How Do You Spell FACE?

Pronunciation: [fˈe͡ɪs] (IPA)

The word "face" is spelled using the letters F-A-C-E. In IPA phonetic transcription, it is represented as /feɪs/. The /f/ corresponds to the sound of blowing air through the lips, the /eɪ/ represents a diphthong with the sound of "ay," and the /s/ is the voiced sound of air passing through a narrow opening between the teeth. This simple four-letter word may seem easy to spell, but mastering the correct phonetic sounds associated with each letter can take time and practice.

FACE Meaning and Definition

Face (noun):

1. The front part of the head, including the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, and chin. It is the part of the body that contains features associated with identification, expression, and communication.

2. The surface of an object that is typically pointed towards the viewer or exposed to the outside. It can refer to the front surface of a building, the visible side of a clock, or the side of a card with a printed or drawn image.

3. A person's facial expression or countenance, reflecting their emotions, mood, or character. It is often used to convey feelings such as happiness, anger, sadness, or surprise.

4. The image formed by a person's features that is used to identify them, especially in photographs, paintings, or on currency notes.

5. A reputation, dignity, or social standing that a person presents to others. It can refer to one's honor, integrity, or credibility in the eyes of society.

6. A surface that presents itself or confronts a particular situation, problem, or challenge. It is often used in phrases like "putting on a brave face" or "face the facts."

7. To confront, encounter, or deal with a difficulty, task, or situation, typically with courage, determination, or resolve. It may involve a direct confrontation, acceptance of consequences, or finding a solution.

8. To turn or be directed towards a specific direction or orientation. It can refer to the side of an object, the direction of a building, or the positioning of a person's body.

Verb:

1. To have the face or front part turned in a particular direction.

2. To be positioned or turn towards someone or something.

3

Top Common Misspellings for FACE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for FACE

Etymology of FACE

The word "face" originated from the Old French word "face", which comes from the Vulgar Latin term "facia". The term "facia" is believed to have derived from the Latin word "facies", meaning "appearance", "form", or "countenance". The Latin word "facies" itself can be traced back to the Indo-European root "*dhe-", which carries the meaning of "to set" or "to put". Over time, the word "face" evolved in various languages to refer to the front part of the head, specifically the feature that encompasses the eyes, nose, mouth, and other facial characteristics.

Idioms with the word FACE

  • sb's face falls The idiom "sb's face falls" means that someone's facial expression changes from a positive or hopeful one to a disappointed or discouraged one. It typically occurs when something unexpected or undesirable happens, causing a sudden shift in their emotions.
  • to sb's face The idiom "to sb's face" means openly or directly addressing someone, typically expressing criticism, disapproval, or confrontation directly to the person concerned, rather than talking behind their back or in their absence. It refers to speaking with someone directly and honestly, without reservation or inhibition.
  • show your face The idiom "show your face" means to be present or make an appearance in a social or public setting, often when it is expected or requested. It suggests being visible or actively participating in a specific event, situation, or gathering.
  • shut your mouth/face The idiom "shut your mouth/face" is an admonition or command for someone to stop speaking or be quiet. It is often used when someone is being disrespectful, talking too much, or saying something inappropriate.
  • shut your gob, at shut your mouth/face The idiom "shut your gob" or "shut your mouth/face" is an informal way of telling someone to stop talking or to be quiet. It is often used in a slightly rude or commanding manner to indicate annoyance or frustration with someone's words or behavior.
  • be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "be laughing on the other side of your face" means to suddenly stop feeling happy or satisfied when faced with an unexpected negative outcome or consequence. It implies that someone's initial joy or confidence is reversed, leading to a change in their demeanor.
  • laugh out of the other side of your mouth, at be laughing on the other side of your face The idiom "laugh out of the other side of your mouth" or "laugh on the other side of your face" is used to convey the idea that someone will experience a completely different, often unpleasant, outcome or situation than they initially anticipated or believed. It implies that their current confidence or amusement will be replaced by disappointment or regret.
  • wipe the smile off sb's face The idiom "wipe the smile off someone's face" means to make someone stop feeling happy, satisfied, or confident, usually by saying or doing something that is upsetting, disappointing, or humiliating to them.
  • stare sb in the face The idiom "stare someone in the face" means to confront or be confronted with a clear and undeniable truth, fact, or reality, often referring to an obvious or impending outcome that can no longer be ignored or denied.
  • the face of sth The idiom "the face of something" refers to the outward appearance, image, or representation of something. It implies the visible or prominent aspect that is generally associated with a particular thing or concept. It can also mean the most recognizable or representative person or thing related to a specific subject or organization.
  • keep a straight face The idiom "keep a straight face" means to remain serious and not show any signs of amusement or laughter, even in a humorous or absurd situation. It refers to maintaining a neutral and composed facial expression.
  • stuff your face To "stuff one's face" means to eat or consume food greedily and in large quantities, often with delight or without manners. The phrase carries a connotation of excessiveness and lack of self-control in eating habits.
  • have a face like the back end of a bus The idiom "have a face like the back end of a bus" refers to someone who has an unattractive or unpleasant facial expression. It suggests that the person's face resembles the unattractive rear or back end of a bus.
  • throw sth back in sb's face The idiom "throw something back in someone's face" refers to the act of using something that was previously said or done by someone against them in a confrontational or argumentative manner. It involves bringing up and emphasizing a past action, statement, or favor in a way that is intended to embarrass, criticize, or discredit the person it is being thrown at.
  • wipe sth off the face of the earth/globe, at wipe sth off the map The idiom "wipe something off the face of the earth/globe" or "wipe something off the map" means to completely eradicate or destroy something, usually referring to a place or a group of people. It suggests removing all traces or existence of something so that it no longer exists.
  • written all over sb's face The idiom "written all over sb's face" refers to an obvious or clear expression of emotions or thoughts that are easily discernible through a person's facial expressions and body language. It implies that the person's true thoughts, feelings, or intentions are unmistakably and visibly displayed on their face.
  • until you are blue in the face The idiom "until you are blue in the face" means to continue doing or saying something to the point of exhaustion or frustration, often resulting in no change or impact on the situation.
  • put on a brave face The idiom "put on a brave face" means to hide one's true feelings or fears behind a facade of strength or courage, especially in difficult or challenging situations. It is often used to describe an individual who tries to appear brave, confident, or unaffected even when they may be feeling scared, anxious, or overwhelmed.
  • put a brave face on it, at put on a brave face The idiom "put a brave face on it" or "put on a brave face" means to conceal one's true feelings or fears and act in a courageous or confident manner, especially in a challenging or difficult situation. It involves presenting a strong or positive outward appearance despite feeling scared, worried, or uncertain on the inside. It often signifies making an effort to mask vulnerability or maintain composure in the face of adversity.
  • wouldn't know sth if it hit you in the face, at wouldn't know sth if you fell over one/it The idiom "wouldn't know something if it hit you in the face" means that someone is very oblivious or ignorant about a particular thing, even if it is extremely obvious or apparent. It implies that the person is so unaware that they wouldn't recognize the thing even if it had a direct impact or was right in front of them. A similar variation of the idiom is "wouldn't know something if you fell over one/it," which suggests that the person would still remain clueless about something even if they stumbled or had a physical encounter with it.
  • sb's face is a picture The idiom "sb's face is a picture" means that someone's facial expression is very clear or vivid, usually conveying a strong emotion or reaction to something amusing, surprising, or shocking.
  • get out of my face! The idiom "get out of my face!" is an expression used to express annoyance, frustration, or anger towards someone who is being intrusive, bothersome, or excessively demanding of attention. It is a way of telling someone to leave you alone and stop interfering or bothering you.
  • let's face it 1 The idiom "let's face it" means to accept or acknowledge an unpleasant or difficult reality, often used when stating an uncomfortable truth or addressing a controversial topic.
  • let's face it 2 The idiom "let's face it" is typically used to introduce or acknowledge a difficult or unpleasant truth or reality that cannot be avoided or denied. It suggests a resignation or acceptance of the situation being discussed.
  • sb's face doesn't fit The idiom "sb's face doesn't fit" means that someone is not favored or accepted in a particular social or professional context, usually because they do not conform to expected norms or preferences, regardless of their qualifications or abilities. It implies that the person's appearance, personality, or background makes them incompatible or unsuited for a particular role or group.
  • be wiped off the face of the earth, at disappear off the face of the earth The idiom "be wiped off the face of the earth" or "disappear off the face of the earth" refers to the complete and sudden eradication or vanishing of someone or something. It implies that the person or object in question has vanished without any trace, leaving no evidence or indication of their existence. It is often used figuratively to emphasize the extent or permanence of someone's disappearance.
  • in your face The idiom "in your face" is typically used to describe something or someone that is bold, confrontational, or aggressive in their behavior, often intended to provoke or challenge someone. It refers to a direct, upfront approach without concern for politeness or subtlety.
  • disappear off the face of the earth The idiom "disappear off the face of the earth" means to vanish or go missing completely, leaving no trace or information about one's whereabouts. It suggests a sudden and total disappearance, as if the person or thing has ceased to exist in any known or visible form.
  • cut off your nose to spite your face The idiom "cut off your nose to spite your face" means to behave in a self-destructive manner or take actions that harm oneself in order to seek revenge or harm someone else, even if it ends up being counterproductive or detrimental to one's own well-being or interests. It refers to the act of making a decision or taking an action that ultimately leads to negative consequences for oneself, often motivated by an irrational desire for revenge or retaliation.
  • egg on sb's face The idiom "egg on someone's face" means to cause someone to feel embarrassed, foolish, or humiliated due to their own actions, mistakes, or statements. It suggests that the individual has said or done something that has resulted in public embarrassment or a loss of credibility.
  • not look sb in the eye/face The idiom "not look someone in the eye/face" refers to the act of avoiding direct eye contact or interaction with another person. It often indicates a lack of confidence, guilt, or honesty and can suggest that the person is avoiding confrontation or hiding something.
  • be in sb's face The idiom "be in someone's face" means to be confrontational, assertive, or overly present in someone's personal space, often in an intrusive or annoying manner, challenging their boundaries. It describes a situation where someone is overwhelming another person with their presence or actions.
  • in the face of sth "In the face of something" is an idiomatic expression that means despite or in spite of a challenging or difficult situation or circumstance. It refers to the act of confronting or dealing with something unpleasant or adverse with determination, courage, or perseverance. It implies overcoming obstacles, difficulties, or resistance.
  • on the face of it The idiom "on the face of it" means that when something is initially considered or observed, it appears a certain way or suggests a particular conclusion. However, upon further examination or analysis, the situation or outcome might be different or more complex than it initially seemed.
  • take sth at face value The idiom "take something at face value" means to accept or believe something exactly as it appears or is presented, without questioning or doubting its truthfulness or underlying motives. It implies accepting information or statements without deeper analysis or skepticism.
  • face the music The idiom "face the music" means to accept and confront the consequences or unpleasant realities of a situation, especially after behaving irresponsibly or making a mistake.
  • a long face The idiom "a long face" refers to someone having a sad or disappointed expression on their face, typically due to a feeling of discouragement or frustration. It is often used to describe someone who looks unhappy or dejected.
  • laugh in sb's face The idiom "laugh in someone's face" means to openly and contemptuously mock or ridicule someone, usually in response to something they have said or done.
  • fly in the face of sth The idiom "fly in the face of something" means to openly oppose or contradict a commonly accepted belief, rule, or convention, often in a bold or defiant manner. It implies acting against prevailing expectations or norms, demonstrating a disregard for established conventions or opinions.
  • not be just a pretty face The idiom "not be just a pretty face" means that someone is not only attractive or good-looking, but they also possess intelligence, skills, or qualities that go beyond their appearance. It suggests that the person should not be underestimated based solely on their physical appearance, as they have other valuable attributes as well.
  • the unacceptable face of sth The idiom "the unacceptable face of something" refers to the aspect or representation of something that is deemed inappropriate, immoral, or socially unacceptable. It highlights the negative and undesirable aspects associated with a particular issue, person, or organization.
  • be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" means that something is extremely obvious or evident, to the point that it cannot be ignored or disputed. It refers to something that is so clearly and undeniably visible, just like the nose on a person's face, that no further explanation or analysis is necessary.
  • be (as) plain as a pikestaff, at be (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "be (as) plain as a pikestaff" or "be (as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is extremely obvious or clear. It describes a situation or fact that is easily noticeable without any effort, just like the plainness of a pikestaff (a long, thick, and unadorned wooden staff) or the nose on someone's face, which is a prominent and unmistakable feature.
  • red in the face The idiom "red in the face" refers to a person's face turning red due to embarrassment, anger, or exertion. It typically implies a strong emotional or physical reaction that is evident by the reddening of the cheeks or skin on the face.
  • give a red face The idiom "give a red face" means to embarrass or humiliate someone. It refers to an action or event that causes someone to feel ashamed or self-conscious, resulting in their face turning red due to blushing or emotional distress.
  • face only a mother could love The idiom "face only a mother could love" refers to someone's physical appearance being unattractive or displeasing to most people, but their mother is still able to find beauty in them due to their unconditional love. It is often used humorously to describe someone who is unappealing in terms of looks.
  • make a face (at sb/sth) The idiom "make a face (at sb/sth)" means to contort or distort one's facial expressions to convey disapproval, disgust, or dislike towards someone or something. It involves using facial gestures, such as frowning, grimacing, or sticking out one's tongue, to express disapproval or dislike in a non-verbal manner. This idiom is often used to indicate rudeness, mockery, or disdain towards someone or something.
  • make/pull a face The idiom "make/pull a face" refers to the act of contorting one's facial expression in a disapproving, exaggerated, or silly manner in order to display one's emotions or reactions. It is often done to express dislike, confusion, amusement, or disagreement nonverbally.
  • make a face The idiom "make a face" refers to the act of contorting one's facial expression, typically to show disapproval, disapproval, disgust, or amusement. It involves forming different facial expressions, often involving the mouth, eyes, and eyebrows, in order to convey a specific emotion or reaction.
  • face off The idiom "face off" refers to a confrontation or competition between two parties or individuals, typically involving a direct and intense confrontation or competition, often with an element of hostility or rivalry. It can be used in various contexts, such as sports, politics, or personal conflicts. The term is often associated with a face-to-face encounter in which both sides assert their positions or engage in a direct battle, either physically or metaphorically.
  • fly in the face of sm or sth The idiom "fly in the face of someone or something" means to openly defy or contradict someone or something, usually in a bold or defiant manner. It refers to not conforming to established norms, expectations, or beliefs, going against commonly accepted ideas or principles.
  • face to face The idiom "face to face" refers to a situation or encounter where people are in each other's physical presence, typically in close proximity, able to see and interact with one another directly. It implies a direct and personal interaction, as opposed to communicating through other means such as messages, phone calls, or video chats.
  • save face The idiom "save face" means to take actions or make efforts to avoid embarrassment, humiliation, or the loss of reputation in a difficult or awkward situation. It refers to the act of preserving one's dignity or social standing in order to maintain a positive image.
  • say to face The correct idiom is "face to face," not "say to face." Here is the definition for the idiom "face to face": "Face to face" means encountering or meeting someone in person, having a direct conversation or interaction with them, without any intermediaries or barriers. It signifies a personal, direct, and often intimate encounter between individuals. It can also refer to a situation where people confront each other directly, without hiding behind technology or other forms of communication.
  • screw up your face The idiom "screw up your face" refers to making a facial expression that conveys disgust, displeasure, confusion, or a combination of these emotions. It typically involves wrinkling or contorting the face in a way that expresses negative feelings or confusion about something.
  • face (that) only a mother could love The idiom "face (that) only a mother could love" refers to someone's unattractive physical appearance that might only be appreciated or loved by their mother due to the unconditional love and acceptance mothers typically have for their children. It humorously indicates that the person's appearance may not be appealing to others.
  • can't see hand in front of face The idiom "can't see hand in front of face" is used to describe a situation where visibility is extremely poor, to the point that one cannot see even a short distance ahead. It signifies a lack of clarity, understanding, or perception, often in a metaphorical sense.
  • set in a type face The phrase "set in a type face" typically refers to the act of choosing a particular font or style for a written text or document. It originates from the printing industry, where individual metal or wooden types were arranged and set in a specific font for creating printed material. In a broader sense, it can also be used to indicate a specific presentation or aesthetic style for any form of written or displayed content.
  • set face against The idiom "set face against" means to oppose or be strongly against something. It implies a firm, determined resistance or disapproval towards a particular idea, action, or person.
  • hide one's face in shame The idiom "hide one's face in shame" means to feel deeply embarrassed or remorseful about something one has done, to the extent that they wish to conceal their face or identity out of shame or disgrace.
  • face away The idiom "face away" refers to someone diverting their attention or focus from something or someone, usually by physically turning their face in the opposite direction. It can also imply consciously avoiding confrontation or ignoring a situation.
  • show face The idiom "show face" typically refers to physically being present at a social gathering, event, or some kind of meeting. It implies the act of making an appearance or showing up, often to maintain social or professional connections.
  • not show face
  • Shut face!
  • laugh out of the other side of face and laugh out of the other ...
  • be laughing on the other side of face The idiom "be laughing on the other side of the face" is similar in meaning to "having the last laugh" or "getting one's comeuppance." It refers to a situation where someone is currently delighted or confident, but is expected to face disappointment, embarrassment, or a turn of events that will reverse their fortune and make them feel foolish or regretful.
  • stand there with one's bare face hanging out The idiom "stand there with one's bare face hanging out" means to appear or act completely unashamed or unabashed about something, often after being caught doing something wrong or foolish. It implies that the person is not embarrassed by their actions and shows a lack of remorse or self-consciousness.
  • cut off nose to spite face The idiom "cut off nose to spite face" means to carry out an action that is ultimately self-destructive or harmful in an attempt to harm or seek revenge against someone else. It refers to the illogical and extreme nature of hurting oneself in the process of trying to hurt someone else.
  • cut nose off to spite face The idiom "cutting off one's nose to spite one's face" refers to a situation where a person's actions to harm or inconvenience someone else ultimately end up harming themselves more. It reflects the idea of making a self-destructive choice in an attempt to seek revenge or prove a point, but in doing so, only brings further harm or detriment to oneself.
  • slam the door in sm's face The idiom "slam the door in someone's face" refers to the abrupt rejection or dismissal of someone, often in a rude or disrespectful manner. It implies that someone is being shut out, ignored, or denied access to a particular opportunity or conversation. It can be used figuratively to describe a sudden and harsh rejection.
  • a slap in the face The idiom "a slap in the face" refers to an action or event that is disrespectful, demeaning, or hurtful, often unexpected, that undermines or challenges someone's beliefs, desires, or self-esteem. It can be both a literal action of physically slapping someone's face or a metaphorical description of a figurative action or situation that causes a similar emotional response.
  • slap in the face The idiom "slap in the face" refers to a figurative expression used to describe an action or statement that is unexpected, insulting, or offensive to someone, often causing hurt, disappointment, or humiliation. It conveys the idea of a physical act of slapping someone's face as a metaphorical representation of an emotional blow or a gesture of disrespect.
  • smack in the face The idiom "smack in the face" is used to describe a surprising, unexpected, or shocking event or revelation that confronts a person directly and forcefully, much like being physically struck in the face. It implies the immediate impact and inability to avoid or ignore the situation at hand.
  • smash sm's face in The idiom "smash someone's face in" typically refers to physically assaulting or violently attacking someone, usually resulting in severe injury to their face. It is a figurative expression used to convey extreme aggression or anger towards someone. Note that it is important to understand that this idiom is not to be taken literally or condone any form of violence.
  • wipe the smile off your face The idiom "wipe the smile off your face" means to cause someone to stop smiling or to make someone's happy expression disappear, usually through a comment, action, or event that brings disappointment, humiliation, or discouragement.
  • put a smile on sm's face The idiom "put a smile on someone's face" means to bring enjoyment, happiness, or pleasure to someone, often by doing or saying something that brings them joy or by acting in a way that brightens their mood.
  • soak one's face
  • blow up in face The idiom "blow up in your face" means that a situation or plan unexpectedly goes wrong and has negative consequences for the person involved. It suggests that someone's actions backfire on them, causing them difficulties or embarrassment.
  • until are blue in the face The idiom "until you're blue in the face" refers to repeatedly doing or saying something for an extended period of time, despite it being ineffective or not making any difference. It suggests that no matter how much effort, persuasion, or argument is put into something, it will not change the outcome or opinion of others.
  • talk until one is blue in the face The idiom "talk until one is blue in the face" means to talk or argue persistently and to the point of exhaustion or frustration, without making any progress or convincing anyone. It implies that no matter how much someone speaks or argues, their efforts are in vain and have little effect on the situation or the people involved.
  • blue in the face The idiom "blue in the face" means to do or say something to the point of exhaustion or frustration without achieving the desired result. It suggests that one has put forth a great deal of effort or argument, but it has been in vain.
  • cut one's nose off to spite one's face The idiom "cut one's nose off to spite one's face" means to take an action that is intended to harm someone else, but ultimately ends up hurting oneself as well. It refers to making a decision or taking a course of action that may seem satisfying in the short term as a means of revenge or proving a point, but ultimately has negative consequences for oneself.
  • I'd rather face a firing squad than do sth The idiom "I'd rather face a firing squad than do something" is an exaggerated expression used to convey extreme aversion, dread, or reluctance toward an activity or task. It emphasizes the idea that the alternative of facing a firing squad, which typically implies imminent death, is preferable to engaging in the mentioned activity.
  • stand there with bare face hanging out The idiom "stand there with bare face hanging out" means to be caught or exposed in an embarrassing or shameful situation, leaving one feeling awkward and humiliated. It implies a sense of being unable to hide one's guilt, dishonesty, or incompetence.
  • put a brave face/front on sth The idiom "put a brave face/front on something" means to act or appear optimistic, confident, or courageous in a difficult or challenging situation, despite feeling scared, anxious, or uncertain inside. It involves hiding one's true emotions or fears and presenting a positive or brave demeanor to others.
  • stare you in the face The idiom "stare you in the face" means that something is very obvious or clearly apparent, to the point that it is impossible to ignore or overlook it. It refers to a situation, fact, or truth that is right in front of someone, demanding their attention and recognition.
  • stare sth in the face The idiom "stare something in the face" means to confront a difficult or challenging situation directly and without fear. It implies facing or acknowledging something unpleasant or threatening, without avoiding or backing down from it.
  • look sb in the face To "look someone in the face" means to confront or be honest with someone directly and boldly, without any sign of guilt or shame. It implies openly acknowledging or accepting responsibility for one's actions or opinions, without trying to hide or avoid them. It can also suggest challenging or questioning someone with confidence and directness.
  • be staring sb in the face The idiom "be staring somebody in the face" means that something is extremely obvious or evident, often referring to a problem, solution, or truth that is clearly visible or easily understood. It implies that the person should have been able to recognize or acknowledge the obvious without difficulty.
  • stare sm in the face The idiom "stare someone/something in the face" means to confront or face a particular situation or problem directly, often emphasizing the difficulty or challenge associated with it. It implies looking something directly in the eye without avoiding or shying away from it.
  • look sm in the face The idiom "look someone in the face" means to confront or face someone directly and confidently, often in a challenging or assertive manner. It implies that one is not afraid to confront others or assert their position in a direct manner.
  • straight face The idiom "straight face" refers to the act of maintaining a serious or expressionless demeanor, particularly when faced with something humorous or absurd. It describes the ability to control one's facial expressions and not show any signs of amusement or disbelief.
  • stuff face The idiom "stuff face" refers to the act of eating a large amount of food quickly or greedily, often with little regard for manners or social norms.
  • fill face
  • Monday's child is fair of face The idiom "Monday's child is fair of face" is a traditional nursery rhyme line that suggests that individuals born on a Monday are generally attractive or beautiful in appearance. It implies that those born on this day possess physical beauty, specifically referring to facial features.
  • come face to face with The idiom "come face to face with" means to encounter or confront someone or something directly. It implies a close and direct interaction or meeting with someone or something, often unexpectedly or surprisingly.
  • fly in the face of The idiom "fly in the face of" means to directly oppose or contradict something, especially when it goes against common sense or established beliefs. It often refers to an action or behavior that defies expectations or conventional wisdom.
  • face the consequences The idiom "face the consequences" refers to taking responsibility for one's actions or decisions and accepting the resulting outcomes or repercussions, whether they are positive or negative. It implies acknowledging and dealing with the effects or aftermath of one's choices, often emphasizing the need to accept the potential disadvantages or penalties that may arise.
  • tell one to face
  • throw in face
  • throw back in face The idiom "throw back in face" means to remind someone of a past mistake or failure in a way that is intended to embarrass or humiliate them. It involves using someone's previous actions against them in an argument or as a means of belittling them.
  • have a face like thunder The idiom "have a face like thunder" refers to someone's facial expression portraying intense anger, displeasure, or annoyance. It implies that the person's face is dark, stern, and full of aggression, resembling the appearance of an approaching storm.
  • Shut your face/gob/mouth/trap! The idiom "Shut your face/gob/mouth/trap!" is an expression used to instruct someone to stop talking or to be quiet. It is a straightforward and often forceful way of telling someone to cease speaking.
  • set sth in a type face The idiom "set something in a type face" refers to the act of formally and permanently recording or documenting something. It originally comes from the practice of using movable type printing, where individual metal type blocks were manually arranged and locked into a frame to create printed materials. Therefore, "setting something in a type face" symbolizes the process of preserving or memorializing information in a written or printed form.
  • take sm or sth at face value To take someone or something at face value means to accept or believe their apparent meaning or explanation without questioning or suspecting any deeper or hidden meaning or intention. It involves accepting something as true or genuine based solely on its outward appearance or stated explanation, without considering any ulterior motives or underlying implications.
  • at face value The idiom "at face value" means to accept something as it appears or is presented, without questioning its authenticity or underlying meaning. It refers to taking information or a statement exactly as it is expressed, without looking for hidden implications, ulterior motives, or deeper understanding.
  • disappear/vanish off the face of the earth The idiom "disappear/vanish off the face of the earth" refers to a person or thing suddenly and completely disappearing without a trace. It implies that the individual or object has become completely inaccessible, with no knowledge of their whereabouts or existence. The expression is often used metaphorically to describe someone's sudden and unexplained absence or the complete absence of something.
  • face headon The idiom "face head-on" means to confront or deal with a difficult or challenging situation directly and without hesitation or avoidance. It implies confronting a problem directly instead of trying to escape or ignore it.
  • fly into the face of danger The idiom "fly into the face of danger" means to deliberately confront or challenge a dangerous or risky situation without fear. It implies acting courageously and boldly in the face of potential harm or adversity.
  • have a face like a wet weekend The idiom "have a face like a wet weekend" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone's facial expression or demeanor as appearing gloomy, saddened, or displeased. It implies that the person's appearance resembles the dreary and unappealing atmosphere of a wet and rainy weekend.
  • wipe sm or sth off the face of the earth The idiom "wipe someone or something off the face of the earth" means to completely eliminate or destroy someone or something, often implying that there will be no trace or evidence of their existence. It suggests complete eradication or annihilation, analogous to erasing something from the face of the earth.
  • slam the door in face The idiom "slam the door in someone's face" means to abruptly reject or dismiss someone, often in a rude or disrespectful manner. It reflects a metaphorical action of closing a door forcefully and leaving the person on the other side without further interaction or consideration.
  • be written all over sb's face The idiom "be written all over sb's face" means that someone's feelings, emotions, or thoughts are easily apparent or clearly visible through their facial expressions or body language. It suggests that a person's face reveals their true emotions, even if they are trying to hide or suppress them.
  • It's written all over one's face. The idiom "It's written all over one's face" means that someone's facial expression clearly reveals their thoughts, emotions, or reactions, making it evident to others. It implies that the person's feelings or intentions are so apparent that they can be easily perceived by observing their facial expressions.
  • arse about face The idiom "arse about face" means to do something in a completely backward or illogical manner, essentially reversing the correct or expected order of things. It implies a sense of confusion, disorganization, or doing things in the wrong way.
  • wipe off the face of the earth The idiom "wipe off the face of the earth" means to completely eradicate or exterminate something or someone. It suggests the complete removal or destruction with no traces or remnants remaining.
  • on the face of the earth The idiom "on the face of the earth" is used to emphasize the presence or existence of someone or something in the world or within a particular context. It is often employed to express astonishment, disbelief, or a sense of exaggeration. For example, "I have never seen a person as talented as him on the face of the earth."
  • off the face of the earth The idiom "off the face of the earth" is used to describe something or someone disappearing completely or without a trace. It suggests that the individual or object is gone or missing in such a way that it seems as though they have disappeared from the surface of the earth itself.
  • face facts The idiom "face facts" means to accept and confront the reality of a situation, typically a difficult or unpleasant one, rather than avoiding or denying it.
  • fill one's face The idiom "fill one's face" means to eat a large amount of food, often with great enjoyment or greed. It implies satisfying one's hunger or appetite by consuming a substantial quantity of food.
  • have egg on your face The idiom "have egg on your face" means to be embarrassed or humiliated, usually as a result of making a mistake or experiencing a failure in front of other people. It suggests the feeling one might have if they had a messy egg accident and ended up with egg on their face, which would attract attention and cause embarrassment.
  • have egg on one's face The idiom "have egg on one's face" means to be embarrassed or humiliated due to a mistake, failure, or misjudgment in a public or noticeable way.
  • face (the) facts The idiom "face (the) facts" means to accept or confront a difficult or unpleasant reality or truth, rather than denying or avoiding it. It implies acknowledging and addressing the truth head-on, even if it may be uncomfortable or challenging.
  • can't see one's hand in front of one's face The idiom "can't see one's hand in front of one's face" means that it is extremely dark or foggy, making it impossible to see even a short distance ahead. It is often used figuratively to describe a situation in which one has no clarity or visibility, whether it be literal or metaphorical.
  • mess sm's face up
  • blow up in your face The idiom "blow up in your face" refers to a situation or plan that unexpectedly fails or backfires, causing negative consequences or harm to the person involved. It implies that the outcome is not only unexpected but also highly detrimental, leading to disappointment, embarrassment, or even physical harm.
  • blow up/explode in sb's face The idiom "blow up/explode in someone's face" refers to a situation where a plan or action backfires on someone, causing them unexpected problems or negative consequences. It implies that the outcome is sudden, disastrous, and usually has a significant impact on the person involved, often leading to failure or embarrassment.
  • blow up in sm's face The idiom "blow up in someone's face" refers to a situation where a plan or action backfires or goes wrong, causing unexpected and often negative consequences for the person or people involved. It usually implies that the failure or negative outcome is immediate and significant, similar to if something were to explode abruptly and harm the person standing too close to it.
  • look in the face The idiom "look in the face" means to confront or face a difficult or challenging situation or truth directly, without fear or hesitation. It implies being brave and unflinching when dealing with adversity. It can also refer to acknowledging and accepting the reality of a situation, even if it is unpleasant or uncomfortable.
  • wouldn't know if it hit in the face The idiom "wouldn't know if it hit in the face" means that a person is completely oblivious or unaware of something, even if it is obvious or directly affects them. It implies that the person lacks awareness, understanding, or simply fails to notice the impact or consequences of a situation, much like not realizing if something physically struck them in the face.
  • wipe the smile off face The phrase "wipe the smile off face" is an idiom that means to remove or eliminate someone's happiness, joy, or satisfaction, often by delivering bad news, criticism, or by outshining them in some way. It implies taking away the person's delighted or self-assured expression.
  • what's his face The idiom "what's his face" is typically used as a placeholder or temporary reference for a person whose name the speaker cannot recall or does not wish to mention. It is used when someone wants to refer to a person without specifying their name.
  • to face The idiom "to face" means to confront or deal with a difficult, challenging, or unpleasant situation without avoiding or running away from it. It implies addressing or accepting the consequences or realities of a certain situation or decision.
  • take at face value The idiom "take at face value" means to accept something as true or genuine without considering any underlying meaning or hidden motives. It implies that one should believe or trust what is presented on the surface without questioning or analyzing it further.
  • stare in the face To "stare in the face" means to confront or face a difficult or challenging situation directly and without fear or avoidance. It implies acknowledging and dealing with something unpleasant, unfavorable, or daunting directly and honestly, without backing down. It often requires courage and determination to confront the issue head-on instead of ignoring or evading it.
  • soak face
  • smash face in The idiom "smash face in" refers to a situation where someone forcefully or violently hits another person's face, causing injury or damage. It can also be used metaphorically to describe overcoming someone or defeating them completely, often in a confrontational or aggressive manner.
  • screw up face The idiom "screw up face" refers to the act of contorting one's facial expression into a displeased or disgusted look. It is commonly used to convey disapproval, distaste, or a negative reaction to something.
  • put face on The idiom "put face on" typically refers to the act of applying makeup or appearing presentable, especially in a professional or formal setting. It means to groom oneself, enhance one's appearance, or simply make oneself look more attractive.
  • put a smile on face The idiom "put a smile on face" means to make someone happy or bring joy to someone. It refers to the act of providing a reason for someone to smile or be cheerful.
  • put a brave face on The idiom "put a brave face on" means to act or appear brave, strong, or confident in spite of feeling intimidated, scared, or upset. It implies making an effort to mask one's true emotions or vulnerabilities and presenting a positive outlook in challenging or difficult situations.
  • mess face up
  • lose face The idiom "lose face" refers to the embarrassment or humiliation a person experiences when their reputation, dignity, or social standing is damaged or undermined. It is particularly associated with Asian cultures, where maintaining face or individual and group reputation is highly valued.
  • laugh in face The idiom "laugh in face" refers to responding to someone's criticism, insults, or negative comments with laughter or amusement, rather than getting angry or upset. It means showing resilience, confidence, or indifference in the face of derogatory remarks.
  • It's written all over face The correct idiom is "It's written all over your face." The phrase "It's written all over your face" means that someone's emotions, thoughts, or feelings are evident or easily observable in their facial expressions. It implies that a person's face clearly reveals their true intentions or state of mind, even if they are trying to hide it. This idiom often refers to feelings like happiness, sadness, surprise, embarrassment, guilt, or excitement that can be seen in one's facial expressions.
  • in the face of The idiom "in the face of" means to confront or deal with difficulties, challenges, or obstacles without being hindered or intimidated by them. It implies the ability to remain strong, determined, or resolute despite unfavorable circumstances or opposition.
  • in face
  • I'd rather face a firing squad than do The idiom "I'd rather face a firing squad than do" is a figurative expression used to convey extreme reluctance or aversion towards a certain task or activity. It implies that the speaker would prefer to endure a potentially life-threatening situation (such as facing a firing squad) rather than engage in or complete the stated action. It emphasizes the strong negative feelings or the unwillingness of the individual towards the mentioned task.
  • hide face in shame The idiom "hide face in shame" means to feel extreme embarrassment or disgrace due to one's actions or a particular situation. It metaphorically suggests wanting to cover one's face to conceal the shame or humiliation felt.
  • have egg on face The idiom "have egg on face" means to be in a situation where one feels embarrassed, humiliated, or foolish due to a mistake, failure, or misunderstanding. It often implies that the person's error or misjudgment is evident to others, causing them to have a sense of shame or humiliation, comparable to having literal eggs smeared on their face.
  • get out of face
  • fling up in face
  • feed face
  • fall on face The idiom "fall on face" means to experience failure or embarrassment, typically in a public or noticeable manner. It implies that one's attempt or endeavor has resulted in a complete and evident defeat or humiliation.
  • fall flat on face The idiom "fall flat on face" means to fail or to experience a humiliating or embarrassing setback or defeat. It refers to a situation where someone's efforts or endeavors do not achieve the desired outcome, resulting in personal embarrassment or disappointment.
  • face with
  • face up The idiom "face up" typically means to confront or deal with a difficult or unpleasant situation directly, without avoidance or evasion.
  • face to face with The idiom "face to face with" means to be in direct confrontation or to come into close proximity or contact with someone or something, usually in a physical sense. It implies being in a situation where there is no escape or avoidance, and having to deal with a person or situation directly.
  • face on The idiom "face on" typically describes a situation or attitude in which someone is confronting or dealing with a difficulty or challenge head-on, without hesitation or fear. It implies a direct and courageous approach in facing obstacles or unfavorable circumstances.
  • face it The idiom "face it" means to accept or confront a difficult or unpleasant truth or situation, often without trying to avoid or deny it.
  • face is a picture The idiom "face is a picture" is used to describe someone's expression or facial appearance that clearly reflects their emotions or feelings. It implies that the person's face provides a visible representation or reflection of what they are experiencing internally.
  • face into
  • face forward The idiom "face forward" means to directly confront or address a situation, challenge, or problem with determination, without hesitating or looking back. It implies focusing on the future while leaving the past behind and moving ahead with resolve and confidence.
  • face down The idiom "face down" generally means to confront or deal with a difficult or challenging situation or problem head-on, without fear or hesitation. It implies standing up to something or someone, often using or exhibiting assertiveness, courage, and resilience. It can also refer to physically placing something, such as a document or a card, with the front side or "face" downward.
  • face doesn't fit The idiom "face doesn't fit" refers to a situation where someone's appearance, personality, or skills are not considered compatible or suitable for a particular role or situation. It indicates that an individual's attributes or qualities do not meet the expectations or requirements set by others.
  • be written all over face The idiom "be written all over face" is used to describe a person's emotions, thoughts, or intentions that are clearly evident and easily noticeable through their facial expressions or body language. It implies that the person's true feelings or reactions are so obvious that they can be read or understood without any further explanation.
  • be staring in the face The idiom "be staring in the face" means to be very obvious, evident, or present in a situation, often referring to a problem or a solution that is impossible to ignore or overlook.
  • be just a pretty face The idiom "be just a pretty face" refers to a person, usually a woman, who is considered attractive but lacking depth or substance beyond their physical appearance. It suggests that the person may not possess intelligence, skills, or talents beyond their appealing looks.
  • be in your face The idiom "be in your face" refers to someone or something that is aggressive, confrontational, or assertively intrusive in a way that is bothersome or causes discomfort. It often describes someone who disregards personal boundaries or is excessively expressive and overwhelming in their behavior or opinions.
  • be in face There doesn't seem to be a commonly used idiomatic expression "be in face". However, if you meant "in your face", it is an idiom that refers to something or someone being confrontational, forceful, or assertive in a direct and often aggressive manner. It can also refer to something being obvious or impossible to ignore.
  • all over face The idiom "all over the face" typically refers to a person's expression or appearance that clearly reveals an emotion, intention, or reaction, often indicating embarrassment, shock, or excitement. It implies that the person cannot hide or conceal their true feelings, making them evident to others.
  • face up (to sm or sth) The idiom "face up (to someone or something)" means to confront or deal with a person or situation directly and without avoiding or ignoring it. It implies accepting a difficult or challenging reality and being brave enough to address it.
  • fall flat (on your face) The idiom "fall flat (on your face)" means to fail or be unsuccessful, usually in a public manner that is embarrassing or humiliating. It implies a complete lack of success or a failure to meet expectations, resulting in disappointment or ridicule.
  • feed one's face The definition of the idiom "feed one's face" is to eat greedily or voraciously. It typically implies eating a large or excessive amount of food without much regard for manners or self-control.
  • wouldn't know sth if it hit you in the face The idiom "wouldn't know something if it hit you in the face" means that someone is completely clueless or unaware of a particular thing, even if it was incredibly obvious or directly pointed out to them. It highlights the lack of awareness or understanding someone has regarding a specific topic or situation.
  • fling sth up in sm's face The idiom "fling something up in someone's face" means to bring up a particular issue, mistake, or problem forcefully and without warning in order to criticize or confront someone. It usually involves reminding someone about past actions or issues in a confrontational manner, often with the intent to embarrass or provoke a reaction.
  • fall flat on your/its face The idiom "fall flat on your/its face" means to experience a complete and embarrassing failure or setback in an endeavor. It implies that the efforts or plans made have not achieved the desired outcome and have resulted in disappointment or humiliation.
  • what's his/her face The idiom "what's his/her face" is an expression used to refer to someone whose name is forgotten or unknown, often substituted when the speaker cannot recall a specific person's name. It is used as a placeholder or to indicate that the speaker does not consider the person important enough to remember their name.
  • face sth down To "face something down" means to confront or challenge a difficult or threatening situation, problem, or opponent with bravery, determination, or confidence. It implies resolving or dealing with the issue head-on and refusing to back down or be intimidated.
  • face sm down The phrase "face someone down" means to confront someone directly, often with determination or courage, without showing fear or backing down. It typically refers to a situation where someone has a confrontation or disagreement with another person and stands their ground, refusing to be intimidated or defeated.
  • pull a face The idiom "pull a face" means to make a distorted or exaggerated facial expression, often indicating disapproval, disgust, or amusement.
  • laugh on the other side of one's face The idiom "laugh on the other side of one's face" is used to describe a situation where someone initially finds something funny or amusing, but their initial joy turns into disappointment or regret later on. It suggests that a person's laughter or happiness will turn into a negative emotion or the opposite outcome. It implies that a person's initial amusement or happiness will eventually be replaced by a less pleasant or more serious situation.
  • egg on one's face The idiom "egg on one's face" refers to a situation where someone feels embarrassed, foolish, or humiliated due to making a mistake, being proven wrong, or experiencing a failure in front of others. It implies being in a position of self-inflicted disgrace or humiliation.
  • be (or get) in someone's face The idiom "be (or get) in someone's face" refers to aggressively confront or challenge someone, usually by invading their personal space or speaking directly and aggressively towards them. It implies getting physically close and creating an uncomfortable or confrontational atmosphere. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is being overly assertive, confrontational, or disrespectful towards another person.
  • face up to The idiom "face up to" means to confront or acknowledge a difficult situation, problem, or reality, usually with courage or determination. It implies taking responsibility for dealing with something rather than avoiding or ignoring it.
  • in someone's face The idiom "in someone's face" refers to displaying confrontational or aggressive behavior towards someone, often by getting very close to them physically, speaking loudly, or expressing hostility or anger. It implies challenging or provoking someone directly, usually to assert oneself or express dissent or opposition.
  • pull a long face The idiom "pull a long face" means to have a sad or gloomy expression on one's face, typically as a result of disappointment, sadness, or dissatisfaction. It refers to the act of making one's face appear longer by dropping the corners of the mouth and looking despondent.
  • put a bold face on The idiom "put a bold face on" means to act confidently or bravely in a difficult or challenging situation, often hiding true feelings or fears. It implies presenting a strong and composed outward appearance despite inner turmoil or vulnerability.
  • set one's face against The idiom "set one's face against" means to firmly or resolutely oppose or disapprove of something or someone. It implies a determined stance or unwillingness to accept or support a particular situation or person.
  • show one's face The idiom "show one's face" means to appear or make an appearance, especially in a place or situation where one is expected, usually after avoiding or being absent for some time.
  • to someone's face To say or do something in someone's presence, especially when it is confrontational or direct.
  • stare someone in the face The idiom "stare someone in the face" means to be blatantly obvious or impossible to overlook. It refers to a situation or fact that is directly in front of someone, demanding their attention or recognition. It denotes a clear and undeniable presence or reality that cannot be ignored or denied.
  • cut off one's nose to spite one's face The idiom "cut off one's nose to spite one's face" means to take a vindictive or retaliatory action that ultimately harms oneself more than it harms others. It refers to making a self-destructive choice or decision out of anger, pride, or the desire for revenge, without considering the negative consequences it may have on one's own well-being or goals.
  • volte face The idiom "volte face" refers to a sudden and complete change in opinion, decision, or course of action. It signifies a reversal or turnaround, often without prior warning or explanation.
  • laugh in somebody’s face The idiom "laugh in somebody's face" refers to the act of openly mocking, ridiculing, or expressing derision towards someone in a disrespectful and dismissive manner. It implies making fun or belittling someone directly in their presence, often in response to something they have said, done, or suggested.
  • laugh on the other side of your face The idiom "laugh on the other side of your face" means to prevent oneself from becoming too confident or arrogant in a situation, as it implies that one's circumstances may change or become unfavorable, leading to a complete reversal of fortune or a change in attitude.
  • (pull, wear, etc.) a long face The idiom "(pull, wear, etc.) a long face" means to appear sad, disappointed, or dejected. It describes someone's facial expression or demeanor when they are feeling down or unhappy.
  • save (somebody’s) face The idiom "save (somebody's) face" means to prevent someone from feeling embarrassed, humiliated, or losing their dignity in a particular situation. It involves taking actions or making efforts to protect someone's reputation or self-esteem, usually within a social or public context.
  • wipe somebody/something off the face of the earth The idiom "wipe somebody/something off the face of the earth" refers to completely destroying or annihilating someone or something, leaving no trace behind. It implies complete eradication or elimination.
  • shut/slam the door in somebody’s face The idiom "shut/slam the door in somebody’s face" means to rudely reject or dismiss someone, usually by abruptly ending a conversation or denying them a request. It implies a deliberate act of disrespect or disregard towards the person, often leaving them feeling insulted or excluded.
  • have/be left with egg on/all over your face The idiom "have/be left with egg on/all over your face" means to be embarrassed or humiliated as a result of making a mistake or being proven wrong publicly. It entails feeling foolish or ashamed due to a failed action, statement, or decision.
  • be staring somebody in the face The idiom "be staring somebody in the face" means that something is very obvious or apparent, often in a way that is difficult to ignore or overlook. It implies that the answer or solution to a problem or situation is right in front of the person, yet they fail to recognize or acknowledge it.
  • be staring something in the face The idiom "be staring something in the face" means to be facing or confronting a difficult or obvious situation or fact directly, without any escape or denial. It suggests that something is obvious and cannot be ignored or avoided any longer.
  • be written all over somebody’s face The idiom "be written all over somebody’s face" means that someone's feelings, emotions, or thoughts are very apparent or evident through their facial expressions or body language. It implies that the person's true or honest reactions are easily observable and can be easily read or understood by others.
  • blow up in somebody’s face The idiom "blow up in somebody's face" means that a plan or action that someone intended to be successful or advantageous has backfired or resulted in failure or negative consequences for them.
  • do something till you are blue in the face The idiom "do something till you are blue in the face" refers to continuously or persistently doing something in a futile or excessive manner, to the point of exhaustion or frustration, without achieving the desired outcome or result. It implies that no matter how much effort or time is expended, the outcome will not change.
  • somebody’s face doesn’t fit The idiom "somebody’s face doesn’t fit" refers to a situation when a person does not seem to be well-suited or accepted in a particular environment or group, often due to their appearance, behavior, personality, or background. It implies that the person is not easily accepted or preferred by others in the given context.
  • somebody’s face is like thunder The idiom "somebody's face is like thunder" refers to someone who has a very angry or upset facial expression. It implies that the person's mood is reflected on their face, and they appear visibly disturbed or displeased.
  • somebody has a face like thunder The idiom "somebody has a face like thunder" means that someone has a very angry, gloomy, or sullen expression on their face. It suggests that the person looks extremely irritated or upset, resembling dark storm clouds brewing.
  • face to face (with somebody) The idiom "face to face (with somebody)" refers to being in close proximity to someone or having a personal encounter with them. It typically implies direct interaction or communication, often involving a physical meeting or confrontation.
  • face to face with something The idiom "face to face with something" means to directly encounter or confront a specific situation, experience, or challenge. It implies being in close proximity to a problem or circumstance, typically requiring immediate attention or action.
  • face up/down The idiom "face up/down" refers to the orientation or position of an object. "Face up" means that the front or top side of an object is turned upward, while "face down" means that the front or top side of an object is turned downward.
  • feed your face The idiom "feed your face" is a colloquial expression that means to eat a lot or to consume food excessively. It is often used humorously or to convey someone's indulgence in eating.
  • fly in the face of something The idiom "fly in the face of something" means to directly oppose or contradict something, often in a bold or defiant manner. It refers to going against established beliefs, rules, traditions, or expectations, regardless of the potential consequences or disapproval faced.
  • have the face to do something The idiom "have the face to do something" refers to having the audacity or courage to do something, often implying that it is unwarranted or inappropriate. It suggests that the person has no shame or self-awareness in carrying out the action despite potential social disapproval or consequences.
  • in somebody’s face The idiom "in somebody's face" refers to behaving or acting in a way that invades or intrudes upon someone's personal space or privacy. It often implies confrontational or aggressive behavior, where one is deliberately trying to provoke or challenge the other person.
  • in the face of something The idiom "in the face of something" typically means to confront or deal with a difficult situation or challenge directly and boldly, without backing down or being deterred. It suggests a resolute determination to confront and overcome obstacles.
  • not just a pretty face The idiom "not just a pretty face" refers to someone who is not only attractive in appearance but also possesses intelligence, talent, or other qualities that go beyond their physical beauty. It implies that the person should not be underestimated or judged solely based on their looks, as they have additional qualities and abilities that may surprise others.
  • (as) plain as the nose on your face The idiom "(as) plain as the nose on your face" refers to something that is completely obvious or easily understandable, usually referring to a fact or situation that is clearly visible or apparent to anyone. It emphasizes the clarity and unmistakable nature of the subject or situation, similar to how one's nose is prominently visible on their face.
  • pull/make faces/a face (at somebody) The idiom "pull/make faces/a face (at somebody)" means to contort or distort one's facial expression in a humorous, exaggerated, or mocking manner to express amusement, disapproval, or taunting towards someone else. It involves using exaggerated facial gestures, such as sticking out the tongue, squinting the eyes, or contorting the mouth, to convey a particular emotion or message without using words.
  • put your face on The idiom "put your face on" typically means to apply makeup or make oneself presentable, particularly for a public appearance or a special occasion. It refers to the act of enhancing one's physical appearance by applying cosmetics to the face.
  • put a brave face on something The idiom "put a brave face on something" means to pretend to be brave, composed, or unaffected by a situation, even though one may be feeling anxious, upset, or scared. It refers to the act of concealing one's true emotions in order to maintain a positive or strong appearance.
  • set your face against somebody/something To "set your face against somebody/something" means to express strong disapproval or opposition towards someone or something. It implies that you are firmly and openly against their ideas, actions, or beliefs. It usually involves showing a determined resistance or refusal to support them or their cause.
  • a straight face The idiom "a straight face" refers to an expressionless or serious facial expression, usually maintained during a situation where it would be expected to show amusement or surprise. It implies the ability to hide one's true emotions or reactions, often used to describe someone who can keep a serious demeanor even when something humorous or unexpected occurs.
  • to somebody’s face The idiom "to somebody's face" means to say or do something directly in front of a person, typically when delivering a criticism or expressing a displeasure. In other words, it refers to confronting or dealing with someone openly and often confrontationally, rather than talking about them behind their back or in their absence.
  • what’s his/her face The idiom "what's his/her face" is used to refer to someone whose name or identity is forgotten or unknown. It is often used as a placeholder when a person cannot recall or is unsure of an individual's name.
  • a slap in the face (or eye) The idiom "a slap in the face (or eye)" refers to an unexpected and humiliating insult or offense that feels highly personal and demeaning. It can be used to describe a situation where someone feels deeply hurt, disrespected, or betrayed by someone else's actions or words. The idiom suggests that the offense is not only an abstract slight but rather a figurative physical attack resulting in emotional and psychological pain.
  • the acceptable face of something The idiom "the acceptable face of something" refers to a situation or person that represents the most socially or morally acceptable aspect of something, often used to describe a more favorable representation compared to the less desirable or controversial aspects. It implies that the subject being referred to may have negative implications or may be perceived negatively, but there is one component or individual that is considered more acceptable or presentable.
  • the acceptable face of The idiom "the acceptable face of" refers to a person, organization, or thing that represents a more positive or socially approved aspect or example of a certain concept or group. It implies that the person or entity in question is a well-regarded or respected representation within a larger context or category that may otherwise have a negative reputation.
  • set (one's) face against (something) The idiom "set (one's) face against (something)" means to strongly oppose or disapprove of something. It indicates a determined and unwavering resistance or rejection of a particular idea, action, or proposition.
  • set your face against The idiom "set your face against" means to strongly oppose or be strongly against something or someone. It implies showing clear disapproval or resistance towards a particular idea, action, or person.
  • set your face against something The idiom "set your face against something" means to strongly oppose or be determined to resist something or someone. It suggests taking a firm or unwavering stance against a particular idea, action, or situation.
  • be just another pretty face The idiom "be just another pretty face" refers to a person, usually a woman, who is only valued for their physical appearance and lacks any significant qualities or talents beyond that. It implies that the person's attractiveness is their only asset, and they are not considered to be intellectually or personally remarkable.
  • be not just another pretty face The idiom "be not just another pretty face" means that someone should not be solely valued or recognized for their physical appearance or attractiveness. It suggests that they should also possess intelligence, skills, or other valuable qualities to be truly remarkable or noteworthy.
  • just another pretty face The idiom "just another pretty face" refers to someone, typically a woman, who is physically attractive but lacks intelligence, skills, or depth of character. It implies that their appearance is their only notable attribute and suggests a lack of substance beyond their good looks.
  • (one's) face is a picture The idiom "(one's) face is a picture" means that someone's facial expression is so vivid, expressive, or revealing that it conveys a multitude of emotions, thoughts, or reactions in a visually striking manner.
  • (as) plain as the nose on (one's) face The idiom "(as) plain as the nose on (one's) face" means that something is very obvious or easily observable, just like the nose on a person's face is distinctive and cannot be easily overlooked. It implies that the situation or fact is so clear and evident that it cannot be denied or ignored.
  • a face as long as a fiddle The idiom "a face as long as a fiddle" is typically used to describe someone who looks sad, disappointed, or dejected. It implies that the person's expression is so long and downcast that it resembles the elongated shape of a fiddle.
  • be as plain as the nose on (one's) face The idiom "be as plain as the nose on (one's) face" means that something is very obvious, clear, or easily noticed. This expression is often used to emphasize that someone should easily see or understand something due to its obvious nature.
  • at face value, take The idiom "at face value, take" means to accept something as it appears to be, without questioning its true meaning or intentions. It implies taking information, statements, or situations at their literal or surface level, without analyzing or doubting them.
  • be taken at face value The idiom "be taken at face value" means to accept something as true or genuine based solely on its apparent or obvious meaning or appearance, without considering any underlying or hidden intentions or interpretations. In other words, it implies believing or judging something or someone based on what is directly presented or expressed, without questioning or delving deeper into possible motivations or implications.
  • stand there with one’s bare face hanging out The idiom "stand there with one’s bare face hanging out" is used to describe someone who is standing or being present in a situation without any shame or embarrassment, often after having committed a wrongdoing or being caught in a lie. It signifies a lack of remorse or concern for their actions, with their face metaphorically representing their lack of guilt or shame.
  • all over (one's) face The idiom "all over (one's) face" refers to a situation where someone's expression or demeanor clearly reveals or expresses a particular emotion, thought, or quality. It suggests that the truth or a particular characteristic is easily noticeable or discernible by looking at someone's face.
  • be written all over (one's) face The idiom "be written all over (one's) face" means that someone's emotions or thoughts are clearly visible or evident through their facial expressions. It implies that a person's true feelings or reactions are so apparent that they cannot be concealed or hidden.
  • be written all over somebody's face The idiom "be written all over somebody's face" means that a person's emotions, reactions, or thoughts are very clearly and visibly displayed on their face, making it obvious to others how they feel or what they are thinking. In other words, their facial expressions effectively communicate their inner state or intentions.
  • be written all over your face The idiom "be written all over your face" refers to when someone's true thoughts or emotions are clearly and visibly displayed on their face, making it obvious to others what they are thinking or feeling.
  • egg on your face The idiom "egg on your face" refers to a situation where someone feels embarrassed or humiliated due to a foolish or embarrassing mistake they have made publicly. It implies that a person's actions or words have led to their own embarrassment, leaving them with figurative egg (representing embarrassment or shame) on their face.
  • be laughing on the other side of (one's) face The idiom "be laughing on the other side of (one's) face" means to experience a sudden change in circumstances or fortune that results in disappointment, humiliation, or regret after initially feeling confident or pleased. It implies a reversal of a favorable situation into an unfavorable one, often causing someone to realize the negative consequences of their actions or words.
  • be out of (one's) face The idiom "be out of (one's) face" typically refers to a state in which a person is intoxicated or under the influence of drugs. It implies that the individual's behavior is altered or their mental and physical faculties are impaired due to substance abuse.
  • (Boy,) is my face red! The idiom "(Boy,) is my face red!" is used as an expression of embarrassment or shame after making a mistake or being caught in an awkward situation. The phrase implies that the person's face has turned red due to blushing.
  • put a brave (or bold or good) face on something The idiom "put a brave (or bold, or good) face on something" means to try to appear brave, positive, or optimistic in a difficult or challenging situation, even though one may be feeling fearful, worried, or disappointed. It implies the act of concealing one's true emotions or fears and presenting oneself as composed and confident.
  • butter face The idiom "butter face" is a slang term typically used in informal contexts, mainly in an offensive or derogatory way. It refers to a person, usually a woman, whose physical appearance is attractive or appealing except for her face, hence the term "butter face." The phrase is a play on words from the expression "but her face."
  • come face to face with (someone or something) The idiom "come face to face with (someone or something)" means to encounter or meet someone or something in a direct and often unexpected manner, often resulting in a personal interaction or confrontation. It implies a literal or figurative situation where two parties are brought into close proximity, allowing for a direct interaction to take place.
  • face card The idiom "face card" refers to any of the playing cards in a deck that depict a face or a figure (i.e., the King, Queen, or Jack).
  • resting bitch face "Resting bitch face" refers to a facial expression, typically on a person, that naturally appears unapproachable, cold, or irritated when their face is at rest. It is characterized by a neutral or slightly downturned mouth, furrowed brows, and an overall lack of expression, which can mistakenly convey an unfriendly or unfocused demeanor, even if the person is not feeling that way. The idiom is often used humorously or playfully to describe someone whose neutral expression might be misconstrued negatively by others.
  • bitchy resting face The idiom "bitchy resting face" refers to a facial expression that unintentionally appears angry, annoyed, or displeased, even when the person is not actually feeling that way. It is used humorously to describe someone whose neutral or natural expression may give off negative or unfriendly vibes, although their mood might not necessarily reflect that.
  • blank look on (one's) face The idiom "blank look on (one's) face" refers to the expression of confusion, lack of understanding, or complete absence of any emotion or response displayed by a person. It suggests that the person does not comprehend or is not aware of what is being said or happening around them.
  • blow up in (one's) face The idiom "blow up in (one's) face" refers to a situation where a plan or action unexpectedly goes wrong, causing negative consequences or backfiring on the person who initiated it. It implies that the outcome is disastrous and has a significant impact on the individual.
  • blow up in somebody's face The idiom "blow up in somebody's face" typically means that a plan, action, or situation that was intended to bring success or benefit suddenly turns out to have the opposite effect, causing trouble, failure, or harm to the person involved.
  • do something until you are blue in the face The definition of the idiom "do something until you are blue in the face" is to continue doing or arguing about something to the point of exhaustion or frustration, even though it seems to have no effect or result. It implies that no matter how much effort or persuasion is made, it will not change the outcome.
  • till (one) (is) blue in the face The idiom "till (one) (is) blue in the face" means to continue doing or saying something without any effect or result, even to the point of exhaustion. It implies a sense of futility or pointlessness in the action.
  • till you're blue in the face The idiom "till you're blue in the face" means to continue doing or saying something for an extended period of time without achieving the desired result, often in a repetitive or futile manner. It implies that no matter how much effort or persuasion is put forth, it will be ineffective or fruitless.
  • until (one) is blue in the face The idiom "until (one) is blue in the face" means to continue doing or saying something without achieving any result or convincing others, even to the point of exhaustion or frustration.
  • face (that) would stop a clock The idiom "face (that) would stop a clock" is used to describe someone's appearance as being extremely unattractive or repulsive. It suggests that the person's face is so shockingly hideous that it could figuratively cause a clock to stop ticking.
  • come face to face with someone The idiom "come face to face with someone" means to meet or encounter someone in person, especially unexpectedly or after a long time of separation. It often implies a close encounter or direct interaction with the person.
  • come face to face with something The idiom "come face to face with something" means encountering or confronting a particular situation, problem, or challenge directly and personally. It often implies a sense of a close and direct encounter with something, typically unexpected or intense.
  • crater face The idiom "crater face" is a derogatory expression used to describe someone with severe acne or blemishes on their face. It is often used in a mocking or demeaning manner to criticize someone's appearance.
  • don't cut off your nose to spite your face The idiom "don't cut off your nose to spite your face" means to take an action that is intended to harm someone else, but ultimately ends up hurting oneself more. It is an expression used to advise against engaging in self-destructive or counterproductive behavior for the sake of revenge or to prove a point.
  • (one's) face doesn't fit The idiom "(one's) face doesn't fit" means that someone is not being accepted, favored, or considered desirable for a particular role or position, often due to personal bias or social reasons. It suggests that the individual's appearance, demeanor, personality, or background is not compatible with the expected or desired standards or requirements of a particular situation or group.
  • shut the door in (someone's) face The idiom "shut the door in (someone's) face" means to abruptly reject or dismiss someone, often by disregarding their feelings, opinions, or requests. It implies that the person is treated with disrespect or denied an opportunity to participate or be included.
  • duck face The idiom "duck face" refers to a facial expression or pose typically made for photographs, where the individual puckers or pouts their lips in a manner that resembles the beak of a duck. This expression is often seen as an attempt to appear attractive or alluring, but it has been satirized and is often considered unflattering or comical.
  • from the face of the earth The idiom "from the face of the earth" means completely disappearing or becoming completely extinct or eradicated. It suggests that something or someone has vanished or been wiped out so thoroughly that they cannot be found or traced anywhere.
  • wipe something off the face of the earth To "wipe something off the face of the earth" means to completely eliminate or erase something or someone, usually in a forceful or violent manner. It implies complete annihilation or destruction, leaving no trace or evidence behind. This idiom is often used figuratively to express a strong desire or intention to eradicate something or someone completely.
  • egg on face The idiom "egg on face" refers to a situation where a person feels embarrassed, humiliated, or foolish due to their own actions, words, or decisions. It implies that someone has made a mistake or an error in judgment, and now has to face the consequences or public humiliation.
  • have egg on one’s face The idiom "have egg on one’s face" means to feel embarrassed, ashamed, or humiliated due to one's own mistake, failure, or foolishness. It refers to the imaginary act of having raw egg on one's face, which symbolizes a public display of humiliation or a visible sign of an error.
  • with egg on (one's) face The idiom "with egg on one's face" means to feel embarrassed or humiliated due to a mistake, failure, or being proven wrong in a public or noticeable manner. It suggests that the person's mistake or error is so glaringly obvious that it is as if they have literal egg on their face, symbolizing foolishness or clumsiness.
  • with egg on your face The idiom "with egg on your face" means to be embarrassed or humiliated by one's own mistake, failure, or misfortune, resulting in public ridicule or shame. It implies that one's actions or words have backfired or been proven wrong, leaving them looking foolish or inept.
  • his, her, etc. face is like thunder The idiom "his, her, etc. face is like thunder" means that someone's facial expression is angry, displeased, or full of rage. It describes a person whose face visibly shows their intense emotions, particularly negative ones like anger or annoyance.
  • wipe the/that smile, grin, etc. off your/somebody's face The idiom "wipe the/that smile, grin, etc. off your/somebody's face" is used to convey the act of making someone stop smiling or feeling happy, typically through a revelation or unpleasant news. It implies taking away someone's happiness or erasing their conceited or smug expression by exposing them to something that will quickly change their mood or mindset.
  • explode in your face The idiom "explode in your face" means that something, typically a plan or an idea, fails or goes wrong in a dramatic and unexpected way, causing significant negative consequences or embarrassment. It refers to a situation where expectations are not met and problems suddenly and dramatically arise.
  • look someone in the face The idiom "look someone in the face" means to make direct eye contact with someone and confront them directly, often implying sincerity, honesty, or bravery in facing a difficult situation or discussing something honestly.
  • a face like thunder The idiom "a face like thunder" is used to describe someone who has an extremely angry or displeased facial expression. It implies that the person's face has become dark, stormy, and filled with anger or resentment.
  • a kick in the face The idiom "a kick in the face" refers to a sudden, unexpected, or harsh blow or setback, usually in a figurative sense. It signifies a strong negative impact or disappointment that causes significant distress or emotional pain.
  • a red face The idiom "a red face" refers to the facial expression or appearance of someone whose face has turned red due to embarrassment, shame, anger, or some other intense emotion.
  • a smack in the face The idiom "a smack in the face" is typically used to describe a situation or experience that is surprising, unexpected, or extremely shocking. It implies a sudden and forceful reality check, similar to the physical act of receiving an unexpected strike to the face. This idiom is commonly employed to express feelings of astonishment, disappointment, or betrayal when something happens that contradicts one's expectations or beliefs.
  • a volte-face The idiom "a volte-face" refers to a complete change in opinion, attitude, or behavior. It signifies a sudden reversal or flip-flop in someone's stance or position on a particular issue.
  • be in (one's) face The idiom "be in (one's) face" refers to someone or something being aggressively confrontational, intrusive, or excessively present in a way that is annoying, irritating, or overwhelming. It implies a lack of personal space or boundaries, and often suggests assertiveness or being too forward in one's actions or behavior.
  • be not just a pretty face The idiom "be not just a pretty face" means that a person should not be solely valued for their physical appearance but should also possess intelligence, talent, skills, or other qualities that make them capable or interesting. It implies that being attractive is not enough and that there should be substance beyond physical beauty.
  • be staring (one) in the face The idiom "be staring (one) in the face" means that something is very obvious or apparent to someone, but they may not initially realize or acknowledge it. It refers to a situation or solution that is right in front of someone, but they fail to recognize or accept it.
  • be staring someone in the face The idiom "be staring someone in the face" means that something is obvious or easily noticeable, yet someone fails to recognize or acknowledge it. It implies that the solution or truth is right in front of the person, but they are unable to see or comprehend it.
  • face fungus The idiom "face fungus" is a colloquial expression used to refer to a beard or facial hair. It is commonly used in a humorous or lighthearted manner to describe someone's facial hair growth.
  • face head-on The idiom "face head-on" means confronting or dealing with a difficult or challenging situation directly and fearlessly, without avoiding or shying away from it.
  • face man The idiom "face man" refers to a person who is skilled at interacting with others and is often chosen to represent a group, organization, or company in a public or social setting. This individual is adept at presenting a positive image, maintaining good relationships, and effectively communicating with different stakeholders. The term "face man" can also be used to describe someone who is primarily responsible for handling public relations and external communication for a particular entity.
  • face out The idiom "face out" refers to the act of displaying or positioning something, such as a product or book, so that the front cover or attractive side is facing outward or visible to others. It is often used in the context of arranging items on shelves or in displays to make them more appealing and easily noticeable.
  • face time The idiom "face time" refers to the amount of time spent interacting with someone in person, especially in a professional or business context. It refers to physical presence and direct interaction, as opposed to virtual or remote communication methods.
  • face to face with (someone or something) The idiom "face to face with (someone or something)" means being in close proximity to someone or something in a direct and personal encounter. It implies being in a situation where direct interaction, confrontation, or communication with the person or thing is unavoidable or imminent.
  • face value The idiom "face value" refers to accepting something or judging it based on its apparent meaning or appearance, without considering any underlying factors or hidden meanings. It implies taking something at its surface level or accepting it as it appears, without questioning its authenticity or looking for any deeper significance.
  • fall (flat) on (one's)/its face The idiom "fall (flat) on (one's)/its face" is used to describe a situation where someone or something fails or experiences a humiliating setback, often due to incompetence, lack of preparation, or an unsuccessful attempt. It suggests a complete and abrupt failure, often resulting in embarrassment or disappointment.
  • fall on one's face The idiom "fall on one's face" means to experience a major failure or defeat, often resulting in embarrassment or humiliation. It refers to a situation where someone's attempt at something turns out to be completely unsuccessful or backfires, leading to a loss of credibility or reputation.
  • feed one’s face The idiom "feed one's face" means to eat a lot or to eat in a very enthusiastic or voracious manner. It implies indulging in excessive or mindless eating.
  • fill one’s face The idiom "fill one's face" means to eat or consume food in large quantities or greedily. It implies indulging in or enjoying a large meal or satisfying one's appetite excessively.
  • frog face
  • fungus-face
  • fuzz-face The idiom "fuzz-face" is a colloquial term used to describe someone with a scruffy or unkempt appearance, particularly referring to facial hair. It implies that the person has a beard or mustache that is long, disheveled, or untamed, resembling a fuzzy or fuzzy-looking face.
  • game face The idiom "game face" refers to the act of putting on a serious, determined, or focused expression or attitude in order to deal with a challenging situation or task. It is commonly used to describe individuals who hide their emotions or vulnerabilities and project a confident and unshakable demeanor. This idiom is often used in sports or competitive contexts, but can also be applied to other areas of life where one must display a strong and determined front.
  • get face The idiom "get face" typically refers to gaining or enhancing one's reputation, status, or recognition in a particular social or professional setting. It often involves seeking approval, respect, or admiration from others. In some contexts, it may also involve asserting one's authority or dominance.
  • get in (someone's) face The idiom "get in (someone's) face" refers to confronting or approaching someone aggressively or confrontationally, often in a confrontational or intrusive manner, in order to express disagreement, assert oneself, or challenge their views or actions. It involves directly and assertively addressing someone, usually in an intense or provocative manner, to engage in a conflict or make a point.
  • get in somebody's face The idiom "get in somebody's face" means to confront or challenge someone aggressively, usually by getting extremely close to them physically and intruding into their personal space. It suggests a confrontational and assertive approach in order to intimidate or provoke a reaction from the person being confronted.
  • get in someone’s face The idiom "get in someone's face" means confront or challenge someone aggressively or assertively, usually in a confrontational or intimidating manner. It refers to getting uncomfortably close to someone physically or verbally, invading their personal space to assert dominance or aggression.
  • get out of (one's) face The idiom "get out of (one's) face" means to go away and stop bothering or annoying someone. It is typically used when someone wants another person to leave them alone or give them space.
  • get out of someone's face The idiom "get out of someone's face" means to leave or move away from someone's presence, usually used when someone is annoying, bothering, or irritating another person. It suggests a strong desire for personal space or solitude.
  • give (someone) face The idiom "give (someone) face" refers to showing respect, honor, or courtesy towards someone, typically in a public or social setting, in order to maintain harmony or avoid conflict. It is commonly used in Chinese culture, where "face" represents one's reputation, dignity, or prestige. Giving face involves acknowledging someone's authority, achievements, or status, and treating them with deference or esteem. This can be done through gestures, compliments, or other forms of recognition.
  • have the face to The definition of the idiom "have the face to" is: To possess the audacity, nerve, or boldness to do something, especially when it is considered inappropriate, rude, or disrespectful. It implies the act of confidently and shamelessly committing an action despite the potential negative consequences or the disapproval of others.
  • hide one's face The idiom "hide one's face" means to feel embarrassed, ashamed, or guilty about something and attempting to avoid others' attention or judgment. It can also refer to avoiding public scrutiny or exposure due to a negative or disreputable situation.
  • in (one's) face The idiom "in (one's) face" refers to something that is prominently or aggressively presented to someone, often causing them to feel confronted or overwhelmed. It can also imply a direct challenge or provocation.
  • in someone’s face The idiom "in someone's face" refers to the act of confronting or challenging someone directly and aggressively, often by invading their personal space or attempting to provoke a reaction. It can involve being confrontational, pushy, or obnoxious towards the person in order to assert dominance or make a point.
  • in the face The idiom "in the face" means directly confronting, challenging, or opposing someone or something despite potential negative consequences or resistance. It often implies a brave or defiant attitude in the face of adversity or opposition.
  • Is my face red! The idiom "Is my face red!" is often used as an exclamation to express embarrassment or humiliation. It signifies a feeling of embarrassment or shame due to a particular situation or an action that has been noticed by others.
  • laugh in (one's) face The idiom "laugh in (one's) face" means to openly ridicule or mock someone, usually by laughing at them, especially when they are in a vulnerable or serious situation. It implies a disrespectful disregard for the person's feelings or opinions.
  • laugh in somebody's face The idiom "laugh in somebody's face" means to openly or contemptuously mock or ridicule someone, usually in response to their ideas, opinions, or assertions. It implies a lack of respect or consideration for the other person's perspective or feelings.
  • laugh in someone's face The idiom "laugh in someone's face" means to openly and scornfully ridicule or mock someone, typically in response to their proposition, idea, or suggestion. It implies a complete lack of respect or consideration for the person being laughed at.
  • let's face (the) facts The idiom "let's face (the) facts" means to accept or acknowledge the reality of a situation, often when it is unpleasant or difficult. It implies the need to be honest, objective, and realistic, rather than avoiding or denying the truth.
  • let's face it "Let's face it" is an idiom used when acknowledging a truth or reality, usually one that is difficult or uncomfortable to accept. It is often used to introduce a statement that may be unpopular or unpleasant but needs to be acknowledged.
  • long face The idiom "long face" refers to a sad or disappointed facial expression that reflects a person's dejection, melancholy, or dissatisfaction with a situation or outcome.
  • look (one) in the face The idiom "look (one) in the face" means to confront someone directly, especially in a situation where it may be challenging or uncomfortable. It implies the act of meeting someone's gaze directly and bravely, without fear or hesitation.
  • look/stare you in the face The idiom "look/stare you in the face" means to be clearly visible, obvious, or directly in front of someone, often referring to a situation, problem, or opportunity that cannot be ignored or denied. It implies that something is so apparent and evident that it demands attention or action.
  • loss of face The idiom "loss of face" refers to the humiliation or embarrassment suffered by an individual or group due to the loss of reputation, prestige, or social standing, often resulting from a public failure, mistake, or disgraceful act. It is commonly used to describe situations where someone's self-esteem, status, or credibility is undermined, causing a significant blow to their image or reputation in the eyes of others.
  • mace someone’s face
  • make a face (at someone) The idiom "make a face (at someone)" refers to the act of contorting or distorting one's facial expressions in order to convey disgust, disapproval, or mockery towards someone or something. It involves intentionally twisting or altering the features of one's face to communicate a negative reaction or sentiment.
  • mess someone’s face up The idiom "mess someone’s face up" means to physically harm or injure someone's face, often resulting in disfigurement or damage. It implies causing significant damage or causing one's appearance to be severely altered.
  • not have the face The idiom "not have the face" means that someone does not possess the audacity, courage, or moral authority to do or say something. It is often used when referring to a situation where someone lacks the confidence or grounds to behave in a certain way.
  • off (one's) face The idiom "off (one's) face" typically means to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol to an extreme or excessive degree. It refers to being heavily intoxicated or high.
  • off your face The idiom "off your face" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or under the influence of drugs. It refers to a state where the person's behavior, speech, or actions are greatly affected by the substance consumed.
  • out of (one's) face
  • pizza face The idiom "pizza face" is a derogatory term used to describe someone with severe acne or pimple scars on their face.
  • play kissy-face The idiom "play kissy-face" refers to behaving in a flirtatious or affectionate manner, especially through excessive displays of physical affection or exchanging kisses repeatedly. It often implies that the behavior is perceived as insincere, superficial, or done solely for attention or to manipulate a situation.
  • poker face The idiom "poker face" refers to the deliberate expressionless or blank facial expression maintained by someone in order to conceal their emotions, thoughts, or intentions, particularly during situations involving deception, bluffing, or keeping a secret.
  • powder one’s face The idiom "powder one's face" means to apply makeup, especially face powder, to enhance one's appearance, typically in a light and quick manner. It can also refer to the act of refreshing one's makeup or appearance. This idiom is commonly used in a figurative sense to suggest someone is trying to improve their image or hide something behind a façade of beauty.
  • pull a face (at someone) The idiom "pull a face (at someone)" refers to making a funny or exaggerated facial expression, often used to express annoyance, contempt, or mockery towards someone. It involves distorting one's facial muscles in a deliberate manner to convey a specific emotion or sentiment to another person.
  • pull/make faces/a face The idiom "pull/make faces/a face" refers to someone contorting their facial expressions in a silly, exaggerated, or mocking manner, often with the intention of expressing amusement, disdain, or disbelief. It involves distorting the features of one's face, such as scrunching the nose, sticking out the tongue, or raising eyebrows. It can be done either playfully or as a way of expressing displeasure or mockery.
  • put a good face on To "put a good face on" means to present a positive or optimistic appearance even in difficult or challenging situations. It refers to the act of masking one's true emotions or hardships and portraying a composed, confident, or cheerful demeanor outwardly. It is often used when someone tries to make the best of a situation or maintain a positive attitude despite underlying difficulties.
  • put a smile on someone’s face To "put a smile on someone's face" means to do or say something that brings joy, happiness, or amusement to someone, resulting in them smiling or feeling better. It usually refers to an act of kindness, a gesture, or a conversation that uplifts someone's spirits or brings them positivity.
  • put one's face on The idiom "put one's face on" means to apply makeup or enhance one's appearance in preparation for an event or social gathering. It refers to the act of putting on cosmetics to make oneself appear more presentable or attractive.
  • rack face
  • rearrange someone's face The idiom "rearrange someone's face" is a figurative expression used to describe physically assaulting or severely beating someone, typically with the intention of causing significant facial injuries that alter their appearance. It emphasizes the intensity and severity of the beating, suggesting a desire to leave the person unrecognizable or disfigured.
  • red in the face, be Being "red in the face" is an idiom that refers to someone feeling embarrassed, ashamed, or humiliated. It typically describes a person whose face turns red due to increased blood flow caused by these emotions.
  • red-face test
  • save someone's face To "save someone's face" means to preserve their reputation, pride, or dignity, especially in a situation where they could have experienced embarrassment, shame, or loss of respect. It involves preventing someone from public humiliation or maintaining their self-esteem.
  • screw up (one's) face The idiom "screw up (one's) face" refers to making a distorted or contorted facial expression, typically due to displeasure, confusion, or disgust. It involves scrunching or twisting the muscles in one's face, often accompanied by furrowing the brow, narrowing the eyes, or twisting the mouth.
  • shoot off (one's) face
  • shut your face! The idiom "shut your face!" is an informal and rude way of telling someone to stop talking or to be quiet. It is an impolite and forceful command to cease speaking.
  • shut your mouth/trap/face/gob! The idiom "shut your mouth/trap/face/gob!" is an impolite way of telling someone to stop talking or keep quiet. It is a direct and forceful command to cease speaking immediately.
  • smash somebody's face/head in The idiom "smash somebody's face/head in" typically means to physically attack someone by repeatedly hitting and causing severe damage to their face or head, often resulting in serious injuries or disfigurement. It is usually used figuratively to emphasize extreme anger, rage, or a desire to harm someone.
  • soak one’s face
  • someone's face fits The idiom "someone's face fits" refers to a situation where someone's appearance or characteristics suit a particular role, job, or social group. It implies that a person is accepted or favored because they have the desired attributes or qualities that align with the expectations or requirements of a specific situation.
  • stare (someone or something) in the face The idiom "stare (someone or something) in the face" means to confront or face something or someone directly without any avoidance or hesitation. It implies a situation where one is unable to ignore or deny the presence, truth, or reality of something.
  • stare something in the face The idiom "stare something in the face" means to confront or acknowledge a difficult or unpleasant situation directly, without avoiding or ignoring it. It implies facing the reality or truth of something, often implying the need for courage or determination.
  • stuff (one's) face The idiom "stuff (one's) face" means to eat a large amount of food quickly and greedily. It implies indulging in excessive eating, often without regard for manners or moderation.
  • stuff one’s face The idiom "stuff one's face" refers to the act of eating a large amount of food quickly and greedily. It implies indulging in excessive eating without regard for manners or self-control.
  • suck face The idiom "suck face" is a colloquial and slang term that refers to very passionate and intense kissing. It implies a deep and prolonged kissing session, often involving couples who are extremely enamored with each other.
  • take (someone or something) at face value The idiom "take (someone or something) at face value" means to accept or believe someone or something exactly as they appear, without questioning or analyzing further. It implies accepting information, statements, or appearances without considering any hidden meanings, ulterior motives, or deeper implications.
  • take somebody/something at face value The idiom "take somebody/something at face value" means to accept someone or something as it appears without questioning or doubting their intentions or credibility. It implies accepting information or judging a person solely based on their initial presentation or superficial characteristics. It suggests not seeking hidden meanings or ulterior motives beyond what is readily apparent.
  • throw (something) back in(to) (one's) face The idiom "throw (something) back in(to) (one's) face" means to remind someone of something they said or did in a way that embarrasses or criticizes them. It refers to using someone's words or actions against them for the purpose of showing their hypocrisy or proving them wrong.
  • throw in someone's face The idiom "throw in someone's face" means to deliberately remind or mention something in a confrontational or aggressive manner, usually in an attempt to make someone feel guilty or embarrassed about it. It implies a sense of using the reminder as a weapon to belittle or humiliate the person.
  • throw something back in someone's face The idiom "throw something back in someone's face" means to remind someone of something they said or did, usually in a confrontational or hurtful manner, especially when it contradicts their current standpoint or attempts to diminish their credibility. It involves using their previous words or actions against them as a way to make a point or challenge their current position.
  • to (one's) face The idiom "to (one's) face" refers to an action or statement that is done or said openly and directly in someone's presence, typically without attempting to conceal one's true feelings or intentions. It implies a lack of deception or hiding of one's opinions, making a declaration or confrontation straightforward and honest.
  • to somebody's face The idiom "to somebody's face" means confronting or criticizing someone directly, openly, and in their presence. It refers to speaking or acting honestly with someone, without hiding one's true feelings or thoughts.
  • turd face The idiom "turd face" is not widely recognized or documented. It is potentially a derogatory slang term used to insult or mock someone's appearance, particularly their facial features. It is considered offensive and impolite to use such language.
  • turn (one's) face to the wall The idiom "turn (one's) face to the wall" means to resign oneself to impending death or defeat, often by turning away from the world and refusing to communicate or interact with others. It signifies a sense of hopelessness or surrender in the face of a difficult situation.
  • wash its face The idiom "wash its face" typically means that something or someone is able to cover its own costs, expenses, or making a profit. It refers to a situation or entity being financially viable or self-sustaining.
  • what’s his face The idiom "what's his face" refers to a person whose name or identity is forgotten, unknown, or unimportant to the speaker. It is often used when referring to someone whose name the speaker cannot recall or does not want to mention.
  • wipe the smile off (one's) face The idiom "wipe the smile off (one's) face" means to do something that makes someone lose their happy or confident expression, typically by saying or doing something disheartening or discouraging.
  • wipe the smile off someone's face The idiom "wipe the smile off someone's face" means to make someone stop smiling or become less happy or confident, usually by saying or doing something unpleasant or discouraging. It implies removing the joy or contentment from a person's expression.
  • wouldn't know (something) if it hit (one) in the face The idiom "wouldn't know (something) if it hit (one) in the face" is used to describe someone who is completely oblivious or unaware of a particular thing or situation even if it was obvious or apparent. The person is so unaware that they would not recognize or realize something even if it were instantly and obviously presented right in front of them.
  • written all over (one's) face The idiom "written all over (one's) face" refers to a person's facial expression or appearance that clearly reveals their emotions, thoughts, or intentions, often when they are trying to conceal them.
  • written all over your face The idiom "written all over your face" refers to the easily recognizable expression or signs of a person's emotions or thoughts that are conveyed through their facial expressions, body language, or demeanor.
  • your face falls The idiom "your face falls" is used to describe a noticeable change in someone's facial expression, typically due to disappointment, sadness, or a loss of optimism. It suggests that their mood quickly shifts from positive to negative, resulting in a visible physical change in their countenance.
  • your/somebody's face doesn't fit The idiom "your/somebody's face doesn't fit" means that someone does not belong or is not accepted in a certain environment or situation. It suggests that the person's appearance, behavior, or characteristics do not match the expected norms or preferences of that particular group or context, making it difficult for them to fit in or be accepted.
  • zit face The idiom "zit face" is a slang term used to describe someone, typically a teenager, who has a significant amount of acne or pimples on their face. It is a derogatory term, often used to mock or ridicule the person's appearance.
  • face someone down The idiom "face someone down" means to confront or challenge someone directly and assertively, usually with the intention of making them back down or submit. It involves standing your ground in front of someone and using unwavering determination and confidence to intimidate or overpower them.
  • face something down The idiom "face something down" means to confront or stand up to a difficult or challenging situation, issue, or opponent with confidence, determination, and courage. It implies not backing down or being intimidated in the face of adversity or conflict.
  • face someone or something forward The idiom "face someone or something forward" typically means to position or orient someone or something in a direction that is forward or front-facing. It suggests aligning or turning someone or something towards the intended direction or goal.
  • face up (to someone or something) The idiom "face up (to someone or something)" means to confront or deal with a person or situation directly and openly, without avoiding or ignoring it. It involves acknowledging and taking responsibility for one's actions or decisions, or addressing a challenging circumstance without hesitation.
  • face someone with something The idiom "face someone with something" generally means to confront or present someone with a difficult or challenging situation, information, or problem that they have to deal with or address.
  • face something with something The idiom "face something with something" means to confront or deal with a difficult or challenging situation using a particular attitude, approach, or resource. It implies taking on the situation head-on and using a specific tool, method, strategy, or mindset to address it effectively.
  • I'd rather face a firing squad than do something The idiom "I'd rather face a firing squad than do something" is an exaggerated expression used to convey a strong aversion or preference towards not doing a particular task. It implies that an individual would rather endure a severe punishment or face imminent danger (such as execution by a firing squad) than engage in the undesired activity.
  • fly in the face of someone or something The idiom "fly in the face of someone or something" means to go against, contradict, or defy someone or something directly and boldly, often without considering the consequences or possible negative outcomes. It refers to openly opposing established beliefs, rules, norms, or expectations, in a manner that is confrontational or challenging.
  • wipe the/that grin off (one's) face The idiom "wipe the/that grin off (one's) face" means to remove or eliminate the smug, self-satisfied expression from someone's face. It is often used to express the desire to make someone stop feeling so pleased or superior about something.
  • have the (brass) face to (do something) The idiomatic expression "have the (brass) face to (do something)" refers to someone having the audacity, boldness, or nerve to do something that is typically considered inappropriate, disrespectful, or outrageous. It implies that the person has no shame or embarrassment in their actions and is willing to push boundaries without regard for the consequences or social norms.
  • (one's) face fits The idiom "one's face fits" means that someone is liked or accepted by a particular group, organization, or situation, often due to having the desired qualities or characteristics that conform to their expectations or preferences. It implies that the person's appearance, behavior, or personality is congruent with what is desired or deemed suitable in that context.
  • (one's) face is like thunder The idiom "(one's) face is like thunder" refers to someone having a very angry or serious expression on their face. It implies that the person's facial expression is dark and intense, resembling a stormy sky, and indicating their displeasure or irritation.
  • be looking (one) in the face The idiom "be looking (one) in the face" means to be staring directly at someone or something, often referring to a situation where the answer or solution is obvious or easily noticeable. It emphasizes the idea that the person or thing is right in front of you, and there is no need to search, speculate, or overlook what is clearly visible.

Similar spelling words for FACE

Plural form of FACE is FACES

Conjugate verb Face

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have faced
you would have faced
he/she/it would have faced
we would have faced
they would have faced
I would have face
you would have face
he/she/it would have face
we would have face
they would have face

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been facing
you would have been facing
he/she/it would have been facing
we would have been facing
they would have been facing

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would face
you would face
he/she/it would face
we would face
they would face

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be facing
you would be facing
he/she/it would be facing
we would be facing
they would be facing

FUTURE

I will face
you will face
he/she/it will face
we will face
they will face

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be facing
you will be facing
he/she/it will be facing
we will be facing
they will be facing

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have faced
you will have faced
he/she/it will have faced
we will have faced
they will have faced

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been facing
you will have been facing
he/she/it will have been facing
we will have been facing
they will have been facing

IMPERATIVE

you face
we let´s face

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to face

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was facing
you were facing
he/she/it was facing
we were facing
they were facing

PAST PARTICIPLE

faced

PAST PERFECT

I had faced
you had faced
he/she/it had faced
we had faced
they had faced

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been facing
you had been facing
he/she/it had been facing
we had been facing
they had been facing

PRESENT

I face
you face
he/she/it faces
we face
they face

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am facing
you are facing
he/she/it is facing
we are facing
they are facing

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

facing

PRESENT PERFECT

I have faced
you have faced
he/she/it has faced
we have faced
they have faced

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been facing
you have been facing
he/she/it has been facing
we have been facing
they have been facing

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it face

SIMPLE PAST

I faced
you faced
he/she/it faced
we faced
they faced

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