How Do You Spell DIG?

Pronunciation: [dˈɪɡ] (IPA)

The word "dig" is spelled with three letters - d, i, and g. The first sound is a voiced dental plosive represented by the letter "d" in the English alphabet. The second sound is a short, front, high vowel represented by the letter "i". The final sound is a voiced velar plosive represented by the letter "g". The word "dig" is commonly used as a simple verb to refer to the act of breaking up or excavating earth or other material.

DIG Meaning and Definition

Dig can be defined as a verb with multiple meanings depending on the context. Primarily, dig refers to the action of breaking up, turning over, or loosening the earth or any other material using a tool such as a shovel or spade. This action is commonly performed for various purposes like planting, excavating, or constructing. Additionally, dig can also pertain to the act of creating a hole or cavity by removing earth or other substances, often in search of something or to bury an object.

Figuratively, dig can be used when someone is investigating deeply or searching intensively for information, often revealing hidden or obscure details about a particular subject. It can also be used to describe the act of praising or appreciating someone enthusiastically, especially in a light-hearted or teasing manner, such as "digging" someone's sense of style or humor.

Furthermore, dig is often used colloquially to refer to enjoying or finding pleasure in something, such as music, art, or a particular activity. It can also be used metaphorically to describe understanding or grasping a concept or idea, as in "getting the dig."

Overall, dig encompasses various meanings ranging from physical actions like digging the earth to metaphorical interpretations of investigation, appreciation, and comprehension.

Top Common Misspellings for DIG *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for DIG

Etymology of DIG

The word "dig" has multiple etymological origins.

One source of the word comes from the Old English verb "dig-", which meant "to dig" or "to excavate". This Old English word is related to the Middle Low German word "diggen", the Middle Dutch word "diggelen", and the Old Norse word "dikja", all of which also mean "to dig".

Another source of the word "dig" comes from the Late Middle English term "dyke", which meant "a ditch" or "a trench". The word "dyke" was derived from the Middle Dutch word "dic" or "dijk", ultimately originating from the Old Norse word "diki", all of which referred to a "ditch" or an "embankment".

Idioms with the word DIG

  • dig yourself into a hole The idiom "dig yourself into a hole" means to get oneself into a difficult or problematic situation by saying or doing something that creates more trouble or complications than originally intended. It refers to the act of figuratively digging a hole in the ground, in which the individual becomes trapped or stuck and finds it challenging to escape the consequences of their actions.
  • dig (deep) into your pocket(s)/resources/savings The idiom "dig (deep) into your pocket(s)/resources/savings" means to spend or use a significant amount of money or resources, often beyond what is initially desired or expected. It implies a financial or resource commitment that may require extra effort, sacrifice, or depletion of one's reserves.
  • dig your heels in The idiom "dig your heels in" means to firmly refuse to change your opinion, attitude, or course of action, even if there is opposition or pressure to do so. It implies a stubborn determination to stand your ground and not give in to outside pressures.
  • dig your own grave The idiom "dig your own grave" means to unintentionally or unknowingly engage in actions or make choices that will ultimately lead to one's own downfall or ruin. It implies the sense of self-destruction or self-sabotage caused by one's own decisions or behavior.
  • poke/dig sb in the ribs The idiom "poke/dig someone in the ribs" means to jab or nudge someone with one's elbow or fist, usually in a playful or secretive manner, in order to draw their attention to something or to convey a message.
  • dig/dip into your pocket The idiom "dig/dip into your pocket" means to spend or contribute money, often reluctantly or with some difficulty. It signifies reaching into one's pocket or wallet to retrieve funds in order to make a payment or cover expenses. It can also imply generosity or selflessness when someone willingly contributes or donates money for a cause or to help someone.
  • dig sm dirt up The idiom "dig up some dirt" refers to the act of uncovering or discovering damaging or incriminating information about someone, usually to use it against them or tarnish their reputation. It implies the act of searching for hidden or secret details that may expose someone's flaws or wrongdoings.
  • dig up one's tomahawk
  • dig up (sm) dirt (on sb) The idiom "dig up (someone's) dirt (on somebody)" refers to the act of uncovering or discovering negative or incriminating information about someone, often with the intention of tarnishing their reputation or using it against them. It implies the act of conducting a thorough investigation or research to find embarrassing or damaging details about a person's past or present.
  • dig the dirt The idiom "dig the dirt" means to find or uncover damaging or embarrassing information about someone, typically with the intention of using it against them or for personal gain. It involves investigating, researching, or seeking out hidden details or secrets about a person's past or present that could potentially harm their reputation.
  • dig sm dirt up (on sm) The idiom "dig up dirt (on someone)" means to gather or uncover damaging or incriminating information about someone, often with the intention to harm or discredit them. It is often used to describe thorough investigations or research aimed at finding personal secrets or scandalous details about someone's past.
  • dig down The idiom "dig down" typically means to search deeply or thoroughly for information or resources. It can also refer to delving into one's own reserves or capabilities in order to accomplish something difficult or overcome a challenge.
  • dig deep The idiom "dig deep" typically means to put in extra effort or make a more vigorous attempt to resolve a problem, achieve a goal, or overcome a challenge, usually involving reaching within oneself for strength, determination, or resources. It implies delving into one's reserves, both mentally and physically, in order to accomplish something extensive or demanding.
  • dig up sth The idiom "dig up something" means to uncover, discover, or find information, facts, or evidence, typically from the past or hidden. It can also refer to physically digging into the ground to find or excavate something.
  • dig out sth The idiom "dig out something" means to find or retrieve something that is buried, hidden, or difficult to locate. It is often used in situations where one has to search or rummage through various things to uncover the desired item or information.
  • dig in your heels The idiom "dig in your heels" means to refuse to change your opinion or decision, and to resist or become stubbornly determined about a particular course of action. It suggests someone's unwillingness to compromise or back down.
  • dig in The idiom "dig in" has multiple meanings based on the context: 1. To start eating eagerly or with enthusiasm. Example: "When the food arrived, we all dug in and finished our plates." 2. To take a strong stand or position and refuse to back down. Example: "Despite facing criticism, she dug in and defended her unpopular ideas." 3. To commence or intensify a task or activity. Example: "Let's dig in and get this project finished on time." 4. To bury oneself or something under the ground. Example: "The dog likes to dig in the backyard and bury its bones." Overall, "dig in" implies a determined and enthusiastic approach towards starting or continuing an action, whether it pertains
  • take a dig at sm The idiom "take a dig at someone" means to make a sly or sarcastic comment or action directed at another person in order to criticize or mock them. It involves subtly or indirectly insulting or ridiculing someone.
  • give sm a dig The idiom "give someone a dig" refers to making a light or playful jab or poke at someone, either physically or verbally, often with the intention of teasing or provoking a reaction. It can also imply offering a small piece of information or insight that may catch someone off guard or surprise them.
  • Dig up! The idiom "Dig up!" is a colloquial expression used to encourage someone to disclose or reveal information or facts that are not readily known or easily accessible. It implies that the person should make efforts to research, investigate, or find out more about a particular subject or topic. It can also be used in a more literal sense, where someone is urged to physically dig or excavate to find or uncover something, often in a playful or joking manner.
  • dig out (of sth) The idiom "dig out (of something)" typically means to free oneself or someone else from a difficult or challenging situation, often by making a great effort or overcoming obstacles. It can also refer to physically removing oneself or someone from a particular place or location.
  • dig one's own grave The idiom "dig one's own grave" means to do something that will ultimately lead to one's own destruction, downfall, or failure, often due to one's own actions, choices, or decisions. It refers to metaphorically digging a hole or creating a situation that will result in negative consequences or harm oneself in the long run.
  • dig one's heels in To "dig one's heels in" means to refuse to change one's opinion, position, or decision, and to be stubbornly resistant to others' attempts to persuade or influence. It refers to a determined and unwavering resolve to stick to one's beliefs or plans, even in the face of opposition or pressure.
  • dig for sth The idiom "dig for sth" typically means to search or explore thoroughly, often in the context of seeking information, facts, or evidence. It implies a diligent and persistent effort to uncover or discover something.
  • dig at sm or sth The idiom "dig at someone or something" means to make a sarcastic comment or subtly criticize someone or something. It is usually done in a lighthearted or playful manner, often intending to highlight a flaw or provoke a reaction in a joking manner.
  • dig sth out The idiom "dig sth out" means to retrieve or find something that is buried, hidden, or difficult to find by searching or digging through something. It can be used both in a literal sense, such as finding an item buried in the ground, or in a figurative sense, like retrieving information or memories that are deeply buried in one's mind.
  • dig sth into sth The idiom "dig sth into sth" generally means to work or mix something into something else vigorously and thoroughly. It can also refer to burying something deeply or firmly in a particular substance or material.
  • dig sm or sth up The idiom "dig something up" means to find or discover something, often after searching or researching extensively. It can also refer to unearthing or revealing information or facts that have been forgotten, hidden, or overlooked.
  • dig sm or sth out of sth The idiom "dig something out of something" generally means to search or find something that is buried, hidden, or difficult to locate within a particular place or context. It can also be used figuratively, implying the act of uncovering or discovering something that may be forgotten or not easily accessible.
  • dig sm or sth in sth The idiom "dig (someone or something) in (something)" typically means to bury or place someone or something deep into a particular substance or material. It can be used both in a literal sense, such as digging someone into the sand at the beach, or in a figurative sense, implying deeply engaging or involving someone or something in a certain situation or activity.
  • dig in heels The idiom "dig in heels" means to refuse to change one's stance or opinion, and to resist or refuse to do something, often stubbornly or resolutely. It typically describes a determined or stubborn resistance to change or to giving in to pressure.
  • dig heels in When someone "digs their heels in," it means that they strongly resist or refuse to change their position, opinion, or course of action, even when faced with opposition or pressure to do so. It suggests a stubborn determination to stand firm and not back down.
  • dig in one's heels The idiom "dig in one's heels" means to refuse to change one's position or standpoint, often in a stubborn or resistant manner, regardless of pressure or opposition from others. It refers to the behavior of digging one's heels into the ground to resist being moved.
  • dig into The idiom "dig into" typically means to begin eating something with enthusiasm or to start devouring something eagerly. It can also be used figuratively to describe engaging deeply or intensely in a task, topic, or activity.
  • dig own grave The idiom "dig own grave" means to engage in actions or behave in a way that leads to one's own downfall or negative consequences. It refers to someone who is unknowingly or intentionally putting themselves in a disadvantageous or harmful situation through their own decisions or actions.
  • dig up dirt The idiom "dig up dirt" is commonly used to mean finding or uncovering incriminating or damaging information about someone, typically for the purpose of tarnishing their reputation or causing harm.
  • dig somebody in the ribs The idiom "dig somebody in the ribs" means to gently or playfully poke someone in the ribs with one's elbow or fingers. It is often used to attract someone's attention or to indicate a shared understanding or secret between two people.
  • dig deep (into something) The idiom "dig deep (into something)" means to make an effort to thoroughly understand or research a topic or issue. It entails delving deeply into a subject, often by conducting extensive research, analyzing various aspects, or exploring different perspectives. This idiom conveys the idea of investing time, effort, and mental energy to gain comprehensive knowledge or insight into a particular matter.
  • dig (deep) in/into your pocket(s), savings, etc. The idiom "dig (deep) in/into your pocket(s), savings, etc." means to spend or contribute a significant amount of money, usually more than expected or desired. It implies reaching into one's financial resources and putting forth a substantial effort to cover a cost or contribute to something. This expression is often used when someone is faced with unexpected expenses or when additional funds are required to support a particular endeavor.
  • dig your heels/toes in The idiom "dig your heels/toes in" means to refuse to change one's opinion, stance, or decision, and to resist any attempts to persuade or convince otherwise. It refers to stubbornly holding onto a position or belief, often in a determined or obstinate manner.
  • dig a grave for yourself The idiom "dig a grave for yourself" means to engage in actions or behavior that will inevitably lead to one's own downfall or failure. It implies making choices or decisions that are self-destructive, harmful, or counterproductive, ultimately leading to negative consequences or outcomes.
  • dig (oneself) an early grave The idiom "dig (oneself) an early grave" is used to describe a situation in which someone is engaging in self-destructive behavior that will likely lead to their own downfall, ruin, or demise. It suggests that the individual's actions or choices are harmful, detrimental, or dangerous, and may result in severe consequences or even premature death.
  • dig (someone) an early grave The idiom "dig (someone) an early grave" means to contribute to or hasten someone's downfall, ruin, or demise through one's actions, words, or behavior. It implies that someone is actively or unintentionally causing harm or problems that may result in a negative outcome or consequences for another person.
  • Big Dig The idiom "Big Dig" refers to a significant and costly construction project, typically involving extensive excavation or tunneling. It originated from the project with the same name, which was a major infrastructure undertaking in Boston, Massachusetts, that involved rerouting highways and creating tunnels. Therefore, "Big Dig" is often used figuratively to describe any large-scale, intricate, and expensive endeavor.
  • dig (deep) into (one's) pocket(s) The idiom "dig (deep) into (one's) pocket(s)" means to spend or donate a significant amount of money. It implies that the person needs to reach into their pockets and expend more money than they initially intended or expected.
  • dig (someone) The idiom "dig (someone)" is an informal phrase that means to like or admire someone very much. It implies finding someone attractive, enjoyable, or fascinating.
  • dig (something) The idiom "dig (something)" typically means to enjoy, understand, or appreciate something. It is often used to express a positive sentiment towards something or to convey enthusiasm for a particular person, thing, or situation.
  • dig (someone or oneself) out of a hole The idiom "dig (someone or oneself) out of a hole" means to help someone or oneself out of a difficult or problematic situation. It refers to providing assistance or support to overcome difficulties, challenges, or mistakes, similar to helping someone escape from a metaphorical hole in the ground.
  • dig a pit for The idiom "dig a pit for" means to deliberately create a situation or set of circumstances that can harm or sabotage someone, often with the intention of causing their downfall or defeat. It implies cunning and malicious intent to trap or deceive someone.
  • dig at The idiom "dig at" typically means to make a sarcastic, critical, or mocking remark about someone or something in a subtle or indirect way. It can be used to express an indirect criticism, often with a humorous or teasing tone.
  • dig at (someone or something) The idiom "dig at (someone or something)" means to make a sly or subtle critical comment or gesture towards someone or something, usually with an intention to mock or provoke a reaction. It can be used to express sarcasm, ridicule, or disapproval towards the targeted person or thing.
  • dig for The idiom "dig for" means to search or seek something diligently, often requiring effort or persistence. It can be used both literally, referring to physically digging in the ground, and figuratively, in the sense of searching or investigating thoroughly.
  • dig for (something) The idiom "dig for (something)" typically means to search or inquire intensively and persistently in order to find or obtain something desired, whether it is information, evidence, or a physical object. It implies putting in effort, often involving deep research or investigation, to uncover or discover the desired target.
  • dig in(to) (something) The idiomatic expression "dig in(to) (something)" means to begin eating a meal with enthusiasm and gusto, often using one's hands or utensils to consume the food eagerly. It can also be used in a metaphorical sense, indicating a determined and focused approach to tackling a task or delving into a subject matter.
  • dig it The idiom "dig it" means to understand or appreciate something. It can also be used to express enthusiasm or enjoyment towards something.
  • dig it out The idiom "dig it out" typically means to excavate or remove something that is buried or hidden, either physically or metaphorically. It can refer to uncovering a physical object from the ground or digging through information, thoughts, or memories to retrieve or rediscover something.
  • dig out The idiom "dig out" generally means to remove something, especially by digging or excavating. In a figurative sense, it can also refer to uncovering or finding information or items from the past.
  • dig out of The idiom "dig out of" typically means to extricate oneself or someone else from a difficult or challenging situation by working hard or making significant efforts. It implies the need for determination, persistence, and diligent effort to overcome obstacles or problems.
  • dig out of (something) The idiom "dig out of (something)" generally refers to overcoming or extricating oneself from a difficult or challenging situation, often by putting in a lot of effort or making significant effort towards improvement. It implies the idea of taking action to get out of a problem, similar to how one would physically dig themselves out of a hole.
  • dig some dirt up The idiom "dig some dirt up" refers to the act of searching for or uncovering information or secrets about someone, often with the intention of using it against them or for personal gain.
  • dig this The idiom "dig this" typically means to understand or appreciate something in an enthusiastic manner. It can also be used to request or persuade someone to pay attention or listen carefully.
  • dig up tomahawk
  • dig yourself a hole The idiom "dig yourself a hole" means to unintentionally create a difficult or problematic situation for oneself by saying or doing something foolish, inappropriate, or ill-advised. It suggests that a person's actions or words are leading to negative consequences or trouble, resembling digging a hole that becomes progressively deeper and harder to get out of.
  • give a dig The idiom "give a dig" means to make a subtle or sarcastic remark, often intended to criticize or mock someone. It can also refer to a small, playful physical jab or poke.
  • give someone a dig The idiom "give someone a dig" typically means to make a brief, light and playful jab or poke at someone, often with the intention of teasing or provoking them in a lighthearted manner. It can also refer to lightly criticizing or teasing someone by making a witty or sarcastic remark.
  • take a dig at The idiom "take a dig at" means to make a critical or disparaging remark about someone or something in a subtle or indirect manner. It typically involves a sarcastic or snide comment aimed at mocking or belittling someone.
  • take a dig at someone The idiom "take a dig at someone" means to make a sarcastic or critical remark about someone, usually with the intention of mocking or ridiculing them. It typically involves subtly or indirectly insulting someone, often in a playful or teasing manner.
  • dig someone or something in something The idiom "dig someone or something in something" typically means to bury or place someone or something deep into a particular substance or material. It is often used in literal contexts, such as digging someone in the sand at the beach, burying a treasure in the ground, or planting a stake in the soil.
  • dig something into something The idiom "dig something into something" typically means to forcefully or deeply embed or bury an object into a particular substance or material. It can also be used metaphorically to convey the idea of firmly establishing or ingraining something in a specific context or situation.
  • dig something out The idiom "dig something out" means to search or retrieve something that is buried, hidden, or difficult to find. It can be used both literally and figuratively, implying the act of locating and bringing to the surface something, whether it is a physical object, information, memories, or ideas.
  • dig someone or something up The idiom "dig someone or something up" generally means to find or discover information or facts about someone or something that has been hidden or forgotten, typically by conducting research or investigation.
  • dig into your pocket The idiom "dig into your pocket" means to spend or contribute money for a particular purpose, often in a generous or substantial manner. It signifies the act of reaching into one's pocket to retrieve money for a specific expense or donation.
  • dig some dirt up (on someone) The idiom "dig some dirt up (on someone)" means to uncover or discover damaging or incriminating information or secrets about someone, often with the intention of using it against them or exposing them. It typically refers to gathering information about someone's personal or professional life that may be embarrassing or harmful to their reputation.
  • dig the dirt (or dig up dirt) The idiom "dig the dirt" or "dig up dirt" means to gather or uncover secret or damaging information about someone, often for the purpose of exposing or discrediting them. It refers to investigating or delving into someone's personal or professional life to uncover potentially scandalous or embarrassing information.
  • dig (oneself) in(to) a hole The idiom "dig (oneself) in(to) a hole" means to unintentionally worsen a situation through one's own actions or statements, especially when trying to defend or justify oneself. It refers to a person metaphorically digging a hole for themselves, making it harder to escape or recover from the situation.

Similar spelling words for DIG

Plural form of DIG is DIGS

Conjugate verb Dig

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have dug
you would have dug
he/she/it would have dug
we would have dug
they would have dug

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been digging
you would have been digging
he/she/it would have been digging
we would have been digging
they would have been digging

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would dig
you would dig
he/she/it would dig
we would dig
they would dig

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be digging
you would be digging
he/she/it would be digging
we would be digging
they would be digging

FUTURE

I will dig
you will dig
he/she/it will dig
we will dig
they will dig

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be digging
you will be digging
he/she/it will be digging
we will be digging
they will be digging

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have dug
you will have dug
he/she/it will have dug
we will have dug
they will have dug

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been digging
you will have been digging
he/she/it will have been digging
we will have been digging
they will have been digging

IMPERATIVE

we Let´s dig

PAST

I dug
we dug
you dug
he/she/it dug
they dug

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was digging
you were digging
he/she/it was digging
we were digging
they were digging

PAST PARTICIPLE

dug; digged

PAST PERFECT

I had dug
you had dug
he/she/it had dug
we had dug
they had dug

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been digging
you had been digging
he/she/it had been digging
we had been digging
they had been digging

PRESENT

I dig
you dig
he/she/it digs
we dig
they dig

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am digging
you are digging
he/she/it is digging
we are digging
they are digging

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

digging

PRESENT PERFECT

I have dug
you have dug
he/she/it has dug
we have dug
they have dug

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been digging
you have been digging
he/she/it has been digging
we have been digging
they have been digging

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it dig

SIMPLE PAST

I dug; digged
you dug; digged
he/she/it dug; digged
we dug; digged
they dug; digged

Infographic

Add the infographic to your website: