How Do You Spell BORN?

Pronunciation: [bˈɔːn] (IPA)

The spelling of the English word "born" can sometimes cause confusion due to the silent "r" at the end of the word. The IPA phonetic transcription for "born" is /bɔːn/. The symbol "ɔː" represents a long "o" sound, while the "n" at the end of the word is not pronounced. This word is often confused with "bourn" (IPA: /bɔːn/), which means a small stream, but the two words are pronounced in the same way.

BORN Meaning and Definition

Born is an adjective that describes the origin or beginning of a person, animal, or entity's existence. It primarily refers to the act of being brought into existence through birth, but can also be used metaphorically to describe the origin or creation of an idea or concept.

In the context of individuals, born refers to the moment of emergence from the mother's body, where a baby transitions from the womb to the outside world. It signifies the event of birth itself, encompassing the physical delivery and first moments of life. It is an essential milestone in a person's life, marking their entry into the world.

Metaphorically, born can describe the origin of a particular idea, belief, or concept. It implies the generation or creation of something new and signifies the initial inception or discovery of a concept or theory.

The term born can also highlight a person's inherent or natural qualities. It suggests that certain characteristics, skills, or talents are present from birth or are an integral part of an individual's personality. For example, a person may be described as naturally born with artistic abilities or a born leader.

Overall, born emphasizes the essential beginnings, whether in physical existence, intellectual ideas, or inherent qualities, and underscores the intrinsic nature or origin of the subject in question.

Top Common Misspellings for BORN *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for BORN

Etymology of BORN

The word "born" originated from the Old English word "beran" or "bearu", which meant "to carry" or "to give birth to". It is related to the Old High German word "beran" and the Old Norse word "baera", both having similar meanings. The modern meaning of "born" as the act of coming into existence at birth or being brought into existence is derived from these ancient roots.

Idioms with the word BORN

  • born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family and has been provided with abundant resources and opportunities right from birth. It implies that their life has been marked by privilege and ease, often lacking first-hand experience of financial or social challenges.
  • wish you had never been born The idiom "wish you had never been born" is a strongly worded expression conveying extreme resentment, anger, or frustration towards someone, reflecting a deep desire that the person had never come into existence or had never been born.
  • born and bred The idiom "born and bred" refers to a person's place of birth and upbringing, indicating that they were born in a particular location and have lived there for a significant part of their life. It emphasizes a strong connection with one's place of origin and often implies a deep understanding and familiarity with the local culture and traditions.
  • not be born yesterday The idiom "not be born yesterday" means to be knowledgeable, aware, or experienced, implying that one is not easily fooled or naive. It suggests that the person has enough wisdom or street-smarts to recognize deception, dishonesty, or manipulation.
  • in all my (born) days The idiom "in all my (born) days" is an expression used to emphasize that in a person's entire lifetime or experience, they have never seen or encountered something before. It highlights astonishment, disbelief, or amazement at the situation or event being referred to.
  • as (if) to the manner born The idiom "as (if) to the manner born" means to behave or perform a specific task with natural ease, confidence, or familiarity, as if one was born or raised to do so. It implies that the person in question possesses an inherent quality or skill that allows them to excel in a particular situation without any difficulty or training.
  • It is better to be born lucky than rich. The idiom "It is better to be born lucky than rich" means that having good fortune or luck in one's life is more valuable and advantageous than being born into a wealthy family or having material wealth. It suggests that luck or fortunate circumstances can bring more opportunities, happiness, and success than simply having financial resources.
  • I/he/she wasn't born yesterday! The idiom "I/he/she wasn't born yesterday!" means that the person being referred to is not naive or easily fooled. It implies that the person is experienced, knowledgeable, and aware of various tricks or deceitful tactics used by others.
  • I've never felt/heard/seen etc. sth in all my (born) days! The idiom "I've never felt/heard/seen etc. sth in all my (born) days!" is used to express extreme surprise or disbelief about something, emphasizing that the person has never experienced or encountered such a thing before in their entire life.
  • born on the wrong side of the blanket The idiom "born on the wrong side of the blanket" refers to someone who is illegitimate or born out of wedlock. It suggests that the person's parents were not married at the time of their birth, which may have carried social stigma or unfavorable consequences in certain cultures or historical contexts.
  • Were you born in a barn? The idiom "Were you born in a barn?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise or frustration at someone's lack of manners or awareness of their surroundings. It implies that the person being addressed has behaved or left a door open in a manner usually associated with someone who was raised in a barn, which is typically seen as a place devoid of proper etiquette or social graces.
  • be born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "be born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to being born into a wealthy or privileged family, where one enjoys advantages and opportunities that others do not have access to. It implies that from birth, an individual has inherited wealth and a life of comfort and luxury.
  • born with a silver spoon in one's mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in one's mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family, often characterized by inheriting or having access to great wealth and advantages from birth. It implies that the person has had a luxurious and comfortable upbringing, with many opportunities and resources readily available to them.
  • born to be sth The idiom "born to be sth" refers to someone who seems naturally suited or destined for a specific role or occupation. It implies that the person has innate abilities, characteristics, or talents that make them well-suited or naturally inclined towards a certain profession or lifestyle.
  • born to do sth The idiom "born to do sth" means that someone possesses a natural or innate talent or inclination for a particular activity or role. It suggests that the person is ideally suited for the task and performs it effortlessly or exceptionally well.
  • There's one born every minute. The definition of the idiom "There's one born every minute" is that there are many foolish or gullible people in the world who can easily be deceived or taken advantage of. It implies that people are easily tricked or manipulated, referencing the belief that someone is born with those tendencies every minute.
  • (as) to the manner born The idiom "(as) to the manner born" means to possess or display innate or natural ability or skill in a particular area/activity without requiring any additional training or experience. It implies that the person is born with a talent for something or has been raised with the knowledge or experience necessary to excel in a certain task or role.
  • not born yesterday The idiom "not born yesterday" refers to someone who is not gullible or easily deceived. It implies that the person is knowledgeable, experienced, and aware of how things work, especially in terms of deception or trickery.
  • If you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned. The idiom "If you're born to be hanged, then you'll never be drowned" implies that fate or destiny cannot be escaped, and if something is meant to happen to someone, it will inevitably occur, regardless of other circumstances or attempts to avoid it. The phrase suggests that regardless of the risks or dangers one may face, their ultimate fate will always catch up with them.
  • born out of wedlock The idiom "born out of wedlock" refers to a person who is born to parents who are not married to each other. It typically implies that the child's parents were not legally married at the time of their birth, which may carry social or moral implications depending on cultural and historical contexts.
  • born and raised The idiom "born and raised" refers to someone being born in a particular place and having lived there for their entire childhood and possibly even their whole life. It emphasizes the strong connection and deep familiarity a person has with their place of origin.
  • born with a silver spoon in mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family, and therefore enjoys a life of ease and abundance from birth. It implies that the person has been given many advantages and opportunities without having to work for them.
  • be born with a silver spoon in mouth The idiom "be born with a silver spoon in mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family. It suggests that the person has been provided with numerous advantageous opportunities and a comfortable lifestyle since birth, often with little or no effort on their part.
  • born to the purple The idiom "born to the purple" refers to someone who is born into noble or royal lineage. It is often used to indicate someone's privileged or elevated social status by birth.
  • in all one's born days The idiom "in all one's born days" typically means throughout one's entire life or in all of one's existence. It is often used to emphasize that something is unlikely or unexpected, as if it has never happened before in someone's entire lifetime.
  • to the manner born The idiom "to the manner born" means to possess a natural talent or skill for a particular activity or role. It implies a certain innate ability or familiarity with the way things are done, as if one were born or raised in that particular environment or social class.
  • to the manor born The idiom "to the manor born" refers to someone who is born into a high social class or noble background, implying that they are naturally suited for a life of wealth, privilege, and sophistication. It suggests that the person has the qualities, skills, or behavior expected from an aristocratic upbringing.
  • be/be born/be made that way The idiom "be/be born/be made that way" refers to the innate or inherent qualities, characteristics, or behavior of an individual that are believed to be natural, unchangeable, or predetermined. It suggests that these attributes or traits are deeply rooted in a person's nature from birth or have been developed over time and are not easily altered.
  • be born to be/do something The idiomatic phrase "be born to be/do something" refers to a belief or expression indicating that someone possesses a natural or innate talent, ability, or inclination towards a particular activity, profession, or skill.
  • not know you are born The idiom "not know you are born" implies that someone is unaware or unappreciative of their fortunate circumstances or the privileges they have. It is often used to express frustration or disbelief towards someone who complains or shows a lack of gratitude without realizing how fortunate they are compared to others.
  • there’s one born every minute The idiom "there's one born every minute" is a sarcastic expression that means there are always gullible or easily deceived people. It suggests that people are regularly being fooled or taken advantage of because of their naivety or lack of critical thinking skills.
  • (as/as if) to the manner born The idiom "(as/as if) to the manner born" means to have a natural talent, ability, or skill in performing a particular task or role. It implies that one possesses the necessary qualities from birth or has acquired them so effortlessly that it appears innate. It suggests a high level of proficiency or familiarity in a particular area or task.
  • born to (be or do something) "Born to (be or do something)" is an idiom used to describe someone who has a natural talent, inclination, or significant potential to excel in a particular field or activity. It implies that the person seems destined or naturally suited for a specific role or skill.
  • born in a barn The idiom "born in a barn" is used to describe someone who lacks manners or social etiquette, suggesting that they were raised with little or no refinement. It implies that the person is thoughtless, uncultured, or forgetful about basic behavior and manners typically expected in public or social settings.
  • be born with a silver spoon in (one's) mouth The idiom "be born with a silver spoon in (one's) mouth" refers to a person who is born into a wealthy or privileged family, enjoying a life of luxury and privilege from birth. It implies that the individual has had a fortunate start in life and has never experienced hardship or financial struggles.
  • be born yesterday The idiom "be born yesterday" means to be naive, gullible, or lacking in experience or knowledge. It implies that someone is easily tricked or deceived because they have little understanding of the world or its ways. The phrase suggests that the person in question is like a newborn, with no prior understanding or awareness of things.
  • born within the sound of Bow bells "Born within the sound of Bow bells" is an idiom that refers to someone who was born within the traditional sound of the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church in the City of London. It is used to describe someone who is a true Cockney, meaning they were born and raised in the East End of London and have the distinct accent and characteristics associated with that area.
  • born in the purple The idiom "born in the purple" typically refers to someone who is born into a position of power, privilege, or royalty. It often connotes a sense of entitlement or prestige associated with one's noble or high-ranking birth. The phrase originated in the Byzantine Empire, where the color purple was associated with imperial nobility.
  • born under a lucky star The idiom "born under a lucky star" refers to a person who is believed to have a naturally fortunate life or a special destiny, often indicating that they consistently experience positive or favorable circumstances.
  • born with a caul on (one's) head The idiom "born with a caul on (one's) head" refers to someone who is believed to have exceptional luck or innate supernatural abilities since birth. In literal terms, a caul is a thin, filmy membrane that sometimes covers the head or face of a newborn baby during birth. It is considered rare and has been historically associated with various superstitions and beliefs regarding good fortune, protection from harm, or special powers. Thus, the idiom is used figuratively to describe someone who is thought to possess extraordinary qualities or is destined for success.
  • born with a silver spoon The idiom "born with a silver spoon" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family, and therefore inherits great wealth or advantages from birth. It implies that the person has been raised in a luxurious or privileged environment and has never experienced hardships or financial difficulties.
  • born with a silver spoon in his or her mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in his or her mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family and has been provided with many advantages and opportunities from the beginning of their life. It implies that the person has been fortunate and has not had to work hard or face many challenges due to their privileged background.
  • born yesterday The idiom "born yesterday" is typically used to describe someone who is naïve, lacking in knowledge or experience, and easily deceived. It implies that the person is gullible or easily taken advantage of due to their perceived innocence or lack of insight.
  • curse the day (one) was born The idiom "curse the day (one) was born" means expressing extreme frustration, regret, or unhappiness to the extent of wishing one had never been born. It indicates a deep sense of despair or resentment towards one's existence or life circumstances.
  • I wasn't born yesterday The idiom "I wasn't born yesterday" means that someone is not easily fooled or deceived because they are experienced, knowledgeable, or aware of the situation or trick being presented to them. It implies that the person is not naive or gullible.
  • I've never (done something) in all my (born) days The idiom "I've never (done something) in all my (born) days" is used to express extreme surprise or astonishment at something that has just happened or been witnessed. It indicates that the speaker has never encountered or experienced anything like it before in their entire life.
  • manner born The idiom "manner born" refers to someone who possesses inherent natural abilities or qualities, particularly in terms of behaving or conducting oneself in a certain way. It suggests that the individual has a natural inclination or innate understanding of a certain skill or behavior, as if they were raised or educated specifically for it.
  • natural-born The idiom "natural-born" refers to an inherent or innate trait, quality, or attribute that is present in someone from birth. It implies that the person possesses a particular ability or characteristic naturally, without the need for extensive training or development.
  • not know you're born The idiom "not know you're born" is used to express the idea that someone fails to appreciate or understand how fortunate they are in their current circumstances. It implies that they are unaware of the hardships or difficulties that others have experienced.
  • there's a sucker born every minute The idiom "there's a sucker born every minute" means that people can be easily fooled or taken advantage of, suggesting that there are always naive or gullible individuals who can be swindled or deceived. It emphasizes the idea that there is a constant supply of vulnerable or unsuspecting individuals who are susceptible to scams or exploitation.
  • Were you born in a tent? The idiomatic expression "Were you born in a tent?" is a rhetorical question used to criticize someone for leaving a door open or failing to close it properly. It implies that the person's behavior lacks consideration or awareness of their surroundings, similar to growing up in a tent where doors are not typically present or easily closed.
  • not know (one is) born The idiom "not know (one is) born" means to be naive or lacking in experience or understanding about a certain topic, situation, or skill. It implies that someone is completely unaware or ignorant of something.

Similar spelling words for BORN

Conjugate verb Born

CONDITIONAL

I would born
you would born
he/she/it would born
we would born
they would born

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be borning
you would be borning
he/she/it would be borning
we would be borning
they would be borning

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have born
you would have born
he/she/it would have born
we would have born
they would have born

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been borning
you would have been borning
he/she/it would have been borning
we would have been borning
they would have been borning

FUTURE

I will born
you will born
he/she/it will born
we will born
they will born

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be borning
you will be borning
he/she/it will be borning
we will be borning
they will be borning

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have borned
you will have borned
he/she/it will have borned
we will have borned
they will have borned

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been borning
you will have been borning
he/she/it will have been borning
we will have been borning
they will have been borning

IMPERATIVE

you born
we let´s born

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to born

PAST

I borned
you borned
he/she/it borned
we borned
they borned

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was borning
you were borning
he/she/it was borning
we were borning
they were borning

PAST PARTICIPLE

borned

PAST PERFECT

I had borned
you had borned
he/she/it had borned
we had borned
they had borned

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been borning
you had been borning
he/she/it had been borning
we had been borning
they had been borning

PRESENT

I born
you born
he/she/it borns
we born
they born

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am borning
you are borning
he/she/it is borning
we are borning
they are borning

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

borning

PRESENT PERFECT

I have borned
you have borned
he/she/it has borned
we have borned
they have borned

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been borning
you have been borning
he/she/it has been borning
we have been borning
they have been borning

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