How Do You Spell DOLLAR?

Pronunciation: [dˈɒlə] (IPA)

The word "dollar" is spelled with two L's in American English, whereas in British English it's spelled with one L. In IPA phonetic transcription, it's spelled /ˈdɒlər/ in British English and /ˈdɑːlər/ in American English. The difference in spelling reflects the differences in pronunciation between the two dialects, with American English typically pronouncing the vowel in "dollar" with a longer sound. It's important to note these spelling differences when communicating with speakers of different English dialects.

DOLLAR Meaning and Definition

A dollar is the primary unit of currency in the United States, also used in several other countries. It is a standard monetary unit that denotes a specific value, symbolized by the symbol "$". The term "dollar" originates from the Thaler, a silver coin used in Europe in the 16th century. Today, a dollar is typically represented in both physical and digital form, including paper bills and digital transactions.

In the United States, the dollar is divided into smaller denominations, such as cents (1 cent = 1/100th of a dollar). These smaller units are represented by coins (e.g., pennies, dimes, and quarters) and are used for everyday transactions. The dollar serves as a medium of exchange for various goods and services, allowing individuals to buy and sell items within the economy.

The value of a dollar can fluctuate relative to other currencies in the foreign exchange market. Exchange rates determine how much one currency is worth compared to another. As such, the value of a dollar can impact international trade, investments, and economic policies.

Beyond the United States, the term "dollar" is also used in other countries as their official currency, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and several countries in the Caribbean. However, the value and exchange rate of these dollars can differ from the U.S. dollar.

In summary, a dollar is a standard unit of currency in the United States and other countries, which can be represented as physical bills or digital transactions, and divided into smaller denominations for everyday usage.

Top Common Misspellings for DOLLAR *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for DOLLAR

Etymology of DOLLAR

The word "dollar" has its etymology rooted in the German language. It originated from the Low German word "daler" or "dahler", which was a widely-used currency in the trade networks of the Hanseatic League during the late Middle Ages. The term "daler" ultimately comes from the German word "Taler", which was the nickname for a silver coin called the Joachimsthaler.

The Joachimsthaler was first minted in the 16th century in the town of Joachimsthal (now Jáchymov, Czech Republic). It gained popularity due to the high silver content and became a widely-used currency throughout Europe. As European traders encountered this currency, they adopted its name or variations of it. For example, in Dutch it became "daalder" and in Spanish "dólar". English speakers eventually borrowed it as "dollar".

Idioms with the word DOLLAR

  • you can bet your bottom dollar, at you can bet your life The idiom "you can bet your bottom dollar" or "you can bet your life" is used to express absolute certainty or confidence in something happening or being true. It implies that one is so confident in their belief or prediction that they are willing to wager everything they own or even their life on it.
  • pay top dollar The idiom "pay top dollar" means to pay the highest price possible for something or to pay more than the average or expected price. It implies a willingness to spend a significant amount of money in order to acquire something.
  • the almighty dollar The idiom "the almighty dollar" refers to the belief that money holds immense power and influence, highlighting the idea that financial wealth often takes precedence over other values or considerations in society.
  • day late and a dollar short The idiom "day late and a dollar short" is used to describe someone who is always late or unprepared, often missing out on an opportunity or failing to meet expectations due to procrastination or lack of foresight. It means being behind or inadequate in both timing and resources to achieve the desired outcome.
  • a day late and a dollar short The idiom "a day late and a dollar short" refers to someone or something that is too late or too little to be of any use or to have any impact, usually in regards to solving a problem or meeting a goal. It implies that the person or thing missed the opportunity to make a difference or provide a timely solution.
  • dollar signs in sb's eyes The idiom "dollar signs in someone's eyes" is used to describe a person's intense greed or desire for money or material wealth. It suggests that the person is solely focused on financial gain and is willing to prioritize it above all else.
  • you can bet your life bottom dollar The idiom "you can bet your life bottom dollar" means that you are confident or certain about something. It suggests that you are willing to wager everything you have, symbolized by your last dollar, on the truth or outcome of a statement or situation.
  • you bet your bottom dollar The idiom "you bet your bottom dollar" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something. It indicates a strong belief or assurance in the truth or success of a statement or action.
  • bet bottom dollar The idiom "bet bottom dollar" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something, often used to convey certainty in the outcome of a situation or to express a high degree of trust or belief in someone or something. It essentially means to bet or wager one's last dollar or most valuable possession, emphasizing how sure one is about the outcome.
  • be as sound as a dollar The idiom "be as sound as a dollar" refers to something that is reliable, trustworthy, and of good quality. It signifies a strong and sturdy state, similar to the dependability and strength associated with the value of a dollar.
  • you (can) bet your bottom dollar The idiom "you (can) bet your bottom dollar" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something. It implies that the speaker is willing to wager their last dollar on the certainty or truth of the statement being made.
  • you can bet your life/your bottom dollar The idiom "you can bet your life/your bottom dollar" means that something is certain or guaranteed. It expresses a high level of confidence or absolute certainty about something.
  • dollar for dollar The idiom "dollar for dollar" refers to an economic exchange or trade where the value of one item or action is equal to that of another. It implies a fair and equal exchange or equivalency, typically used to express a balanced financial transaction.
  • bet one's bottom dollar
  • dollar signs in eyes The idiom "dollar signs in eyes" refers to a person's intense greed or obsession with accumulating wealth. It implies that someone is driven solely by the desire for money and is willing to prioritize financial gain over other considerations.
  • you can bet your life/your bottom dollar (on something/(that)…) The idiom "you can bet your life/your bottom dollar (on something/(that)…)" means being extremely confident and convinced about the certainty or outcome of a particular event or situation. It signifies that the person's belief or assurance is so strong that they are willing to stake their life or all their money on it. In essence, it emphasizes the high level of certainty or trust in the statement being made.
  • the 64,000 dollar question The idiom "the 64,000 dollar question" refers to an extremely important or difficult question, often one that is central to a topic, situation, or issue. It implies that the question carries significant value or carries a high stake in terms of its impact, meaning, or consequences.
  • another day, another dollar The idiom "another day, another dollar" means that the result or outcome of a situation is insignificant or unremarkable, as it suggests that each day is uneventful or ordinary, with no significant changes in one's earnings or circumstances. It is often used to express a sense of mundane routine or lack of excitement in one's daily life or work.
  • bet one’s bottom dollar The idiom "bet one's bottom dollar" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something. It is often used to express a strong belief or assurance that something will happen or be true, even to the point of risking one's last dollar on it.
  • bet your bottom dollar The idiom "bet your bottom dollar" means to be absolutely certain or confident about something, often indicating a strong belief in the outcome of a situation. It implies that someone is willing to risk everything they have, even the very last dollar they possess, on the outcome being true or correct.
  • one’s bottom dollar The idiom "one's bottom dollar" means someone's last or remaining amount of money or their absolute assurance or confidence in something. It indicates that someone is willing to bet or rely on the small amount of money they have left, emphasizing the belief they have in the outcome or their commitment.
  • pay, earn, charge, etc. top dollar The definition of the idiom "pay, earn, charge, etc. top dollar" is to pay, earn, or charge the highest price or rate for something. It refers to the act of paying or receiving a premium price for goods, services, or work performed.
  • adobe dollar
  • dollar signs in (one's) eyes The idiom "dollar signs in (one's) eyes" is used to describe someone who is excessively motivated by the possibility of making money or becoming rich. It suggests that the individual is overly focused on financial gain, often to the point of ignoring other important factors or behaving unethically.
  • sixty-four-dollar question The idiom "sixty-four-dollar question" refers to a crucial or pivotal question that is particularly difficult or important to answer. It suggests that the answer to this question holds significant relevance or consequence.
  • sound as a dollar The idiom "sound as a dollar" typically means something or someone that is stable, reliable, and trustworthy. It refers to financial steadiness and soundness, suggesting that the person or thing in question is solid and in good condition.
  • the gray dollar The idiom "the gray dollar" refers to the economic power and consumer spending of older generations, particularly those who are retired or nearing retirement age. It represents the influence and financial potential of older individuals in the marketplace, as they often have accumulated wealth and disposable income.
  • the pink dollar The idiom "the pink dollar" refers to the economic power and purchasing potential of the LGBTQ+ community. It reflects the notion that businesses, brands, and markets can specifically target and cater to this demographic to tap into their consumer spending. The term originated from the association of the color pink with gay culture and the symbol of the dollar sign representing the monetary aspect of this demographic's economic influence.
  • the sixty-four thousand dollar question The idiom "the sixty-four thousand dollar question" refers to a very important or difficult question, often the most crucial one in a given situation or topic. It suggests a question that carries a high degree of significance, value, or difficulty. The phrase originated from the popular American game show "The $64,000 Question" that aired from 1955 to 1958, where contestants would attempt to answer extremely challenging questions for a chance to win a large sum of money.
  • the sixty-four-dollar question "The sixty-four-dollar question" is an idiom that refers to a crucial or pivotal question, often in a context where the answer will greatly impact the outcome or understanding of a situation. It implies that the answer is both valuable and sought after, similar to winning a significant amount of money.
  • top dollar The idiom "top dollar" refers to the highest possible price or payment that someone is willing to pay for something. It implies that an item or service is of exceptional value and worth the highest amount.

Similar spelling words for DOLLAR

Plural form of DOLLAR is DOLLARS

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