How Do You Spell ETC?

Pronunciation: [ɛtsˈɛtɹə] (IPA)

The word "etc" is an abbreviation of the Latin phrase "et cetera," meaning "and so forth." In IPA phonetic transcription, it is spelled /ɛt ˈsɛtərə/. The word is commonly used to indicate that a list is not exhaustive and there are other items that could be included. It is usually followed by a comma to separate it from the rest of the list. It is important to note that "etc" is not an appropriate substitute for actual examples or important information that should be included in the list.

ETC Meaning and Definition

Etc, short for et cetera, is a Latin term that translates to "and other similar things" or "and so on" in English. It is commonly used in both spoken and written language to indicate that there are additional items, examples, or ideas that are not explicitly mentioned but can be inferred or generalized.

Etc is typically used in lists or enumerations to save time and space when repeating similar elements or to avoid an exhaustive recounting of all the possibilities. It implies that the list could continue or that there are other unspecified items belonging to the same category or context.

For instance, in a sentence like "I love reading novels, biographies, poetry, etc.," the use of etc indicates that the speaker enjoys reading other genres but hasn't included them for brevity. Similarly, in "Please bring pens, papers, notebooks, etc. to the meeting," it suggests that other necessary stationery items are also expected.

The use of etc is not limited to tangible items; it can also refer to other concepts, such as "She enjoys activities like hiking, painting, photography, etc." This indicates that there are additional activities beyond the examples given that are also enjoyable to the individual.

Overall, etc is a useful linguistic device that allows for succinct expression, implying that there are more relevant things that could be mentioned without explicitly listing them all.

Common Misspellings for ETC

Etymology of ETC

The word "etc" is an abbreviation for the Latin expression "et cetera", which translates to "and others" or "and so forth". "Et" means "and", while "cetera" means "the rest" or "the remaining ones". This abbreviation is commonly used to indicate that there are other similar items or elements that could be included but are not explicitly listed.

Idioms with the word ETC

  • a load of rubbish, nonsense, etc. The idiom "a load of rubbish, nonsense, etc." refers to something that is considered completely untrue, worthless, or without value. It is a dismissive phrase used to express a strong disbelief or lack of belief in a statement, idea, or claim.
  • a pillar of society, etc. The idiom "a pillar of society" refers to an individual who is highly respected, influential, and seen as a crucial and reliable supporter or example within their community. This person typically demonstrates strong moral values, integrity, and actively contributes to the well-being and progress of society. They are often considered a foundation or essential element that upholds and strengthens the social fabric. The idiom can also be used in similar contexts such as "a pillar of the community" or "a pillar of the church" to denote the same meaning in specific settings.
  • a sight too good, too much, etc. The idiom "a sight too good, too much, etc." is used to express astonishment, surprise, or overwhelming appreciation for something that exceeds one's expectations or is extraordinary in a positive way. It implies that whatever is being described is beyond what is considered normal or usual, often in a way that is almost unbelievable or remarkable.
  • a week tomorrow, on Monday, etc. The idiom "a week tomorrow, on Monday, etc." refers to an event or action that will take place a week after the day being mentioned. For example, if someone says, "I'll see you next Wednesday," and today is Wednesday, they mean they will see you exactly a week from now on the following Wednesday.
  • a week yesterday, last Monday, etc. The idiom "a week yesterday, last Monday, etc." is used to refer to a time period that occurred exactly one week before the present moment, or the current day. It indicates the specific day of the week that happened seven days prior to the current day.
  • go down well, badly, etc. The idiom "go down well, badly, etc." refers to how something is received and perceived by others. It describes to what extent something is appreciated, accepted, or liked by a particular audience or group of people. The phrase can be used to express whether something has elicited a positive, negative, or neutral reaction.
  • half a minute, tick, second, etc. The idiom "half a minute, tick, second, etc." is used to express the speaker's request for a brief moment or a short amount of time. It implies a temporary pause or delay, indicating that the person will attend to something shortly.
  • in the teeth of danger, opposition, etc. The idiom "in the teeth of danger, opposition, etc." is used to describe a situation where someone or something faces a challenge, threat, or obstacle directly and boldly, without retreat or concealment. It implies confronting the danger or opposition head-on, without hesitation or fear.
  • lucky you, me, etc. The idiom "lucky you, me, etc." is an expression used to express good fortune or positive circumstances that someone else has experienced. It is often used sarcastically or ironically to highlight one's own feelings of envy or disappointment in comparison to the other person's luck or advantage.
  • more fool you, them, etc. The idiom "more fool you, them, etc." is used to express criticism or disapproval of someone's foolish actions or decisions. It implies that the person being addressed lacks wisdom or judgment. It can be seen as a way of saying, "You are even more foolish than I originally thought."
  • pique somebody's interest, curiosity, etc. The idiom "pique somebody's interest, curiosity, etc." means to arouse, stimulate, or provoke someone's interest, curiosity, or other feelings of interest or curiosity in something. It implies capturing someone's attention or engaging them in a way that makes them want to know more or explore further.
  • stuff him, that, etc. The idiom "stuff him, that, etc." is an exclamation used to express contempt, disregard, or dismissal towards someone or something. It often signifies a strong feeling of not caring or being bothered about someone or their opinions.
  • the top ten, twenty, etc. The idiom "the top ten, twenty, etc." refers to a ranking or list of the best or most significant individuals, things, or achievements in a particular category. It indicates the highest or most prestigious position within a specific context.
  • to yourself, himself, etc. The idiom "to oneself, himself, etc." means doing something in a solitary or private manner, away from the presence or involvement of others. It refers to engaging in an activity or behaving in a certain way without external influence or interference.
  • trust you, him, her, etc. The idiom "trust you, him, her, etc." means to have faith or confidence in someone's actions, abilities, or intentions. It implies that one believes the person can be relied upon and is trustworthy.
  • up and leave, go, etc. The idiom "up and leave, go, etc." refers to abruptly or suddenly departing from a place or situation without any notice or explanation. It implies the act of leaving swiftly and without any lingering or hesitation.
  • your, his, etc. name is mud The idiom "your, his, etc. name is mud" means that someone's reputation or image has been tarnished, usually as a result of being involved in a scandal, controversy, or some kind of disreputable behavior. It suggests that the person's name is associated with disgrace or disfavor.
  • your, his, etc. word is law The idiom "your, his, etc. word is law" is used to indicate that a specific person's statement or decision is considered final and must be obeyed or accepted without question. It implies that their authority or influence is unquestionable and holds significant weight or power in a particular situation.
  • your, his, etc. word is your, his, etc. bond The idiom "your, his, etc. word is your, his, etc. bond" means that a person's promise or verbal agreement is as binding and trustworthy as a formal, written contract. It implies that the individual's integrity and honesty are highly regarded and that their words can be relied upon without any written documentation.
  • it's/that's not saying much, etc. The idiom "it's/that's not saying much" is used to express the belief that a particular accomplishment, quality, or statement is not impressive or significant. It suggests that the standard or comparison being made is relatively low, thus diminishing the significance of the subject in question.
  • be puffed up with pride, etc. The idiom "be puffed up with pride, etc." means to be filled with an excessive amount of pride, arrogance, or self-importance. It describes someone who is overly proud and boastful about their accomplishments or attributes.
  • be the picture of health, happiness, etc. The idiom "be the picture of health, happiness, etc." means to appear or exhibit a great state of health, happiness, or any other positive quality. It suggests someone or something that looks or presents themselves as being in an extremely good condition or mental state.
  • good for you, him, etc. The idiom "good for you, him, etc." is typically used as a sarcastic or insincere response to someone's accomplishment, positive news, or success. It implies a lack of genuine enthusiasm or congratulations towards the person being addressed. It is often employed when the speaker feels indifferent, jealous, or dismissive of the other person's achievements.
  • make the most of yourself, himself, etc. The idiom "make the most of yourself, himself, etc." means to fully utilize or develop one's abilities, qualities, or potential in order to achieve success or improve oneself. It implies maximizing opportunities, striving for personal growth, and making the best use of one's talents and capabilities.
  • speak for myself, himself, etc. The idiom "speak for myself, himself, etc." means to express one's own personal opinion or viewpoint, usually in contrast or opposition to the opinions of others. It signifies that the speaker is sharing their individual perspective and does not intend to represent or speak on behalf of anyone else.
  • a recipe for disaster, success, etc. The idiom "a recipe for disaster" is used to describe a situation, plan, or combination of elements that is likely to result in a disastrous outcome or outcome that is highly undesirable. It implies that the specific factors or circumstances involved are likely to lead to negative consequences or failure. Similarly, the idiom "a recipe for success" refers to a combination of elements or factors that are likely to lead to a successful outcome or achievement of desired goals.
  • your, his, etc. word of honour The idiom "your/his/etc. word of honour" refers to a solemn and binding promise or commitment that someone makes, emphasizing their trustworthiness and integrity. It implies that the individual's word is absolutely reliable and can be taken as a guarantee of their sincerity and commitment to follow through on their promise.
  • be pushing 40, 50, etc. The idiom "be pushing 40, 50, etc." is used to describe someone who is approaching or getting close to a particular age. It implies that the person is close to reaching the next decade of their age, such as being close to turning 40 or 50.
  • your, his, etc. heart is in the right place The idiom "your, his, etc. heart is in the right place" is used to describe someone who may make mistakes or have shortcomings but has good intentions or a kind and well-meaning nature. It suggests that despite any flaws or errors, the person's underlying intentions and motives are sincere and good-hearted.
  • only too glad, ready, etc. The idiom "only too glad, ready, etc." means to be extremely willing, eager, or enthusiastic about doing something. It denotes a strong willingness or readiness to assist or participate in a particular action or task.
  • every inch a/the leader, star, hero, etc. The idiom "every inch a/the leader, star, hero, etc." means someone who fully embodies the qualities or characteristics associated with being a leader, star, hero, etc., in every aspect or detail. It indicates that the person in question possesses all the essential qualities and exhibits the expected behavior, leaving no doubt about their competence or excellence in their respective field.
  • a law unto himself, herself, etc. The idiom "a law unto himself, herself" refers to someone who behaves or acts independently, disregarding the rules or conventions that govern others. It implies that the person does things according to their own desires, decisions, or principles, without conforming to external norms or guidelines. They often exhibit an attitude of self-reliance and autonomy, making choices without seeking validation or approval from others.
  • no prizes for guessing what..., who..., etc. The idiom "no prizes for guessing what..., who..., etc." is used to indicate that something is very obvious or easily predictable. It implies that there is no need for any special effort or intelligence to determine the answer or outcome. It suggests that the answer or outcome is so clear that even a simple guess would be correct.
  • be more than glad, ready, etc. The idiom "be more than glad, ready, etc." means to be extremely willing, enthusiastic, or eager to do something. It expresses a strong desire or readiness to take part in or engage with a particular activity or situation. For example, if someone says they are "more than glad" to help you, it implies that they are very happy and willing to assist you, going beyond what is simply expected.
  • more than a little excited, shocked, etc. The idiom "more than a little excited, shocked, etc." means to be extremely and intensely overwhelmed by an emotion such as excitement, shock, or any other strong feeling. It implies a heightened level of that emotion beyond what would be considered normal or expected.
  • to the tune of $500, etc. The idiom "to the tune of $500, etc." means to a large or significant amount, typically regarding a cost, price, or expense. It implies that the mentioned dollar amount or value is substantial and noteworthy.
  • not for the life of me, etc. The idiom "not for the life of me" is used to express strong disbelief or refusal, indicating that no matter what efforts are made, the speaker cannot or will not do something. It implies that the action or possibility is completely unimaginable or impossible for the speaker, regardless of their determination or willpower.
  • a glutton for punishment, work, etc. The idiom "a glutton for punishment, work, etc." refers to a person who willingly or excessively subjects themselves to difficult or unpleasant experiences. It implies that the individual has a tendency or inclination to endure challenging circumstances, often to an extent that may appear unnecessary or excessive to others.
  • your, his, etc. pet hate The idiom "your, his, etc. pet hate" refers to something that someone dislikes or finds extremely irritating. It is a person's particular and strong aversion towards a specific thing, activity, or behavior. It is something that consistently annoys or bothers them, often beyond what it may typically bother others. The word "pet" in this context conveys the sense of an individual's personal, cherished dislike or annoyance.
  • a paid-up member, etc. The idiom "a paid-up member" refers to someone who has fully paid the required fees or dues to become a member of a particular organization, group, or club. Similarly, "a paid-up subscriber" or "a paid-up shareholder" indicates that someone has paid all the necessary fees to maintain their subscription or ownership in an organization or company. In general, the term signifies full compliance with the payment obligations, indicating active and recognized membership or involvement in a specific group or entity.
  • no matter who, what, where, when, etc. The idiom "no matter who, what, where, when, etc." is used to convey that something is irrelevant regardless of the circumstances. It suggests that nothing or no one can change or affect a particular outcome, decision, or situation. It emphasizes the universality of a certain condition or action, implying that it will always remain constant regardless of the variables involved.
  • kick up a fuss, row, etc. The definition of the idiom "kick up a fuss, row, etc." is to express strong dissatisfaction or protest, often in a loud or aggressive manner. It refers to causing a commotion or creating a disturbance to draw attention to a particular issue or to voice discontent.
  • your mother's, wife's, etc. apron strings The idiom "your mother's, wife's, etc. apron strings" refers to being excessively dependent on someone, typically a female figure such as one's mother or wife. It suggests that the person is unable or unwilling to make decisions or act independently, constantly seeking guidance or approval from the mentioned person. It implies a lack of autonomy and independence.
  • a walking dictionary, encyclopedia, etc. The idiom "a walking dictionary, encyclopedia, etc." refers to a person who possesses an extensive knowledge or expertise on a specific subject or various subjects. It suggests that the individual has a remarkable ability to recall and share information, providing an abundance of facts and details as if they were a living, portable reference source.
  • not for nothing do I, will they, etc.... The idiom "not for nothing do I, will they, etc...." is used to emphasize that something is not done or said without good reason or purpose. It suggests that there is a significant reason behind a particular action or statement.
  • your, his, etc. hackles rise The idiom "your, his, etc. hackles rise" refers to feeling intense anger, irritation, or defensiveness in response to a situation or comment. It is commonly used to indicate someone's strong emotional reaction characterized by their hair standing on end, as in the rigid hairs of an animal's neck or back when it is threatened or provoked. This idiom suggests a heightened sensitivity or an instinctual response to feeling provoked or offended.
  • take somebody out of himself, herself, etc. The idiom "take somebody out of himself, herself, etc." means to help someone escape their current, typically negative, state of mind or emotions. It refers to an action or experience that redirects their focus, temporarily shifting away from their own worries, problems, or self-centered thoughts. This idiom usually implies that the person becomes more engaged, animated, or uplifted as they are momentarily removed from their own troubles and preoccupations.
  • be pressed/pushed for money, space, time, etc. The idiom "be pressed/pushed for money, space, time, etc." means to be in a situation where one is experiencing a shortage or lack of something, particularly in terms of financial resources, physical room, available time, or similar constraints. It implies feeling pressure or being in a tight situation due to the scarcity of the mentioned element.
  • on the road to ruin, disaster, etc. The idiom "on the road to ruin, disaster, etc." refers to someone or something being destined or heading towards a destructive, disastrous, or negative outcome or fate. It suggests that the person or situation is on a path that will lead to failure, ruin, or trouble.
  • the first flush of youth, enthusiasm, etc. The idiom "the first flush of youth, enthusiasm, etc." refers to the initial or early stage of something, typically characterized by a high level of excitement, energy, or passion. It describes the initial period when someone experiences the full intensity or freshness of youth, enthusiasm, love, or any other intense feeling or activity. It implies a sense of novelty and unbridled enthusiasm that may wane or change with time or experience.
  • be the wrong side of 30 etc The idiom "be the wrong side of 30" is used to describe someone who is older than the age of 30, often implying that they are too old for a specific activity, trend, or behavior. It suggests that they have crossed a threshold where age may be seen as a drawback or disadvantage.
  • on the road to recovery, stardom, etc. The idiom "on the road to recovery, stardom, etc." means making progress or moving towards a particular goal or desired outcome. It implies that the person or situation being referred to has overcome some difficulties or hurdles and is now actively working towards achieving success or improvement.
  • make, etc. a dent in something To make an impact or achieve progress in a particular task or goal.
  • his, her, etc. face is like thunder The idiom "his, her, etc. face is like thunder" means that someone appears extremely angry or upset, often with a stern or intense expression on their face.
  • too funny, sad, etc. for words The idiom "too funny, sad, etc. for words" means that something is so extreme in its humor, sadness, etc. that it defies description or explanation in words. It is beyond words to fully capture or convey the depth of the emotion or experience.
  • be a recipe for disaster/happiness/success etc. The idiom "be a recipe for disaster/happiness/success etc." means that a certain situation, decision, or choice is likely to result in a negative or positive outcome respectively. It suggests that certain factors or elements are present that will lead to a certain result.
  • a lot, not much, etc. in the way of something The idiom "a lot, not much, etc. in the way of something" means the amount or quality of something present. It refers to how much of something is available or can be expected in a particular situation.
  • the other day (or night, afternoon, etc.) The idiom "the other day (or night, afternoon, etc.)" refers to a day, night, afternoon, etc. that occurred recently but is not specified or remembered exactly.
  • in his, her, its, etc. way The phrase "in his, her, its, etc. way" means that someone is doing something or expressing themselves in their own unique manner or style. It suggests that they may not be conforming to traditional expectations or norms, but are instead choosing to approach things in their own way.
  • cut, pare, etc. something to the bone To cut, pare, etc. something to the bone means to reduce something to the minimum or most basic level, often in terms of costs, resources, or personnel. This idiom implies the extreme reduction or elimination of all non-essential elements.
  • be far and away the best/greatest/worst etc. When something is far and away the best, greatest, worst, etc., it means that it is clearly superior or inferior to others in its category, without any doubt or competition.
  • want in (or out or off, etc.) The idiom "want in (or out or off, etc.)" means wanting to participate in or be involved in something, or conversely, wanting to disengage or not be involved.
  • for my, his, etc. part This idiom means speaking or acting on one's own behalf or from one's own perspective. It is often used to express an individual's personal opinion or viewpoint on a particular matter.
  • too close/high, etc. for comfort The idiom "too close/high, etc. for comfort" means that a situation or proximity is causing unease or anxiety because it is excessively near or intense. It suggests that the situation is troubling or concerning due to its closeness or intensity.
  • run around/rush around etc. like a bluearsed fly To be very busy or active and moving quickly but not accomplishing much; to be in a state of frantic activity without achieving anything significant.
  • in our, their, its, etc. midst The definition of the idiom "in our, their, its, etc. midst" is to be in the middle or surrounded by a group of people or things.
  • be out of your mind with worry, etc. To be extremely worried or anxious.
  • land a blow, punch, etc. "Land a blow, punch, etc." means to successfully hit or strike someone or something with force during a physical altercation or confrontation.
  • it's a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will do something This idiom means that something is extremely unlikely to happen. The odds of it occurring are so low that it is almost impossible.
  • ask (or tell, etc.) someone point-blank To ask someone point-blank means to ask them a question directly and bluntly, without beating around the bush. It is a straightforward question without any hidden meanings or implications. Similarly, telling someone point-blank means stating something directly and bluntly without any sugar-coating or euphemisms.
  • to good, little, etc. effect The phrase "to good, little, etc. effect" means having a positive, negative, significant impact or result, depending on the context in which it is used. It indicates how well someone or something is able to achieve a desired outcome or goal.
  • bring somebody/something, come, get, fall, etc. into line (with somebody/something) To make someone or something conform or comply with a particular standard or set of expectations.
  • build up/work up, etc. a head of steam To build up or work up a head of steam means to gradually increase in intensity or excitement, often reaching a peak. It refers to gaining momentum or energy towards a specific goal or outcome.
  • If it looks like a duck and walks etc. like a duck, it is a duck This idiom means that if something appears to be a certain way and behaves in a certain manner, then it is most likely to be that thing. It is often used to describe situations where the evidence or characteristics point unmistakably to a specific conclusion.
  • as far as I can remember, see, tell, etc. The phrase "as far as I can remember, see, tell, etc." is used to qualify a statement or assertion by indicating that it is based on one's own memory, perception, or understanding, and may not be completely accurate or reliable. It is often used to imply that the speaker is unsure or uncertain about the information being shared.
  • lend support, weight, credence, etc. to something To give assistance, authority, importance, or belief to something.
  • all the better, harder, etc. The idiom "all the better, harder, etc." is used to emphasize that something is even more beneficial, challenging, etc. than it already is.
  • put on a good, poor, wonderful, etc. show To put on a good, poor, wonderful, etc. show means to present oneself or a performance in a way that impresses or fails to impress others, depending on the modifier used in the idiom. It can refer to a person's behavior, appearance, or skill in a particular situation.
  • a slip of a boy, girl, etc. The idiom "a slip of a boy, girl, etc." refers to a young person who is small or slight in build, often used affectionately or to emphasize their youth and innocence.
  • change, alter, etc. beyond/out of recognition To change something so significantly that it is difficult to recognize or identify its original form.
  • go to any, great, etc. lengths The idiom "go to any, great, etc. lengths" means to make a great effort or do whatever is necessary to achieve a goal or desired outcome.
  • what is he, are they, etc. like? This idiom is used to inquire about the personality, behavior, or characteristics of a person or group of people. It is asking for information or impressions about the individual or group in question.
  • the last thing you want, need, etc. The least desirable or most unwelcome thing in a particular situation.
  • that was a game, meal, walk, etc. and a half! This idiom is used to emphasize that something was particularly enjoyable, challenging, or impressive. It suggests that the activity was so good that it felt like doing it was equivalent to doing double the amount or effort.
  • a/the devil of a job, nuisance, fellow, etc. The idiom "a/the devil of a job, nuisance, fellow, etc." is used to describe something or someone difficult, frustrating, or troublesome. It suggests that dealing with the particular task or individual is challenging and requires a lot of effort.
  • be on the expensive etc. side If something is on the expensive side, it means that it is more expensive than one might like or expect. It refers to something that is costly or higher in price compared to similar items or services.
  • in (good, poor, etc.) repair "In (good, poor, etc.) repair" means the condition or state of something being in good, poor, or another specified level of maintenance or condition. It describes how well-maintained or functional something is.
  • strike fear, etc. into somebody/sb’s heart The idiom "strike fear, etc. into somebody's heart" means to make someone feel very afraid or fearful. It refers to an action or behavior that causes intense fear or anxiety in someone.
  • curiously, funnily, strangely, etc. enough This idiom is used to introduce a surprising or unexpected fact, detail, or circumstance in a slightly ironic or sarcastic way. It often implies that what is being said is contrary to what might be expected or believed.
  • your, somebody's, etc. blue-eyed boy An idiom that refers to someone who is favored or highly regarded by someone else, often receiving special treatment or opportunities as a result. This person is typically seen as exemplary or particularly deserving of praise or esteem.
  • That was a game etc. and a half! This idiom is an exaggerated way of expressing that something was especially challenging, thrilling, or intense.
  • such as it is (or was, etc.) Such as it is (or was, etc.) is a phrase used to indicate that something is not very impressive or satisfactory, but it is the only thing available or can be done in the circumstances. It is often used to express disappointment or resignation about the current state of something.
  • How strange, etc. is that? This idiom is often used to express surprise or disbelief at something unusual or unexpected. It is a way of acknowledging the strangeness of a situation or event.
  • be glad, etc. to see the back of somebody/something To be glad, etc. to see the back of somebody/something means to be relieved or happy when someone or something finally leaves or is gone.
  • on the large, small, etc. side This idiom is used to describe something as being slightly bigger, smaller, etc. than average or expected. It refers to the size or quantity of something being more towards one extreme or another. For example, "The portions at this restaurant are on the large side" means that the sizes of the portions are larger than usual.
  • get, have, etc. the sniffles To have a minor cold or to be slightly unwell, typically characterized by a runny or stuffy nose and sneezing.
  • paint a terrible, depressing, rosy, etc. picture To describe a situation or scenario in a way that emphasizes certain negative or positive aspects, often to influence others' perceptions or emotions.
  • by yourself, himself, etc. The idiom "by yourself, himself, etc." means to do something alone or without anyone else's help.
  • the jaws of death, defeat, etc. The jaws of death, defeat, etc. refer to a situation or circumstance that is incredibly dangerous, threatening, or difficult to escape from.
  • be nothing short of astonishing/miraculous etc. To be extremely impressive, amazing, or extraordinary; to exceed expectations in a remarkable way.
  • he/she doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his/her body This idiom is used to describe someone who is inherently kind, generous, and free from negative emotions such as jealousy or meanness. It implies that the person is good-natured and lacks any malicious or negative qualities.
  • try, use, etc. every trick in the book The idiom "try, use, etc. every trick in the book" means to use every possible method or strategy available in order to achieve a desired outcome. It refers to employing all known or possible tricks, techniques, or strategies to achieve a particular goal.
  • have, etc. teething problems/troubles The idiom "have teething problems/troubles" refers to experiencing difficulties or challenges in the early stages of something new or during a period of adjustment or transition. Just as a baby experiences discomfort and pain while their teeth are growing, an organization, project, or system may encounter initial obstacles or setbacks before becoming fully operational or successful.
  • I don't mind admitting, telling you..., etc. The phrase "I don't mind admitting, telling you, etc." is used to indicate that the speaker is about to reveal something that may be surprising or unexpected, but they are comfortable doing so. It is a way to preface a confession or revelation.
  • have your business, sensible, etc. head on To have your business, sensible, etc. head on means to approach a situation or problem with a clear mind, rational thinking, and good judgment. It implies being focused, practical, and logical in decision-making.
  • go, come, etc. down to the wire The idiom "go, come, etc. down to the wire" means to go to the last minute or final moment before a deadline, decision, or outcome is determined.
  • of all people, things, etc. This idiom is used to express surprise or disbelief that a particular person, thing, etc. is involved in a situation or has a certain characteristic, especially when they are least expected to have it.
  • what did you, etc. do with something? The idiom "what did you do with something?" is used to ask someone what they did or accomplished with a particular item or opportunity. It implies curiosity or surprise about the outcome or use of the object in question.
  • call yourself a teacher, friend, etc.? To question someone's claim or self-proclaimed title or expertise in a certain area; to challenge someone's qualifications or abilities in a certain role.
  • not as bad(ly), etc. as all that This idiom is used to express that something is not as severe, harmful, or negative as it may have initially appeared or been described. It suggests that the situation is not as serious or negative as it was believed to be.
  • carry/take something too, etc. far To carry or take something too far means to push a situation, idea, or action beyond what is considered reasonable or acceptable. It involves going to an excessive or extreme degree, often leading to negative consequences.
  • sb couldn't act, argue, fight, etc. their way out of a paper bag This idiom is used to describe someone who is incapable or lacking in a certain skill or ability. It suggests that the individual is so inept or incompetent that they would struggle to accomplish even the simplest or most basic task, such as getting out of a paper bag.
  • there's much lot etc. to be said for This idiom means that there are valid reasons or arguments in favor of a particular idea or point of view. It suggests that there are positive aspects that should be considered when discussing or evaluating something.
  • as clean, pure, etc. as the driven snow This idiom is used to describe someone or something that is very pure, innocent, or uncorrupted. It is often used to highlight someone's good character or moral integrity.
  • dig (deep) in/into your pocket(s), savings, etc. To spend money generously or make a substantial financial commitment, often beyond what is comfortable or convenient.
  • keep to, stay on, etc. the straight and narrow To "keep to the straight and narrow" means to stay on a morally upright or honest path and to avoid temptation or wrongdoing. It can also mean to stay focused on one's goals or objectives without being distracted or led astray.
  • get, pull, etc. your finger out "Get, pull, etc. your finger out" is an idiom that means to start working or acting more efficiently and quickly; to stop being lazy or slow and put more effort into achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • have something, nothing, little, etc. to show for something If someone has something, nothing, little, etc. to show for something, it means that they have gained very little or nothing at all as a result of their efforts or actions.
  • you, etc. can't have it both ways The idiom "you, etc. can't have it both ways" means that it is not possible to have or do two things that are mutually exclusive or contradictory, therefore a person must choose one option over the other.
  • pick, etc. something out of a hat To choose something randomly or without much thought or consideration.
  • his, your, etc. raison d'être The idiom "his, your, etc. raison d'être" refers to a person's primary reason or purpose for existence, their fundamental motivation or justification for being. It is often used to describe something that gives meaning and direction to someone's life or actions.
  • a (damn, etc.) sight too good, etc. This idiom is typically used when something is perceived as being exceptionally good, impressive, or surprising in a positive way. It can also imply that something is too much or overwhelming in a positive sense.
  • be, come, etc. on line The idiom "be, come, etc. on line" means to be connected to the internet or to be available for communication or interaction through an online platform.
  • you, etc. can stuff something The idiom "you, etc. can stuff something" is a rude or dismissive way of expressing that something is not worthwhile or desirable. It is often used to convey annoyance or disapproval towards a suggestion, idea, or request.
  • one of those days (or weeks, etc.) The idiom "one of those days" is used to describe a day or period of time in which everything seems to be going wrong or not going as planned. It can refer to a day filled with unfortunate events, bad luck, frustration, or general feelings of dissatisfaction.
  • be, come, get, etc. in on the ground floor The idiom "be, come, get, etc. in on the ground floor" means to become involved with something from the beginning or at an early stage, giving one a strong advantage or opportunity for success. This is typically used in business or investment contexts to emphasize the benefits of being part of a venture or project from its inception.
  • spin (somebody) a yarn, tale, etc. To spin somebody a yarn, tale, etc. means to tell someone a long, elaborate, and often fictional story in order to deceive, manipulate, or entertain them.
  • in your, his, etc. wisdom This idiom is used to sarcastically question or mock someone's supposed wisdom or intelligence in making a decision or taking an action. It implies that the person's decision is not wise or intelligent.
  • win, lose, etc. by a short head The idiom "win, lose, etc. by a short head" refers to a situation where the outcome of a competition or contest is extremely close, with only a very small margin separating the winner from the loser. This idiom is commonly used in sports and other competitive situations.
  • the other day, morning, etc. The phrase "the other day, morning, etc." is used to refer to a unspecified time in the recent past. It is often used when the speaker does not remember exactly when an event occurred.
  • in your, this, etc. neck of the woods The phrase "in your, this, etc. neck of the woods" is an idiomatic expression used to refer to someone's or one's own local area or neighborhood. It indicates a specific geographical location or region where the speaker or the listener lives or is currently situated.
  • be/take all day, morning, etc. To be extremely time-consuming or to require a very long period of time to complete a task or activity.
  • just my, his, etc. luck The idiom "just my, his, etc. luck" is used to express resignation or frustration when something unfortunate or unlucky happens, implying that such events are common occurrences for the person in question. It suggests a sense of inevitability or predictability in experiencing bad luck.
  • he, she, etc. won't eat you The phrase "he, she, etc. won't eat you" is an idiom used to reassure someone that a person they are anxious or intimidated by will not physically harm them or cause them any serious harm. It is meant to convey that the person in question is not as threatening or dangerous as they may appear.
  • down to the last, smallest, final, etc. something The idiom "down to the last, smallest, final, etc. something" means to have used or consumed almost all of a particular item or resource, leaving only a very small amount or none at all. It signifies reaching the very end or limit of something.
  • cut, tear, etc. something to ribbons To completely destroy or tear something into small pieces or shreds.
  • as, if, when, etc. the spirit moves sb The idiom "as, if, when, etc. the spirit moves sb" means to do something when one feels inspired, motivated, or compelled to do so. It implies acting on a sudden impulse or strong emotion.
  • for all I, you, etc. know The phrase "for all I, you, etc. know" means that despite what one might think or believe, the situation or information is uncertain or unknown. It is used to indicate that the speaker or another person is not certain about something.
  • repay sb's effort, time, attention, etc. To show gratitude or reciprocation for someone's hard work, time, attention, or other efforts that they have put in to help or support you.
  • laugh/scream/shout etc. your head off To laugh/scream/shout etc. your head off means to do something with great intensity or in an extreme manner. It implies that one is expressing themselves loudly and enthusiastically, often without concern for how they may appear to others.
  • I don’t blame you/her, etc. (for doing something) The phrase "I don’t blame you/her, etc. (for doing something)" is used to express understanding or sympathy for someone's actions, even if they may not have been entirely correct or justified. It suggests that the speaker understands why the person did what they did and does not hold any resentment or disapproval towards them for it.
  • I don't blame you/her, etc. The phrase "I don't blame you/her, etc." is used to express understanding or sympathy for someone's actions or decisions, often in situations where it would be easy to do so. It means that the speaker agrees with the person or understands their reasoning for a particular choice or behavior.
  • be in bad, the worst possible, etc. taste To be in bad taste means to be offensive or inappropriate, often pertaining to behavior or speech that is disrespectful, vulgar, or insensitive. It implies a lack of regard for social norms or basic decency.
  • one, two, etc. down, one, two etc. to go. This idiom means that a certain number of tasks or steps have been completed successfully, and a certain number of tasks or steps remain to be done. It is often used to indicate progress in a project or goal.
  • a matter of inches, metres, etc. The idiom "a matter of inches, metres, etc." refers to a situation where a very small distance or measurement can make a significant difference or determines the outcome of a particular situation. It emphasizes the importance of small details or precise measurement in achieving success or avoiding failure.
  • he, she, etc. has gone/been and done something This idiom is often used to express surprise or disbelief at someone's actions or choices. It implies that the person in question has done something unexpected, shocking, or unusual.
  • be, stay, etc. young at heart To be, stay, etc. young at heart means to have a youthful and lively attitude or outlook on life, regardless of one's age. This idiom suggests having a playful, optimistic, and enthusiastic mindset that is typically associated with youthfulness.
  • bear, take, etc. the brunt of something To "bear, take, etc. the brunt of something" means to endure the worst part or the main impact of something difficult or unpleasant.
  • keep up, move, etc. with the times To keep up, move, etc. with the times means to stay current, modern, or in tune with the latest trends, advancements, or changes in society. It often implies adapting to new ideas, technology, or ways of doing things in order to remain relevant or successful.
  • my, her, the other, the same, etc. side of the fence The phrase "my side of the fence" or "his, her, the other, the same, etc. side of the fence" typically refers to someone's perspective, point of view, or position on a particular issue or situation. It can imply a contrast or difference in opinions, beliefs, priorities, or values between individuals or groups.
  • charge, cost, pay, etc. the earth To charge, cost, pay, etc. the earth means to be extremely expensive or to demand a very high price. It implies that the cost is exorbitant or unreasonable.
  • the day, week, month, etc. before last The idiom "the day, week, month, etc. before last" refers to a specific period of time that occurred just before the most recent period of time mentioned.
  • How strange/stupid/cool, etc. is that? This idiom is typically used to express surprise, disbelief, admiration, or disdain towards something that is unusual, unexpected, interesting, or puzzling. It is often used rhetorically to emphasize the unique or peculiar nature of a situation or event.
  • on the big, small, high, etc. side The idiom "on the big, small, high, etc. side" means slightly larger, smaller, higher, etc. than average or expected. It indicates a deviation from the norm in terms of size, quantity, or quality.
  • be banging, etc. your head against a brick wall The idiom "banging, etc. your head against a brick wall" means to continuously try to achieve something without success, often because the task or situation is impossible or futile.
  • he, she, etc. isn't having any The idiom "he, she, etc. isn't having any" means that someone is not willing to accept or tolerate a particular situation, behavior, or decision. It implies a refusal or unwillingness to participate or comply with something.
  • wipe the/that smile, grin, etc. off your/somebody's face To wipe the smile, grin, etc. off your/somebody's face means to make someone stop smiling or laughing by saying or doing something that upsets or embarrasses them. It can also mean to defeat or humiliate someone who is feeling pleased with themselves.
  • the Big Three, Four, etc. The idiom "the Big Three, Four, etc." refers to a group of three, four, or more important or dominant individuals, organizations, or entities within a particular industry, field, or context. These entities are typically considered to have significant influence, power, or control over a specific area or aspect.
  • be open to abuse etc. To be vulnerable or prone to being taken advantage of, mistreated, or exploited.
  • damn the consequences, expense, etc. To proceed with a decision or action without considering or worrying about the potential negative consequences, expense, etc.
  • thread your way through, between, etc. sth To carefully navigate or move through a narrow or congested space.
  • be as crazy, rich, etc. as they come To be the epitome or prime example of being crazy, rich, or any other quality.
  • if he's, she's, etc. a day The idiom "if he's, she's, etc. a day" is used to emphasize that someone is at least a certain age, usually older than the speaker assumes. For example, if someone says "She looks 25 if she's a day," it means the speaker believes the person looks older than 25.
  • put your, their, etc. heads together To put your, their, etc. heads together means to work together with others to come up with ideas or solutions to a problem.
  • annoy, frighten, scare, etc. the hell out of sb To greatly irritate, terrify, or startle someone.
  • every bit as good, bad, etc. (as somebody/something) The idiom "every bit as good, bad, etc. (as somebody/something)" means to be equally good, bad, etc. as someone or something else, without any differences or distinctions.
  • some (people, members, etc.) are more equal than others This idiom refers to a situation in which certain individuals are given preferential treatment or privileges over others, often based on factors such as social status, wealth, or power. It highlights the inequality and unfairness that can exist within a group or society.
  • be far and away the best etc. To be significantly better than all others in a particular category or competition.
  • get, take, etc. a free ride To get, take, etc. a free ride means to benefit or gain advantage from a situation without putting in any effort or contributing in any way.
  • need, want, etc. your head examined To suggest that someone needs psychiatric evaluation or therapy; to imply that someone's behavior or thoughts are irrational or crazy.
  • frighten, scare, etc. the (living) daylights out of sb To frighten, scare, etc. the (living) daylights out of someone means to terrify them to an extreme degree. It implies that they have been scared so intensely that it feels as though their daylight (life force) has been momentarily taken away.
  • in a good, bad, etc. state of repair The idiom "in a good, bad, etc. state of repair" means that something is in a specific condition in terms of its physical or functional state. It refers to the overall condition or quality of something, whether it is well-maintained, deteriorating, or in need of repair.
  • buy, get, etc. something off the shelf The idiom "buy, get, etc. something off the shelf" means to purchase or obtain something that is readily available and already made, as opposed to something that is custom-made or specially ordered.
  • the next man, woman, person, etc. The idiom "the next man, woman, person, etc." is used to refer to any ordinary or typical individual, emphasizing that they are not outstanding or exceptional in any way. It implies that someone or something is not unique or different from others in a particular group or category.
  • he, she, etc. wouldn't harm/hurt a fly This idiom is used to describe someone who is gentle, kind, and unlikely to do harm to anyone or anything, even something as small and vulnerable as a fly.
  • have several, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have several irons in the fire" means to be involved in multiple activities or projects at the same time, often in order to increase the likelihood of success or to have backup options.
  • what, how, why, etc. in the world The idiom "what, how, why, etc. in the world" is used to express astonishment, confusion, or disbelief about something that seems impossible or improbable. It is often used to emphasize the speaker's surprise at a particular situation or event.
  • hate, be sick of, etc. the sight of somebody/something To hate, be sick of, etc. the sight of somebody/something means to strongly dislike or feel repulsed by someone or something and to have a strong aversion or negative feeling towards them/it upon seeing them/it.
  • who am I, are you, etc. to do something? This idiom is used to express uncertainty or disbelief about one's right or ability to do something, often questioning one's own authority or position in a given situation. For example, "Who am I to tell you how to live your life?" or "Who are you to judge me?"
  • as/whenever, etc. the fancy takes you The idiom "as/whenever, etc. the fancy takes you" means to do something whenever one feels like it or whenever the desire or mood strikes. It implies acting on impulse or whim without adherence to a strict plan or schedule.
  • in the ordinary, normal, etc. course of events, things, etc. "In the ordinary, normal, etc. course of events, things, etc." is an idiom that means typically or usually, as expected or as is commonly the case. It refers to the natural progression or sequence of events that would occur in a normal or routine situation.
  • be on good, friendly, etc. terms (with sb) To be in a positive and cooperative relationship with someone.
  • the child/house/mother, etc. from hell The idiom "the child/house/mother, etc. from hell" refers to someone or something that is extremely difficult, troublesome, or unpleasant to deal with. It can be used to describe a particularly challenging or problematic individual or situation.
  • be on, show, prove, etc. your mettle To show or prove one's ability, strength, or determination in a difficult or challenging situation.
  • easy, clear, quick, etc. as anything The idiom "easy, clear, quick, etc. as anything" means something that is extremely easy, clear, quick, etc. to do or understand. It is emphasizing that the task or situation is very simple and straightforward.
  • be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat To "be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat" means to be acting in a professional or authoritative manner, as if one were in the role of a teacher, lawyer, etc. It implies taking on the responsibilities and demeanor associated with that profession.
  • I, he, etc. won't do something again in a hurry The idiom "I, he, etc. won't do something again in a hurry" means that the person mentioned will not repeat a particular action quickly or easily because of a negative experience or outcome associated with it.
  • be, etc. in/out of touch To be in/out of touch means to be well informed or knowledgeable about something. Being in touch suggests being aware of the latest information or developments in a particular field, while being out of touch indicates a lack of awareness or knowledge.
  • for a/some reason/reasons best known to himself, herself, etc. The idiom "for a/some reason/reasons best known to himself, herself, etc." is used to indicate that the speaker does not know or understand the true motivation or reason behind a person's actions or decisions.
  • to my, your, etc. way of thinking The phrase "to my, your, etc. way of thinking" is an idiom that means from one's own perspective or point of view. It is used to introduce or emphasize an opinion or belief that may differ from others.
  • so bad, stupid, etc. it isn't true This idiom is used to exaggerate how bad, stupid, etc. something is, implying that it is so extreme that it seems unreal or exaggerated.
  • roar, romp, sweep, etc. to victory To achieve a resounding and overwhelming victory in a competition or endeavor with great noise, enthusiasm, or speed.
  • days/months/weeks etc. on end For a period of consecutive days/months/weeks etc. without interruption or break.
  • no matter who, what, where, etc. The idiom "no matter who, what, where, etc." means irrespective of the person, thing, place, etc. that is being discussed or referred to. It emphasizes that a particular factor is not significant or relevant in a given situation.
  • leave a lot, much, something, etc. to be desired To leave a lot, much, something, etc. to be desired means that something is not as good as it could or should be; it is lacking in some way and does not meet expectations.
  • see, look at, etc. something through somebody’s eyes To understand or consider something from someone else's perspective or point of view.
  • take five (or ten, etc.) To take a short break from an activity or task, typically for five or ten minutes.
  • be, stand, act, etc. shoulder to shoulder The idiom "be, stand, act, etc. shoulder to shoulder" means to work closely with someone or a group of people, to be united in purpose or to support each other in a difficult situation.
  • leave, go off, etc. with your tail between your legs To leave a situation in a humiliated or defeated manner; to retreat with a sense of shame or embarrassment.
  • somewhere around, between, etc. something This idiom is used to indicate that something is located in a general area, without being specific about the exact location. It suggests that the object or place is within a certain range or vicinity.
  • while away the time, etc. To spend time in a relaxed or leisurely manner, typically by engaging in a pleasant or enjoyable activity.
  • not half as good, nice, etc. as somebody/something This idiom means not nearly as good, nice, etc. as somebody/something. It is used to compare one thing or person to another, emphasizing that the latter is significantly better or superior.
  • cook, dance, etc. up a storm To do something with great energy, skill, or enthusiasm.
  • pay, earn, charge, etc. top dollar To pay, earn, charge, etc. top dollar means to pay or charge the highest possible price or rate for something. It signifies paying or receiving a premium price for a product or service.
  • have a good, bad, high, low, etc. opinion of somebody/something To have a good, bad, high, low, etc. opinion of somebody/something means to have a favorable or unfavorable judgement or view regarding that person or thing, to think highly or poorly of them.
  • I, you, etc. could use a drink, etc. This idiom suggests that someone is in need of a drink, usually an alcoholic beverage, to relax or unwind. It implies that the person is feeling stressed, upset, or in need of a break.
  • dance/sing/talk etc. up a storm To do something with a lot of energy, enthusiasm, or skill.
  • close, lock, etc. the stable door after the horse has bolted To take precautions or measures after an event has already occurred, making them useless or ineffective.
  • lonely hearts club/column, etc., at lonely hearts The idiom "lonely hearts club/column, etc., at lonely hearts" refers to a group or section dedicated to individuals who are seeking companionship or romantic relationships. It is typically used to describe a space, such as a social gathering or a written column, where people can connect with others who are also feeling lonely or looking for love.
  • bugger, sod, etc. this for a lark! This idiom is an informal way of expressing frustration, annoyance, or anger towards a situation or task. It implies that the speaker does not want to deal with or complete the task at hand and would rather do something else for fun or enjoyment instead. It is often used in a humorous or sarcastic manner.
  • on the right/wrong side of 40, 50, etc. The idiom "on the right/wrong side of 40, 50, etc." refers to being younger or older than a specific age, suggesting that reaching the mentioned age signifies a turning point or milestone in life. Being on the right side of the age means being younger and having more opportunities to achieve one's goals, while being on the wrong side means being older and potentially facing limitations or obstacles.
  • get your ass over/in here, etc. The idiom "get your ass over/in here, etc." is an informal and emphatic way of telling someone to come to a specific location or to take immediate action. It is often used in a forceful or urgent manner to convey a sense of impatience or frustration.
  • scare, annoy, etc. the hell out of somebody To greatly frighten, irritate, or bother someone.
  • reap the benefit, reward, etc. To benefit or gain a reward as a result of one's actions or efforts.
  • not have two beans, brain cells, etc. to rub together The idiom "not have two beans, brain cells, etc. to rub together" is used to describe someone who is extremely unintelligent or lacking in basic common sense or discernment. It implies that the person is so lacking in mental capacity that they cannot even manage the simple task of rubbing two small objects together.
  • be a Londoner/patriot/politician etc. through and through To be a Londoner/patriot/politician etc. through and through means to embody the qualities, characteristics, and values associated with being a Londoner, patriot, politician, etc. completely and without exception. It implies a deep and unwavering commitment to one's identity or role, and a strong sense of pride and loyalty towards it.
  • paint a bleak/rosy etc. picture of sth To present a scenario or situation in a certain way, whether negative (bleak), positive (rosy), or otherwise, typically with an exaggerated or overly dramatic view.
  • do sth, nothing, etc. for/to sb To do something for/to someone means to act or behave in a particular way toward them, either helping them or causing harm to them.
  • (choose, follow, take, etc.) the line of least resistance "Following the line of least resistance" means taking the easiest or most convenient course of action, avoiding difficulties or hardships. It refers to choosing the path that requires the least effort or confrontation.
  • make great, much, etc. play of/with something To make great, much, etc. play of/with something means to exaggerate or overemphasize something in order to draw attention to it or make it seem more important or impressive than it actually is.
  • screw him, you, that, etc. The phrase "screw him, you, that, etc." is a vulgar expression used to show disdain, disregard, or disrespect towards someone or something. It implies a sense of disregard or dismissal towards the person or thing being referenced.
  • in (great, grand, etc.) style To do something in a very extravagant, impressive, or high-quality manner.
  • nothing could be further from my mind, the truth, etc. This idiom means that something is not at all what one is currently thinking about or considering. It can also mean that something is the complete opposite of what one is currently believing or perceiving.
  • come over (all) faint, dizzy, giddy, etc. To feel lightheaded, dizzy, or faint abruptly or suddenly.
  • be, come, etc. within a whisker of something/of doing something The idiom "be, come, etc. within a whisker of something/of doing something" means to be very close to achieving or accomplishing something, or to narrowly miss out on something. It implies being on the brink of success or failure.
  • you, he, she, etc. started it This idiom is used to deflect blame onto someone else for initiating a conflict or argument. It suggests that the speaker is not at fault because the other person was the one who began the situation.
  • his, her, etc. ears are flapping The idiom "his, her, etc. ears are flapping" means that someone is listening attentively to a conversation or gossip. It implies that the person is eagerly trying to hear or discover information.
  • quite the best, the worst, etc. something The phrase "quite the best, the worst, etc. something" is used to emphasize that something is the very best, worst, etc. example of its kind. It indicates that there is no other example that surpasses it in terms of quality or characteristics.
  • make a better, good, poor, etc. fist of something The idiom "make a better, good, poor, etc. fist of something" means to do something, especially a task or job, with varying degrees of success or skill. It can imply making a strong effort or attempt, or failing to do something effectively.
  • cover your ass, butt, backside, etc. The idiom "cover your ass, butt, backside, etc." means to take precautions or actions to protect oneself from being blamed, punished, or experiencing negative consequences in a given situation. It often involves ensuring that one's actions are documented, justified, or defended in order to avoid potential repercussions.
  • you'll, he'll, etc. be lucky This idiom is used to indicate that someone has a good chance or is fortunate to have a particular outcome or experience. It suggests that the person is in a fortunate position and likely to have success or good fortune in a given situation.
  • rather you, etc. than me This idiom is used to express relief that someone else is experiencing a difficult or unpleasant situation instead of oneself. It implies a sense of gratitude or relief that the speaker is not in the same situation as the other person.
  • be on the expensive/heavy/large etc. side The idiom "be on the expensive/heavy/large etc. side" means to be more expensive, heavy, large, etc. than desired or expected. It is typically used to indicate that something costs more, weighs more, or is bigger than preferred or anticipated.
  • first, second, etc. go "First, second, etc. go" is an idiom used to describe taking turns or making attempts in a specific order, often in a competitive or sequential situation. It implies a structured process or order in which individuals or groups participate.
  • a matter of hours, minutes, etc. The idiom "a matter of hours, minutes, etc." is used to indicate that something will happen very soon or in a very short amount of time.
  • who, what, where, etc. the devil... This idiom is used when someone is speaking about a person, place, thing, etc. with frustration or confusion, often implying that they cannot understand or believe what is happening. It is similar to saying "what in the world is going on?" or expressing disbelief at a situation.
  • Lord (only) knows (what, where, why, etc.)… The phrase "Lord (only) knows" is a colloquial expression that is used to convey uncertainty or bewilderment about a situation or outcome. It implies that only a higher power or higher authority would have the knowledge or understanding of a particular circumstance.
  • ride, drive, walk, etc. (off) into the sunset This idiom means to leave a situation, especially after achieving something or after a moment of triumph or success. It is often used to describe a departure in a cinematic or dramatic way, suggesting a happy ending or resolution. The phrase is often associated with Western movies where the hero rides off into the sunset at the end of the film.
  • be, live, etc. in a world of your own Definition: To be detached or isolated from reality, to have one's own unique way of thinking or acting that is different from others.
  • give to understand (or believe, etc.) To give someone the impression or idea that something is true or certain, without explicitly stating it.
  • miles too big, small, expensive, etc. The idiom "miles too big, small, expensive, etc." means something that is significantly too large, small, expensive, etc. compared to what is needed or expected. It often implies an excessive or unreasonable amount or size.
  • go, etc. into overdrive To go into overdrive means to start working or operating at an increased intensity or maximum capacity.
  • (the) next, first, second, etc. time round The idiom "(the) next, first, second, etc. time round" refers to a subsequent occasion or opportunity for something to happen or be done. It signifies that something will happen or be attempted again in the future, with the reference to the number indicating the specific repetition or iteration of the event.
  • pull, bring, etc. somebody up short This idiom refers to interrupting or stopping someone abruptly, often to make them aware of a mistake, fault, or unexpected situation. It can also be used to describe a sudden and unexpected challenge or correction that causes someone to pause or reassess their actions.
  • be patience, honesty, simplicity, etc. itself To be patience, honesty, simplicity, etc. itself means to embody or personify a particular quality or trait to an exceptional degree. It suggests that the individual possesses the characteristic in an almost perfect or ideal way.
  • save, keep, etc. something for a rainy day to save something, especially money, for a time in the future when it might be needed or when it will be of more use
  • wouldn't wish something on my, etc. worst enemy This idiom means that the speaker strongly dislikes or finds something so terrible that they would not want it to happen even to someone they dislike or hate. It expresses a deep aversion or fear towards a particular situation or outcome.
  • bad, hard, etc. luck (on somebody) To experience a series of unfortunate events or circumstances that are out of one's control.
  • rip somebody/something apart/to shreds, bits, etc. This idiom means to criticize or attack someone or something harshly and aggressively. It can also be used to describe tearing or destroying something completely.
  • when the US/UK/China, etc. sneezes, Japan/Germany, etc. catches cold This idiom means that when a major country or economy experiences a problem or setback, it can have negative repercussions for smaller or dependent countries or economies. It highlights the interconnectedness of global economies and the potential for a domino effect when a major player encounters difficulties.
  • in the eyes of the law, world, etc. In the eyes of the law, world, etc. means according to the perspective or judgment of a particular authority or group. It suggests that something is legally or socially accepted or judged in a certain way.
  • get, have, hold, etc. the whip hand To have control or dominance over a situation or person; to be in a position of power or authority.
  • be in a good, bad, dark, etc. place When someone is said to be "in a good, bad, dark, etc. place" it means that they are currently experiencing a certain emotional or mental state. This can refer to being happy, sad, distressed, troubled, etc. depending on the specific context in which the idiom is used.
  • boring, silly, etc. in the extreme The idiom "boring, silly, etc. in the extreme" refers to something that is extremely dull, uninteresting, or ridiculous. It is often used to emphasize just how unengaging or absurd a situation or thing is.
  • bless you, her, him, etc. The phrase "bless you" is a common response when someone sneezes. It is often used as a polite gesture to wish someone good health or to dispel any perceived bad luck associated with sneezing. When the phrase is extended to include someone's name or pronoun (e.g. "bless her," "bless him"), it is an expression of good wishes, typically in a more personal or specific context.
  • a sight better, worse, etc. "A sight better, worse, etc." is an idiom used to convey a significant difference in quality or degree. It implies that something is noticeably better, worse, etc. than something else.
  • bear hard, heavily, severely, etc. on somebody To "bear hard, heavily, severely, etc. on somebody" means to put a great deal of pressure, weight, or responsibility on someone, often causing them distress or difficulty.
  • be, keep, etc. in touch To be, keep, etc. in touch means to communicate or maintain contact with someone, typically on a regular basis. It can also imply staying connected and aware of someone's current situation or activities.
  • stuff it, them, you, etc. The phrase "stuff it, them, you, etc." is an informal way of telling someone to stop talking or expressing a strong disagreement or annoyance. It can also be used as a dismissive or scornful expression.
  • a whale of a job etc. The idiom "a whale of a job etc." means a task or job that is very large, challenging, impressive or significant.
  • (steer, take, etc.) a middle course To steer or take a middle course means to navigate between two extremes or opposing viewpoints, finding a balanced or moderate position. It involves avoiding extremes and finding a compromise or middle ground.
  • laugh, shout, scream, etc. your head off To laugh, shout, scream, etc. very loudly or enthusiastically.
  • lay, put, roll, etc. out the welcome mat To greet someone warmly and enthusiastically; to show hospitality and make someone feel welcome.
  • for reasons best known to himself (or herself, etc.) This idiom is used to explain that the true reasons behind someone's actions or decisions are unclear, as they have chosen not to disclose them.
  • next, first, second, etc. time around/round The idiom "next, first, second, etc. time around/round" is used to refer to a subsequent attempt, effort, or occurrence after the initial one. It implies a belief that success or improvement may be achieved in future attempts, or that a situation will be handled differently or more effectively the next time.
  • keep somebody's seat, etc. warm To keep somebody's seat, etc. warm means to temporarily take care of someone's responsibilities or duties while they are away, ensuring they can easily step back into their role when they return.
  • blow, bomb, wipe, etc. sth off the map To completely destroy or eliminate something, typically referring to a location or target.
  • as clever, stupid, etc. as they come The idiom "as clever, stupid, etc. as they come" is used to describe someone who embodies a particular quality to the highest degree possible. For example, if someone is described as "as clever as they come," it means that they are extremely clever or intelligent. Similarly, if someone is described as "as stupid as they come," it means that they are extremely foolish or lacking in intelligence.
  • when the US/UK/China, etc. sneezes, Japan/Germany, etc. catches a cold This idiom refers to the concept that when a major global economy such as the US, UK, or China experiences economic instability or downturns, smaller economies such as Japan or Germany are likely to be significantly impacted as a result. Just as catching a cold is a common consequence of being exposed to someone who is sneezing, so too do smaller economies often feel the effects of economic fluctuations in larger countries.
  • cut an interesting etc. figure To "cut an interesting figure" means to appear or present oneself in a way that is striking, unique, or unusual in a visually appealing or intriguing manner.
  • you, he, etc. will be lucky The phrase "you, he, etc. will be lucky" is an idiom used to indicate that someone has a good chance of experiencing a positive outcome, typically due to a stroke of good fortune or luck. It implies that the person in question is likely to have success or good things happen to them in a particular situation.
  • leave a lot, much, etc. to be desired The idiom "leave a lot, much, etc. to be desired" means that something is not as good as it could be or not up to the expected standard, leaving room for improvement or disappointment.
  • a day, moment, etc. or two This idiom means a very short period of time, usually just a day or a brief moment. It is often used to indicate a small amount of time that is not significant or important.
  • be a crisis/disaster etc. in the making The idiom "be a crisis/disaster etc. in the making" refers to a situation or event that is developing or unfolding in a way that is likely to lead to a serious problem, emergency, or failure if not addressed or corrected. It implies that the circumstances are steadily worsening and heading towards a negative outcome.
  • not have two brain cells, pennies, etc. to rub together This idiom is used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or has very little common sense. It implies that the person has such a small amount of intelligence or money that they do not even have enough to physically rub two of something together.
  • you, etc. can whistle for it If you say "you can whistle for it" to someone, you are telling them that they will not get what they want, no matter how much they ask or try.
  • ram, force, thrust, etc. something down somebody's throat To insist someone accept or endure something, such as an idea or perspective, in a forceful or aggressive manner.
  • easy on the eye, ear, etc. The phrase "easy on the eye, ear, etc." is used to describe something that is visually pleasing or aesthetically attractive, or something that is pleasant to listen to. It refers to something that is easy or enjoyable to look at, hear, etc.
  • lift, blow, etc. the lid off something To lift, blow, etc. the lid off something is to reveal or expose a hidden or secret truth or information. It means to uncover or bring to light something that was previously unknown or hidden.
  • your, his, etc. bête noire The idiom "your, his, etc. bête noire" refers to a person or thing that someone particularly dislikes, dreads, or is extremely annoyed by. It is something that is a constant source of irritation or frustration for the individual.
  • in some, equal, etc. measure The phrase "in some, equal, etc. measure" means to a certain extent or degree, proportionate to something else. It implies that two or more things are comparable or balanced in terms of their quantity or quality.
  • old habits, traditions, etc. die hard The idiom "old habits, traditions, etc. die hard" means that it is difficult to change or get rid of long-standing behaviors, customs, or beliefs, even when they are no longer useful or relevant. It implies that it is challenging to break away from familiar patterns and ways of thinking.
  • be nothing short of astonishing etc. To be truly remarkable or impressive; to exceed all expectations.
  • be bored, drunk, etc. out of your mind To be extremely bored, drunk, or otherwise mentally disengaged to the point of feeling disconnected or uninterested.
  • If it looks like a duck and walks/quack/flies etc. like a duck, it is a duck. This idiom means that if something has all the appearance or characteristics of a particular thing, it is most likely that thing. It is used to emphasize relying on observable evidence or behavior rather than assumptions or appearances.
  • you could have knocked me, etc. down with a feather The phrase "you could have knocked me down with a feather" is often used to express extreme surprise or astonishment. It suggests that the person was so shocked or surprised by something that they felt as though they could have been knocked over by a very light touch, such as a feather.
  • make, etc. a mint To make a mint means to make a large amount of money or profit, often quickly and easily. It can also refer to achieving great success or wealth in general.
  • keep something, stay, etc. under wraps To keep something under wraps means to keep it secret or hidden from others. It suggests that something is being kept confidential or not disclosed to the public.
  • (do something) in the teeth of danger, opposition, etc. To do something despite facing significant challenges or obstacles such as danger or strong opposition.
  • lovely and warm, cold, quiet, etc. This idiom is typically used to describe someone who appears to be kind, friendly, cheerful, or pleasant on the surface, but actually has a negative or deceitful nature underneath. It can also be used to describe a situation or environment that seems ideal or comfortable initially, but is actually uncomfortable, hostile, or negatively surprising upon closer inspection.
  • all, completely, etc. at sea The idiom "all at sea" means to be confused, disoriented, or unsure about something. It can also refer to being completely at a loss or without any knowledge or direction.
  • like, etc. the sound of your own voice This idiom refers to someone who enjoys hearing themselves talk or speak. It implies that the person is self-absorbed or talkative, often going on and on without consideration for others' thoughts or feelings.
  • hardly/scarcely etc. earthshattering The idiom "hardly/scarcely etc. earthshattering" describes something that is not particularly impressive, significant, or impactful. It is often used to convey a sense of mediocrity or unimportance.
  • for all you, I, they, etc. care This idiom is typically used to convey that the speaker does not care about someone or something at all. It indicates a lack of concern or interest in the person or situation being mentioned.
  • I've never felt etc. in all my days! This idiom is used to express surprise or amazement at experiencing something for the first time in one's life. It signifies that the speaker has never before encountered a particular situation or feeling.
  • his, her, etc. ears are burning This idiom refers to the belief or superstition that someone is talking about the person mentioned, even though they are not present. It is often said when someone suddenly feels self-conscious or aware that they are being discussed by others.
  • in a good, bad, favourable, etc. light To view or portray something in a positive, negative, or neutral way; to represent something in a certain manner.
  • (have, get, want, etc.) your pound of flesh The idiom "(have, get, want, etc.) your pound of flesh" means to demand what is owed to you, even if it is excessive or harmful to another person. It refers to insisting on getting what you believe you are entitled to, regardless of the consequences and without showing any mercy or consideration for others. The phrase comes from Shakespeare's play "The Merchant of Venice" where the character Shylock demands a pound of flesh as part of a contractual agreement.
  • handle, treat, etc. somebody with kid gloves To handle, treat, etc. somebody with kid gloves means to treat someone very delicately and carefully, usually because they are sensitive or easily upset. It implies being extra gentle and cautious in one's interactions with that person.
  • fall, drop, etc. into place When things fall, drop, etc. into place, it means that everything starts to make sense or work smoothly, often after a period of confusion or uncertainty.
  • (pull, wear, etc.) a long face To look sad, unhappy, or disappointed.
  • more/a bigger etc. bang for your buck Getting more value or benefit for the money or resources spent; maximizing the return on investment.
  • have a lot, anything, etc. on The idiom "have a lot, anything, etc. on" means to be preoccupied or busy with something, often used to imply that one has a lot of work or responsibilities to attend to.
  • he, she, etc. will murder you The phrase "he, she, etc. will murder you" means that the person being referred to will greatly harm, hurt, or outdo someone else in a certain situation. It can be used to emphasize someone's skill, ability, or determination in a particular task or challenge.
  • be glad etc. to see the back of To be relieved or happy that someone or something has left or departed.
  • go, retreat, withdraw, etc. into your shell to retreat or withdraw from social situations or interactions, to become reserved or introverted
  • bring sb to the bargaining/peace etc. table To bring someone to the bargaining/peace etc. table means to persuade or convince someone to participate in negotiations or discussions in order to reach a mutually beneficial agreement or resolution.
  • in good, bad, etc. repair If something is in good, bad, etc. repair, it means that its physical condition is good, bad, etc. and is either well-maintained or poorly maintained.
  • have a senior/blond etc. moment The idiom "have a senior/blond etc. moment" refers to a temporary lapse in memory, judgement, or understanding that is commonly associated with older individuals, blonde individuals, or any other stereotype. It is often used humorously to describe a situation where someone makes a mistake or forgets something.
  • it isn't my, his, etc. thing This idiom is used to indicate that something is not of interest or within one's area of expertise or capabilities. It suggests that the person in question does not have a personal connection or inclination towards a particular activity or subject.
  • not/never in a hundred, etc. years The idiom "not/never in a hundred, etc. years" is used to express that something is extremely unlikely or impossible to happen within the specified time frame.
  • make a day etc. of it To make a day of it means to spend an entire day engaged in a particular activity or outing, often in a leisurely or enjoyable way. It can also refer to making the most of a situation or occasion by extending it and fully immersing oneself in the experience.
  • in the space of a minute, an hour, a morning, etc. The idiom "in the space of a minute, an hour, a morning, etc." means in a very short period of time or within a brief timeframe. It is used to emphasize the speed or suddenness of something happening or changing.
  • I, you, etc. for one The idiom "I, you, etc. for one" is used to express that the speaker or another person is an example or instance of a particular characteristic or opinion. It is often used to emphasize that the speaker or another individual holds a certain viewpoint or belief.
  • be, go, etc. out/out of the window To be, go, etc. out/out of the window is an idiom that means to no longer be considered or relevant, to be disregarded or ignored, or to not apply in a particular situation.
  • have a, sm, etc. say in sth To have a say in something means to have the opportunity to express an opinion or contribute to a decision-making process. It refers to having a voice and being able to influence the outcome of something.
  • bless his, her, etc. cotton socks The expression "bless his, her, etc. cotton socks" is a lighthearted way of expressing affection or fondness for someone. It is often used to show appreciation for someone's kind or endearing qualities.
  • he doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his body The idiom "he doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his body" means that the person being referred to is extremely kind, generous, and lacking in negative qualities such as jealousy or cruelty.
  • as quickly, much, soon, etc. as possible As quickly, much, soon, etc. as possible means to do something as fast or as efficiently as one can. It implies urgency and a desire to complete a task promptly.
  • lay yourself open to attack, criticism, ridicule, etc. To be vulnerable or susceptible to be attacked, criticized, ridiculed, or harmed in some way due to one's actions or behavior.
  • if (my) memory serves me well, correctly, etc. The phrase "if (my) memory serves me well, correctly, etc." means that the speaker believes they are accurately remembering something, but acknowledges the possibility that their memory may not be entirely accurate. It is used to preface a statement to indicate that the speaker is relying on their memory to recall a specific fact or detail.
  • he, she, etc. doesn’t miss a trick Someone who is very observant and always aware of everything that is happening around them, not missing any important details or opportunities.
  • set great, little, etc. store by sth To set great, little, etc. store by something means to value or consider something to be important or unimportant. It reflects the amount of importance or value someone places on something.
  • have a fine etc. pair of lungs To have a fine etc. pair of lungs means to have a powerful or strong voice, usually used to describe someone who is able to speak loudly or sing well.
  • how dare she, you, etc.! The expression "how dare she, you, etc.!" is used to convey shock, disbelief, or anger at someone's audacity or boldness in doing something perceived as inappropriate or disrespectful. It can also suggest a sense of indignation or offense at someone's actions.
  • none the worse, better, richer, etc. The idiom "none the worse, better, richer, etc." means not negatively affected or diminished in a particular aspect. It implies that there has been no negative impact on a situation or individual, and may even suggest that there has been some improvement or positive outcome.
  • sink, vanish, etc. without trace The idiom "sink, vanish, etc. without trace" means to disappear completely or without leaving any evidence behind.
  • see a lot, nothing, etc. of somebody To see a lot, nothing, etc. of somebody means to have frequent or infrequent interactions or encounters with someone. It can also refer to knowing someone well or not knowing them at all.
  • make good, etc. time To use one's time effectively or efficiently; to make the most of an opportunity.
  • be glad/happy/pleased etc. to see the back of sb/sth To be glad/happy/pleased etc. to see the back of someone or something means to be relieved or grateful that they have left or are gone. It implies that the speaker is happy to no longer have to deal with that person or thing.
  • if he’s, she’s, etc. a day The phrase "if he's, she's, etc. a day" is used to emphasize that a person is at least a certain age, often older than the age they are claiming to be. It implies that the person is clearly much older than they are presenting themselves to be.
  • be on good, bad, friendly, etc. terms The phrase "be on good, bad, friendly, etc. terms" means to have a particular type of relationship or level of communication with someone. For example, "She is on good terms with her coworkers" means that she has a friendly and cooperative relationship with them. Conversely, "He is on bad terms with his ex-wife" means that he does not have a positive relationship with her.
  • of one kind, sort, etc. or another A definition for the idiom "of one kind, sort, etc. or another" is: indicating that something is related to or similar to something else in some way, even if the exact details are unclear or unspecified.
  • sth like 96 percent, half, etc. The phrase "sth like 96 percent, half, etc." is an informal or colloquial way of saying "approximately" or "close to". It is used to indicate that something is very close to a specific number or percentage, but not exact.
  • he, it, etc. is not as black as he, it, etc. is painted This idiom means that a person or thing is not as bad as they have been described or perceived. It suggests that the negative characteristics attributed to them are exaggerated or untrue.
  • go down, drop, etc. like ninepins The idiom "go down, drop, etc. like ninepins" means to fall or fail quickly and easily, one after another, in a rapid and successive manner. It originates from the game of ninepins, where the goal is to knock down all nine pins with a ball in as few attempts as possible.
  • not (all) that (good, bad, well, poor, etc.) The idiom "not (all) that (good, bad, well, poor, etc.)" is used to indicate that something is not as good, bad, well, or poor as it may seem or as it is perceived to be. It suggests that the thing being described is only average or mediocre and not exceptional in any way.
  • in good, bad, etc. nick In good, bad, etc. nick is an idiom that means in good, bad, or other specified condition or state. It is often used to describe the overall quality or state of something.
  • the best of three, five, etc. The best of three, five, etc. refers to a competition or series of events in which the winner is determined by having the most victories out of a specified number of games or rounds.
  • close, etc. the barn door after the horse has escaped The idiom "close, etc. the barn door after the horse has escaped" means to take action to prevent a problem or disaster from happening, but it is already too late and the damage has already been done. It refers to trying to remedy a situation after it is already too late to make a difference.
  • give somebody a rough, hard, bad, etc. time To give somebody a rough, hard, bad, etc. time means to treat someone unkindly or to make their experiences difficult or unpleasant.
  • be as clever, stupid, etc. as they come The phrase "be as clever, stupid, etc. as they come" means to be the most extreme example of a certain characteristic, such as being very clever, very stupid, etc. It typically implies that the person in question exemplifies that characteristic to an exceptional degree.
  • a blow-by-blow account, description, etc. A detailed and thorough account or description of an event or series of events, often given in a chronological sequence.
  • (he, she, etc. has) been and done something This idiom is used to emphasize that someone has experienced or achieved something significant or noteworthy. It implies that the person has a certain level of experience, expertise, or achievement in a particular situation or field.
  • blow, smash, etc. something to smithereens To completely destroy something into tiny pieces or fragments.
  • I, he, etc. can't wait The phrase "I, he, etc. can't wait" is an idiom used to express excitement, impatience, or eagerness about something happening in the near future. It signifies a strong desire for a particular event or outcome to occur as soon as possible.
  • the child, etc. from hell The idiom "the child, etc. from hell" is used to describe a person, typically a child, who is extremely difficult, misbehaved, or problematic in some way. The phrase implies that the individual in question is causing a great deal of trouble or distress.
  • be nothing, not much, etc. to write home about This idiom means that something is not very impressive or noteworthy; it is not worth mentioning or getting excited about.
  • be out of mind with boredom etc. To be extremely bored or frustrated.
  • a load of crap, nonsense, rubbish, etc. The idiom "a load of crap, nonsense, rubbish, etc." means something that is untrue, absurd, or of little value. It is used to express disbelief or disdain for a statement or argument.
  • I don't know how, what, why, etc. The phrase "I don't know how, what, why, etc." is used to convey a sense of uncertainty or confusion about something. It indicates a lack of knowledge or understanding about a particular topic or situation.
  • in (good, poor, etc.) state of repair In (good, poor, etc.) state of repair means the condition of something in terms of how well-maintained or functional it is. If something is in good state of repair, it is well-maintained and in good condition. If something is in poor state of repair, it is not well-maintained and may be broken or damaged.
  • (you, etc.) may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb This idiom means that if one is going to be punished for a small offense, they may as well commit a larger offense since the punishment will be the same regardless. In other words, if the consequences are going to be severe either way, one might as well choose the option that gives them a greater reward or benefit.
  • fly into a rage, temper, etc. To suddenly become very angry or lose control of one's emotions.
  • be in bad, poor, the worst possible, etc. taste To say something is in bad, poor, the worst possible, etc. taste means that it is inappropriate, offensive, or unacceptable behavior or language.
  • disappear, etc. into thin air To vanish or disappear completely and without a trace.
  • how selfish, stupid, ungrateful, etc. can you get? This idiom is used to express disbelief or frustration towards someone's actions or behavior that are perceived as extremely selfish, stupid, ungrateful, etc. It implies that the person's actions are so extreme that it is difficult to comprehend or believe.
  • say, etc. something in the same breath To say two contradictory or unrelated things at the same time or one right after the other.
  • turn in his, her, etc. grave The idiom "turn in his, her, etc. grave" means to express the idea that someone who has died would be upset, disappointed, or outraged by something that is happening currently.
  • and all that (jazz, rubbish, stuff, etc.) The phrase "and all that (jazz, rubbish, stuff, etc.)" is used to refer to other unspecified similar things or matters that are related or relevant to the topic being discussed. It is often used to emphasize a point or idea without providing specific examples or details.
  • a miserable, poor, etc. excuse for sth This idiom is used to express disappointment or disapproval towards something that is of poor quality, inadequate or insufficient. It implies that the thing being referred to is not up to standard or acceptable.
  • in (good, poor, etc.) taste In (good, poor, etc.) taste refers to behavior or actions that are socially acceptable or appropriate, or conversely, not socially acceptable or appropriate. It is about having a sense of what is considered tasteful or tasteful behavior in a given context.
  • say something, speak, etc. under your breath The idiom "say something, speak, etc. under your breath" means to speak quietly or in a whisper, often so that others cannot hear what is being said. It can also imply speaking in a muttering or muttered manner.
  • see, spot, smell, etc. something a mile off To be able to detect or notice something easily, often from a great distance or with little effort.
  • what the hell (or heck, devil, etc.) The phrase "what the hell" is an exclamation expressing surprise, frustration, disbelief, or confusion. It is often used to show strong emotion, uncertainty, or shock about a situation or event.
  • a full, good, thick, etc. head of hair The idiom "a full, good, thick, etc. head of hair" refers to someone who has a lot of hair on their head, typically in good condition and thickness. It implies that the person has healthy, voluminous hair.
  • in (good, poor, etc.) nick In (good, poor, etc.) nick means to be in a particular condition or state, typically referring to physical appearance, health, or performance. "In good nick" means to be in good condition or shape, while "in poor nick" means to be in a bad or deteriorating condition.
  • it’s a hundred, etc. to one that somebody/something will (not) do something The idiom "it’s a hundred to one that somebody/something will (not) do something" means that there is a very small likelihood or chance of someone or something doing a particular action. It suggests that the odds are heavily stacked against the likelihood of the outcome happening.
  • get him, her, you, etc.! The idiom "get him, her, you, etc.!'' is a command or directive to physically or verbally confront or attack another person.
  • he, she, etc. couldn't punch his, her, etc. way out of a paper bag This idiom is used to describe someone who is weak, unskilled, or inept at physical tasks, particularly in relation to fighting or conflict resolution. It suggests that the person lacks the physical strength or ability to handle even a very minimal or simple challenge.
  • be as fast etc. as all get out This idiom means to be extremely fast or energetic. It is often used to describe someone or something that moves quickly or with great intensity.
  • heaps better, more, older, etc. The idiom "heaps better, more, older, etc." is used to emphasize that something is significantly better, greater, older than something else. It is often used colloquially to express a large amount or degree of something.
  • in a good, bad, etc. state of repair, at in good, bad, etc. repair In a good, bad, etc. state of repair means the condition in which something is currently in, whether it be good, bad, or somewhere in between in terms of its functionality and maintenance. This idiom is often used to describe the overall condition of a building, vehicle, or object.
  • when you've seen, heard, etc. one, you've seen, heard, etc. them all This idiom means that once you have experienced something similar before, encountering another similar situation or thing will not offer any new or different information, insight, or experience.
  • blow, send, etc. somebody to kingdom come To destroy or kill someone or something completely.
  • plough a lonely, your own, etc. furrow To plough a lonely, your own, etc. furrow means to pursue one's own path or goals independently, without seeking or receiving much help or support from others. It implies solo effort, determination, and perseverance in following one's own unique path.
  • the man, woman, etc. of the moment The person who is currently receiving a lot of attention, praise, or recognition for their achievements or actions.
  • it, etc. says a lot, much, etc. about/for somebody/something This idiom means that something reveals important or significant information about a person or thing, often indicating their character, qualities, or intentions.
  • to go, retreat, etc. into your shell The idiom "to go, retreat, etc. into your shell" means to become introverted, shy, or reserved, often in response to feeling overwhelmed, anxious, or stressed. It can also refer to withdrawing from social interactions or isolating oneself from others.
  • days, weeks, etc. on end The expression "days, weeks, etc. on end" is used to describe a period of time that continues for a long duration without interruption. It implies that something has been happening continuously for a significant amount of time without a break.
  • make great, rapid, etc. strides To make significant progress or advancements in a short amount of time.
  • what are you, was he, etc. getting at? This idiom is used when someone is unclear or confused about someone's intentions or the point they are trying to make in a conversation or situation. It is asking for clarification or explanation.
  • claw your way back, into something, out of something, etc. To struggle fiercely and relentlessly in order to achieve a goal or overcome a difficult situation.
  • blow/bomb/wipe etc. sth/swh off the map This idiom means to completely destroy or obliterate something or somewhere. It is often used metaphorically to describe annihilating something or someone.
  • there’s something, not much, etc. to be said for something/doing something The idiom "there’s something, not much, etc. to be said for something/doing something" means that there is a small amount of merit or value in a particular idea, action, or situation. It suggests that while there may be some positive aspects to consider, overall it may not be particularly desirable or beneficial.
  • bring to the bargaining etc. table To bring to the bargaining table means to bring something (such as a resource, proposal, or demand) to negotiations or discussions in order to reach a compromise or agreement with others. It could also refer to contributing something valuable to a conversation or debate in order to find a solution or make progress.
  • in great, large, etc. measure The idiom "in great, large, etc. measure" means to a significant extent or degree, in a sizable amount or proportion. It suggests that something is present or happening to a considerable or notable degree.
  • somewhere, etc. along/down the line This idiom is used to indicate that something will happen or have an effect at some unspecified point in the future. It can also be used to refer to a specific point in time or a geographical location.
  • a (damn, etc.) sight better, etc. A significant improvement or upgrade in quality, appearance, or performance.
  • cost, charge, etc. the earth The idiom "cost, charge, etc. the earth" means that something is very expensive or requires a high price to acquire or obtain. It implies that the cost is excessive or beyond what is considered reasonable.
  • bully for you, etc. Congratulations or good for you. Used sarcastically or insincerely to show that one is not impressed or does not care about someone else's achievements or good fortune.
  • when (or if, etc.) one's ship comes in (or home) The idiom "when one's ship comes in" refers to a hopeful or positive situation when one's efforts or investments finally pay off and bring success, prosperity, or good fortune. It often implies the idea of achieving one's goals or dreams after a period of waiting or uncertainty.
  • see (or hear, etc.) the last of To experience or witness the culmination or final occurrence of something.
  • have a lot, something, nothing, etc. going for you To have a lot, something, nothing, etc. going for you means to have many factors, advantages, or strengths that contribute to your success or positive image. It acknowledges the positive circumstances or qualities that are helping you in a particular situation.
  • get/have a good, bad, etc. press The idiom "get/have a good, bad, etc. press" refers to the general opinion or coverage in the media about a person, organization, or event. If someone or something has a good press, it means that they are receiving favorable attention or coverage in the media, while having a bad press indicates the opposite - negative attention or coverage.
  • ask, tell, etc. somebody point blank To ask or tell someone something in a direct and blunt manner, without beating around the bush or using subtlety.
  • throw up your hands/arms in despair, horror, etc. This idiom means to show or express a feeling of helplessness, frustration, dismay, or resignation in response to a difficult or overwhelming situation. It often involves physically raising one's hands or arms in a gesture of surrender or defeat.
  • beat/bore/charm etc. the socks off sb To beat/bore/charm etc. the socks off someone means to greatly impress or entertain them, to the extent that they are left amazed or delighted.
  • scare, bore, etc. the pants off somebody The idiom "scare, bore, etc. the pants off somebody" means to terrify, bore, or impress someone to a great degree. It is used to emphasize the intensity of a particular emotion or reaction.
  • be, get, etc. out of control The idiom "be, get, etc. out of control" means to become uncontrollable or disorderly, often referring to a situation or person's behavior that has gone beyond the point of being manageable.
  • be half the dancer etc. used to be The idiom "be half the dancer etc. used to be" means that someone's performance, skills, or abilities have significantly decreased or deteriorated compared to their previous high level of proficiency or excellence. It implies that the person is now only half as good as they once were.
  • he/she can talk/eat, etc. for England The idiom "he/she can [talk/eat, etc.] for England" is used to describe someone who talks, eats, or engages in a particular activity with great enthusiasm or skill, to the point of excess. It suggests that the person is highly proficient or competitive in that particular area. It is often used in a playful or joking manner.
  • get a (good/solid/sound/etc.) grasp of/on (something) To have a thorough understanding or comprehensive knowledge of something; to comprehend or master a concept or skill.
  • have your, his, its, etc. uses The phrase "have your, his, its, etc. uses" means that something or someone has value or serves a purpose in certain situations or circumstances. It implies that even though something may not be perfect or ideal, it still has practical benefits or can be used effectively in some way.
  • he, she, etc. wouldn't say boo to a goose The idiom "he, she, etc. wouldn't say boo to a goose" is used to describe someone who is very timid or shy, and unlikely to speak up or assert themselves in any situation. It suggests that the person is so quiet and unassuming that they would not even say a harmless, quiet word like "boo" to a non-threatening animal like a goose.
  • he, she, etc. won't thank you for something This idiom means that someone will not appreciate or be grateful for something that has been done for them, even though it was done with good intentions.
  • the bigger, faster, etc. the better This idiom means that something is considered superior or more desirable when it is larger, faster, or otherwise of greater magnitude or intensity. It emphasizes the idea that bigger or faster versions of something are typically seen as more impressive or advantageous.
  • at the last minute (or moment, second, etc.) Definition: At the last possible moment; just before an event or deadline.
  • (have) something, nothing, etc. to show for something This idiom means to have visible or tangible results, consequences, or accomplishments as a result of a particular action or effort. It can also mean to have something to present or demonstrate as evidence of one's efforts.
  • cut an interesting/ridiculous/unusual etc. figure To make a striking or unusual appearance; to stand out in a strange or noticeable way.
  • be a Londoner etc. through and through To be a Londoner through and through means to embody all the characteristics and qualities typically associated with being from London. It suggests that someone fully embraces the culture, traditions, and way of life of the city and is a true representation of a Londoner in every sense.
  • go through, hit, etc. a bad/sticky patch To experience a difficult or unpleasant period of time; to encounter challenges or setbacks.
  • once, twice, etc. removed The phrase "once, twice, etc. removed" is used to describe a person's relationship to another person in terms of generations. For example, if someone is described as being "twice removed" from another person, it means they are separated by two generations (e.g. grandparent and grandchild).
  • carry, take, etc. coals to Newcastle The idiom "carry, take, etc. coals to Newcastle" means to do something unnecessary or redundant, as in bringing something to a place where it is already abundant or readily available. It originates from the practice of coal mining in Newcastle, England, where coal was so plentiful that there was no need to bring more from outside sources.
  • there’s nothing, not much, etc. to choose between A and B This idiom means that two options are very similar or have little difference between them, making it difficult to choose one over the other.
  • a whale of a bill/difference/problem etc. The idiom "a whale of a bill/difference/problem etc." is used to describe something very large or substantial in size, amount, or severity. It implies that the object or situation being referred to is significant and difficult to handle or manage.
  • have, etc. an/the edge on/over somebody/something To have a competitive advantage or superiority over someone or something.
  • come easily, naturally, etc. to somebody If something comes easily, naturally, etc. to somebody, it means that they are naturally talented or skilled at doing that particular thing without much effort or difficulty.
  • dance, talk, etc. up a storm To do something with great enthusiasm, energy, or skill.
  • tell a different, another, etc. tale/story To tell a different tale/story means to provide an alternate version of events or to present a different perspective on a situation. It can also refer to making excuses or telling a lie in order to avoid facing consequences or admitting the truth.
  • be well, ideally, better, etc. placed for something/to do something To be in a good or advantageous position or situation for a particular purpose or action.
  • days, weeks, etc. hence Days, weeks, etc. hence is an idiomatic expression that means a specified amount of time in the future from the current moment. It indicates a period or interval starting from the present and extending into the future.
  • half the fun, trouble, etc. of something This idiom means that a significant portion of the enjoyment, difficulty, etc. of something is derived from a particular aspect or element of it.
  • he, she, etc. would just as soon do A The idiom "he, she, etc. would just as soon do A" means that someone has a preference or inclination towards doing a particular action or task. They are just as likely to choose to do A as they are to choose any other option.
  • be nothing if not generous, honest, helpful, etc. This idiom means that the person in question may have many faults or shortcomings, but they are at least known for being generous, honest, helpful, etc.
  • ask, cry, etc. for the moon To ask, cry, etc. for the moon is to demand something that is extremely difficult or impossible to obtain. It refers to making unreasonable or unrealistic requests or demands.
  • be half the dancer, writer, etc. you used to be The idiom "be half the dancer, writer, etc. you used to be" means that someone is not performing at the same level of skill or talent as they previously did in a particular activity or profession. It implies a decline in ability or proficiency compared to their previous achievements.
  • be the picture of health, innocence, etc. To appear or exhibit all the qualities or characteristics of health, innocence, etc.
  • you, he, etc. can't stand somebody/something To be unable to tolerate or endure someone or something; to strongly dislike or have a deep aversion to someone or something.
  • a fat lot of good, use, etc. The idiom "a fat lot of good, use, etc." is used to express disdain or disappointment in something or someone that was supposed to be helpful or beneficial but has ultimately proven ineffective or useless.
  • go, swim, etc. with/against the stream/tide To go, swim, etc. with/against the stream/tide means to conform to or resist prevailing attitudes or trends. It can refer to going along with the majority or resisting popular opinion.
  • meet somebody’s gaze, look, etc. To make eye contact with someone and hold their gaze for a period of time.
  • talk, etc. nineteen to the dozen To talk, etc. nineteen to the dozen means to speak very quickly and energetically, often in a high-speed and animated manner.
  • disappear, vanish, etc. into thin air When something or someone disappears, vanishes, or is no longer visible or present without explanation or apparent cause.
  • not all, everything, etc. somebody’s cracked up to be The idiom "not all somebody's cracked up to be" means that someone or something is not as good or impressive as people say they are. It implies that the person or thing in question does not live up to the hype or expectations surrounding them.
  • second, third, etc. hand "Second, third, etc. hand" is an idiom that refers to information or an object that has been passed down or relayed through multiple sources or individuals, often resulting in decreased accuracy or reliability.
  • what do I, you, etc. care? The phrase "what do I, you, etc. care?" is used to express indifference or lack of concern about a particular situation or topic. It conveys a dismissive attitude towards something that is not seen as important or relevant.
  • have a (good/solid/sound/etc.) grasp of/on (something) To have a good grasp of something means to have a thorough understanding or knowledge of it. It implies being able to comprehend or handle a situation, concept, or skill effectively.
  • not all that good, well, etc. Not particularly good, well, etc.; only average or mediocre.
  • have, etc. a lump in your throat To have a lump in your throat means to feel a strong emotional reaction, such as sadness or excitement, that causes difficulty in speaking or swallowing.
  • set/put (great, etc.) store by something To set/put (great, etc.) store by something means to value or place high importance on something, believing it to be valuable or significant.
  • have, show, etc. bottle The idiom "have, show, etc. bottle" means to have courage, nerve, or audacity. It is often used in British English to describe someone possessing the ability to deal with difficult or risky situations in a brave and confident manner.
  • money, expense, etc. is no object When someone says that money, expense, etc. is no object, they mean that cost is not a concern and that they are willing to spend as much money as needed.
  • we, you, he, etc. can/could/might do worse The idiom "we, you, he, etc. can/could/might do worse" means that the current situation or option is not the best, but there are worse alternatives available. It suggests that the current choice is not ideal, but it is better than other possible outcomes.
  • I, etc. won't bite The idiom "I, etc. won't bite" means that someone or something is not dangerous or harmful, and there is no need to be afraid or worried. It is often used to reassure someone that they can approach or interact with the person or situation without fear of negative consequences.
  • with a capital A, B, etc. used after the name of a letter to emphasize its pronunciation or to refer to it as a specific concept or thing.
  • that's your, his, etc. problem This idiom is used to indicate that a particular issue or situation is someone else's responsibility or concern, and not that of the speaker. It suggests that the person should deal with or resolve the issue on their own.
  • drink, laugh, shout, etc. yourself silly The idiom "drink, laugh, shout, etc. yourself silly" means to engage in a particular activity to an excessive or extreme degree, often to the point of irrationality or losing control.
  • What/Why/Who etc. the (blue) blazes The idiom "What/Why/Who etc. the (blue) blazes" is an expression of surprise or disbelief, typically used to convey frustration or confusion about a situation. It is often used as a more colorful alternative to other, milder expressions of confusion or astonishment. The addition of "blue" in front of "blazes" is simply used for emphasis.
  • have a few/a lot etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few/a lot etc. irons in the fire" means to be involved in multiple projects or activities at the same time, in order to increase the likelihood of success or achievement in at least one of them.
  • have your good, plus, etc. points To have both positive and negative aspects or qualities.
  • be/get/run/etc. out of control When something is out of control, it means that it cannot be managed or restrained effectively. It is chaotic, disorderly, or unpredictable.
  • be in a good, bad, dark, etc. space To be in a good, bad, dark, etc. space means to be in a particular state of mind or emotional condition. It refers to being in a certain mental or emotional place or state, whether positive or negative.
  • come, turn, etc. full circle To return to the original starting point or situation, often with the implication of experiencing a sense of completion or resolution.
  • it’s no skin off my, your, his, etc. nose The idiom "it’s no skin off my, your, his, etc. nose" means that something does not bother or affect someone in any way. It implies that the outcome or consequence of a situation will not impact the person personally.
  • have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects or opportunities that one is actively pursuing or involved in at the same time.
  • how, why, where, who, etc. on earth This idiom is used to express confusion, disbelief, or astonishment about something, often implying that something is difficult to understand or believe. It can also be used to emphasize a strong curiosity or bewilderment about a particular situation or topic.
  • a whale of a job/party/story etc. This idiom is used to describe something as impressive, enormous or remarkable in some way. It often refers to a task, event, or story that is particularly noteworthy or challenging.
  • make, cause, etc. a splash To "make, cause, etc. a splash" means to attract attention or generate excitement or interest, often in a flashy or dramatic manner. It can also refer to making a significant impact or impression on others.
  • in two minutes, ten seconds, etc. flat The idiom "in two minutes, ten seconds, etc. flat" means in a very short period of time, precisely and without delay.
  • go, run, etc. like the wind To go, run, etc. like the wind means to move very quickly or with great speed and urgency.
  • be an actor, cook, etc. in the making To be on the path to becoming an actor, cook, etc. and showing potential or talent in that particular field.
  • be, stay, stand, etc. stock-still The idiom "be, stay, stand, etc. stock-still" means to remain completely still without moving or making any noise.
  • beat, kick, etc. the shit out of somebody To physically assault someone aggressively and with great force.
  • go, etc. to extremes To go to extremes means to act or behave in a very extreme or excessive way, usually beyond what is considered reasonable or normal.
  • a blow-by-blow account, description, etc. (of something) A detailed recounting or description of an event or situation, including every minute detail or aspect in chronological order.
  • he, she, etc. deserves a medal The idiom "he, she, etc. deserves a medal" is used to express admiration or appreciation for someone's exceptional effort, bravery, or achievements. It implies that the person being referred to deserves recognition or praise for their actions.
  • get, win, take, etc. the wooden spoon To come in last place or finish in a position of failure or incompetence in a competition or contest.
  • any minute, day, time, etc. now The idiom "any minute, day, time, etc. now" means that something is expected to happen very soon or very shortly. It implies that the event is imminent and could occur at any moment.
  • cut a fine, poor, sorry, etc. figure The idiom "cut a fine, poor, sorry, etc. figure" means to appear or present oneself in a particular way, typically with a positive or negative connotation. It can refer to someone's appearance, behavior, or overall impression in a given situation.
  • appear, etc. out of thin air The idiom "appear out of thin air" means to suddenly or unexpectedly come into existence or visibility without any apparent explanation or cause. It implies that something has appeared or happened in a mysterious or magical way. This can refer to physically manifesting, arising, or being produced seemingly out of nowhere.
  • be in good, poor, etc. voice The idiom "be in good, poor, etc. voice" means to be in good, bad, etc. health or condition, especially in terms of vocal ability or performance. It refers to how well someone is able to speak or sing at a particular moment.
  • be an artist, professional, etc. to your fingertips To be an artist, professional, etc. to your fingertips means to be extremely skilled, proficient, or knowledgeable in a particular field or endeavor. It implies that someone has mastered their craft or profession down to the smallest detail or nuance.
  • all the farther (or closer, etc.) The idiom "all the farther (or closer, etc.)" means to a greater or lesser degree, extent, or distance. It is often used to emphasize a specific point in a conversation or to convey a specific level of intensity or importance.
  • be convulsed with laughter, rage, etc. To be overwhelmed or overcome by intense emotions such as laughter, rage, or any other powerful feeling.
  • shout, etc. something from the housetops/rooftops To publicly proclaim or announce something in a loud and indiscreet manner.
  • pull a gun, knife, etc. on sb To threaten or use a weapon against someone in a confrontational or aggressive manner.
  • keep good (or bad, etc.) time The idiom "keep good (or bad, etc.) time" means to have a sense of rhythm and tempo when playing music or dancing. It can also refer to being punctual or having good (or bad) timing in general situations.
  • do a good, bad, etc. job To perform a task or job well, poorly, etc. according to a specific standard or expectation.
  • make, lose, spend, etc. a packet To make, lose, spend, etc. a packet means to make, lose, spend, etc. a lot of money; to be wealthy or well-off.
  • What price fame/success/victory etc.? The idiom "What price fame/success/victory etc.?" is a rhetorical question that is used to make someone consider the potential negative consequences or sacrifices that come with achieving fame, success, victory, or other desirable goals. It implies that there may be significant costs or drawbacks to attaining these goals that are often overlooked or not fully understood.
  • have money, time, etc. to play with Having resources such as money or time that one can use or enjoy without worrying about running out or causing harm.
  • with a capital A/B/C etc. The idiom "with a capital A/B/C etc." is used to emphasize or accentuate a particular quality or characteristic. It suggests that the quality or characteristic in question is especially noteworthy or prominent. For example, "She is a talented singer with a capital S." means that she is an exceptionally talented singer.
  • a chicken-and-egg situation, problem, etc. A situation in which it is impossible to determine which came first, as both things depend on the other for existence or occurrence.
  • how, what, why, etc. on earth... The idiom "how, what, why, etc. on earth..." is used to express astonishment or disbelief about something, often emphasizing the difficult or impossible nature of a situation or action. It is typically used in questions to convey incredulity.
  • have done etc. more than has had hot dinners The idiom "have done more than has had hot dinners" means to have had a lot of different experiences or accomplishments in life. It suggests that the person has had a rich and varied life full of achievements and adventures.
  • a hundred/thousand/million and one things/things to do, etc. The idiom "a hundred/thousand/million and one things/things to do, etc." means having a large number of tasks or responsibilities to attend to. It conveys the feeling of being overwhelmed or extremely busy with numerous things that need to be accomplished.
  • cook up, dance up, talk up, etc. a storm To do something with great energy, enthusiasm, or skill; to do something with a lot of intensity or passion.
  • beat, bore, scare, etc. the pants off sb To completely outperform or outdo someone in a particular activity or situation, causing them to be overwhelmed, frightened, or intimidated.
  • do, mean, etc. something for the best To do, mean, or intend something with the best intentions or for the best outcome, even if the result may not turn out positively.
  • curiously, funnily, oddly, strangely, etc. enough This idiom is used to introduce a surprising or unexpected fact, event, or observation. It indicates that something is strange, unusual, or unexpected, but is presented in a light or humorous manner.
  • crab one's act (the deal, etc.) To become annoyed or upset, especially in a sudden or unpredictable manner.
  • as things, people, etc. go "As things, people, etc. go" is an idiom used to describe a general standard or level of quality compared to others of its kind. It is used to indicate that something or someone is acceptable or expected in a given situation.
  • be an artist/patriot/professional/etc. to your fingertips To be an artist/patriot/professional/etc. to your fingertips means to possess exceptional skill, passion, and dedication in one's craft or role, demonstrating mastery and commitment in every aspect of their work or character.
  • have a few lot etc. irons in the fire To have a few lot etc. irons in the fire means to have multiple plans or projects in progress at the same time, or to be involved in several activities or opportunities simultaneously.
  • labour under the delusion, illusion, misapprehension, etc. To believe or operate based on a false belief or misconception.
  • a practical, scientific, etc. turn of mind A practical, scientific, etc. turn of mind refers to an approach or mindset that is characterized by a focus on pragmatic, logical, or analytical thinking. People with this type of mindset are typically rational, methodical, and concerned with finding solutions based on evidence and reason rather than emotion or intuition.
  • run (jog, etc.) in place To perform an action or movement with little or no progress or advancement, often due to being stuck in a repetitive or unproductive cycle.
  • $100, £50, etc. a throw The idiom "$100, £50, etc. a throw" refers to a situation where each person or participant is required to pay the same amount of money in order to participate or be involved in something.
  • have your nose in a book, magazine, etc. The idiom "have your nose in a book, magazine, etc." means to be completely absorbed in reading something, usually to the exclusion of everything else. It implies that the person is deeply focused on the content they are reading and may not be paying attention to their surroundings.
  • I don’t mind admitting, telling you…, etc. This idiom is used to preface a statement or confession by indicating that the speaker is not reluctant or ashamed to admit or share it. It suggests that the speaker is comfortable sharing personal information or feelings.
  • be/come a poor second, third, etc. To be or become of lesser importance, quality, or success compared to someone or something else.
  • not as bad, tall, etc. as all that This idiom is used to downplay or minimize the negative qualities or severity of something, suggesting that it is not as bad, tall, serious, etc. as it may initially seem or as others may believe. It implies that the situation or person being discussed is not as negative or extreme as it is perceived to be.
  • there's a good boy, girl, dog, etc. An expression used to praise or reward someone for their good behavior or actions.
  • how dare you, etc. The phrase "how dare you" is used to express shock, disbelief, or indignation at someone's words or actions. It is a way of showing strong disapproval or reprimand towards the person.
  • get a lot of etc. stick To receive a lot of negative criticism or backlash.
  • rip somebody/something apart/to shreds/to bits, etc. To criticize or attack someone or something in a very harsh and thorough manner.
  • be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out The idiom "be as fast/hot/thin etc. as all get out" means to be extremely fast, hot, thin, etc. It emphasizes the extreme level of a particular quality or attribute.
  • serve a, his, its, etc. purpose To be useful or fulfill a specific need or function.
  • be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc. The phrase "be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc." means to be a situation or course of action that is likely to lead to a specific outcome, whether negative or positive. It implies that certain elements or factors are present or combined in a way that will inevitably result in the specified outcome.
  • a few, two, etc. bricks short of a load The idiom "a few bricks short of a load" is used to describe someone who is not very smart or mentally deficient. It suggests that the person lacks intelligence or common sense.
  • a woman, man, person, etc. of substance "A woman, man, person, etc. of substance" is an idiom used to describe someone who is considered to be important, influential, and of high moral or intellectual quality. It implies that the individual has a significant impact on others and possesses deep integrity and values.
  • it's only, just, etc. a matter/a question of time This idiom means that something is certain or inevitable, it will happen eventually, it is only a matter of time before it occurs.
  • I've never felt/heard/seen etc. sth in all my (born) days! This idiom is used to emphasize that the speaker has never experienced a particular feeling, heard something, seen something, etc. before in their entire life. It indicates surprise or astonishment at an unusual or unexpected event.
  • flash somebody a smile, look, etc. To quickly show a smile, look, or gesture to someone.
  • in my, your, etc. place "In my, your, etc. place" is an idiom that refers to taking someone else's position or role. It can also mean to imagine oneself in someone else's situation or circumstances.
  • like the cat that got, stole, etc. the cream The idiom "like the cat that got the cream" is used to describe someone who looks extremely pleased or satisfied with themselves, often because they have achieved something or received something they wanted. It conveys a sense of smug satisfaction or self-satisfaction.
  • president elect, prime minister elect, etc. The idiom "president elect, prime minister elect, etc." refers to a person who has been chosen or elected to assume a leadership position, but has not yet officially taken up the role or been sworn into office.
  • as good, well, etc. as the next person The idiom "as good, well, etc. as the next person" means being equal in ability, skill, or quality to others. It is often used to emphasize that someone is not better or worse than anyone else in a particular aspect.
  • have many, etc. irons in the fire Having many irons in the fire means being involved in multiple activities or projects at the same time. It suggests that a person is busy with various tasks and is demonstrating their ability to manage and prioritize multiple responsibilities.
  • a sad, poor, etc. reflection on something The idiom "a sad, poor, etc. reflection on something" refers to a situation or outcome that is a negative representation of something else, often indicating disappointment, failure, or an unfortunate consequence.
  • no teacher/actor, etc. worth their salt This idiom is used to indicate that someone is not competent or skilled in their profession. The phrase "no teacher/actor, etc. worth their salt" implies that the individual is not worthy of respect or consideration in their field because they lack the necessary talent or ability.
  • scream, shout, etc. your head off To scream, shout, etc. your head off means to yell or protest loudly and energetically.
  • have done/seen/had etc. more sth than sb has had hot dinners This idiom is used to describe someone who has experienced or done something many times or to a great extent. It implies that the person has a lot of experience or knowledge in a certain area or has done something so often that it is as common as eating hot dinners.
  • pick, pull, etc. somebody/something to bits/pieces To criticize or scrutinize someone or something in a very thorough and detailed manner, often to the point of breaking it down or exposing flaws.
  • be out of your mind with boredom/fear/worry etc. To be extremely bored, afraid, worried, etc. to the point of feeling overwhelmed or consumed by those emotions.
  • it's no skin off my, your, his, etc. nose This idiom means that something does not affect or bother the person it is being said to. It indicates that the person is unaffected or unconcerned by a particular situation or outcome.
  • thank God, goodness, heaven(s), etc. This idiom is used to express relief or gratitude for a positive outcome or situation. It is a way of acknowledging that things could have turned out worse or could have been more challenging, but are thankful that they are not. It is a way of showing appreciation for a fortunate circumstance or event.
  • there's nothing, not much, etc. to choose between A and B This idiom means that there is very little difference between two options or choices.
  • a brick short of a load, two sandwiches short of a picnic, etc. The idiom "a brick short of a load," "two sandwiches short of a picnic," or similar variations are idiomatic expressions used to describe someone who is not very intelligent or mentally deficient. Essentially, it means that the person is missing something essential or is not quite right in their thinking or actions.
  • head and shoulders above the others rest etc. The idiom "head and shoulders above the rest" is used to describe someone or something that is significantly better or superior compared to others. It means being in a higher league or class, standing out as exceptional or outstanding in quality or ability.
  • be knocking (on) 60, 70, etc. The idiom "be knocking (on) 60, 70, etc." means to be approaching a certain age, typically around 60, 70, or older. It suggests that someone is getting close to reaching that milestone age.
  • rot in jail, prison, etc. To be confined in a jail, prison, or similar institution for an extended period of time, often as a punishment for committing a crime.
  • every bit as good, bad, etc. The idiom "every bit as good, bad, etc." means to be completely equal in quality or degree to something else. It is often used to emphasize that two things are comparable in a particular aspect.
  • I, you, etc. can't win The idiom "I, you, etc. can't win" is used to express a feeling of frustration or hopelessness when faced with a situation in which it seems impossible to be successful or achieve a positive outcome, regardless of one's efforts.
  • be on the cold, small, etc. side To be lacking in enthusiasm, warmth, or liveliness.
  • for all I, you, etc. care "For all I, you, etc. care" is an idiomatic expression used to convey that someone does not care or is indifferent about a particular situation or outcome.
  • fire questions, insults, etc. at somebody To fire questions, insults, etc. at somebody means to aggressively ask questions, hurl insults, or criticize them in a rapid and forceful manner.
  • be, feel, etc. out of sorts To be out of sorts means to not feel oneself, to feel unwell or not quite right, either physically or emotionally. It can also refer to feeling out of place or disconnected.
  • when he's, it's, etc. at home? When he's, it's, etc. at home is an idiom that means "in one's element" or "at one's best or most comfortable state." It refers to someone or something being in a familiar and natural setting or situation where they are most confident and capable.
  • what's this, etc. in aid of? This idiom is typically used to question the purpose or reason behind something, often implying confusion or skepticism. It is asking for an explanation or justification for someone's actions or decisions.
  • come/be a poor second, third, etc. The idiom "come/be a poor second, third, etc." means to be much less successful, important, or impressive than someone or something else in a competition or comparison.
  • the chance, etc. of a lifetime An opportunity that is extraordinary and rare, or one that may not come again in a person's lifetime.
  • reflect well, badly, etc. on somebody/something To reflect well, badly, etc. on somebody/something means to make someone or something appear good, bad, etc. in the eyes of others; to enhance, damage, etc. one's reputation or appearance.
  • a man, woman, etc. after your own heart Someone who shares the same attitudes, values, or preferences as oneself; a person who is similar in mindset or interests.
  • roll on the weekend, five o'clock, etc. This idiom is an expression used to convey anticipation or excitement for something ending or beginning. It is often used to express eagerness for the weekend, the end of the workday, or any other event or time of day that is eagerly awaited.
  • rather you, him, etc. than me This idiom is used to express relief or gratitude at the prospect of someone else experiencing a difficult or unpleasant situation instead of oneself. It can also be used to indicate a preference for someone else to handle a challenging task or responsibility.
  • have a nice, good, etc. line in sth To have a nice, good, etc. line in something means to excel at or have a talent for a particular skill or area of expertise. It often refers to someone who is particularly skilled or proficient in a certain field or activity.
  • be as crazy etc. as they come The idiom "be as crazy as they come" means to be extremely eccentric, unusual, or unpredictable; to be truly one of the most wild or unconventional individuals.
  • save, keep, etc. it for a rainy day The idiom "save, keep, etc. it for a rainy day" means to set something aside or save it for a time of need or difficulty in the future. It suggests the importance of being prepared for unexpected or challenging circumstances by saving resources or making wise decisions in advance.
  • at a fast, good, steady, etc. clip The idiom "at a fast, good, steady, etc. clip" means to do something quickly, efficiently, or consistently at a particular pace or speed.
  • have a fine/good etc. pair of lungs To have a fine/good pair of lungs means to have a strong and loud voice or ability to speak loudly.
  • brown, green, etc. is the new black The idiom "brown, green, etc. is the new black" is used to indicate that a particular color (like brown or green) is currently in vogue or considered stylish, similar to how the color black is traditionally seen as a timeless and versatile option in fashion.
  • any judge/lawyer/teacher etc. worth their salt The idiom "any judge/lawyer/teacher etc. worth their salt" is used to describe someone who is competent, skilled, and knowledgeable in their profession. It implies that the individual is worthy of respect and admiration for their abilities and expertise.
  • make a day/night/weekend etc. of it To make a day/night/weekend etc. of it means to fully enjoy and make the most of that time period by engaging in activities or experiences that bring joy, relaxation, or excitement.
  • work, etc. your way through something To work, etc. your way through something means to persevere or make progress through a difficult or challenging situation through hard work, effort, and determination.
  • get, put, etc. something in/out of perspective The idiom "get, put, etc. something in/out of perspective" means to consider or present something in relation to its true importance or impact. It can also mean to view a situation from a different angle or with a broader understanding in order to gain a clearer understanding of its significance.
  • claw your way back, into something, out of something, to something, etc. To exert great effort and determination in order to return to a favorable position, recover from a difficult situation, or achieve success after facing obstacles or setbacks.
  • close, etc. the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "close the stable door after the horse has bolted" means to take action too late, after the damage has already been done. It refers to trying to prevent a situation that has already occurred or cannot be undone.
  • get, buy, etc. something on tick To get, buy, etc. something on tick means to acquire something by paying for it at a later date, typically on credit.
  • hold out little, etc. hope To "hold out little, etc. hope" means to have very little or no expectation or optimism for a positive outcome or result. It suggests a sense of resignation or acceptance of a negative or disappointing outcome.
  • have enough, a lot, etc. on your plate To have enough, a lot, etc. on your plate means to have a lot of responsibilities, tasks, or commitments to deal with at once. It suggests that the person is already dealing with a significant amount and may not be able to take on anything else at the moment.
  • strike fear, terror, etc. into somebody/somebody's heart To make someone feel very afraid or terrified.
  • be a athlete/star/writer etc. in the making The idiom "be a athlete/star/writer etc. in the making" typically means that someone shows potential or talent in a certain field, such as sports, entertainment, or writing, and is on the path to becoming successful or achieving greatness in that area in the future.
  • it says a lot, very little, etc. for somebody/something This idiom means that it reveals a great deal about someone or something, often with very little information or effort. It can suggest that a small detail or action speaks volumes about a person's character or the quality of something.
  • be in a class of your, its, etc. own The idiom "be in a class of your, its, etc. own" means to be exceptional, unique, or unlike anything else in a particular category or group.
  • the bigger, smaller, faster, slower, etc. the better This idiom means that something is more desirable or preferable when it is larger, smaller, faster, slower, etc., depending on the context. It suggest that an extreme or exaggerated quality is more advantageous than a moderate or average one.
  • not a blind bit of notice, difference, etc. This idiom is used to convey that someone or something has received no attention or recognition at all. It implies that the person or thing has been completely disregarded or ignored.
  • be, feel, look, taste, etc. like nothing on earth The idiom "be, feel, look, taste, etc. like nothing on earth" is used to describe something that is incredibly unique, unusual, or exceptional. It implies that whatever is being referred to is unlike anything else that can be found on Earth.
  • what's it to you, him, her, etc.? The idiom "what's it to you, him, her, etc.?" means expressing indifference or annoyance towards someone who is prying or being overly curious about something that does not concern them. It is a rhetorical question that dismisses the other person's nosiness or intrusive behavior.
  • (be, remain, stay, etc.) in the closet To keep one's true identity, beliefs, or preferences hidden or secret. Often used in reference to someone who is concealing their sexuality or some aspect of themselves.
  • your, its, etc. days are numbered This idiom means that someone or something's time is limited or coming to an end soon.
  • be wearing teacher's etc. hat To be in a position of authority or responsibility, taking on the role of a teacher, supervisor, or leader.
  • how are you, etc. fixed? This idiom is used to ask someone about their current situation or state, often inquiring about their well-being, health, or financial status.
  • for God's, heaven's, pity's, etc. sake The idiom "for God's, heaven's, pity's, etc. sake" is used to express frustration, exasperation, or urgency, often in a pleading manner. It is a way of asking someone to consider or do something out of compassion or respect for a higher power or for the sake of their own moral well-being. It is often used to emphasize the importance of a request or to express a strong desire for a particular outcome.
  • make a, no, some, etc. difference To have a noticeable effect or impact on a situation or outcome.
  • get, have, gain, etc. the upper hand To have an advantage or control over a situation or person; to be in a position of power or dominance.
  • to good, great, dramatic, etc. effect To good, great, dramatic, etc. effect means to have a strong or powerful impact or result on something or someone. It suggests that something has been done or performed successfully in achieving a desired outcome.
  • be in good, the best possible, etc. taste "To be in good, the best possible, etc. taste" means to have a sense of style and decorum that is socially acceptable, classy, and aesthetically pleasing. It refers to displaying behaviors, choices, or preferences that are considered refined, elegant, and appropriate in a particular context.
  • wear, put on, etc. sackcloth and ashes The idiom "wear, put on, etc. sackcloth and ashes" means to show extreme sorrow, repentance, or mourning for a mistake or wrongdoing. It refers to the ancient practice of wearing rough, uncomfortable clothing made of sackcloth and sprinkling ashes on oneself as a sign of penitence.
  • a matter of days, miles, pounds, etc. A matter of days, miles, pounds, etc. means a short period of time or distance, usually indicating a small amount or quantity.
  • presidentelect, prime ministerelect, etc. A person who has been elected to be the president, prime minister, or another leader of a country, but has not yet taken office.
  • make (all) the right, correct, etc. noises To "make (all) the right, correct, etc. noises" means to say or do things that are perceived as appropriate, in order to give the impression of being supportive, understanding, or knowledgeable, even if the speaker is insincere or lacking genuine commitment.
  • be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind The idiom "be bored, frightened, pissed, stoned, etc. out of your mind" means to be extremely bored, frightened, angry, high, etc. to the point of feeling as though one's mental faculties are dull or impaired.
  • be (wide) open to abuse/criticism etc. To be (wide) open to abuse/criticism etc. means to be vulnerable or susceptible to being mistreated or criticized.
  • I, etc. would sooner do something The idiom "I, etc. would sooner do something" means that one strongly prefers or would much rather do a particular thing than another option. It suggests a firm preference or choice for one specific action over another.
  • pique sb's curiosity, interest, etc. To stimulate or arouse someone's curiosity, interest, or emotions.
  • kill time, an hour, etc. To engage in an activity that serves to pass the time, especially when waiting for something else to happen.
  • an armchair critic, traveller, etc. An armchair critic, traveler, etc. is someone who criticizes or offers opinions on a subject without having firsthand experience or direct involvement in it. They tend to give their opinions based on observations and assumptions rather than personal knowledge or experience.
  • have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself To have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself means to express or not express a valid explanation or defense for one's behavior or actions.
  • (find, etc.) a/the middle way A point of balance or compromise between two extremes, avoiding either extreme or the extremes of any situation.
  • your, his, etc. true colours The true nature or character of someone or something, especially when it is revealed or displayed openly or under pressure.
  • the first etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first rung on the ladder" refers to the starting point or the first step towards achieving a goal or progressing in a particular field or endeavor. It signifies the initial stage of a process or journey towards something greater or more significant.
  • drink, laugh, etc. yourself silly To engage in a behavior, such as drinking or laughing, to the point of experiencing extreme and uncontrollable joy or satisfaction.
  • have, etc. your fingers in the till To have your fingers in the till means to be stealing money from your workplace, especially over a period of time.
  • any old thing, time, place, etc. The idiom "any old thing, time, place, etc." is used to indicate that something is not specific or particular, and that any option will do. It suggests a lack of preference or requirements for a particular choice.
  • one, etc. in a million The idiom "one in a million" refers to someone or something that is extremely rare or unique, being one of a very small number in a larger group.
  • the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder" refers to a person's current position or level of achievement in a particular area, with the ladder symbolizing progression or advancement. It is often used to describe someone's status or level within a hierarchy, with each rung on the ladder representing a level of success or accomplishment.
  • take, claim, seize, etc. the moral high ground To take, claim, seize, etc. the moral high ground means to assert a position or viewpoint that is considered morally superior or to adopt a stance that is perceived as being more ethical or virtuous than that of others involved in a situation.
  • he, she, etc. could/might be forgiven for doing something This idiom means that it is understandable or excusable if someone did a particular action, usually because the circumstances or reasons for doing so were compelling or justifiable.
  • his, her, etc. bark is worse than his, her, etc. bite This idiom means that someone's words or threats are more aggressive or intimidating than their actions or ability to follow through with those threats. In other words, they may talk tough but are not actually willing or able to back up their words with actions.
  • get, have, etc. a free hand To have the freedom or authority to do something without interference or restriction.
  • more than flesh and blood can stand, endure, etc. This idiom typically means that something is too difficult, overwhelming, or intolerable for a person to bear. It suggests that the situation or experience exceeds the physical, emotional, or mental capacity of an individual to endure.
  • shame on you, him, etc. "Shame on you, him, etc." is an expression used to express disapproval or disappointment in someone's behavior or actions. It is used to convey that the person should feel ashamed for what they have done.
  • see, etc. how the land lies To assess a situation or understand the true state of affairs.
  • this, our, etc. neck of the woods This phrase is used to refer to a specific area or region, often one that is familiar to the speaker. It is typically used to indicate a geographical location or neighborhood where the speaker is currently located or is from.
  • I, you, etc. can't take somebody anywhere The idiom "I, you, etc. can't take somebody anywhere" means that the person being referred to is prone to engaging in embarrassing or inappropriate behavior no matter where they are taken or what situation they are in. This idiom is often used humorously to describe someone who consistently acts in a manner that reflects poorly on themselves or others.
  • fix somebody with a look, stare, gaze, etc. To fix somebody with a look, stare, gaze, etc. means to look at someone intently and with a steady gaze, often conveying strong emotions or intentions.
  • be kind, generous, etc. to a fault The idiom "be kind, generous, etc. to a fault" means to possess an admirable quality or trait to such an excessive degree that it may lead to negative consequences or be taken advantage of by others.
  • he, she, etc. doesn't miss a trick The idiom "he, she, etc. doesn't miss a trick" means someone is always very aware of what is happening around them and is quick to take advantage of any opportunity or situation. They are very observant and attentive to details.
  • store up trouble, etc. for yourself To store up trouble for yourself means to create problems or difficulties for yourself in the future by making unwise decisions or taking actions that will have negative consequences.
  • cut your political, professional, etc. teeth To gain experience or expertise in a certain area, typically through starting in an entry-level or junior position and gradually progressing to more advanced roles.
  • get, have, etc. the snuffles To have a cold or nasal congestion.
  • money, winning, etc. isn't everything This idiom means that success, wealth, or achievement are not the most important aspects of life and should not be the sole focus or measure of a person's worth or happiness.
  • no matter what, when, why, etc. This idiom is used to indicate that something is true or will happen under any circumstances or regardless of the situation. It emphasizes that a particular action, event, or decision will inevitably occur or be carried out.
  • there's much/a lot etc. to be said for sth/doing sth This idiom means that there are many reasons or arguments in favor of something or doing something. It suggests that there are compelling points to consider in support of a particular idea, action, or decision.
  • like, love, etc. the sound of your own voice This idiom is used to describe someone who enjoys hearing themselves speak, often talking excessively or with excessive pride or self-importance.
  • any judge etc. worth salt The idiom "any judge, etc. worth their salt" refers to someone who is competent, efficient, and respected in their profession or role. It implies that the individual in question has the necessary skills, experience, and qualifications to fulfill their duties effectively.
  • be, keep, etc. in trim To be, keep, etc. in trim means to be physically fit and healthy, often achieved through regular exercise and a healthy lifestyle.
  • he, it, etc. promises well When someone or something "promises well," it means they show potential for success or improvement in the future. The idiom indicates that there are positive signs that suggest good things may come.
  • be, look, etc. set The idiom "be, look, etc. set" means to be fully prepared or ready for something, typically a difficult or challenging task or situation. It can also refer to being in a particular position or arrangement.
  • make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand The idiom "make, etc. something by/with your own fair hand" means to create or craft something oneself without the help of others. It refers to the act of personally working on something with care and skill, using one's own hands.
  • at my, your, etc. time of life The idiom "at my, your, etc. time of life" refers to the specific stage or age someone is currently at in their life. It is often used to reflect on experiences, accomplishments, or struggles that are typical or expected during that particular period of life.

Similar spelling words for ETC

Infographic

Add the infographic to your website: