How Do You Spell COST?

Pronunciation: [kˈɒst] (IPA)

The word “cost” is spelled with the letters c-o-s-t. The IPA phonetic transcription for this word is /kɒst/. The first sound is a voiceless velar plosive /k/. The second sound is a low back rounded vowel /ɒ/. The third sound is a voiceless alveolar fricative /s/. The final sound is a voiceless alveolar stop /t/. The word “cost” has a simple spelling and is commonly used to describe the price of an item or service.

COST Meaning and Definition

Cost is a term that refers to the amount of resources, such as money, time, or effort, required to acquire or achieve something. It is essentially the price or expenditure associated with obtaining a particular good, product, or service. The concept of cost encompasses both the tangible and intangible factors involved in a transaction or activity.

In monetary terms, cost represents the financial value that needs to be paid or invested in order to obtain an item or accomplish a task. It includes the purchase price, production expenses, transportation fees, taxes, or any other expenses incurred. On the other hand, cost can also refer to the non-monetary factors, such as the time and effort expended to complete a job or the opportunity cost of choosing one option over another.

Furthermore, costs can be categorized into various types, including fixed costs, variable costs, and opportunity costs. Fixed costs are those that remain constant regardless of the level of production, while variable costs change in direct proportion to the quantity of goods or services produced. Opportunity cost refers to the potential benefit or value that is forgone when a particular decision is made, indicating the benefits one might have received from choosing another alternative.

Understanding the cost is essential in making informed decisions, as it allows individuals, businesses, and governments to assess the feasibility and profitability of investments or activities. By evaluating costs, individuals can make informed choices, allocate resources efficiently, and plan for future endeavors.

Top Common Misspellings for COST *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for COST

Etymology of COST

The word cost originated from the Old French word coste or couter, which meant expense or price. It further derives from the Latin word constare, where con means together and stare means to stand. In its original Latin form, constare meant to stand together or to be fixed. Over time, the term evolved to specifically refer to the fixed price or expense of something, which gave rise to the modern meaning of cost.

Idioms with the word COST

  • cost sb dear The idiom "cost sb dear" means that something has had a significant negative impact on someone, often resulting in financial loss, personal sacrifice, or severe consequences.
  • count the cost The idiom "count the cost" means to carefully consider and assess the potential negative consequences or sacrifices that come with a particular decision, action, or undertaking before proceeding. It refers to the need to evaluate the potential risks, challenges, and demands involved in order to make an informed choice.
  • cost sth out The idiom "cost sth out" typically refers to the process of calculating or estimating the total cost or expenses involved in a particular project, plan, or endeavor. It involves analyzing the various factors, resources, and steps required, and determining the financial implications of the undertaking.
  • count the cost (of something) The idiom "count the cost (of something)" means to carefully consider the potential disadvantages, consequences, or sacrifices that may result from a particular action or decision before proceeding or committing to it. It involves examining and evaluating the potential risks, expenses, or drawbacks associated with a certain choice or course of action.
  • it will cost you The idiom "it will cost you" refers to a situation where one is informed about a significant expense or consequence associated with a particular action or decision. This phrase implies that undertaking or obtaining something will require a considerable sacrifice in terms of money, effort, time, or any other valuable aspect.
  • cost (one) dear The idiom "cost (one) dear" means to have a high or significant price or consequence. It implies that the action or decision taken by someone resulted in a significant loss, either financially, emotionally, or otherwise.
  • cost out The idiom "cost out" refers to the act of calculating or estimating the expenses involved in a particular project, plan, or course of action. It involves determining the total cost of the various components or factors associated with the endeavor. This idiom is commonly used in business or financial contexts to assess the feasibility, profitability, or affordability of an undertaking before proceeding with it.
  • estimate the cost at "Estimate the cost at" is an idiomatic phrase meaning to make an approximate calculation or projection of the amount of money something is expected to cost. It suggests a subjective evaluation based on available information, experience, or analysis.
  • cost, charge, etc. the earth The idiom "cost, charge, etc. the earth" means that something is extremely expensive or has a highly inflated price. It suggests that the amount being asked for is so exorbitant that it seems as though one would have to pay the entire cost of the Earth itself in order to obtain it.
  • at any cost The idiomatic expression "at any cost" means to achieve or obtain something regardless of the expenses, sacrifices, or consequences involved. It emphasizes a strong determination and willingness to do whatever it takes to accomplish a specific goal, even if it means great efforts, risks, or hardships.
  • it'll cost you The idiom "it'll cost you" means that there is a price to pay for something, either in terms of money or another type of sacrifice or loss. It implies that obtaining or achieving something will require a significant or potentially burdensome investment.
  • cost a bomb/the earth/a packet, at cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idiomatic expressions "cost a bomb/the earth/a packet" and "cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune" convey the notion of something being very expensive or requiring a significant amount of money to obtain or accomplish. Here are the definitions for each: 1. "Cost a bomb" (or "cost the earth" or "cost a packet"): This idiom suggests that something is extremely costly or expensive. It emphasizes the idea that the price is incredibly high, similar to the destructive force of a bomb or the vastness of the earth's resources. 2. "Cost an arm and a leg" (or "cost a small fortune"): This idiom implies that something is excessively expensive, often to the point of being unaffordable
  • cost an arm and a leg The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" is used to describe something that is extremely expensive or costly. It refers to the idea of a price being so high that it is equated to losing a valuable body part.
  • cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idiom "cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune" means that something is extremely expensive or that the price being asked is excessively high. It implies that the cost is so exorbitant that it may feel like sacrificing a body part or losing a substantial amount of money to acquire or afford it.
  • estimate the cost at (something) The idiom "estimate the cost at (something)" means to calculate or approximate the cost of something to be a particular amount. It refers to making an educated or informed guess about the expenses required for a certain project, purchase, or endeavor.
  • cost a bomb The idiom "cost a bomb" means that something is very expensive or costly. It implies that the price of something is astronomically high, similar to the detonation of a bomb causing significant damage and expense.
  • cost sharing Cost sharing refers to a mechanism or practice where multiple parties agree to divide the expenses or financial burden of a particular project, endeavor, or activity. It commonly involves the sharing of costs between organizations, businesses, governments, or individuals to collectively fund a certain initiative or venture. This arrangement ensures that each party contributes a portion of the overall cost involved, thereby distributing the financial responsibility among all involved parties.
  • cost the earth The idiom "cost the earth" means that something is extremely expensive or costly. It implies that the price or value of the thing being talked about is unreasonably high, resembling the value of the Earth itself.
  • cost (sb) an arm and a leg The idiomatic phrase "cost (sb) an arm and a leg" means that something is very expensive, to the point of requiring a significant sacrifice or substantial investment. It implies that the price being charged is exorbitant or unreasonably high.
  • to (one's) cost The idiom "to (one's) cost" means to learn something through personal experience or suffering from negative consequences, usually involving a loss or expense. It suggests that the lesson or knowledge gained was acquired at a significant price or at great personal expense.
  • and hang the cost/expense "And hang the cost/expense" is an idiom that means to disregard or ignore the cost or price of something. It signifies a willingness to proceed with an action, regardless of the financial implications or consequences. It implies a disregard for monetary considerations and emphasizes the importance or urgency of the action or decision at hand.
  • at all cost/costs The idiom "at all cost/costs" means to do something or achieve a goal regardless of the difficulties, risks, or sacrifices involved. It implies a determination to accomplish the desired outcome, regardless of any obstacles or consequences.
  • cost sb a pretty penny The idiom "cost sb a pretty penny" means that something was very expensive or cost a significant amount of money.
  • cost somebody dear To "cost somebody dear" means that a decision, action, or mistake resulted in significant negative consequences or losses for the person involved. It implies that the individual paid a high price, either in terms of money, reputation, relationships, or any other valuable aspect.
  • cost a pretty penny The idiom "cost a pretty penny" means that something is very expensive or costly. It implies that a significant amount of money is required to purchase or acquire something.
  • at all cost(s) The idiom "at all cost(s)" means taking any action necessary, regardless of the expense, effort, or consequences involved. It emphasizes the determination to achieve a particular goal or objective, even if it requires great sacrifice or effort.
  • and hang the cost The idiom "and hang the cost" means to disregard or not be concerned about the expense or financial implications of something. It suggests a willingness to prioritize enjoyment, fulfillment, or achievement over any associated costs or expenses.
  • hang the cost/expense To "hang the cost/expense" is an idiom that means to ignore or disregard the price or financial burden associated with something. It implies a willingness to spend money or incur expenses without consideration or concern for the consequences.
  • cost (or charge or pay) the earth The idiom "cost (or charge or pay) the earth" means that something is extremely expensive or costly. It implies that the price or cost of something is exorbitant or beyond what is reasonable or expected.
  • cost (someone) dearly The idiom "cost (someone) dearly" means that someone has suffered a significant and sometimes irrevocable loss or consequence as a result of a particular action or situation. It implies that the cost or price paid was significant and had a profound impact on the person involved.
  • cost something out The idiom "cost something out" refers to the process of calculating or estimating the total expense or cost of something. It involves carefully considering all the necessary components or factors that contribute to the overall cost in order to determine an accurate or realistic figure.
  • know/learn/find something to your cost The idiom "know/learn/find something to your cost" means to gain knowledge or experience through a negative or costly consequence. It implies that one becomes aware of something after suffering a loss or setback. It suggests that the lesson or understanding was acquired at great personal expense or disadvantage.
  • at any cost, at at all cost(s) The idiom "at any cost" or "at all cost(s)" means that someone is willing to do or achieve something regardless of the difficulties, risks, or sacrifices involved. It emphasizes the determination and willingness to achieve a specific goal or objective, without considering the negative consequences that may arise.
  • cost/pay an arm and a leg The idiom "cost/pay an arm and a leg" means that something is extremely expensive or costly. It implies that the price or expense is so high that it feels like sacrificing a limb to afford it.
  • at cost The idiom "at cost" refers to selling or offering something for the exact price it was obtained for, without any additional markup or profit. It indicates that no extra charges or expenses have been included.
  • cost shar·ing Cost sharing is the practice of dividing the expenses or financial burden of a project, program, or service between two or more parties. Each party involved agrees to contribute a certain amount or percentage towards the total costs incurred.
  • charge, cost, pay, etc. the earth The idiom "charge, cost, pay, etc. the earth" means to be extremely expensive or costly. It implies that the price being asked or paid is exorbitantly high and unreasonable.
  • cost/pay/charge the earth The idiom "cost/pay/charge the earth" means that something is very expensive or costs a lot of money.

Similar spelling words for COST

Plural form of COST is COSTS

Conjugate verb Cost

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have cost
you would have cost
he/she/it would have cost
we would have cost
they would have cost

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been costing
you would have been costing
he/she/it would have been costing
we would have been costing
they would have been costing

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would cost
you would cost
he/she/it would cost
we would cost
they would cost

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be costing
you would be costing
he/she/it would be costing
we would be costing
they would be costing

FUTURE

I will cost
you will cost
he/she/it will cost
we will cost
they will cost

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be costing
you will be costing
he/she/it will be costing
we will be costing
they will be costing

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have cost
you will have cost
he/she/it will have cost
we will have cost
they will have cost
I will have costed
you will have costed
he/she/it will have costed
we will have costed
they will have costed

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been costing
you will have been costing
he/she/it will have been costing
we will have been costing
they will have been costing

IMPERATIVE

you cost
we let´s cost

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to cost

PAST

I costed
you costed
he/she/it costed
we costed
they costed

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was costing
you were costing
he/she/it was costing
we were costing
they were costing

PAST PARTICIPLE

cost
costed

PAST PERFECT

I had cost
you had cost
he/she/it had cost
we had cost
they had cost
I had costed
you had costed
he/she/it had costed
we had costed
they had costed

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been costing
you had been costing
he/she/it had been costing
we had been costing
they had been costing

PRESENT

I cost
you cost
he/she/it costs
we cost
they cost

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am costing
you are costing
he/she/it is costing
we are costing
they are costing

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

costing

PRESENT PERFECT

I have cost
you have cost
he/she/it has cost
we have cost
they have cost
I have costed
you have costed
he/she/it has costed
we have costed
they have costed

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been costing
you have been costing
he/she/it has been costing
we have been costing
they have been costing

SIMPLE PAST

he/she/it cost

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