in the face of difficulties or obstacles. It conveys a strong sense of resolve and unwavering dedication towards succeeding.
  • (you, etc.) may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb The idiom "(you, etc.) may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb" means that if one is going to face punishment or consequences for a minor offense, they might as well commit a more significant offense and face stronger consequences. In other words, since the punishment would be similar regardless of the severity of the action, it implies that one might as well take a risk or go all the way.
  • be (all) skin and bone(s) The idiom "be (all) skin and bone(s)" refers to an individual who is extremely thin or emaciated, typically due to malnutrition or serious illness. It implies that the person's body lacks muscle and fat, making their appearance predominantly skeletal.
  • there's a lot/much to be said for (something) The idiom "there's a lot/much to be said for (something)" means that there are strong arguments or persuasive points in favor of a particular idea, opinion, or course of action. It suggests that the mentioned thing has significant merits or advantages worthy of consideration and support.
  • be on your best behaviour The idiom "be on your best behavior" means to exhibit one's most polite, well-mannered, and controlled behavior in a particular situation or in the presence of others. It implies the need to act in accordance with social norms, rules, or expectations, usually to make a positive impression or to avoid causing offense or trouble.
  • be the dead spit of (someone) The idiom "be the dead spit of (someone)" means to closely resemble or look very similar to someone else, often to the point of being almost identical in appearance or mannerisms. It implies that the similarities between the two individuals are striking and undeniable. The phrase "dead spit" is often used as an intensified version of "spitting image," which also conveys a high degree of similarity.
  • be bored, drunk, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, drunk, etc. out of your mind" means to feel extremely bored, intoxicated, or any other intense feeling to the point of being mentally or emotionally overwhelmed or exhausted. It suggests a state of complete absorption in a particular state or activity, resulting in a lack of attention or awareness towards other things.
  • be at full strength The idiom "be at full strength" typically means to be at the maximum level of capability, power, or capacity. It refers to being fully equipped or prepared to face a particular situation or challenge.
  • be in a good cause The idiom "be in a good cause" refers to being involved or engaged in a situation or activity that is morally right or socially beneficial. It implies being on the side of righteousness, justice, or charitable work.
  • be one up on (someone or something) The idiom "be one up on (someone or something)" means to have an advantage over someone or something, especially by being more knowledgeable, experienced, or prepared. It suggests that a person or thing is in a superior position or has an edge in a particular situation.
  • would not be caught dead The idiom "would not be caught dead" is used to express a strong aversion or refusal to do something, go somewhere, or be associated with someone or something. It suggests that the person is so unwilling or ashamed of the mentioned activity, place, or association that they would prefer death or extreme consequences rather than being involved in it.
  • be in the dark The idiom "be in the dark" means to be unaware or uninformed about something, often referring to being ignorant or having no knowledge about a particular situation, event, or matter.
  • be no big deal The idiom "be no big deal" means that something is not important or significant. It refers to a situation or event that is considered trivial or unremarkable, causing no major impact or consequence.
  • be every inch The idiom "be every inch" means to fully embody or possess a particular quality or characteristic to the utmost extent. It signifies that someone or something completely fits the description or expectation, leaving no doubt or room for any other interpretation.
  • be above board The idiom "be above board" means to be honest, transparent, and open in one's actions or dealings, without any hidden intentions or ulterior motives. It suggests operating in a completely legal and ethical manner.
  • not all something is cracked up to be The idiom "not all it is cracked up to be" means that something or someone is not as good, impressive, or satisfying as people may have described or expected. It implies that the reality or experience does not live up to the high expectations or hype that surrounds it.
  • be like/as safe as Fort Knox The idiom "be like/as safe as Fort Knox" means to be extremely secure or well-protected. It refers to the high level of security and impregnability associated with Fort Knox, a United States Army post in Kentucky known for storing a significant portion of the country's gold reserves. Thus, something that is described as "as safe as Fort Knox" is considered highly guarded and secure.
  • be wringing (one's) hands The idiom "be wringing (one's) hands" means to express or show extreme worry, distress, or anxiety about a situation or problem. It suggests a state of helplessness or desperation in dealing with a difficult or challenging circumstance. The phrase typically conveys a person's visible physical expression of their inner turmoil, as if they are twisting or squeezing their hands together out of nervousness or concern.
  • be the talk of smw The idiom "be the talk of smw" means to be the subject of conversation or gossip among a certain group or community. It implies that someone or something has become widely discussed or highly remarked upon, with people expressing their opinions or sharing information about it.
  • be higher than a kite The idiom "be higher than a kite" is a colloquial expression that means to be very intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, typically referring to the state of being excessively high or euphoric. It is often used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or experiencing a strong psychedelic effect.
  • get into deep water, at be in deep water The idiom "get into deep water" or "be in deep water" means to be in or get into a difficult or problematic situation, often resulting from one's own actions or choices. It signifies being in trouble or facing serious consequences.
  • be on the money The idiom "be on the money" means to be accurate, correct, or precise in a particular judgment, prediction, or assessment. It implies being exactly right or hitting the mark. It is often used to express that something is spot-on or completely accurate in terms of understanding or interpreting a situation.
  • be in the public eye The idiom "be in the public eye" refers to being well-known, recognized, or observed by people in general. It conveys the idea of being subject to public scrutiny, attention, or interest. This could apply to celebrities, public figures, politicians, or anyone who maintains a high level of visibility and exposure to the general public. Being in the public eye often means being under constant observation or having one's actions, opinions, or personal life subject to public speculation and commentary.
  • be of/have no fixed abode/address The idiom "be of/have no fixed abode/address" refers to a person who does not have a permanent place of residence or a stable home. It indicates that the individual is transient or lacks a permanent physical location to reside in.
  • be down to (one) The idiom "be down to (one)" means to have only one remaining option or choice, typically due to having exhausted all others. It implies that the situation or decision has been narrowed down to a single possibility.
  • be like The idiom "be like" is commonly used in informal contexts, especially in spoken language, to report or mimic someone's words, actions, or behavior. It is often used to provide a succinct summary or representation of what someone said or did in a specific situation.
  • be chalk and cheese The phrase "be chalk and cheese" is an idiom that means two people or things are completely different from each other in terms of personality, characteristics, or qualities. It signifies a stark contrast or stark difference between two entities.
  • be as mad as a hornet The idiom "be as mad as a hornet" means to be very angry or furious. It is often used to describe someone who is extremely enraged or in a state of intense anger.
  • be out of (one's) skull The idiom "be out of (one's) skull" means to be extremely disoriented, confused, or mentally unstable. It suggests someone's complete lack of rational thinking or sanity.
  • be downhill all the way The idiom "be downhill all the way" is used to describe a situation that becomes progressively easier or simpler. It suggests that the most challenging part has already been overcome and that everything will only get easier from that point on. It implies a smooth and effortless progress towards a desired outcome.
  • be in a state The idiom "be in a state" typically means to be in an agitated, anxious, or distressed state of mind or emotions. It refers to feeling extremely unsettled, worried, or upset about something.
  • be on the wrong end of (something) The idiom "be on the wrong end of (something)" generally means to experience the negative or disadvantageous effects or consequences of a situation, action, or decision. It implies being in an unfavorable or losing position, often resulting in negative outcomes.
  • cut out to be (something) The idiom "cut out to be (something)" means that someone possesses the necessary qualities or abilities for a particular role, profession, or task. It refers to fitting well or being well-suited for a specific purpose or position.
  • be tight-lipped The idiom "be tight-lipped" means to be extremely reluctant or unwilling to reveal or disclose information. It refers to someone who keeps their mouth closed, often indicating a desire to maintain secrecy or confidentiality about a certain subject or situation.
  • be no question of (doing) (something) The idiom "be no question of (doing) (something)" means that there is no room for doubt or uncertainty about a certain action or decision. It emphasizes a firm and definite decision, with no possibility of any other alternative.
  • be dollars to doughnuts that (something happens) The idiom "be dollars to doughnuts that (something happens)" is used to express a strong belief or certainty about something, often when one outcome is considered more likely than another. It is similar to saying that one is so confident in a particular outcome that they are willing to bet a considerable amount of money on it (dollars), against something with a comparatively lesser value (doughnuts).
  • be at sb's beck and call The idiom "be at someone's beck and call" means to be constantly available and ready to do whatever someone asks or commands without any hesitation or complaint. It suggests being in a subservient position and always being attentive to the needs or demands of the person being referred to.
  • be cooking The idiom "be cooking" typically means someone or something is in the midst of preparation, action, or progress, often involving achieving success, growth, or advancement.
  • be (batting) on a sticky wicket The idiom "be (batting) on a sticky wicket" means to be in a challenging or difficult situation that is hard to handle or resolve. It originates from the game of cricket, where a sticky wicket refers to a pitch that is damp or muddy and therefore offers unpredictable and difficult conditions for batting. Being on a sticky wicket implies being at a disadvantage or facing adverse circumstances that make progress or success uncertain.
  • be down to somebody/something The idiom "be down to somebody/something" refers to being reliant or dependent on a particular person or thing. It indicates that the success, outcome, or choice is ultimately determined by that person or thing.
  • be bitten by/have the bug The idiom "be bitten by/have the bug" typically refers to suddenly developing a strong passion or intense interest in something, often an activity or hobby. It implies a strong desire or urge to engage in that particular activity or pursue it further.
  • be no better than (a) sth The idiom "be no better than (a) sth" means that someone or something is just as bad, or even worse, than another person or thing being referred to. It implies that the person or thing being mentioned is equally flawed, lacking redeeming qualities, or comparable in a negative sense.
  • be under arms The idiom "be under arms" refers to the state of being prepared and ready for combat or conflict. It typically implies that individuals or a group of people are equipped with weapons or military gear and are actively engaged in military duty or defense.
  • be only a question of time The idiom "be only a question of time" means that something is inevitable or bound to happen, although it may not be immediately apparent. It suggests that the outcome or occurrence of a certain event is certain, but its exact timing or duration is uncertain.
  • be light on something The idiom "be light on something" generally means to have a scarcity or lack of something, often referring to a particular resource, ingredient, or aspect. It implies that there is not much of that thing compared to what is typically expected or desired.
  • be a shining example The idiom "be a shining example" means to serve as a positive role model or exhibit exceptional qualities that others should strive to emulate. It implies demonstrating exemplary behavior, values, or achievements that make one stand out and inspire others.
  • be in (one's) good books The idiom "be in (one's) good books" means to be in someone's favor or to have their approval. It implies that the person perceives you positively and thinks highly of you.
  • be nothing special The idiom "be nothing special" means to be ordinary, unremarkable, or not particularly impressive or exceptional in any way.
  • be a double-edged sword The idiom "be a double-edged sword" is a figure of speech that means something has both positive and negative consequences or effects. It implies that a particular situation, action, or decision can have advantages and disadvantages simultaneously, just as a double-edged sword has two sharp edges that can cut in both directions.
  • be (as) light as a feather The idiom "be (as) light as a feather" means to be extremely light in weight, either physically or metaphorically. It implies that something or someone is not heavy and can be easily lifted or carried. In a metaphorical sense, it suggests a lack of burden or worries, resulting in a carefree and effortless state.
  • be as fresh as a daisy The idiom "be as fresh as a daisy" means to feel or appear well-rested, lively, energetic, and full of vitality. It refers to being in an excellent condition, both physically and mentally.
  • be out on the tiles The idiom "be out on the tiles" typically means to be out enjoying oneself, usually by going out for a night on the town or engaging in social activities. It implies being away from home, socializing, and having a good time.
  • be held in high regard The idiom "be held in high regard" means to be highly respected, esteemed, or valued by others. It implies that others have a high opinion of the person or thing being discussed.
  • be twice the man/woman that (someone) is The idiom "be twice the man/woman that (someone) is" is typically used to express that a particular person is much stronger, more capable, or superior in some way compared to the other person being mentioned. It emphasizes the individual's exceptional qualities, abilities, or character, suggesting that they surpass the accomplishments or virtues of the other person.
  • be at the bottom of sth The idiom "be at the bottom of something" typically refers to uncovering the true cause or origin of a situation or problem. It means to identify the underlying reason or source behind an issue or action.
  • be not worth a fig The idiom "be not worth a fig" means something or someone is of little or no value, significance, or importance. It suggests that the thing or person in question is considered worthless or insignificant, similar to the actual value of a fig fruit, which is relatively low.
  • be speaking/talking out of both sides of your mouth The idiom "be speaking/talking out of both sides of your mouth" means to say one thing and then say something contradictory or hypocritical shortly afterward. It refers to someone being deceptive or insincere, saying different things to different people or presenting conflicting views.
  • be (all) out to (do something) The idiom "be (all) out to (do something)" means to be extremely determined or intent on achieving a certain goal or agenda. It suggests a strong and unwavering commitment towards achieving a particular objective, often implying that one will put forth maximum effort or go to great lengths to accomplish it.
  • be struck all of a heap The idiom "be struck all of a heap" means to be completely surprised, shocked, or taken aback by something unexpected or startling. It refers to the feeling of being suddenly overwhelmed or bewildered, leaving one momentarily in a state of astonishment or speechlessness.
  • be a law unto (oneself) The idiom "be a law unto oneself" refers to an individual who behaves or acts independently and autonomously, disregarding or refusing to follow established rules, regulations, or societal norms. It suggests that the person sets their own rules and does not feel bound or constrained by external authority or conventions.
  • be etched with sth, at be etched smw The idiom "be etched with something" or "be etched somewhere" typically refers to something being deeply ingrained or permanently remembered in someone's mind or memory. It suggests that a particular experience, image, or emotion has left a lasting impression that cannot easily be forgotten or erased. The word "etched" originates from the process of engraving or carving designs onto a surface, and in this context, it emphasizes the idea of something being indelibly marked or imprinted.
  • be all in somebody's/the mind The idiom "be all in somebody's mind" typically refers to when someone or something occupies someone's thoughts or preoccupies their mind entirely. It implies a strong and dominant presence of a particular person, topic, or concern in someone's thoughts or mental focus.
  • be putty in your hands The idiom "be putty in your hands" means to be easily influenced, controlled, or manipulated by someone. It implies that the person being referred to is like malleable putty, moldable according to the desires or influence of another person.
  • be (not) (one's) department The idiom "be (not) (one's) department" refers to a situation where something is (not) within the scope of someone's responsibility or area of expertise. It suggests that someone is (not) responsible for or knowledgeable about a particular matter, task, or issue, and therefore, it should be handled by someone else.
  • be snowed under The idiom "be snowed under" refers to being overwhelmed, overburdened, or inundated with work, tasks, responsibilities, or obligations to the point where it becomes difficult to manage or cope with them all.
  • be as honest as the day (is long) The idiom "be as honest as the day (is long)" means to be completely honest and trustworthy, without any traces of deception or dishonesty. It implies that the person's honesty is consistent and enduring, just like the length of a day.
  • be close to the mark The idiom "be close to the mark" means to be very near to being accurate, correct, or true in a statement, estimation, or assessment of something.
  • be fighting for life The idiom "be fighting for life" refers to a critical situation in which someone is struggling to survive or undergoing intense efforts to recover from a severe illness or injury. It describes a scenario where a person's life is at stake, and they are making great efforts or receiving medical intervention to overcome it.
  • be unable to hear yourself think The idiom "be unable to hear yourself think" means being in a noisy or chaotic environment that makes it extremely difficult to concentrate, gather your thoughts, or have clear mental focus. It refers to a situation where external distractions or excessive noise prevent one from having a moment of peace and quiet required for reflection or deep thinking.
  • be the armpit of the world/universe The idiom "be the armpit of the world/universe" is an informal expression used to describe a place or location that is considered to be extremely unpleasant, uninteresting, or undesirable. It implies that the said place is one of the worst or least appealing in the world or universe. The idiom draws a humorous or exaggerated analogy to the armpit, which is generally considered an unpleasant area of the body due to sweat, body odor, and lack of cleanliness.
  • be ten/two a penny The idiom "be ten/two a penny" means something or someone is very common, ordinary, or easily found. It suggests that the thing or person is so widespread that they are of little value or significance.
  • be in a groove The idiom "be in a groove" means to be in a state of being highly productive, efficient, and skillful at a particular task or activity. It refers to the feeling of being in a rhythm or flow, where everything is going smoothly and effortlessly.
  • be honor-bound to (do something) The idiom "be honor-bound to (do something)" means feeling morally or ethically obligated to do a specific action due to a sense of personal integrity, duty, or commitment. It implies that a person feels bound by their honorable character to fulfill an obligation or responsibility.
  • be no skin off (one's) nose The idiom "be no skin off (one's) nose" means that something has no impact or consequence on someone. It implies that whatever is happening or being done does not personally affect or bother the person involved.
  • If you can't be good, be careful. The idiom "If you can't be good, be careful." can be defined as a piece of advice or admonition cautioning someone to exercise caution or make responsible choices when engaging in activities that could potentially lead to negative consequences or trouble if not done in a morally or ethically correct manner. It suggests that if one cannot adhere to high standards of behavior, they should, at the very least, proceed with caution to avoid putting themselves or others at risk.
  • be of like/one mind The idiom "be of like/one mind" refers to the state of agreement or having the same opinion or perspective as someone else. It means that individuals are thinking or feeling similarly on a particular matter, sharing a common viewpoint or understanding.
  • on your own head be it The idiom "on your own head be it" is an expression used to hold someone responsible for the consequences or negative outcome of their own actions or decisions. It implies that the person will bear the full responsibility and face the consequences of their choices.
  • be not just a pretty face The idiom "be not just a pretty face" refers to the notion that someone should not be judged solely on their physical appearance or perceived attractiveness. This phrase implies that the person possesses other qualities or abilities beyond their looks, and should not be underestimated or underestimated.
  • be riveted to the spot The idiom "be riveted to the spot" means to be completely unable to move or leave a particular place because of intense shock, surprise, fear, or astonishment. It implies being so captivated or paralyzed by a specific event or situation that one is unable to react or respond.
  • be in line for sth The idiom "be in line for something" means that someone is likely to receive or achieve something, usually a desirable outcome or reward, in the future. It suggests that the person is on track or has put themselves in a favorable position to obtain what they are hoping for.
  • be out of mind The idiom "be out of mind" typically means to be forgetful, to have temporarily lost mental focus or clarity, or to be preoccupied with other thoughts or concerns. It refers to a situation where someone's mind is not fully engaged or present in the current moment.
  • Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die. The idiom "Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die" suggests that one should enjoy life to the fullest, indulge in pleasure, and make the most of the present moment because death is inevitable and unknown circumstances lie ahead. It encourages a hedonistic attitude of embracing enjoyment without concern for future consequences.
  • You should be so lucky! The idiom "You should be so lucky!" is a sarcastic or cynical remark made in response to someone expressing a hope or desire for something they have little chance of getting. It suggests that the person's wish is unlikely to come true and implies they are not deserving or fortunate enough to attain it.
  • be in a class of your, its, etc. own The idiom "be in a class of your, its, etc. own" refers to someone or something that is exceptional or unparalleled in their capabilities, characteristics, or quality. It implies that they are so unique and outstanding that they stand above all others and do not belong to any particular category or comparative group.
  • be in another world The idiom "be in another world" refers to someone who is completely engrossed in their own thoughts or imagination, often oblivious to their surroundings or current situation. It suggests that the person is mentally detached or daydreaming, appearing distant or absent-minded.
  • crazy about, be The idiom "crazy about, be" means to have a strong and intense enthusiasm or affection towards someone or something. It implies being extremely passionate, infatuated, or deeply interested in a particular person, activity, or object.
  • you don't have to be a rocket scientist (to do something) The idiom "you don't have to be a rocket scientist (to do something)" means that a particular task or concept is not overly complex and does not require high intelligence or specialized knowledge to understand or accomplish. It implies that the task is relatively straightforward and can be easily comprehended or carried out by most individuals without much difficulty.
  • be at peace The idiom "be at peace" means to be in a state of tranquility, calmness, or contentment. It refers to experiencing inner harmony or a sense of emotional and mental rest.
  • be the making of (one) The idiom "be the making of (one)" means that something or someone has had a significant positive impact on a person's development or success. It suggests that this particular thing or individual has played a crucial role in shaping their character or achieving their potential.
  • make no claim to be sth The idiom "make no claim to be sth" means to not assert or assert a false claim about oneself being or having a particular characteristic or quality. It implies that a person is not attempting to present themselves as something they are not, or they are being modest about their abilities, qualifications, or status.
  • be out for/after sb's scalp The idiom "be out for/after someone's scalp" means to be extremely determined to defeat or harm someone, often through aggressive or vindictive means. It implies seeking revenge, punishment, or total conquest over the person, typically due to a perceived wrongdoing or personal animosity.
  • be up (one's) alley The idiom "be up (one's) alley" means to be well-suited to someone's interests, skills, or preferences. It refers to something that is within their area of expertise or something they enjoy or have knowledge about.
  • be at (one's) service The idiom "be at one's service" means to be readily available and willing to help or assist someone with their needs or requests. It implies a willingness to provide whatever assistance or support is required.
  • be in over head The idiom "be in over your head" means to be involved in a situation that is too challenging or difficult to manage, often due to a lack of knowledge, experience, or resources. It implies a state of being overwhelmed or out of one's depth.
  • be more fun than a barrel of monkeys The idiom "be more fun than a barrel of monkeys" means to be extremely entertaining, enjoyable, or amusing. It suggests that the activity or event being referred to is incredibly fun, just like watching a barrel full of monkeys playing and interacting with each other.
  • be in one's right mind The idiom "to be in one's right mind" means to be sane, mentally healthy, and showing sound judgment or rational thinking. It implies that someone is thinking or behaving sensibly and logically.
  • be one of a kind The idiom "be one of a kind" refers to something or someone that is unique and unlike anything or anyone else. It indicates that there is no comparable or similar entity to the one being described.
  • be in a sweat The idiom "be in a sweat" means to be in a state of anxiety, worry, or nervousness. It refers to feeling stressed or agitated about a particular situation or problem.
  • be a card-carrying member (of something) The idiom "be a card-carrying member (of something)" refers to someone who is a official and active member of a particular organization or group, often with a membership card or other proof of membership. It implies that the person is fully committed to and actively involved in the group's activities, principles, or goals.
  • be away with the fairies The idiom "be away with the fairies" means to be absent-minded, preoccupied with one's own thoughts or fantasies, and not paying attention to the present situation or reality. It often implies that the person is lost in their own world of imagination or daydreaming.
  • be waiting for the other shoe to drop The idiom "be waiting for the other shoe to drop" means to anticipate or expect something bad or negative to happen, usually as a consequence of an already occurred event or situation. It conveys the feeling of impending doom or the belief that things cannot stay good or go smoothly for too long. The phrase originates from the sound of someone dropping a shoe on the floor, often in an apartment or hotel room, where the noise of the first shoe hitting the ground is followed by the anticipation and certainty of the second shoe hitting the ground as well.
  • be (flat) on one's back The idiom "be (flat) on one's back" means to be physically unable to move or unable to do anything due to illness, injury, or exhaustion. It describes a state of being bedridden and incapacitated.
  • be (on) the right side of (an age) The idiom "be (on) the right side of (an age)" means to be younger than a particular age or to be in a favorable age range for a specific purpose or situation. It implies that being at or below a certain age is advantageous or provides certain benefits.
  • be all fur coat and no knickers The idiom "be all fur coat and no knickers" is used to describe someone or something that appears impressive, fancy, or sophisticated on the outside, but lacks depth, substance, or true quality underneath. It suggests that the person or thing emphasizes appearance or superficiality rather than substance or authenticity.
  • be etched on your heart/memory/mind The idiom "be etched on your heart/memory/mind" means that a particular experience, image, or information has had a profound or lasting impact, leaving a strong and indelible impression that is difficult to forget or erase. It implies that the memory or knowledge is deeply ingrained and firmly fixed in one's thoughts or feelings.
  • be (just/right) up sb's street The idiom "be (just/right) up someone's street" means that something is perfectly suited to someone's interests, skills, or preferences. It suggests that the person would thoroughly enjoy or excel at the given activity, task, or opportunity.
  • not be worth a fig The idiom "not be worth a fig" means that something or someone has little or no value or importance. It often implies that the subject is considered insignificant, worthless, or negligible.
  • cease to be The idiom "cease to be" means to stop existing or to come to an end. It refers to the moment when something or someone no longer exists or functions.
  • be on top of (something) The idiom "be on top of (something)" means to have complete control, knowledge, or awareness of a situation, task, or responsibility. It implies being fully informed, organized, and in command of one's responsibilities or duties.
  • be all fingers and thumbs The idiom "be all fingers and thumbs" means to be clumsy or awkward, especially when trying to perform a task that requires dexterity or precision. It implies the inability to handle objects skillfully or manipulate them with ease.
  • be taken at face value "Be taken at face value" means to accept something or someone exactly as they appear, without questioning or doubting their intentions or meaning. It suggests believing what is presented on the surface without further investigation or analysis.
  • be murder The idiom "be murder" is typically used to describe a situation or task that is exceptionally difficult, challenging, or frustrating. It implies that dealing with or accomplishing the specific thing is extremely taxing or arduous, often invoking a sense of struggle or hardship.
  • be caught flat-footed Being "caught flat-footed" means to be taken by surprise or caught off guard in a situation, typically due to being unprepared or unaware of what is happening. It refers to a state of being caught or found in a vulnerable or disadvantageous position, much like someone caught off balance with their feet flat on the ground, unable to react quickly or effectively.
  • not be worth a hill of beans The phrase "not be worth a hill of beans" means that something or someone is deemed to be of very low or negligible value or importance.
  • be hard pushed The idiom "be hard pushed" means to be faced with a difficult or challenging situation where it is hard to achieve or accomplish something. It implies that one is struggling or finding it tough to accomplish a particular task or meet certain expectations.
  • be on a rampage The idiom "be on a rampage" is used to describe someone who is behaving uncontrollably and engaging in a furious, destructive, or violent spree. It implies that the person is causing chaos or damage and is often used to emphasize their aggressive or hostile actions.
  • be the shape of things to come The idiom "be the shape of things to come" refers to a situation or event that is a clear indication or preview of what will happen in the future. It suggests that the current state or development is a sign or representation of what is to come and may serve as a reliable indicator of future trends or outcomes.
  • not to be sneezed/sniffed at The idiom "not to be sneezed/sniffed at" means not to be ignored or underestimated, as something is considered valuable, important, or worthwhile despite initial appearances or perceptions. It implies that dismissing or disregarding the significance or quality of something would be a mistake.
  • be like putty in someone's hands The idiom "be like putty in someone's hands" means to be easily influenced, controlled, or manipulated by someone else. It suggests that the person has no resistance or strength to stand up for themselves, much like how putty is soft and malleable, easily shaped by the hands of the person manipulating it.
  • be caught/taken short The idiom "be caught/taken short" means to be in a situation where you suddenly and urgently need to do something, especially when you need to go to the bathroom but there is no facility available. It implies being unprepared or in an inconvenient circumstance.
  • a force to be reckoned with The idiom "a force to be reckoned with" means a person or thing that is powerful, influential, or potent, and should be taken seriously or considered as a significant factor in any situation. It is used to describe someone or something that possesses great strength, capability, determination, or impact.
  • be well up on The idiom "be well up on" means to be knowledgeable or well-informed about a particular subject or topic. It suggests having a deep understanding, extensive knowledge, or being familiar with the details and current developments related to the subject.
  • be a dirty word The idiom "be a dirty word" refers to something that is considered disreputable, unacceptable, or offensive. It implies that the mentioned word or concept carries a negative connotation and is looked down upon or avoided in the given context.
  • be dead and buried The idiom "be dead and buried" means to be completely finished or no longer able to influence or affect a situation. It suggests that something is permanently settled, resolved, or put to rest, with no possibility of revival or further discussion.
  • be at peace with the world The idiom "be at peace with the world" means to feel calm, content, and harmonious with oneself and the surrounding environment. It refers to a state of inner tranquility and acceptance, where one is free from worries, conflicts, or negative emotions, and has a positive outlook towards life and others.
  • be struck with The idiom "be struck with" means to be deeply affected or impressed by something, often unexpected or surprising, causing a strong emotional or intellectual reaction. It implies being profoundly influenced or captivated by a certain idea, revelation, or realization.
  • be up a gum tree The idiom "be up a gum tree" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation with no clear solution or way out. It implies being stuck or stranded, often feeling helpless or at a loss for what to do.
  • be thrown in the deep end The idiom "be thrown in the deep end" means to be put into a challenging or difficult situation without much preparation or guidance. It commonly refers to being placed in a complex or demanding task or responsibility suddenly, without prior experience or adequate support.
  • be in the doghouse The idiom "be in the doghouse" refers to being in trouble or facing a state of disfavor or disapproval, often as a result of one's actions or behavior. It suggests being in a situation where someone is upset or angry with you and you are viewed negatively.
  • be a bit of all right The definition of the idiom "be a bit of all right" means to be attractive or appealing in appearance or character. It is used to describe someone or something that is considered desirable or pleasing.
  • be up (oneself) The idiom "be up oneself" is used to describe someone who is excessively confident, self-important, or egotistical. It refers to a person who has an overly high opinion of themselves and displays arrogant or conceited behavior.
  • not be a happy camper The idiom "not be a happy camper" is used to describe someone who is unhappy, dissatisfied, or displeased with a certain situation or circumstance. It implies that the person is experiencing discomfort or unease, similar to how a less-than-happy camper would feel while camping.
  • be nuts about (someone or something) The idiom "be nuts about (someone or something)" means to be extremely enthusiastic, obsessed, or infatuated with someone or something. It typically indicates a strong liking or passion towards a person or an object.
  • be as good as your word The idiom "be as good as your word" means to fulfill or honor one's promises or commitments. It implies that one's words should carry weight and reliability, and they should act accordingly to keep their word.
  • be (only) to be expected The idiom "be (only) to be expected" means that something is not surprising or unexpected given the circumstances or situation. It implies that the behavior or outcome is logical, typical, or what one would anticipate in that particular context.
  • be chilled to the bone/marrow To be chilled to the bone/marrow means to be extremely cold, to the point where one feels it deep in their bones or marrow. It refers to a feeling of intense coldness that penetrates through one's entire body.
  • be in with a shout (of something/of doing something) The idiom "be in with a shout (of something/of doing something)" means to have a reasonable chance or possibility of achieving something or being successful. It implies that someone or something is in contention or has a good shot at accomplishing a particular goal or outcome.
  • be hell on wheels The idiom "be hell on wheels" typically means to be extremely active, forceful, or aggressive in pursuing one's goals or objectives. It refers to someone who is relentless, unstoppable, and often successful in their endeavors.
  • be hanging over (one) To be hanging over (one) is an idiomatic expression that means to be constantly worrying or causing anxiety or apprehension to someone. It refers to a situation or problem that feels burdensome or unresolved and is constantly occupying one's thoughts, causing a sense of unease or impending doom.
  • be staring something in the face When someone is "staring something in the face," it means that they are facing or confronting a difficult or challenging situation. It denotes the awareness and closeness of an impending issue or problem that is hard to ignore or avoid.
  • (one) would be forgiven for (doing something) The idiom "(one) would be forgiven for (doing something)" means that the person's action or behavior is understandable or justifiable under the circumstances, even though it may not be considered socially acceptable or morally correct. Essentially, it implies that one could be pardoned or excused for their actions given the situation they are in.
  • wild about, be The idiom "wild about" means to have a strong and intense enthusiasm or admiration for someone or something. When someone is "wild about" someone or something, they have an overwhelming passion or affection for it.
  • you must be joking The idiom "you must be joking" is an expression used when one believes that what has been said or suggested is so unbelievable or absurd that it cannot possibly be true, and thus assumes the speaker is joking or not being serious. It conveys skepticism, disbelief, or incredulity towards a statement.
  • be losing it The idiom "be losing it" refers to the state of becoming mentally or emotionally unstable, often characterized by confusion, irrational behavior, or forgetting things easily. It implies that someone's mental faculties or control over a situation are diminishing.
  • be up to par The idiom "be up to par" means to meet the expected standard or level of quality. It refers to being at an acceptable or satisfactory level of performance or competence.
  • be dying for/to do sth The idiom "be dying for/to do something" means to have a strong and intense desire or craving to do something. It implies eagerness or longing for a particular action or experience.
  • be rolling in money/it The idiom "be rolling in money/it" refers to a person who is extremely wealthy or has an ample amount of money. It implies that the person is experiencing financial abundance and is likely to live a lavish lifestyle.
  • be off beam The idiom "be off beam" means to be mistaken, incorrect, or misguided in one's thinking, understanding, or judgment. It refers to being off course or deviating from the correct path or direction.
  • be on (one's) high horse The idiom "be on (one's) high horse" means to act in a haughty, superior, or arrogant manner, often by asserting one's own importance or criticizing others. It indicates that someone is being overly proud and condescending.
  • be on ice The idiom "be on ice" refers to being put on hold, postponed, or temporarily halted. It suggests that something or someone is put aside or kept in a state of suspension until further notice.
  • she’ll be right The idiom "she'll be right" is a colloquial expression primarily used in Australian and New Zealand English. It is used to convey a sense of reassurance or optimism in a situation, expressing confidence that everything will turn out fine or that there is no need to worry. It can be used to downplay concerns, suggest a laid-back attitude, or indicate a belief that things will work out as expected.
  • be right with you The idiom "be right with you" is a polite phrase used to inform someone that you will attend to them or give them your full attention shortly. It implies that the person is currently preoccupied or attending to another task, but will prioritize the individual's needs as soon as possible.
  • be known to be/do sth The idiom "be known to be/do something" refers to a person or thing having a reputation or a recognized quality for a specific action, behavior, or characteristic. It implies that the information about someone or something in question is widely acknowledged or verified by others.
  • (if the) truth be told The idiom "(if the) truth be told" is used to preface a statement that is honest, sincere, or revealing of the speaker's true feelings or thoughts. It emphasizes the speaker's intention to speak truthfully or confess something that might not have been previously stated.
  • be wasting your breath The idiom "be wasting your breath" means to speak or argue in vain, as the effort expended will not achieve the desired result. It suggests that one's words or advice will not make any difference or have an impact on the person or situation being addressed.
  • be talking through your hat The idiom "be talking through your hat" means to speak with confidence or authority about something that you have little or no knowledge about. It implies that the person is making things up or talking nonsense.
  • There ought to be a law! The idiom "There ought to be a law" is used to express strong dissatisfaction or frustration with a situation, suggesting that a specific action or rule needs to be put in place to address the issue. It implies a belief that legislation is necessary to regulate or control certain behaviors or circumstances.
  • be in fighting trim The idiom "be in fighting trim" means to be in a state of physical or mental readiness, prepared to face challenges, obstacles, or opponents with confidence and strength. It suggests being in optimal condition, both physically and mentally, to perform or compete at one's best.
  • be quick/slow on the uptake The idiom "be quick/slow on the uptake" refers to someone's ability to comprehend or understand things quickly or slowly. If someone is quick on the uptake, it means they are able to grasp new concepts or information readily. Conversely, if someone is slow on the uptake, it means they require more time or effort to comprehend or understand something.
  • be off the hook The idiom "be off the hook" typically means to be relieved or freed from a difficult situation, responsibility, or obligation. It implies that someone is no longer implicated, accountable, or in trouble for something.
  • be the picture of health, innocence, etc. The idiom "be the picture of health, innocence, etc." refers to someone who appears or embodies the qualities or characteristics related to a specific attribute, such as health, innocence, or any other positive quality. It implies that the person's appearance or demeanor is a perfect representation of those qualities, often without flaws or signs of any negative aspects.
  • be a load off (one's) mind The idiom "be a load off (one's) mind" means to feel relieved and less burdened by a worry, problem, or responsibility that has been resolved or removed. It implies feeling a sense of relaxation and freedom from a previously stressful or bothersome situation.
  • be out of the woods The idiom "be out of the woods" means to have overcome a difficult or dangerous situation, often with a sense of relief and safety. It implies that the worst is over and one is no longer in immediate danger or facing problems.
  • be good, and if you can't be good, be careful The idiom "be good, and if you can't be good, be careful" is a phrase often used to advise someone to make responsible choices and conduct themselves in a well-behaved manner. It implies that if it is not possible to be virtuous or follow all the rules, then at least exercise caution and avoid any potential consequences or harm that may arise from reckless behavior.
  • be in/get into a state The idiom "be in/get into a state" typically refers to a state of emotional distress, agitation, or extreme anxiety. It suggests being overwhelmed by an intense feeling, often leading to confusion, disarray, or a lack of composure.
  • be second only to (someone or something) The idiom "be second only to (someone or something)" means to be highly regarded or esteemed, being just under or ranked immediately after a particular person or thing in terms of importance, skill, ability, prominence, or superiority. It implies being the closest or nearest competitor or being the next best option after the mentioned person or thing.
  • be in tall cotton The idiom "be in tall cotton" typically means to be in a favorable or advantageous situation, often referring to being successful, prosperous, or enjoying a period of good fortune.
  • (one) would be lucky The idiom "(one) would be lucky" means that someone would be fortunate if a particular situation or outcome occurs. It suggests that the chance or probability of the event happening is quite low, emphasizing that it would be unexpected or fortunate if it were to happen.
  • far be it from one to The idiom "far be it from one to" is an expression used to indicate that someone strongly believes they would not do something or behave in a certain way. It is often used to distance oneself from a particular action, opinion, or behavior, emphasizing that it is contrary to their character or values.
  • be on about The idiom "be on about" means to continue talking about or discussing a particular topic, often in a passionate or repetitive manner. It implies that someone is fixated or preoccupied with something and keeps bringing it up in conversations.
  • be a shadow of (someone or something's) former self The idiom "be a shadow of (someone or something's) former self" means to have greatly declined in quality, skill, ability, or overall appearance compared to what it once was. It suggests that something or someone has drastically deteriorated or lost the qualities that made them impressive, successful, or noteworthy in the past.
  • be part and parcel of sth The idiom "be part and parcel of something" means that something is an essential and unavoidable component or inherent feature of a larger whole or situation. It implies that the element being referenced is an integral and indispensable part of a particular thing or circumstance, and cannot be separated or removed from it.
  • be full of piss and vinegar The idiom "be full of piss and vinegar" means to be full of energy, enthusiasm, or vigor. It refers to someone who is highly spirited, active, and ready to take on challenges or engage in lively activities.
  • be on full/red alert The idiom "be on full/red alert" refers to being in a state of heightened awareness, vigilance, or readiness for an imminent threat or danger. It stems from military terminology, where different levels of readiness are assigned colors, with red often indicating the highest level of alertness. In a broader context, it can also imply being prepared or attentive to any situation that requires immediate action or response.
  • be in high spirits The idiom "be in high spirits" means to be very happy, enthusiastic, or joyful. It refers to a state of being cheerful and lively, often accompanied by a positive outlook and optimism.
  • be a victim of your own success The idiom "be a victim of your own success" means that an individual or an entity faces negative consequences or difficulties as a result of achieving great success or accomplishing their goals. It refers to situations where the accomplishments or achievements of someone or something lead to unintended problems or challenges.
  • I'll be hanged if I know The idiom "I'll be hanged if I know" is an expression used to convey complete uncertainty or puzzlement about something. It suggests that the speaker has no idea or understanding about a particular situation or question.
  • be as one, at be at one The idiom "be as one" or "be at one" refers to a state of harmony, unity, or agreement between people or parties. It suggests that they are in complete understanding of each other, share the same perspective, or are in perfect sync, typically in relation to their thoughts, feelings, opinions, or actions. It implies a deep connection or an absence of conflicts or differences, fostering a sense of togetherness and mutual support.
  • be not amused The idiom "be not amused" means to be unimpressed, uninterested, or unsatisfied with something, often expressing annoyance, irritation, or disapproval. It implies that someone is not finding something funny, entertaining, or enjoyable, and may respond with a lack of amusement or a negative reaction.
  • be the brains behind The idiom "be the brains behind" refers to a person who is the mastermind or source of intelligence behind a plan, idea, or project. This person is usually responsible for providing the ideas, strategies, and knowledge that drive the success or innovation of a particular endeavor.
  • be a dead cert The idiom "be a dead cert" means that something is highly probable or certain to happen. It implies that there is no doubt or uncertainty about the outcome or success of a particular situation or event.
  • be shot through with sth The idiom "be shot through with sth" means that something is deeply or thoroughly permeated or filled with a particular quality or characteristic. It describes a situation where something is infused or marked by a specific element to a great extent. It implies that a certain trait or attribute is found abundantly throughout a particular thing or situation.
  • be a license to print money The idiom "be a license to print money" is used to describe a situation, business venture, or investment opportunity that is extremely profitable or guaranteed to make large amounts of money. It implies that it is as if the person or entity involved has been granted official permission to create or generate money effortlessly.
  • be worried sick The idiom "be worried sick" means to be extremely anxious, stressed, or concerned about something or someone to the point of physical or emotional distress.
  • be caught with your trousers down The idiom "be caught with your trousers down" means to be caught in a state of unpreparedness, vulnerability, or embarrassment. It implies being unexpectedly exposed or caught off-guard in a compromising situation. The phrase originates from the literal act of being caught with one's pants down, often associated with breaking social norms or engaging in inappropriate behavior.
  • be alive and kicking The idiom "be alive and kicking" means to be robust, active, and healthy. It is often used to indicate that someone is full of energy and vitality, or to express that something is still functioning or present despite challenges or adversity.
  • be at the receiving end The idiom "be at the receiving end" typically means to be the target or recipient of something, often negative or unpleasant. It refers to being in a situation where one is subjected to or experiencing the effects of something, usually criticism, blame, punishment, aggression, or unfair treatment.
  • be/feel at home The idiom "be/feel at home" means to feel comfortable, relaxed, and familiar in a particular place or situation as if it were one's own home. It conveys a sense of ease, belonging, and being in one's element.
  • be in bad odor with The idiom "be in bad odor with" means to be disliked, disapproved, or held in low regard by others. It typically suggests that someone has lost favor, credibility, or trust due to their actions, behavior, or reputation. It can imply being unpopular or having a negative image.
  • be a victory for common sense When we say that something is "a victory for common sense," it means that a decision, action, or outcome is in accordance with practical and logical thinking. It implies that good judgment and rationality have prevailed over confusion, bias, or illogical choices, leading to a positive and sensible result. This idiom emphasizes the importance of practical reasoning and applauds instances where common sense prevails.
  • be good for (someone or something) The idiom "be good for (someone or something)" means to have a positive or beneficial effect on someone or something. It implies that someone or something would benefit from or be improved by a certain action, circumstance, or situation.
  • be on shit list The idiom "be on someone's shit list" means to be in disfavor or to be in a negative position with someone, typically due to a prior offense, mistake, or disagreement, leading to their displeasure or resentment towards you.
  • be in too deep The idiom "be in too deep" means to be involved in a situation, relationship, or commitment to such an extent that it becomes difficult or impossible to escape or resolve without negative consequences. It implies being overwhelmed, trapped, or compromised, usually due to one's own actions or decisions.
  • be worth it The idiom "be worth it" means that something is deserving of the effort, time, or money spent on it because the resulting outcome or benefits justify the investment. It implies that even though the action or situation might be challenging or demanding, the rewards or satisfaction gained are deemed valuable enough to make it worthwhile.
  • be in bad, the worst possible, etc. taste The idiom "be in bad, the worst possible, etc. taste" refers to something that is deemed as offensive, vulgar, or inappropriate in terms of behavior, style, or choices. It implies that the action or statement goes against societal or cultural norms and is considered distasteful or lacking in aesthetic judgment.
  • be rolling in the aisles The idiom "be rolling in the aisles" means to be laughing uncontrollably or finding something extremely funny. It is typically used to describe a situation or a joke that is incredibly humorous and elicits a strong and prolonged laughter.
  • be puffed up with pride, etc. The idiom "be puffed up with pride, etc." means to be overly proud or boastful about one's accomplishments, abilities, or qualities. It refers to a state of excessive self-importance or arrogance.
  • be sweet on The idiom "be sweet on" means to have a strong romantic or affectionate attraction towards someone. It implies that someone is infatuated or has a crush on another person.
  • be down on (one) like a ton of bricks The idiom "be down on (one) like a ton of bricks" means to criticize, reprimand, or confront someone with great severity or intensity. It implies that someone is being overly harsh or judgmental towards another person, often catching them off guard or overwhelming them. The phrase emphasizes the weight or forcefulness of the criticism or negative feedback being received.
  • be off the danger list The idiom "be off the danger list" means to no longer be in a state of risk or peril, suggesting that a person or thing has managed to overcome a dangerous situation or avoid potential harm. It implies that the individual or situation is now considered safe or out of immediate danger.
  • be a crisis/disaster etc. in the making The idiom "be a crisis/disaster etc. in the making" refers to a situation or event that is gradually developing or progressing towards becoming a crisis, disaster, or something similarly unwanted or unfavorable. It implies that the signs, elements, or factors present suggest that a problematic outcome is inevitable or highly likely to occur in the near future. This expression highlights the sense of foreboding and impending negative consequences associated with the situation at hand.
  • be down with (something) The idiom "be down with (something)" is a colloquial expression that means to be in agreement with or supportive of something. It indicates that a person is in favor of a particular idea, concept, or action. It can also convey enthusiasm, interest, or willingness to participate in something.
  • be on good terms (with someone) The idiom "be on good terms (with someone)" means to have a positive and friendly relationship with someone. It implies that the individuals involved are amicable, understanding, and have no unresolved conflicts or issues between them.
  • hit (or be on) the bottle Idiom: Hit (or be on) the bottle Meaning: To frequently or excessively drink alcohol, often as a means of escape or coping with problems. Example sentence: After losing his job, John started hitting the bottle and his drinking habits became a serious concern for his friends and family.
  • be at work The idiom "be at work" typically refers to someone actively engaged in performing a task, job, or activity with dedication, effort, and focus. It signifies being fully present, mentally and physically, and giving one's best effort to fulfill responsibilities or achieve desired outcomes.
  • be on someone's back The idiom "be on someone's back" means to constantly criticize, nag, or pressure someone about something, often causing them annoyance or distress. It typically refers to a persistent and bothersome level of interference or scrutiny in someone's life or work.
  • be a Londoner etc. through and through The idiom "be a Londoner through and through" refers to an individual who embodies the quintessential characteristics or qualities associated with being a native or longtime resident of London, England. It implies that the person fully embraces and exemplifies the spirit, culture, and way of life that is strongly associated with the city. They are considered a true Londoner, deeply rooted in the city's customs, traditions, and mindset.
  • Neither a borrower nor a lender be. The idiom "Neither a borrower nor a lender be" is a quote from William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. It encourages people to avoid borrowing or lending money, suggesting that it is better to be independent and self-reliant rather than relying on others or getting entangled in financial obligations. The underlying message is to be cautious about financial transactions and to prioritize one's own financial stability.
  • be off (one's) food The idiom "be off (one's) food" refers to a state of loss of appetite or a decreased interest in eating. It implies that someone is not enjoying their meals or is experiencing a temporary or prolonged aversion to food.
  • be light on The idiom "be light on" means to have a small amount or insufficient supply of something, usually referring to a resource, material, or a quality. It suggests that there is not enough of whatever is being referred to.
  • could be worse The idiom "could be worse" is used to acknowledge a less than desirable situation or outcome while highlighting that it is not as bad as it could have been. It signifies a sense of gratitude or relief for the current circumstances, despite their imperfections.
  • be hanging over your head The idiom "be hanging over your head" means that something, usually a problem or a task, is pending or looming in a way that causes stress, worry, or a sense of impending consequences. It suggests that the issue is unresolved and continually present in one's thoughts or consciousness.
  • be as happy as Larry/a sandboy The idiom "be as happy as Larry/a sandboy" means to be extremely happy and content. It refers to a state of joy and satisfaction, often denoting a carefree and blissful demeanor. The origins of this expression are uncertain, with various theories proposed, but the exact origin remains unclear.
  • be on friendly terms with (someone) To be on friendly terms with someone means to have a good and amicable relationship with them. It suggests that there is a positive and congenial connection between two individuals, characterized by mutual respect, friendliness, and possibly even close friendship.
  • be (like) putty in sb's hands The idiom "be (like) putty in someone's hands" refers to a person who is easily controlled or manipulated by another individual. It implies that the person has little resistance or resilience and can be molded or influenced according to someone else's will.
  • be up to your eyes in sth The idiom "be up to your eyes in sth" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular activity, situation, or responsibility. It indicates being deeply involved or engrossed in something to the point of being heavily burdened or having no time for anything else.
  • be on sb's shit list The idiom "be on someone's shit list" means to be in someone's bad graces, to have done something to anger or upset them, causing them to be displeased or hold a grudge against you. It implies that you are in a position where the person is unhappy with you and may treat you with hostility or coldness.
  • be ready to roll To be ready to roll means to be fully prepared or organized for something, often implying readiness to take action or start a project or task. It suggests being in a state of readiness or willingness to proceed without hesitation or delay.
  • be up and running The idiom "be up and running" means that something is fully functional, operational, or functioning as expected after a period of being set up or repaired. It is often used to describe the successful completion of a project or the restoration of a system or process.
  • be on the scent (of someone or something) The idiom "be on the scent (of someone or something)" means to be actively and determinedly pursuing or investigating someone or something, usually in order to find or discover them. It often implies being close to finding or achieving the desired outcome. This idiom originates from the idea of dogs or other animals using their sense of smell to track scents in order to find their target.
  • be hopping mad The idiom "be hopping mad" means to be extremely angry or furious about something.
  • be all in (one's/the) mind The idiom "be all in (one's/the) mind" means that something exists only in one's imagination or perception and does not have a tangible or real existence. It refers to a situation or belief that is not based on reality but is instead a product of one's thoughts or emotions.
  • be as happy as a sandboy The idiom "be as happy as a sandboy" refers to someone who is extremely content and joyful. The expression originates from the 19th-century expression "happy as a sandboy," which referred to the joyous demeanor of the workers who sold sand to pubs for spreading on the floors to keep them clean and manageable. These sandboys were often depicted as carefree and joyful, hence the idiom.
  • be beyond sb's ken The idiom "be beyond someone's ken" means that something is too difficult or complex for someone to understand or comprehend. It implies that the concept or idea is outside of their knowledge or range of understanding.
  • be on relief The idiom "be on relief" refers to being dependent on financial assistance or receiving government aid, typically in times of unemployment or hardship. It suggests that someone is relying on external support to meet their basic needs, instead of being self-sufficient.
  • let it be known The idiom "let it be known" means to make something public or widely understood. It implies the act of declaring or making information or a statement widely known or a fact acknowledged by others.
  • Appearances can be deceiving. The idiom "Appearances can be deceiving" means that things or people may not be as they seem at first glance. It suggests that one should not judge or form opinions solely based on external appearances, as they can often be misleading or unrepresentative of the true nature or qualities.
  • be close to (one's) heart The idiom "be close to (one's) heart" means that something is deeply important or cherished by someone. It implies a strong emotional connection or attachment to a particular person, idea, value, cause, or possession.