How Do You Spell FIRST?

Pronunciation: [fˈɜːst] (IPA)

The word "first" is spelled with the letters f-i-r-s-t. In IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) transcription, it is pronounced /fɜːrst/, with the "f" sound being produced by the lips pressing together, the "ɜː" being a relaxed version of the "u" sound in "cute", the "r" being a post-alveolar liquid, the "s" being a voiceless alveolar fricative, and the "t" being produced by the tongue touching the alveolar ridge, followed by a burst of air.

FIRST Meaning and Definition

First is an adjective that refers to the initial or initial-born aspect of something, or the initial occurrence or event in a sequence, process, or series of events. It represents the foremost or leading position in terms of time, order, rank, importance, or significance. It signifies being the earliest, the earliest known, or the earliest possible in a particular context.

In chronological terms, first can denote the most recent or earliest moment in time, indicating the start or commencement of a particular endeavor, movement, era, or historical period. It can also describe the earliest moment or earliest known record of existence for an object, idea, or concept. Additionally, first can indicate the beginning or opening in a series, such as the primary installment or debut of a book, movie, or album.

When used in a ranking or hierarchical context, first signifies the highest or topmost position, indicating superiority or preeminence over other elements or individuals in a group, list, competition, or task. It may also relate to being the original or founding member of a group, the creator of an innovation, or the pioneer of a field.

Furthermore, first can convey the idea of being the most important or significant, highlighting its distinguished or principal status among other things or persons. It often implies prominence, excellence, or distinction, reflecting a notable or outstanding achievement, performance, or accomplishment.

As an adverb, first describes the action of being before anything or anyone else, indicating priority, preference, or precedence in terms of both time and order. It is often used to signify an action occurring initially or at the beginning of a series of actions or events.

Top Common Misspellings for FIRST *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for FIRST

Etymology of FIRST

The word "first" originated from the Old English word "fyrst", which is believed to have derived from the Proto-Germanic word "*furisto" or "*frumatizo". This Proto-Germanic term is also related to the Old High German word "furst", meaning "foremost" or "first". Furthermore, both the Old English and Proto-Germanic words are believed to have derived from the Proto-Indo-European root "*per-", which means "forward" or "beyond". The word "first" has maintained a similar form and meaning throughout its development in various languages.

Idioms with the word FIRST

  • safety first The idiom "safety first" implies that safety should be prioritized above all else. It emphasizes the importance of adopting precautions and measures to prevent accidents or harm in any given situation.
  • get to first base The idiom "get to first base" typically refers to making initial progress or achieving the first step or level toward accomplishing a goal or developing a relationship. It originates from baseball, where "first base" is the first stop on the way to scoring a run. In a broader sense, it signifies moving forward from a starting point, although the specific context may vary depending on the situation.
  • get to/reach first base The idiom "get to/reach first base" typically refers to progress or advancement in a relationship or a task. It is often used in a romantic or sexual context, indicating the initial stages of physical intimacy, specifically kissing or light physical contact. In a broader sense, it can also refer to making progress or achieving an initial milestone in any endeavor or situation.
  • take first/second place The idiom "take first/second place" refers to achieving the top or second position in a competition, race, or any competitive event. It means to come in first or second among the participants, indicating a high level of success or accomplishment.
  • in the first/second place The idiomatic expression "in the first place" or "in the second place" is used to introduce or emphasize a point or reason that supports an argument or explanation. It is often used when someone is discussing multiple reasons or factors contributing to a particular situation. It denotes the order of importance or sequence of events, with "in the first place" referring to the most important point or reason, and "in the second place" referring to the next important point or reason.
  • not know the first thing about sth The idiom "not know the first thing about something" means to have absolutely no knowledge or understanding about a particular subject, task, or concept. It implies a complete lack of familiarity or expertise.
  • first things first The idiom "first things first" means prioritizing or dealing with the most important or urgent matters before attending to others. It emphasizes the importance of order and proper sequence in handling tasks or situations.
  • if at first you don't succeed, try, try again The idiom "if at first you don't succeed, try, try again" means that if you fail at something or are unsuccessful in your initial attempt, it is important to persevere and make further attempts in order to achieve success. It emphasizes the importance of resilience, determination, and learning from previous failures.
  • first among equals The idiom "first among equals" refers to a person who holds a higher or more prestigious position within a group, but is considered equal in terms of authority or status. This individual possesses a higher rank or title, yet they treat other members of the group as equals and involve them in decision making.
  • first and last The idiom "first and last" is used to describe something or someone that is considered to be the best or most outstanding example within a certain category or context. It implies that the mentioned thing or person is unmatched or unparalleled in terms of quality, significance, or achievement, both at the beginning and the end.
  • come first The idiom "come first" refers to the prioritization of something or someone above all others. It means that a particular person, thing, or action holds the highest importance or is given top priority in a given situation or context.
  • first come, first served The idiom "first come, first served" means that individuals or entities will be helped, attended to, or given access to something in the order in which they arrived. In other words, the person or group that arrives or claims something first will be prioritized or given preference over others.
  • at first The idiom "at first" typically means to describe the initial or starting point of something, referring to the earliest stage or moment in a sequence of events or experiences.
  • be in the first flush of The idiom "be in the first flush of" refers to being in the early stages or initial period of a particular condition, experience, or emotion. It typically implies a state of enthusiasm, excitement, and freshness that comes with something new or recently started.
  • first and foremost The idiom "first and foremost" means that something is of primary importance or priority. It emphasizes that the mentioned point or action is the most significant or the initial consideration in a given situation.
  • put sb/sth first The idiom "put sb/sth first" means to prioritize someone or something above all else. It implies giving the utmost importance and attention to someone or something, often at the expense of other matters or individuals.
  • head first The idiom "head first" refers to doing something with complete enthusiasm, determination, or without any hesitation or reticence. It suggests that a person is jumping into a situation without considering the potential risks or consequences. It implies an all-in approach or wholehearted commitment to an action.
  • give sb (the right of/to) first refusal The idiom "give someone (the right of/to) first refusal" means to offer someone the opportunity to purchase something before it is offered to others, allowing them to have the first choice to accept or decline the offer.
  • the first string The idiom "the first string" typically refers to the most skilled or highly regarded individuals in a group or team. It suggests that these individuals are considered to be the best or most valuable players, often used in the context of sports or performing arts where the first string members are the ones who are primarily relied upon or given priority.
  • first step is always the hardest The idiom "first step is always the hardest" means that beginning a new endeavor or taking the initial action towards a goal is often the most difficult and challenging part. It suggests that getting started requires a lot of courage, motivation, and effort, but once the first step is taken, subsequent steps become easier.
  • love at first sight The idiom "love at first sight" refers to an intense passion or strong affection felt immediately upon meeting someone for the first time. It implies a sudden and powerful attraction that is often described as a profound and overwhelming emotional connection, without prior knowledge or deep understanding of the person.
  • the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder" refers to the initial, highest, or subsequent step in a series of achievements, advancements, or levels of progress towards a goal or success. It highlights the idea of starting at the bottom and gradually climbing upwards towards higher levels of attainment or accomplishment.
  • He that would the daughter win, must with the mother first begin. The idiom "He that would the daughter win, must with the mother first begin" means that if someone wants to successfully pursue a romantic relationship with someone, they should first try to establish a positive relationship with the person's parents or family. By winning the approval and trust of the person's mother, it becomes more likely to gain the affection and acceptance of the person they are interested in. This proverbial phrase emphasizes the significance of familial relationships and the importance of pleasing parents when pursuing a romantic partner.
  • Shoot first, ask questions later The idiom "Shoot first, ask questions later" means taking immediate action or making a hasty decision without obtaining all the necessary information first. It suggests prioritizing action over careful consideration or assessment of a situation.
  • Not if I see you sooner, and Not if I see you first The idioms "Not if I see you sooner" and "Not if I see you first" are often used as humoristic ways to refuse a request or challenge made by someone. They suggest that the speaker will avoid the other person or take action before they have a chance to encounter each other. The phrases imply that the speaker is determined to prevent the other person from achieving their goal or that they hold a competitive or defiant attitude towards the person.
  • first see the light of day The idiom "first see the light of day" means the first time something is born, created, or becomes known or visible. It refers to the moment when something or someone is first brought into existence or comes to public attention.
  • If at first you don't succeed The idiom "If at first you don't succeed" means that if you fail or encounter difficulties in your initial attempt at something, you should persevere and try again rather than giving up or becoming discouraged.
  • at first blush The idiom "at first blush" means to form an opinion or judgment based on initial and superficial information or appearance, without deeper consideration or analysis. It refers to making quick assumptions or impressions about something or someone without thoroughly understanding or knowing all the details.
  • at first glance The idiom "at first glance" means forming an initial judgment or opinion about something or someone based solely on a quick or superficial observation or impression. It refers to making a snap assessment before looking more deeply or gathering more information.
  • at first glance/sight The idiom "at first glance/sight" refers to forming an immediate or initial impression about someone or something based on a quick observation or superficial encounter. It suggests making judgments or assumptions before having a deeper understanding or knowledge about the person or situation.
  • at first sight The idiom "at first sight" refers to forming an immediate impression or feeling about something or someone upon initial observation, without further investigation or analysis. It implies a strong and often instant attraction, interest, or judgment based solely on superficial appearance or first impressions.
  • get to first base (with sm or sth) The idiom "get to first base (with someone or something)" typically refers to making progress or achieving a basic level of success in a particular situation or relationship. It is often used in a romantic context, suggesting that someone is able to establish a closer connection or achieve initial success in pursuing a romantic or sexual relationship with another person.
  • First in, best dressed "First in, best dressed" is an idiomatic expression that means the first person to arrive or take action in a particular situation will have an advantage or be more likely to succeed than others who come later. It suggests that being prompt or taking early action provides an advantage over those who delay or arrive late.
  • play first chair The idiom "play first chair" commonly refers to someone's position as the lead or principal performer in a musical group, particularly in an orchestra or a band. Being designated "first chair" means that the individual is considered the most skilled or talented musician in their specific section or instrument and holds a prominent role in setting the tone and guiding the performance.
  • cast the first stone The idiom "cast the first stone" is a phrase derived from a Bible story in which Jesus confronts a group of people who are about to stone a woman for her sins. The phrase has come to be interpreted as a caution against being judgmental or critical of others when one is not without fault themselves. It suggests that one should not condemn or criticize others for their actions or behavior if they have also made mistakes or have their own flaws.
  • have first call on The idiom "have first call on" means to have the privilege or priority to be chosen or selected before others. It refers to being the first choice or having the first opportunity to do or receive something.
  • If at first you don't succeed, (try, try, and try again). The idiom "If at first you don't succeed, (try, try, and try again)" means that if you are unsuccessful in achieving something, you should persevere and keep attempting until you are successful. It emphasizes the importance of resilience and not giving up easily when faced with obstacles or failure.
  • be carried out feet first The idiom "be carried out feet first" refers to the act of dying or leaving a place or situation in a horizontal position, with the feet leading the way, as if being taken away on a stretcher or in a coffin. It implies a final departure from a location or situation, often with a sense of finality or permanence.
  • First catch your hare The idiom "First catch your hare" means that before one can achieve a desired outcome or accomplish a goal, they must first obtain the necessary prerequisites or take the essential initial steps. It emphasizes the importance of careful planning and preparation before attempting to achieve a certain result.
  • You first The idiom "You first" is a polite or sarcastic phrase used to tell someone to go ahead or take action before oneself. It can be used to show courtesy or as a sarcastic way to express impatience or frustration with another person.
  • the first etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first rung on the ladder" refers to the initial step or level of progress in a particular field, career, or pursuit. It signifies the beginning or starting point of a process or the first stage of advancement towards a goal. It emphasizes the importance of taking that initial step in order to achieve further success or climb higher on the figurative ladder of achievement.
  • Selfpreservation is the first law of nature The idiom "Self-preservation is the first law of nature" means that human beings and living organisms instinctively prioritize their own survival and well-being above all else. It implies that individuals will naturally act in ways that protect themselves, avoid danger, and ensure their own survival, as this is a fundamental instinct ingrained in their nature.
  • of the first water The idiom "of the first water" is used to describe something or someone that is of the highest quality or excellence. It implies that the subject being described is the best in its category, comparable to a flawless gemstone of the highest grade.
  • not know the first thing about The idiom "not know the first thing about" means to lack basic knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or topic. It suggests a complete lack of familiarity or expertise in a given area.
  • Ladies first The idiom "Ladies first" is a commonly used phrase that suggests that women should go or be served before men, particularly in situations where there is a sense of etiquette or courtesy involved. It is a polite gesture emphasizing chivalry and respect towards women, prioritizing their needs or allowing them to take the lead in certain situations.
  • know the first thing about The definition for the idiom "know the first thing about" is to have no knowledge or understanding about something at all. It suggests a complete lack of familiarity or expertise in a particular subject or activity.
  • in the first place and in the first instance The idiom "in the first place" or "in the first instance" is used to refer to the initial or original situation or circumstance. It emphasizes the beginning or starting point of a discussion, argument, or action.
  • in the first place The idiom "in the first place" is used to refer to something that was initially stated, mentioned, or done, highlighting its importance or relevance. It indicates going back to the beginning or original point of discussion or consideration.
  • hindside first
  • have first crack at The idiom "have first crack at" means to have the initial opportunity or advantage to attempt or try something before anyone else. It implies being the first in line or having the first chance to do or achieve something.
  • give first refusal The idiom "give first refusal" refers to offering someone the opportunity to accept or reject something before it is offered to others or made available to the general public. It means to give someone priority or the first chance to accept or decline a particular offer or opportunity.
  • first thing The idiom "first thing" refers to the earliest or initial point in time or the top priority among a series of tasks. It implies that something is done or should be done with the utmost importance and urgency, typically at the beginning of a sequence or day.
  • first off "First off" is an idiom that means as a first point or consideration in a sequence of thoughts or actions. It is used to introduce the initial or most important part of something.
  • first of all The definition of the idiom "first of all" means as the first point or in the first place when listing or discussing multiple points or reasons. It is used to emphasize that the following statement is the initial or primary consideration before moving on to other matters.
  • first leg The idiom "first leg" typically refers to the initial part or stage of a journey, race, or competition. It is commonly used in sporting contexts such as relay races or multi-stage events, where each participant or team completes one leg before passing the baton or continuing to the next stage. It can also generally describe the beginning or starting point of any kind of endeavor or process.
  • First impressions are the most lasting The idiom "First impressions are the most lasting" means that the initial opinion or judgment formed about someone or something tends to have a strong and enduring impact on one's perception or memory. It implies that the first encounter or experience can significantly influence how one views and remembers someone or something in the long term.
  • first hundred years are the hardest The idiom "first hundred years are the hardest" is a humorous and lighthearted way of saying that the beginning or starting period of something, such as a project, enterprise, or a significant milestone, can be the most challenging and difficult. It implies that once this initial phase is overcome, the task or endeavor becomes easier, suggesting that perseverance and dedication are required at the initial stages of anything new.
  • first hand The idiom "first hand" refers to experiencing or witnessing something directly, without any intermediary or second-hand information. It implies that the person has personal and direct knowledge or involvement in a particular situation or event.
  • first crack at The idiom "first crack at" means having the initial opportunity or attempt at doing something before others. It implies being the first or having the first opportunity to do or experience something.
  • be first past the post The idiom "be first past the post" refers to a situation in which someone or something successfully completes or achieves something ahead of others. It is derived from a racing term used in horse racing and other sports, where the winner is determined by the first participant to cross a designated finishing line. In a broader sense, this idiom is often used to signify being the first or quickest to accomplish a goal or reach a desired outcome.
  • be first among equals The idiom "be first among equals" means to hold a position of leadership or superiority within a group of individuals who are considered equals. It suggests that while all members may be on an equal footing, one person stands out due to their exceptional abilities, achievements, or influence. It signifies being the most prominent or authoritative figure within a group without completely overshadowing or dominating the others.
  • at first light The definition of the idiom "at first light" is: Refers to the time just after sunrise or the first appearance of light in the morning. It describes the early hours of the day or the moment when the sky starts to brighten, usually used to indicate the start of an event or an activity.
  • at first hand The idiom "at first hand" means experiencing or witnessing something directly, without any intermediary or second-hand information. It refers to having personal and immediate knowledge or understanding of a situation, event, or occurrence.
  • be in the first flush of sth The idiom "be in the first flush of sth" refers to being in the early stages or initial period of something, usually associated with youth, enthusiasm, or success. It describes a moment when something is at its peak or in its prime, often suggesting a sense of freshness, vigor, or excitement.
  • (first) dibs on sth The idiom "(first) dibs on something" is used to claim or request priority or the right to possess or use something before others. It implies that the person making the statement wants to be the first one to have or benefit from something.
  • have first call on sth The idiom "have first call on something" means to have the right or priority to obtain or use something before others. It implies being given the first opportunity or choice for a particular resource or privilege.
  • of the first magnitude The idiom "of the first magnitude" refers to something that is of utmost importance, significance, or great magnitude. It is often used to emphasize the exceptional qualities or importance of a person, event, or idea.
  • there’s a first time for everything The idiom "there's a first time for everything" means that there will always be instances or experiences that one will encounter for the very first time in their life. It implies the idea that new experiences, challenges, or opportunities are constantly arising and should be embraced or approached with an open mind.
  • feet first The idiom "feet first" means to enter, engage, or undertake something in a bold, uninhibited, or uninformed manner without proper planning or consideration of consequences. It refers to a reckless approach where one dives into a situation head-on, without taking the time to assess or prepare adequately.
  • first up The idiom "first up" refers to being the first person or thing in a sequence or order. It can also imply taking on a task or responsibility before anyone else.
  • put somebody/something first To "put somebody/something first" means to prioritize or give the highest importance to someone or something above all others. It implies that you prioritize their needs, well-being, or interests before anything else.
  • from the (very) first The idiom "from the (very) first" typically means from the beginning or since the very start of something. It refers to being present or involved in a situation or activity right from its inception.
  • from first to last The idiom "from first to last" means completely, thoroughly, or throughout the entire duration or process. It refers to the entire span or sequence of something, typically from the beginning to the end.
  • (in) the first flush of something The idiom "(in) the first flush of something" refers to the initial or early stage of an experience, typically characterized by enthusiasm, excitement, or vigor. It is often used to describe the initial period of a romantic relationship, a new job, a new venture, or any other situation where the feelings are intense and fresh.
  • on first acquaintance The idiom "on first acquaintance" refers to one's initial impression or understanding of someone or something after only a brief meeting or introduction. It suggests that opinions or judgments formed during the first encounter may change or deepen with further knowledge or experience.
  • not get to first base (with something/somebody) The idiom "not get to first base (with something/somebody)" is an informal expression that originates from the game of baseball. In baseball, "getting to first base" refers to the first step or the initial accomplishment. When this expression is used figuratively, it means to fail to make any progress towards a goal or to have no success in a particular endeavor, especially when attempting to establish a relationship or advance a situation. It implies that the person is unable to move beyond the first stage or is not able to achieve any meaningful results.
  • have first call (on somebody/something) The idiom "have first call (on somebody/something)" means to have the right or priority to use or access someone or something before others. It implies that the person or entity possessing first call has the advantage or privilege of being the first choice or option.
  • not know the first thing about (something) The idiom "not know the first thing about (something)" means to have no knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or topic. It implies a complete lack of familiarity or expertise in that area.
  • not know the first thing about somebody/something The idiom "not know the first thing about somebody/something" means to have no knowledge or understanding whatsoever about a particular person or thing. It indicates a complete lack of information or familiarity with the subject in question.
  • get to first base (with someone or something) The idiom "get to first base (with someone or something)" is often used in a romantic or sports context. Its primary definition is to make initial progress or achieve the first stage or level of success, particularly in a romantic relationship. The phrase is derived from baseball, where reaching first base is the first step toward scoring a run. In non-romantic settings, it can also indicate the initial accomplishment or progress in any endeavor.
  • reach first base The idiom "reach first base" is often used in the context of dating or romantic relationships. It refers to successfully initiating physical contact or achieving a certain level of intimacy with a potential partner. This phrase has its origins in baseball, where "first base" is the initial step or milestone towards scoring a run.
  • get to first (base) (with someone) The idiom "get to first (base) (with someone)" refers to successfully achieving the initial level or stage of familiarity or intimacy with someone, often in a romantic or flirtatious context. It typically implies progressing beyond mere acquaintance or initial interactions and closer to establishing a more meaningful connection.
  • be first out of the box To be first out of the box means to be the first to take action or to act quickly on a particular matter or situation. It refers to being proactive and having a head start compared to others in accomplishing a task or addressing an issue.
  • first port of call The idiom "first port of call" refers to the initial place or person that someone goes to for help, advice, or assistance in a specific situation or problem. It indicates the primary destination or resource that is sought out as a starting point.
  • have first call The idiom "have first call" means to have the highest or primary priority or privilege in making a choice or decision. It suggests having the right to choose or decide before others and being given priority in a particular situation.
  • have first call on (something) The idiom "have first call on (something)" means to have the priority or exclusive right to use or obtain something before others. It implies having the initial opportunity or privilege to make use of or acquire a particular resource or item.
  • cast (or throw) the first stone The idiom "cast (or throw) the first stone" refers to the act of criticizing or expressing blame towards someone else while neglecting one's own flaws or shortcomings. It originates from a biblical story in which Jesus challenges a crowd about stoning a woman caught in adultery. He says, "Let any one of you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her." It essentially implies that one should not judge others if they themselves are not perfect or entirely blameless.
  • draw first blood The idiom "draw first blood" refers to initiating an attack or confrontation and being the first to cause harm, injury, or provoke a response from someone else. It can also imply being the first to succeed or make progress in a competitive situation.
  • first blood The idiom "first blood" refers to the initial achievement or advantage gained in a competition, dispute, or conflict. It originates from the practice of recognizing the first person to inflict injury or draw blood in a fight or battle. Figuratively, it signifies being the first to make a significant impact or gain an advantage over opponents in any given situation.
  • first cousin The idiom "first cousin" refers to a family member who is the child of one's aunt or uncle, sharing the same grandparents.
  • have first crack at (something) The idiom "have first crack at (something)" means to have the opportunity to do or attempt something before anyone else. It suggests being given the initial chance or advantage in a particular situation.
  • the first flush of youth, enthusiasm, etc. The idiom "the first flush of youth, enthusiasm, etc." refers to the initial stage or period of something, typically characterized by a strong or intense display of qualities such as youthfulness, enthusiasm, or passion. It suggests the early and vibrant stage of an experience or emotion, often before it becomes more subdued or less intense over time.
  • there's a first time for everything The idiom "there's a first time for everything" means that there will always be new experiences or opportunities in life, even for things that have never happened before. It implies that no matter how unusual or unprecedented something may seem, it is possible and likely to occur eventually.
  • fall at the first hurdle The idiom "fall at the first hurdle" means to fail or be defeated at the very beginning of a task or endeavor, often due to a lack of ability, preparation, or determination. It refers to someone stumbling or being unable to overcome the initial obstacle or challenge.
  • jump in feet first The idiom "jump in feet first" means to enthusiastically and wholeheartedly engage in a new activity or situation without hesitation or caution. It suggests taking immediate action and fully committing to something without considering potential risks or consequences.
  • play first fiddle The idiom "play first fiddle" means to have the most important or prominent role in a particular situation or to be in a position of leadership or control. It refers to the first violin, or concertmaster, in an orchestra who has the principal role and leads the other musicians. Therefore, "playing first fiddle" indicates being at the forefront or taking the lead in a given scenario.
  • first for first
  • first impression The idiom "first impression" refers to the initial opinion or judgment formed about someone or something upon meeting or observing them for the first time. It emphasizes the significance of the initial encounter in shaping one's overall perception or evaluation.
  • first loser The idiom "first loser" refers to someone who finishes in second place or comes close to achieving a goal but falls just short of winning or achieving first place. It implies that while they may have performed well, they ultimately did not succeed in securing the top position.
  • first love The idiom "first love" refers to a person's initial and often intense romantic or emotional attachment to another individual. It typically represents the nostalgic memory and emotional significance of the first romantic relationship or deep emotional connection someone experiences. This idiom encapsulates the idea of the initial experience of love, which is often regarded as unique and influential.
  • first off/up The idiom "first off/up" is an informal expression used to introduce the initial or primary point or aspect of a discussion or statement. It indicates that something is being addressed or emphasized before addressing anything else.
  • first past the post The idiom "first past the post" refers to a voting system in which whichever candidate or party receives the highest number of votes becomes the winner, regardless of whether it is a majority or not. The term originated from horse racing, where the first horse to cross the finish line is declared the winner. This idiom is often used to describe elections where there is no requirement for the winner to receive an absolute majority.
  • first refusal The idiom "first refusal" refers to the right or opportunity to purchase or act before others, granting someone priority or preference in making a decision or acquiring something. It means to have the first chance to accept or reject a proposition or offer.
  • first thing in the morning The idiom "first thing in the morning" refers to the earliest or very beginning of the day, often implying that something will be done or addressed at that time, typically indicating urgency or priority.
  • first world problem The idiom "first world problem" refers to a minor or trivial issue that is typically experienced by individuals living in affluent, developed countries. It is used to highlight the contrast between the everyday struggles faced in developed nations, which are generally characterized by stable infrastructure, high quality of life, and access to resources, and the more significant challenges faced in less developed or impoverished regions of the world. This phrase is often used humorously or sarcastically to acknowledge and poke fun at the relative insignificance of certain problems in the grand scheme of things.
  • first-rate The idiom "first-rate" refers to something of the highest quality or excellence. It denotes excellence, superiority, or top-notch performance in a particular area or aspect.
  • from the first The idiom "from the first" means from the very beginning or from the outset of a situation or event. It implies that something has been the case since the start and has not changed over time.
  • get to first
  • get to first with someone
  • give (one) (the right of/to) first refusal The idiom "give (one) (the right of/to) first refusal" means to offer someone the option or opportunity to acquire something before anyone else. It refers to granting someone the privilege of being the first to accept or reject an offer or proposition, usually related to buying or acquiring something.
  • in the first flush The idiom "in the first flush" refers to the initial stage or early period of something, often characterized by intense enthusiasm, excitement, or success. It commonly implies a sense of freshness and newness in a particular experience or endeavor.
  • in the first instance The idiom "in the first instance" refers to an initial or primary action or decision regarding a particular matter or situation. It emphasizes the importance of addressing something at the beginning or as a first step.
  • last in, first out The idiom "last in, first out" refers to a concept in which the most recent acquisition or addition is the first to be removed or used up. This principle is commonly used in stack-based data structures or procedures, where the last item placed onto the stack is the first one to be removed.
  • make the first move The idiom "make the first move" means to take the initial action or step in a situation or interaction. It implies being the one who initiates or starts something, whether it's a conversation, a game, a negotiation, or any other kind of interaction. Making the first move often requires confidence, assertiveness, and the willingness to take a risk in order to set things in motion.
  • of the first order The idiom "of the first order" is used to describe something exceptional, extraordinary, or of the highest degree. It implies that the quality or significance of the person, event, object, or situation being referred to is unmatched or unparalleled.
  • of the highest/first order The idiom "of the highest/first order" is used to describe something or someone that is the absolute best or most extreme in a particular category or quality. It signifies that the thing or person being referred to is of utmost importance, significance, or excellence.
  • Second place is the first loser. The idiom "Second place is the first loser" means that coming in second is not considered a significant accomplishment, as it implies the person or team has fallen short of winning and is therefore not considered a true winner.
  • see somebody in hell first The idiom "see somebody in hell first" is an expression used to convey strong denial or refusal. It implies that one would rather endure the torment of hell than give in to the request or demand being made. It essentially suggests that the person being referred to has no intention or desire to fulfill the mentioned action.
  • Self-preservation is the first law of nature The idiom "Self-preservation is the first law of nature" means that instinctively, humans prioritize their own well-being and survival above anything else. It reflects the natural tendency to protect oneself and ensure personal survival and safety in any given situation.
  • the first/last to do something The idiom "the first/last to do something" refers to being the initial or final person to accomplish a particular task or take a certain action. It highlights the act of being at the forefront or the tail end of an action or achievement.
  • first go The idiom "first go" refers to being the first attempt or the initial try at something. It implies that it may not be perfect or successful, as it is the first try before gaining experience or improvement.
  • not have the first idea The idiom "not have the first idea" means to have no knowledge or understanding whatsoever about a particular subject or situation. It implies a complete lack of awareness or comprehension.
  • see (one) in hell first The idiom "see (one) in hell first" is an expression used to convey an adamant refusal to do something or an extreme dislike towards someone. It implies that the speaker would rather go to hell than fulfill the request or spend time with the person mentioned.
  • be the first (person) to (do something) The idiom "be the first (person) to (do something)" means to be the initial or earliest individual to accomplish a particular action or task before anyone else. It implies being ahead of others in terms of time, innovation, or achievement.

Similar spelling words for FIRST

Plural form of FIRST is FIRSTS

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