How Do You Spell BITE?

Pronunciation: [bˈa͡ɪt] (IPA)

The word "bite" is spelled with the letter combination "i-t-e" but the pronunciation is slightly different from other words that end in "ite". In IPA phonetic transcription, the word is pronounced /baɪt/ with a long "i" sound, followed by a "t" sound. This spelling is unique because it uses the letter "e" at the end which is usually silent. The spelling accurately represents the sound of the word, making it easier for English learners to correctly pronounce it.

BITE Meaning and Definition

Bite is a verb that refers to the act of using the teeth to cut or grip something, typically resulting in a sharp, sometimes forceful action. It involves exerting pressure with the teeth, often with the intention of tearing, severing, or gnawing.

The term "bite" can also extend beyond the context of animals to describe actions performed by humans. For instance, to bite into a piece of fruit is to take a deliberate and controlled action with the teeth, typically drawing back or breaking off a portion. Similarly, when biting into food, such as a sandwich or a cookie, the teeth are used to break it apart into manageable pieces.

As a noun, "bite" describes the mark or wound left as a result of a bite, often characterized by an indentation or puncture caused by the teeth. This can occur in both humans and animals. Additionally, "bite" can also be used metaphorically to describe a sharp and incisive critique or comment.

The term "bite" also finds application in various idiomatic expressions. For example, "to bite the bullet" means to face a difficult or unpleasant situation with bravery or determination. Similarly, "to bite off more than one can chew" refers to taking on a task or responsibility that proves to be too challenging or overwhelming.

Overall, the term "bite" encompasses the physical act of using teeth to cut or grip something, as well as metaphorical expressions that relate to bravery or accepting difficult circumstances.

Top Common Misspellings for BITE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for BITE

Etymology of BITE

The word "bite" originated from the Old English word "bītan", which can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic word "beutaną". This etymology is also related to the Old Norse word "bita" and the Dutch word "bijten". The Proto-Germanic root word "beutanan" is believed to come from the Proto-Indo-European root word "bheid-", meaning "to split" or "to cleave". Over time, the word "bite" has retained its primary meaning of using the teeth to seize or tear into something.

Idioms with the word BITE

  • sb's bark is worse than their bite The idiom "sb's bark is worse than their bite" means that someone frequently uses strong or aggressive language, threats, or warnings, but rarely actually follows through with their actions. It suggests that a person's intimidating or aggressive demeanor is not truly representative of their true capabilities or intentions.
  • another/a second bite at/of the cherry The idiom "another/a second bite at/of the cherry" refers to getting another opportunity to try or succeed at something that was previously attempted and failed. This expression implies a chance to try again or make amends after a previous unsuccessful attempt.
  • bite/snap sb's head off To "bite/snap someone's head off" means to angrily respond to someone in a harsh or aggressive manner. It implies a strong negative reaction or an excessively sharp retort. It is often used to describe situations where someone's response is much harsher or angrier than the situation warrants.
  • come back to bite sb The idiom "come back to bite someone" means that the consequences or negative effects of someone's actions or decisions will eventually affect them in a harmful or unfavorable way. It implies that one will face repercussions for their actions, often in an unexpected or unintended manner.
  • sb/sth won't bite The idiom "sb/sth won't bite" means that someone or something is not harmful, threatening, or dangerous and therefore should not be feared or avoided. It suggests that there is no need to be afraid or cautious in dealing with them.
  • bite sb's head off The idiom "bite sb's head off" means to respond to someone in a very angry or harsh manner, often with hostility or irritation. It refers to a highly confrontational or aggressive reaction towards another person's statement or question.
  • bite your lip The idiom "bite your lip" means to hold back or suppress one's emotions, typically in a situation where it is difficult or inappropriate to express them openly. It refers to the act of biting down on one's own lip as a physical manifestation of self-restraint or restraint from speaking out.
  • bite your tongue The idiom "bite your tongue" means to refrain from speaking or expressing one's thoughts or opinions, usually in order to avoid causing offense or starting an argument. It suggests the act of physically biting down on one's tongue to prevent oneself from saying something.
  • bite me! The idiom "bite me!" is an informal and often sarcastic expression used to convey annoyance, frustration, or defiance. It can be seen as a mildly offensive way of telling someone to go away or dismiss their remark.
  • bite off more than you can chew The idiom "bite off more than you can chew" means to take on more tasks, responsibilities, or challenges than one can handle or manage effectively. It implies overestimating one's capabilities or capacity, resulting in difficulty or failure to complete what was initially intended or promised.
  • bite the bullet The idiom "bite the bullet" means to face or endure a difficult or unpleasant situation with courage and determination, even though it may be uncomfortable or painful.
  • bite the dust The idiom "bite the dust" means to fail or come to an end, often through defeat, death, or some form of failure or setback.
  • bite the hand that feeds you The idiom "bite the hand that feeds you" means to harm or act ungratefully toward someone or something that provides for or supports you. It refers to the acts of showing ingratitude, disloyalty, or hostility towards those who are instrumental in one's well-being or success.
  • put the bite on sb, at put the squeeze on sb The idiom "put the bite on someone" or "put the squeeze on someone" means to pressure or manipulate someone to give or do something, typically involving asking for money or favors in a forceful or insistent way. It implies exerting coercion or putting someone in a difficult or uncomfortable position to obtain what one wants.
  • sb/sth has more bark than bite The idiom "sb/sth has more bark than bite" is used to describe someone or something that appears aggressive or threatening but is actually not dangerous or intimidating. It implies that the person or thing talks or boasts more forcefully than their actions can support.
  • One's bark is worse than one's bite. The idiom "One's bark is worse than one's bite" means that someone appears to be aggressive or threatening, but in reality, they are not as formidable or dangerous as they seem. It suggests that their words or actions may seem intimidating, but they do not possess the ability or willingness to follow through with their threats.
  • bite sm's head off The idiom "bite someone's head off" means to respond to someone with anger, aggression, or irritation, often speaking to them sharply or rudely. It implies that the person is being overly harsh or unreasonable in their reaction.
  • bite the big one The idiom "bite the big one" is a slang expression that means to die or experience a significant failure or defeat. It is often used humorously or sarcastically to describe an unfortunate outcome or a situation that did not go as planned.
  • won't bite The idiom "won't bite" is used to describe someone who is approachable, not intimidating, or not hostile. It implies that the person is friendly and will not harm or cause any trouble.
  • take a bite out of The idiom "take a bite out of" means to consume or reduce a significant amount or portion of something, often with force or impact. It can be used literally or figuratively to describe actions or situations where a substantial portion is being consumed, diminished, or affected.
  • put the bite on The idiom "put the bite on" means to ask or demand for money, typically in a forceful or persistent manner, often by imposing pressure or intimidation.
  • One's bark is worse than bite The idiom "One's bark is worse than bite" means that someone's words or behavior might sound or appear threatening or aggressive, but they rarely follow through with any actual action or harm.
  • I'll bite The idiom "I'll bite" is often used as a rhetorical question expressing surprise, curiosity, or doubt about a statement or situation, with the speaker indicating their willingness to engage in discussion or explore the topic further.
  • has more bark than bite The idiom "has more bark than bite" refers to someone or something that appears or behaves aggressively or intimidatingly, but lacks the ability or willingness to follow through with their threats or actions. It implies that the individual or thing is all talk and bluster, but lacks substance or true power.
  • come back to bite you The idiom "come back to bite you" refers to the consequences or negative outcomes that result from one's previous actions or decisions, usually those that were dishonest, unethical, or harmful. It implies that one will eventually face the repercussions of their actions, often in an unexpected or unfavorable manner.
  • bite tongue To "bite one's tongue" means to stop oneself from saying something, especially when the words could be hurtful, offensive, or unwise in a particular situation. It refers to the act of holding back or restraining one's words, often due to the desire to avoid conflict, maintain personal relationships, or prevent unwanted consequences.
  • Bite the ice!
  • bite the hand that feeds one The idiom "bite the hand that feeds one" means to harm or act ungratefully towards someone who provides support, help, or resources. It refers to the ingratitude and betrayal towards those who have been generous or helpful, often resulting in adverse consequences for the person displaying such behavior.
  • bite the hand that feeds The idiom "bite the hand that feeds" means to harm or show ingratitude towards someone who has been helping or supporting you. It refers to a situation where a person turns against their benefactor despite depending on them for support or assistance.
  • bite on The idiom "bite on" typically means to firmly grip or clench one's teeth together, often as a reaction to pain, stress, or frustration. It can also refer to a determined effort or struggle to overcome a difficult situation or accomplish a challenging task.
  • bite off more than one can chew The idiom "bite off more than one can chew" means to take on or attempt to do more than one is capable of handling or managing. It signifies accepting or committing to a task or responsibility that exceeds one's ability or capacity, often resulting in negative consequences or difficulties.
  • bite off more than can chew The idiomatic expression "bite off more than can chew" means to take on more responsibility or commit to more tasks than one is capable of or prepared for. It refers to a situation where someone overestimates their abilities or resources and ends up struggling to handle the load.
  • bite off The idiom "bite off" means to take on or assume more responsibility, tasks, or commitments than one can handle. It implies that a person has taken on a challenge or obligation that is difficult or overwhelming.
  • bite nails The idiom "bite nails" means to be extremely nervous, anxious, or worried about something. It implies someone continuously biting their nails due to stress or anticipation.
  • bite into The idiom "bite into" refers to physically taking a bite or a piece of something, usually food. It implies sinking your teeth into an object, often to experience its taste, texture, or quality. However, depending on the context, "bite into" can also be applied metaphorically to describe delving into something or engaging in a demanding or challenging situation.
  • bite head off The idiom "bite someone's head off" means to respond to someone in an extremely angry or hostile manner, often by speaking angrily and aggressively. It implies a sharp and aggressive reaction, often disproportionate to the situation.
  • bite back The idiom "bite back" refers to the act of retaliating or responding aggressively after being provoked or mistreated. It implies a response with force or intensity, often involving vindication or punishing someone for their actions or words.
  • bite The idiom "bite" typically means to accept or endure a difficult or unpleasant situation or consequence without complaint, often with a sense of resignation or stoicism.
  • bark is worse than bite The expression "bark is worse than bite" is used to describe someone or something that appears or sounds intimidating or threatening, but in reality, they are not as dangerous or powerful as they seem. It means that a person's or an animal's aggressive or fierce behavior or warnings are not an accurate reflection of their actual capability or likelihood to cause harm.
  • a bite to eat The idiom "a bite to eat" is a casual expression that refers to having a small or light meal or snack, typically something quick and easy to consume.
  • a bite of the cherry The idiom "a bite of the cherry" typically refers to an opportunity to participate or be involved in something advantageous or rewarding. It signifies having the chance to experience or benefit from a particular situation, often when others may have already taken advantage of it. The phrase can imply the desire for a fair share or a chance to enjoy the benefits of a particular endeavor or advantage.
  • bite sth off The idiom "bite something off" means to take on or commit to a task, responsibility, or obligation that is more than one can handle or manage. It implies the act of taking or accepting something substantial or challenging without fully considering the consequences or limitations.
  • bite into sth The idiom "bite into sth" means to take a deliberate and forceful bite of a particular object or food item. It can also be used metaphorically to express the act of delving deeply into or immersing oneself in a particular situation, concept, or problem.
  • bite someone's head off The idiom "bite someone's head off" refers to responding to someone in an angry, hostile, or overly aggressive manner. It implies reacting with unnecessary anger or snapping at someone, often without reason or provocation.
  • bite down (on) The idiom "bite down (on)" means to clamp or press one's teeth tightly together. It is often used to describe an act of exerting firm pressure on something with one's teeth.
  • bite one's lip The idiom "bite one's lip" refers to the act of restraining oneself from speaking or reacting in a particular situation, typically when one wants to avoid showing frustration, anger, or annoyance. It suggests biting the lip to avoid expressing emotions verbally or physically.
  • all bark and no bite The idiom "all bark and no bite" refers to someone who talks aggressively or threatens others, but fails to follow through with any meaningful action. It describes someone who makes empty or loud claims without the ability or intention to back them up.
  • bite the hand that feed The idiom "bite the hand that feeds" means to harm or act ungratefully towards someone who has been kind or helpful to you, often by criticizing or betraying them. It refers to the metaphorical idea of a domesticated animal biting the hand of its benevolent owner who provides it with food.
  • somebody’s bark is worse than their bite The idiom "somebody's bark is worse than their bite" means that someone appears or sounds more aggressive or threatening than they actually are. It suggests that while someone may make a lot of noise and seem intimidating, they are not likely to follow through with their threats or actions.
  • a bite at/of the cherry The idiom "a bite at/of the cherry" refers to an opportunity to achieve or obtain something, especially one that is rare or valuable. It implies that there may not be another chance or that opportunities like this are limited.
  • second bite of the apple The idiom "second bite of the apple" refers to an opportunity to try or achieve something again after a previous attempt may have been unsuccessful or unsatisfactory. It implies a second chance or another opportunity to succeed or make things right.
  • bite (someone) in the arse The idiom "bite (someone) in the arse" refers to a situation where someone's previous actions or decisions have negative consequences or come back to harm them. It implies that a person's choices or behavior have unexpectedly and unpleasantly affected them, often resulting in some form of retribution or backlash.
  • bite (someone) in the ass The idiom "bite (someone) in the ass" refers to experiencing negative consequences or repercussions as a result of one's actions or decisions. It implies that an unfavorable outcome, often unexpected, has affected or harmed the person involved, emphasizing a sense of irony or poetic justice.
  • a bite at the cherry The idiom "a bite at the cherry" means to have an opportunity to do or experience something enjoyable or desirable. It refers to having a chance to accomplish a particular goal or indulge in a favorable situation.
  • a second bite at the cherry The idiom "a second bite at the cherry" refers to a second opportunity or chance to do or achieve something, especially after a previous attempt or opportunity has been unsuccessful.
  • bite (one's) thumb at The idiom "bite one's thumb at" is an expression referring to a gesture of contempt or defiance. It dates back to William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet, where biting one's thumb was a provocative and insulting gesture. It implies insulting or showing disrespect towards someone.
  • come back to bite (one) The idiom "come back to bite (one)" refers to the consequence or negative outcome that arises from one's previous actions or decisions. It implies that something done in the past, often with the intention of obtaining an advantage or avoiding a problem, ends up causing harm or problems in the present or future. It suggests that one may face repercussions or experience the negative effects of their own actions in an unexpected or ironic way.
  • barking dogs seldom bite The idiom "barking dogs seldom bite" means that people who make threats or are overly vocal about something are typically not the ones who follow through with their actions. It suggests that those who loudly boast or make intimidating statements are often less likely to actually take any real action or cause harm.
  • his, her, etc. bark is worse than his, her, etc. bite The idiom "his, her, etc. bark is worse than his, her, etc. bite" means that someone's threats or boasts of aggression or violence are more intimidating or alarming than their actual ability or willingness to follow through on them. In other words, they talk tough but cannot back it up with real action.
  • someone's bark is worse than their bite The idiom "someone's bark is worse than their bite" means that a person may appear to be aggressive, threatening, or intimidating, but they do not actually follow through with their words, and their actions are less severe or harmful than their initial threats or warnings. It suggests that the person is more inclined to make loud or aggressive statements but lacks the ability or willingness to back them up with action.
  • your bark is worse than your bite The idiom "your bark is worse than your bite" refers to someone who appears or sounds more aggressive or threatening than they actually are. It suggests that despite their intimidating demeanor or words, they do not follow through with aggressive actions or lack the ability to back up their threats.
  • don't let the bedbugs bite The idiom "don't let the bedbugs bite" is a playful way of saying "goodbye" or "have a good night's sleep." It is often used as a friendly expression while parting ways or saying goodnight, wishing the person to have a restful sleep free from troubles and worries.
  • bite the biscuit The idiom "bite the biscuit" means to experience a negative outcome or consequence, often as a result of a mistake, failure, or unfortunate event. It implies facing the unfortunate reality or accepting the unpleasant consequences of a situation.
  • bite (one's) head off The idiom "bite (one's) head off" means to respond to someone with anger, hostility, or criticism, usually in an intense or aggressive manner. It implies that the person's reaction is excessively harsh or unwarranted given the circumstance.
  • bite (one's) tongue The idiom "bite one's tongue" means to refrain from speaking or expressing one's opinion, particularly when it may be considered inappropriate, offensive, or unnecessary. It refers to the act of literally biting down on one's tongue to prevent oneself from saying something.
  • bite into (something or someone) The idiom "bite into (something or someone)" means to take a forceful or aggressive action towards a specific situation or a person. It often implies engaging in a task or argument with full intensity or commitment, sometimes resulting in confrontations or conflicts.
  • bite on (something or someone) The idiom "bite on" typically means to firmly grip with the teeth or exert pressure with the jaws on something or someone. However, this phrase can also be used metaphorically to mean confront, tackle, or deal with a difficult or challenging situation, task, or person.
  • take a bite out of (something) The idiom "take a bite out of (something)" usually means to consume a portion or amount of something, often referring to food items. It can also be used figuratively to describe making a substantial impact or reducing a problem or task significantly.
  • bite (one's) nails The idiom "bite one's nails" refers to the act of nervously chewing on one's fingernails, typically due to anxiety, worry, or nervousness about something. It is a physical manifestation of psychological tension or apprehension.
  • bite of the reality sandwich The idiom "bite of the reality sandwich" refers to an act or situation where someone is confronted with or forced to face the truth, often in a harsh or unpleasant way. It implies that a person must come to terms with the reality of a situation, no matter how difficult or unappetizing it may be. This idiom emphasizes the idea of accepting and dealing with the truth, even if it is less desirable or favorable than one's initial perceptions or beliefs.
  • bite on someone The idiom "bite on someone" means to strongly influence, bother, or persistently annoy someone. It implies that someone or something is causing a significant impact or irritating effect on a person's thoughts, emotions, or actions.
  • bite your nails/fingernails The idiom "bite your nails/fingernails" means to feel nervous, anxious, or worried about something. It refers to the physical act of biting one's own nails, which often happens when a person is experiencing tension or stress.
  • bite/snap somebody's head off The idiom "bite/snap somebody's head off" refers to the act of responding to someone in an excessively angry or harsh manner, often by delivering a sharp and aggressive verbal attack. It implies a severe, hostile reaction that can be unexpected or disproportionate to the situation.
  • don't bite the hand that feeds (you) The idiom "don't bite the hand that feeds (you)" means that one should not harm or show ingratitude towards someone who provides them with support, assistance, or resources. It emphasizes the importance of appreciating and treating kindly those who are instrumental in fulfilling one's needs or improving their situation.
  • have a bite The idiom "have a bite" means to eat a small amount of food. It can also be used more generally to refer to satisfying one's appetite or taking a break to eat something.
  • I, etc. won't bite The idiom "I, etc. won't bite" is a reassurance or declaration that one is not dangerous, intimidating, or threatening. It means that the person or thing being referred to is not harmful or will not cause any harm, emphasizing that there is no need to be afraid or hesitant.
  • I’ll bite The idiom "I'll bite" is a colloquial expression that is used to express confusion or surprise when someone is unable to understand or believe something. It is often used to show a willingness to engage in a discussion or debate in order to gain further clarification or explanation. It can be interpreted as an invitation for someone to explain or convince the speaker of something that seems questionable or puzzling.
  • monkey bite
  • put the bite on (one) The idiom "put the bite on (one)" means to make a request, typically for money or a favor, in a persistent or demanding manner. It implies imposing pressure or coercion on someone to get what you want.
  • put the bite on someone The idiom "put the bite on someone" refers to the act of asking or pressuring someone to lend money or provide financial assistance. It typically implies a sense of urgency or desperation in the request.
  • second bite of the cherry The idiom "second bite of the cherry" means having another opportunity to achieve or succeed at something after previously failing or being unsuccessful in the first attempt. It refers to a chance to try again and make amends or rectify any mistakes made in the initial attempt.
  • sound bite A sound bite refers to a short, catchy, or memorable statement or extract from a speech, interview, or broadcast. It is typically delivered by a public figure or media personality and is designed to convey a concise message or grab attention, often becoming a widely quoted or replayed snippet. Sound bites are commonly used in news and political discourse to encapsulate complex ideas into brief and easily digestible phrases.
  • take a bite of the reality sandwich The idiom "take a bite of the reality sandwich" means to face or accept the harsh or unpleasant truth of a situation. It implies the act of acknowledging and confronting the reality, even if it may be difficult or unpleasant to accept.
  • bite into something The idiom "bite into something" refers to the act of taking a forceful or decisive action or decision. It implies fully committing to or engaging in an activity and putting in significant effort and resources. It often involves immersing oneself in a situation without hesitation or reservation.
  • bite something off The idiom "bite something off" means to take on or accept a large or challenging task or responsibility, often implying that the task is more than one can handle. It can also suggest impulsively committing to something without thoroughly considering the consequences or potential difficulties.
  • bite (or snap) someone's head off The idiom "bite (or snap) someone's head off" means to respond to someone in a very angry or rude manner, often by speaking sharply or aggressively. It implies a harsh and aggressive reaction that is disproportionate to the situation or uncalled for.
  • (one) is not going to bite (someone) The idiom "(one) is not going to bite (someone)" means that the person in question is not going to harm or cause any danger to the other person. It is often used to reassure someone who is apprehensive or afraid about interacting with another person or trying something new.
  • (one) won't bite (someone) The idiom "(one) won't bite (someone)" means that someone is not aggressive or likely to harm or attack another person. It is often used to reassure someone that there is no need to be afraid or hesitant in approaching or interacting with another individual.

Similar spelling words for BITE

Conjugate verb Bite

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be bitting
you would be bitting
he/she/it would be bitting
we would be bitting
they would be bitting

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have bitten
you would have bitten
he/she/it would have bitten
we would have bitten
they would have bitten
I would have bite
you would have bite
he/she/it would have bite
we would have bite
they would have bite

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been bitting
you would have been bitting
he/she/it would have been bitting
we would have been bitting
they would have been bitting

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been biting
you would have been biting
he/she/it would have been biting
we would have been biting
they would have been biting

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would bite
you would bite
he/she/it would bite
we would bite
they would bite

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be biting
you would be biting
he/she/it would be biting
we would be biting
they would be biting

FUTURE

I will bite
you will bite
he/she/it will bite
we will bite
they will bite

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be biting
you will be biting
he/she/it will be biting
we will be biting
they will be biting
I will be bitting
you will be bitting
he/she/it will be bitting
we will be bitting
they will be bitting

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have bitten
you will have bitten
he/she/it will have bitten
we will have bitten
they will have bitten

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been biting
you will have been biting
he/she/it will have been biting
we will have been biting
they will have been biting
I will have been bitting
you will have been bitting
he/she/it will have been bitting
we will have been bitting
they will have been bitting

IMPERATIVE

we Let's bite
you bite
we let´s bite

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to bite

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was biting
you were biting
he/she/it was biting
we were biting
they were biting
I was bitting
you were bitting
he/she/it was bitting
we were bitting
they were bitting

PAST PARTICIPLE

bitten

PAST PERFECT

I had bitten
you had bitten
he/she/it had bitten
we had bitten
they had bitten

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been biting
you had been biting
he/she/it had been biting
we had been biting
they had been biting
I had been bitting
you had been bitting
he/she/it had been bitting
we had been bitting
they had been bitting

PRESENT

I bite
you bite
he/she/it bites
we bite
they bite

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am biting
you are biting
he/she/it is biting
we are biting
they are biting
I am bitting
you are bitting
he/she/it is bitting
we are bitting
they are bitting

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

biting
bitting

PRESENT PERFECT

I have bitten
you have bitten
he/she/it has bitten
we have bitten
they have bitten

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been biting
you have been biting
he/she/it has been biting
we have been biting
they have been biting
I have been bitting
you have been bitting
he/she/it has been bitting
we have been bitting
they have been bitting

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it bite

SIMPLE PAST

I bit
you bit
he/she/it bit
we bit
they bit

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