How Do You Spell FLY?

Pronunciation: [flˈa͡ɪ] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "fly" is quite interesting. While most people might think "f-l-i-e" is the correct way to spell it, the actual spelling is "f-l-y." This is due to the fact that the "y" in "fly" represents the long "i" sound, as seen in words like "spy" and "shy." According to IPA phonetic transcription, "fly" is pronounced as /flaɪ/, with the "aɪ" representing the long "i" sound, making it a unique spelling in the English language. Remember, it's not "f-l-i-e," it's "f-l-y!"

FLY Meaning and Definition

Noun:

1. A fly refers to a small winged insect belonging to the order Diptera, typically characterized by a single pair of wings. Flies are widely distributed and have diverse physical features and feeding habits. They are known for their ability to hover or fly swiftly, using their wings' rapid oscillations, which enables them to navigate through the air with agility. Flies are often attracted to spoiled food, waste, or decomposing organic matter and can be a nuisance or transmit diseases to humans and animals alike.

2. In fishing, a fly refers to an artificial lure, usually made of feathers, fur, or synthetic materials, designed to resemble an insect or other small aquatic creature. These flies are used with a fishing rod and reel to attract fish by simulating the prey of the targeted species. Fly fishing is a popular angling technique that relies on the casting and presentation of the fly on or in the water to entice fish to strike.

Verb:

1. To fly means to move through the air by using wings or some other form of propulsion. This term implies the ability to levitate or glide above the ground, not being restricted to terrestrial locomotion. Birds, insects, and some mammals, such as bats, are known to fly naturally. Human flight can be achieved through the use of aircraft or other mechanical devices capable of lifting off the ground and maintaining controlled movement in the air.

2. In a broader sense, to fly can denote the act of traveling quickly or swiftly, especially by air. It is commonly used to describe the action of an airplane, helicopter, or other airborne vehicles as they traverse the sky or carry passengers and cargo from one location to another.

Top Common Misspellings for FLY *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for FLY

Etymology of FLY

The word "fly" has a complex etymology originating from multiple sources.

In its noun form, referring to the insect, "fly" comes from the Old English word "flēoge". This word is believed to be derived from the Proto-Germanic word "*fleugōną". The Proto-Germanic language was the common ancestor of various Germanic languages, including Old English.

The verb form of "fly", meaning to soar through the air, has a different origin. It can be traced back to the Old English word "flēogan", which also comes from the Proto-Germanic root "*fleuganą".

Interestingly, the noun form "fly", meaning the zipper on clothing, has a separate origin. It originated in the late 19th century as a shortened form of "fly-front", referring to the front opening of pants or skirts that fasten with a zipper or buttons.

Idioms with the word FLY

  • set the fur flying, at make the fur fly The idiom "set the fur flying" or "make the fur fly" means to cause or instigate a heated argument, conflict, or dispute. It suggests a situation where emotions are high and intense confrontation is expected. The expression alludes to a scenario in which fur (as in the hair or fur of animals) is violently disturbed, symbolizing a tumultuous and chaotic situation.
  • wave/show/fly the flag The idiom "wave/show/fly the flag" refers to openly expressing support or pride for something, often in a public or visible way. It can also indicate representing a particular group, cause, or belief proudly.
  • go/fly off at a tangent The idiom "go/fly off at a tangent" means to suddenly change the subject or direction of a conversation or thought, often diverting from the main point or topic. It refers to a leap or deviation from the intended path or focus, leading into a different direction entirely.
  • go off on a tangent, at go/fly off at a tangent The idiom "go off on a tangent, at go/fly off at a tangent" means to suddenly shift or veer from the main topic of conversation or main focus of attention onto an unrelated or unrelated direction. It describes a situation where someone starts discussing or pursuing a completely different idea or topic, often irrelevant or tangential to the original discussion or context.
  • fly into a temper/fury, at fly into a rage The idiom "fly into a temper/fury" or "fly into a rage" is used to describe someone suddenly becoming extremely angry or losing their temper. It implies that their anger escalates rapidly, as if it were triggered by an external force or happening in a spontaneous manner.
  • fly on the wall The idiom "fly on the wall" refers to the situation where someone secretly observes or overhears a conversation or event without being noticed or actively participating. It implies being in a position to witness something interesting or private without being detected or making one's presence known.
  • fly into a rage The idiom "fly into a rage" means to suddenly become extremely angry or furious in a swift and explosive manner. It refers to a person losing control of their emotions and exhibiting intense anger.
  • wouldn't harm/hurt a fly The idiom "wouldn't harm/hurt a fly" is used to describe someone who is extremely gentle, peaceful, or harmless. It suggests that the person is not capable of causing harm or being aggressive towards others, even towards small creatures like flies.
  • on the fly The idiom "on the fly" means to do something quickly or spontaneously, typically without prior planning or preparation. It refers to performing a task or making a decision in real-time or on the spot, often in a fast-paced or dynamic situation.
  • fly in the face of sth The idiom "fly in the face of something" means to openly oppose or contradict a commonly accepted belief, rule, or convention, often in a bold or defiant manner. It implies acting against prevailing expectations or norms, demonstrating a disregard for established conventions or opinions.
  • fly off the handle The idiom "fly off the handle" means to suddenly and uncontrollably become extremely angry or lose one's temper.
  • go fly a kite The idiom "go fly a kite" is a dismissive expression used to tell someone to go away or leave. It can be interpreted as a polite way of telling someone to go and find something else to do or occupy their time instead of bothering the speaker.
  • fly in the ointment The idiom "fly in the ointment" refers to a small but significant flaw, obstacle, or problem that spoils an otherwise positive or pleasing situation. It represents an unexpected and inconvenient element that detracts from the overall enjoyment or success of something.
  • sparks fly The idiom "sparks fly" refers to a situation or interaction becoming tense, heated, or intense, often characterized by strong emotions, arguments, or conflict.
  • let rip/fly The idiom "let rip/fly" means to unleash or release something with force or intensity. It can be used in various contexts, such as expressing strong emotions, speaking or acting without restraint, or allowing something to happen without interference. It implies giving free rein to a particular action, feeling, or expression.
  • pigs might fly The idiom "pigs might fly" is used to express extreme skepticism or doubt about the possibility of something happening. It implies that the event being discussed is highly improbable or unlikely to occur.
  • make the fur fly The idiom "make the fur fly" means to provoke or instigate a fight, argument, or intense conflict between individuals or groups. It implies causing or stirring up a commotion or disagreement, often leading to a heated and passionate exchange of words or actions.
  • fly across The idiom "fly across" typically means to spread or travel quickly across a place or region. It suggests an idea or information moving rapidly from one place to another, usually through various means of communication or transportation.
  • straighten up and fly right The idiom "straighten up and fly right" means to behave properly, responsibly, or ethically, often used as an instruction or an admonishment. It is derived from the aviation phrase, urging the pilot to get the aircraft on the proper flight path and fly correctly. In a broader sense, it encourages someone to amend their behavior, be more disciplined, and make better choices.
  • I've got to fly The idiom "I've got to fly" typically means that the speaker has to leave quickly or urgently. It implies that they have important matters or commitments that require their immediate attention or departure.
  • run around like a bluearsed fly The idiom "run around like a blue-arsed fly" is used to describe someone who is extremely busy or active, often in a disorganized or frenetic manner.
  • fly the coop The idiom "fly the coop" means to escape or leave a place, often to avoid a situation or responsibility. It originates from the behavior of domestic birds, such as chickens, when they manage to escape from their coop or cage by flying away.
  • run around/rush around etc. like a bluearsed fly The idiom "run around/rush around like a blue-arsed fly" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely busy or constantly moving in a hectic and frenzied manner. It implies that the person is in a state of chaos or disarray, much like a buzzing fly in constant motion.
  • fly in the face of sm or sth The idiom "fly in the face of someone or something" means to openly defy or contradict someone or something, usually in a bold or defiant manner. It refers to not conforming to established norms, expectations, or beliefs, going against commonly accepted ideas or principles.
  • fly apart The idiom "fly apart" means that something disintegrates or breaks into pieces suddenly and forcefully. It can also be used to describe a situation that falls apart or becomes chaotic.
  • fly around The idiom "fly around" typically means to move quickly or travel frequently from one place to another. It can also refer to being very active or restless.
  • fly by the seat of your pants The idiom "fly by the seat of your pants" means to do something largely relying on intuition or instinct, without any solid plan or preparation. It implies making decisions or taking actions based on one's own judgement and gut feeling rather than following established guidelines or expertise.
  • fly away The idiom "fly away" typically means to depart quickly or abruptly, often referring to someone or something vanishing or disappearing rapidly. It can also be used metaphorically to describe one's dreams or hopes soaring beyond reach or dissipating suddenly.
  • fly the flag The idiom "fly the flag" means to proudly support, represent, or promote something, typically an organization, cause, or belief. It conveys the idea of openly showing allegiance or dedication to a particular entity.
  • a fly in the ointment The idiom "a fly in the ointment" refers to a small but significant issue or problem that spoils an otherwise pleasant or satisfactory situation. It represents an unexpected or undesirable factor that hinders or detracts from an overall positive experience or outcome.
  • fly blind The idiom "fly blind" refers to doing something without sufficient information, preparation, or guidance, often resulting in risks or uncertainty. It suggests acting or proceeding in a situation without being fully aware of the potential consequences or having a clear understanding of the circumstances.
  • You must lose a fly to catch a trout The idiom "You must lose a fly to catch a trout" essentially means that in order to achieve something or attain a desired result, you may have to make a sacrifice or take risks. Similar to the concept of "you gotta give something to get something," it implies that giving up a small benefit or making a small sacrifice now can lead to a greater reward in the future.
  • fly in the face of The idiom "fly in the face of" means to directly oppose or contradict something, especially when it goes against common sense or established beliefs. It often refers to an action or behavior that defies expectations or conventional wisdom.
  • not hurt a fly The idiom "not hurt a fly" means that a person is gentle and kind, and would never intentionally harm or cause trouble to anyone, even the smallest and most harmless beings.
  • fly into the face of danger The idiom "fly into the face of danger" means to deliberately confront or challenge a dangerous or risky situation without fear. It implies acting courageously and boldly in the face of potential harm or adversity.
  • a fly on the wall The idiom "a fly on the wall" refers to a person who is observing a situation or conversation secretly and inconspicuously, typically with the intention of gaining insider knowledge or understanding. It indicates a desire to be present but unnoticed, just like a fly on a wall.
  • fly/show/wave the flag The idiom "fly/show/wave the flag" typically means to display patriotism or support for one's country or cause. It is often used to express pride, loyalty, or solidarity.
  • let fly with The idiom "let fly with" means to unleash or release something forcefully or without restraint, often referring to words or actions. It implies expressing one's thoughts, emotions, or physical movements in a sudden and uncontrolled manner.
  • let fly The idiom "let fly" means to allow something, such as a comment, an object, or emotions, to be released or expressed freely and forcefully. It usually implies a sudden and unrestrained action or outburst.
  • fly past The idiom "fly past" refers to a situation where something quickly or swiftly moves by, usually in a literal sense of flying through the air. It can also be used metaphorically to describe an event or occurrence that happens rapidly or unexpectedly.
  • the feathers fly The idiom "the feathers fly" means a situation or conflict has become intense or heated, often resulting in a physical or verbal fight or argument. It can also indicate a lively and chaotic atmosphere.
  • fly across sth The idiom "fly across something" means to pass or cross something quickly or rapidly, often referring to a physical distance or geographic location. It implies swift movement or progression from one point to another.
  • fly over sm or sth The idiom "fly over someone or something" typically refers to the act of passing over or overlooking someone or something without giving them proper attention or consideration. It implies a lack of involvement or concern.
  • wouldn't harm a fly The idiom "wouldn't harm a fly" is used to describe someone who is exceptionally gentle, kind-hearted, or non-violent. It suggests that the person would not intentionally cause harm or engage in any act of aggression, even towards the most harmless or innocent creatures like flies.
  • will never fly The idiom "will never fly" means that something is unlikely to be successful, feasible, or accepted. It suggests that an idea, plan, or proposal is improbable or has no chance of gaining approval or support.
  • It'll never fly The idiom "It'll never fly" is often used to express skepticism or doubt about the success, feasibility, or viability of something, typically an idea, plan, or proposal. It implies that the suggested concept or venture is unlikely to be successful or functional.
  • fly up to
  • fly to
  • fly the nest The idiom "fly the nest" refers to the act of leaving one's home or family to become independent and self-sufficient. It often implies the transition from childhood or parental dependency to adulthood and personal responsibility.
  • fly over The idiom "fly over" typically refers to the act of traveling over or across a place or destination without stopping or making a substantial impact. It can be used in a literal sense, describing the act of flying over a location without landing, or in a figurative sense, describing the act of not paying attention to or acknowledging something significant.
  • fly out of The idiom "fly out of" typically means to depart quickly or suddenly, often with a sense of urgency or excitement. It can be used to describe a person or object leaving a particular place swiftly, as though propelled by flight.
  • fly out The idiom "fly out" generally refers to an event or situation where something or someone leaves quickly or swiftly, often taking off or departing in a manner similar to a flying object or bird. It can also be used to describe the action of something becoming widely known, popular, or circulated rapidly.
  • fly off with The idiom "fly off with" typically means to take or steal something abruptly or unexpectedly, often referring to objects or ideas. It can also refer to someone getting carried away or becoming excessively enthusiastic about something.
  • fly off The idiom "fly off" typically means to depart or leave quickly and suddenly.
  • fly into The idiom "fly into" means to suddenly become very angry or lose control of one's temper. It refers to the explosive and intense nature of anger, often resulting in outbursts or reactions that are unexpected or disproportionate to the situation at hand.
  • fly from The idiom "fly from" means to run away from or escape a situation or place hastily and fearfully, usually due to fear, danger, or an unpleasant experience. It implies quickly departing to avoid a problem or negative outcome.
  • fly by the seat of pants The idiom "fly by the seat of one's pants" means to proceed or make decisions based on instinct, intuition, or improvisation, rather than on careful planning or guidance. It describes a situation in which someone is navigating or dealing with something without relying on prior knowledge or preparation.
  • fly by The idiom "fly by" generally refers to something that happens very quickly or swiftly, often without much notice or attention.
  • fly at The idiom "fly at" means to attack or pounce on someone or something aggressively, usually out of anger or aggression. It can also be used to describe someone's aggressive approach towards a task or situation.
  • fly a kite The idiom "fly a kite" means to express an idea or suggestion, usually without expecting it to be taken seriously or acted upon. It refers to presenting an unconventional or far-fetched notion, often with the intention of sparking discussion or testing the reaction of others.
  • fly The idiom "fly" typically means to move quickly or swiftly, often in an effortless and agile manner. It can also suggest being successful or having a great time.
  • fly/leave the nest The idiom "fly/leave the nest" is a metaphorical expression referring to the act of venturing out or becoming independent from one's family or home. It often signifies the transition from a dependent and sheltered state to a self-sustaining and self-reliant one.
  • fly at sm or sth The idiom "fly at someone or something" generally means to attack or confront someone or something aggressively, usually both verbally and physically. It is often used to describe a sudden, fierce, and uncontrolled response.
  • let fly (with) sth The idiom "let fly (with) sth" means to unleash or release something forcefully or without inhibition. It often refers to verbal expressions, gestures, or actions that are done with great intensity or without holding back. It implies an uncontrolled outburst or a sudden display of emotions or actions.
  • let fly (sth) The idiom "let fly (sth)" means to release or launch something forcefully or with great speed. It typically refers to physically throwing or shooting an object, but it can also be used metaphorically to describe someone expressing their thoughts or emotions in a passionate or unrestrained manner.
  • make the dust fly The idiom "make the dust fly" typically means to work energetically, intensively, or with great vigor and enthusiasm. It implies taking bold and decisive actions to accomplish tasks or achieve goals. It can also imply creating a commotion or fervor in a particular situation or one's surroundings.
  • let fly (at) The idiom "let fly (at)" means to express anger, criticism, or a physical attack towards someone or something without restraint or inhibition. It refers to reacting impulsively or without holding back in a fierce or aggressive manner.
  • not hurt a fly or flea The idiom "not hurt a fly" or "not hurt a flea" is used to describe someone who is extremely gentle or non-violent in nature. It implies that the person would never intentionally harm or cause any kind of damage or injury to even the smallest and most insignificant creatures.
  • when pigs fly The idiom "when pigs fly" refers to something that is extremely unlikely or impossible to happen. It is often used to dismiss or express skepticism about an idea or suggestion.
  • fly in the face of something The idiom "fly in the face of something" means to directly oppose or contradict something, often in a bold or defiant manner. It refers to going against established beliefs, rules, traditions, or expectations, regardless of the potential consequences or disapproval faced.
  • fly high The idiom "fly high" means to thrive, achieve success, or reach great heights in one's endeavors or aspirations. It implies that someone is excelling or flourishing in a particular field, often exceeding expectations and achieving significant accomplishments.
  • fly into a rage, temper, etc. The idiom "fly into a rage, temper, etc." refers to a phrase used to describe someone becoming extremely angry or losing their temper suddenly and dramatically. It implies a rapid and intense emotional outburst, often accompanied by aggressive or irritable behavior.
  • (go) fly a/your kite The idiom "(go) fly a/your kite" is a phrase used to tell someone to go away or leave. It is often used in a dismissive or slightly rude manner to express annoyance or frustration with someone's presence or behavior. It can also be used to imply that the person should go and occupy themselves with something else and stop bothering or annoying the speaker.
  • fly/go off at a tangent The idiom "fly/go off at a tangent" means to suddenly shift the topic of conversation or to deviate from the original subject or focus. It refers to a situation where someone starts talking or thinking about something unrelated or completely different from what was being discussed before.
  • fly/go out (of) the window The idiom "fly/go out (of) the window" means to no longer be valid, disregarded, or ignored. It implies that a particular concept, expectation, rule, or principle has been abandoned or overlooked.
  • let fly (at somebody/something) (with something) The idiom "let fly (at somebody/something) (with something)" means to unleash or release something, typically anger, criticism, or an attack, towards someone or something. It can also refer to throwing or shooting something with force and intensity.
  • a/the fly in the ointment The idiom "a fly in the ointment" refers to a small or seemingly insignificant issue that spoils or undermines an otherwise positive or pleasant situation. It represents an unexpected complication or problem that mars the overall experience or outcome.
  • not harm/hurt a fly The idiom "not harm/hurt a fly" means that someone is very gentle or non-violent, and they would never intentionally cause harm or hurt to anyone, even the smallest or most insignificant creatures.
  • a fly in amber The idiom "a fly in amber" refers to something or someone that is preserved or unchanged, often in a negative sense, over a long period of time. It suggests stagnation, resistance to change, or being stuck in the past. It can also imply being trapped or caught in a particular situation or mindset. The phrase derives from the fossilized remains of an insect, such as a fly, trapped and preserved in amber, which symbolizes a state of immutability or being caught in time.
  • run around like a blue-arsed fly The idiom "run around like a blue-arsed fly" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is extremely busy, frantic, or constantly moving about in a disorganized and chaotic manner. It implies that the person is rushing around with great energy and urgency, similar to the erratic movement of a fly.
  • rush around like a blue-arsed fly The idiom "rush around like a blue-arsed fly" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is in a state of frantic activity or constantly and chaotically busy. It implies that the person is moving quickly and tirelessly, resembling the buzzing and frenzied flight of a fly with a bright blue bottom.
  • like a blue-arsed fly The idiom "like a blue-arsed fly" is an informal expression used to describe someone or something that is very busy, active, or constantly moving around. It typically implies that the person or object is in a chaotic or frenzied state, similar to the busy movements of a fly.
  • ladybug ladybug, fly away home The idiom "ladybug ladybug, fly away home" refers to a saying that is traditionally used to urge a ladybug to fly away and return to its home. It is often used in a whimsical or playful context, suggesting that a specific person or thing should leave or remove themselves from a situation or environment.
  • fly beneath (the/someone's) radar The idiom "fly beneath (the/someone's) radar" refers to doing something, usually an action or behavior, in a discreet or unnoticed manner, so as to avoid attention, scrutiny, or detection by others. It implies staying under the radar or out of the spotlight.
  • not say boo to a fly The idiom "not say boo to a fly" is used to describe someone who is extremely timid or shy, to the point where they are afraid to speak up or confront others. It implies that the person is so harmless and non-confrontational that they wouldn't even say a word to scare away a harmless fly.
  • monkeys might fly out of my butt The idiom "monkeys might fly out of my butt" is a humorous and exaggerated way of expressing extreme skepticism or disbelief towards a given statement or situation. It suggests that the probability of the mentioned event occurring is so incredibly low or absurd that one would sooner expect to see monkeys flying out of their behinds.
  • fly by the seat of (one's) pants The idiom "fly by the seat of (one's) pants" means to act or make decisions based on instinct or intuition without relying on a predetermined plan or prior knowledge. It suggests a lack of preparation or guidance, instead opting for a spontaneous and improvisational approach. This phrase originated in aviation, where pilots relied on their senses and the feedback from their aircraft to make adjustments and navigate rather than relying solely on instruments.
  • pigs can fly The idiom "pigs can fly" is used to express the idea that something is extremely unlikely or impossible to happen. It implies that certain circumstances or events are so improbable that they are comparable to the absurd notion of pigs being able to fly.
  • when pigs can fly The idiom "when pigs can fly" is used to express that something is highly unlikely or impossible to happen.
  • if pigs had wings, they would/could fly The idiom "if pigs had wings, they would/could fly" is used to express skepticism or to indicate that something is highly improbable or unrealistic. It emphasizes the unlikelihood of a particular situation or outcome, as pigs do not have the physical ability to fly. It is often used in a playful or humorous manner to convey the idea that certain circumstances are simply impossible or highly unlikely to occur.
  • he, she, etc. wouldn't harm/hurt a fly The idiom "he, she, etc. wouldn't harm/hurt a fly" means that the person referred to is kind and gentle, and would never intentionally cause harm to anyone, including small and defenseless creatures like flies. It emphasizes their non-aggressive nature and their tendency to avoid violence or harm.
  • the feathers/fur/sparks will fly The idiom "the feathers/fur/sparks will fly" typically refers to a situation of intense conflict or disagreement where emotions may run high, resulting in a heated argument or confrontation. It suggests that the individuals involved are likely to become aggressive, assertive, or engage in a verbal or physical altercation.
  • fly (one's) freak flag The idiom "fly (one's) freak flag" means to openly express one's unique, individualistic, or unconventional traits or behaviors without worrying about judgment or societal norms. It encourages embracing and celebrating one's true self, regardless of how different it may be from others.
  • fly under (the/someone's) radar The expression "fly under (the/someone's) radar" means to go unnoticed or remain undetected, especially by authorities or someone in a position of power or surveillance. It refers to avoiding attention, scrutiny, or supervision.
  • fly in the teeth of The idiom "fly in the teeth of" means to go against or defy something or someone forcefully, often without regard for the consequences or opposing opinions. It refers to acting in a way that is directly contrary to the prevailing circumstances, norms, or expectations, even if it may be difficult or risky.
  • fly in the face of someone or something The idiom "fly in the face of someone or something" means to go against, contradict, or defy someone or something directly and boldly, often without considering the consequences or possible negative outcomes. It refers to openly opposing established beliefs, rules, norms, or expectations, in a manner that is confrontational or challenging.
  • fly someone or something (into some place) (from some place) To "fly someone or something (into some place) (from some place)" means to transport or bring someone or something by air from one location to another. This idiom usually implies using an airplane to move people or cargo over a considerable distance.
  • a fly on the wheel
  • fly a/your kite The idiom "fly a/your kite" typically means to speak about or express one's own ideas or opinions, especially in a boastful, whimsical, or impractical manner. It refers to indulging in fanciful or unrealistic thinking and making speculative or far-fetched statements without much grounding in reality.
  • fly kites The idiom "fly kites" typically means to engage in idle or frivolous activities, often as a means of evading responsibilities or reality. It can refer to wasting time, daydreaming, or engaging in unproductive pursuits.
  • fly light The idiom "fly light" typically means to travel or move without carrying heavy luggage or belongings. It can also imply traveling with minimal possessions or living a minimalistic lifestyle.
  • fly low The idiom "fly low" often refers to someone keeping a low profile, avoiding attention or notice, or being discreet in their actions. It can also signify being humble, not drawing attention to oneself, or keeping one's accomplishments or abilities hidden.
  • fly mink
  • fly out of the traps The idiom "fly out of the traps" means to start something quickly, eagerly, or energetically, often with a burst of speed or enthusiasm, like a runner or a sprinter who swiftly takes off from the starting blocks at the beginning of a race. It implies a rapid and proactive start to a task or activity.
  • fly trap The idiom "fly trap" typically refers to something or someone that attracts or catches the attention of others easily, often in a negative or unwanted manner. It implies a situation or person that draws others in like flies to a trap.
  • I gotta fly The idiom "I gotta fly" is a colloquial expression that means "I have to leave quickly" or "I need to go immediately." It implies a sense of urgency or a time constraint.
  • I‘ve gotta fly The idiom "I've gotta fly" is a colloquial expression that means "I have to leave quickly" or "I need to go now." It signifies an urgency to depart or be somewhere else without delay.
  • I’ve got to fly The idiom "I've got to fly" is a casual and colloquial expression that means one needs to leave quickly or be in a hurry to depart. It implies a sense of urgency or a time constraint, indicating a need to go somewhere or do something immediately.
  • it will never fly The idiom "it will never fly" means that something is unlikely to be successful, acceptable, or feasible. It implies that an idea, plan, or proposal lacks the necessary elements or qualities to be effective or attain the desired outcome.
  • make the sparks fly The idiom "make the sparks fly" means to cause or create a situation where there is excitement, conflict, or intense emotion. It implies a scenario where there is a lot of energy, passion, or disagreement present.
  • the fur will fly The idiom "the fur will fly" means that there will be a fierce and intense argument or fight, often involving strong emotions and aggression. It implies that the situation will become contentious and out of control. This idiom is often used to describe a situation in which conflict or confrontation is expected to occur.
  • wouldn't hurt a fly The idiom "wouldn't hurt a fly" is used to describe someone who is gentle, pacifistic, or non-violent by nature. It suggests that the person is extremely kind and would never intentionally harm anyone, not even a tiny insect like a fly.
  • fly across something To "fly across something" is an idiomatic expression that means to move swiftly or rapidly across a place or object. It often implies going through the air quickly, as if flying, to reach a destination.
  • fly around someone or something The idiom "fly around someone or something" means to move or circulate swiftly around a person or object, often doing so in a restless or chaotic manner. It could imply being fidgety or busy, constantly moving and not staying in one place for long.
  • fly at someone or something The idiom "fly at someone or something" means to suddenly and aggressively attack or confront someone or something, often with anger or violence. It is figuratively used to describe a sudden outburst or assault on someone or something.
  • fly into something The idiom "fly into something" typically means to suddenly and uncontrollably become very angry, upset, or agitated.
  • fly over someone or something The idiom "fly over someone or something" means to pass over someone or something quickly and without stopping or paying much attention. This can refer to a literal flying over, such as a plane flying over a location without landing, or a figurative flying over, where someone quickly dismisses or overlooks something/someone without giving it much consideration.
  • fly to someone or something The idiom "fly to someone or something" typically means to go quickly or eagerly towards someone or something. It often implies an intense attraction, enthusiasm, or devotion towards a particular person or thing.
  • fly to something The idiom "fly to something" typically means to travel rapidly or eagerly towards a particular thing or destination. It implies a sense of excitement, urgency, or enthusiasm in reaching the desired object, goal, or place.
  • fly off at a tangent The idiom "fly off at a tangent" is used to describe when someone suddenly starts talking or acting in a completely different or unrelated direction, diverting from the main topic or course of action. It implies a sudden and unexpected shift in focus or behavior.
  • wouldn't hurt (or harm) a fly The idiom "wouldn't hurt a fly" means that someone is extremely gentle and kind, indicating that they would never intentionally harm or even inconvenience someone or something, even if it is as harmless as a fly. It is used to describe people who are very kind-hearted, gentle, and non-violent in nature.
  • fly into a temper The idiom "fly into a temper" means to suddenly and uncontrollably become angry or irritated. It describes a rapid and explosive outburst of anger.

Similar spelling words for FLY

Conjugate verb Fly

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have flown
you would have flown
he/she/it would have flown
we would have flown
they would have flown
I would have fly
you would have fly
he/she/it would have fly
we would have fly
they would have fly

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been flying
you would have been flying
he/she/it would have been flying
we would have been flying
they would have been flying

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would fly
you would fly
he/she/it would fly
we would fly
they would fly

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be flying
you would be flying
he/she/it would be flying
we would be flying
they would be flying

FUTURE

I will fly
you will fly
he/she/it will fly
we will fly
they will fly

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be flying
you will be flying
he/she/it will be flying
we will be flying
they will be flying

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have flown
you will have flown
he/she/it will have flown
we will have flown
they will have flown

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been flying
you will have been flying
he/she/it will have been flying
we will have been flying
they will have been flying

IMPERATIVE

you fly
we let´s fly

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to fly

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was flying
you were flying
he/she/it was flying
we were flying
they were flying

PAST PARTICIPLE

flown

PAST PERFECT

I had flown
you had flown
he/she/it had flown
we had flown
they had flown

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been flying
you had been flying
he/she/it had been flying
we had been flying
they had been flying

PRESENT

I fly
you fly
he/she/it flies
we fly
they fly

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am flying
you are flying
he/she/it is flying
we are flying
they are flying

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

flying

PRESENT PERFECT

I have flown
you have flown
he/she/it has flown
we have flown
they have flown

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been flying
you have been flying
he/she/it has been flying
we have been flying
they have been flying

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it fly

SIMPLE PAST

I flew
you flew
he/she/it flew
we flew
they flew

Infographic

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