How Do You Spell FOOL?

Pronunciation: [fˈuːl] (IPA)

The correct spelling of the word "fool" in English is represented phonetically as /fuːl/. The two letters "oo" represent a long vowel sound, as in "food" or "moon". The letter "f" represents a voiceless labiodental fricative sound, created by pressing the lower lip against the upper teeth and blowing air out of the mouth. The letter "l" represents a lateral approximant sound, created by placing the tongue against the alveolar ridge and allowing the sound to escape through the sides of the mouth.

FOOL Meaning and Definition

Fool, noun:

1. A person who lacks sound judgment, intelligence, or common sense, often displaying a tendency to act in a foolish or silly manner. Such individuals may engage in thoughtless or ridiculous behavior that often leads to adverse consequences or being taken advantage of by others. They may also be easily swayed or deceived due to their gullible nature.

2. In some contexts, a fool refers to a court jester or professional entertainer whose role is to provide comic relief, perform amusing tricks, or engage in silly antics, particularly in a medieval or Renaissance setting. These individuals would entertain the nobility and royalty, often through their witty remarks or slapstick comedy.

3. In literature and folklore, the fool is occasionally depicted as a character who possesses hidden wisdom or insight beneath their foolish facade. The fool serves as a tool for social commentary and satire, using their seemingly foolish behavior to critique and expose the flaws and vices prevalent in society.

4. As a verb, fool refers to the act of deceiving or tricking someone, often by leading them to believe something that is untrue or improbable. This action may involve manipulation or the use of cunning strategies to mislead or make a person look foolish.

Overall, the term "fool" describes an individual who exhibits a lack of judgment, often behaving in a silly or foolish manner, and may easily fall victim to deception or manipulation.

Top Common Misspellings for FOOL *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for FOOL

Etymology of FOOL

The word "fool" can be traced back to the Old French noun "fol" and the related Middle English noun "foule", both of which meant "mad person" or "insane person". These terms derived from the Latin word "follis", meaning "bellows" or "windbag".

In medieval times, "fool" referred to a person exhibiting foolish or silly behavior, often employed as an entertainer at a royal court. Over time, the word "fool" evolved to broadly describe someone lacking in common sense or judgment.

Idioms with the word FOOL

  • act the fool The idiom "act the fool" refers to behaving in a silly, foolish, or clownish manner. It typically implies engaging in behavior that is seen as foolish or lacking in seriousness, often for the purpose of entertaining others or seeking attention.
  • any fool thing The idiom "any fool thing" refers to an action, decision, or statement that is foolish, senseless, or lacking in intelligence or reason. It implies that the mentioned thing is so absurd or irrational that even someone lacking common sense or intellect would recognize it as such.
  • fool around with The idiom "fool around with" means to engage in careless or casual activity or behavior, often without a clear purpose or goal. It can also refer to playing with or experimenting with something in a lighthearted or playful manner.
  • fool around The idiom "fool around" generally means to engage in childish or silly behavior, or to waste time on trivial or unproductive activities. It can also refer to engaging in casual or sexual relationships without any serious commitment. The exact meaning may vary depending on the context in which the idiom is used.
  • Fool me once, shame on you fool me twice, shame on me. The idiom "Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me" is a warning or proverb that highlights the importance of learning from one's mistakes. It implies that if someone deceives or takes advantage of you once, it is their fault and they are to blame (shame on them). However, if you allow the same person to deceive or take advantage of you a second time, it is your own fault for not being cautious or learning from your previous experience (shame on you). In essence, the idiom emphasizes the need to be vigilant and not make the same mistake repeatedly.
  • A fool and his money are soon parted. The idiom "A fool and his money are soon parted" means that a foolish or gullible person tends to spend or lose their money carelessly or easily. It implies that those who lack financial intelligence or judgment are likely to be taken advantage of or make poor monetary decisions, leading to them quickly losing their wealth.
  • fool and his money are soon parted The idiom "a fool and his money are soon parted" means that someone who is foolish or easily deceived will quickly lose their money or be taken advantage of financially. It suggests that individuals who lack financial judgment or are easily swayed by others will waste their wealth or fall victim to scams and irresponsible spending.
  • play the fool The idiom "play the fool" means acting in a silly or foolish manner, often as part of a deliberate strategy or to deceive others. It refers to consciously behaving in a way that downplays one's intelligence or seriousness in order to achieve a particular outcome or goal.
  • play for a fool The definition of the idiom "play for a fool" is to deceive or trick someone by making them appear foolish or gullible. It is used to describe the act of manipulating or taking advantage of someone's trust or naivety.
  • every fool thing The idiom "every fool thing" typically refers to anything and everything, regardless of its importance, significance, or relevance. It implies that something is trivial, unimportant, or of little value. It can also suggest that an action or decision lacks wisdom or common sense.
  • There's no fool like an old fool The idiom "There's no fool like an old fool" means that older individuals are often more prone to making foolish mistakes or decisions due to their experience or lack of awareness. It suggests that older people, who may have lived longer, should have gained wisdom and avoided foolishness, but sometimes fail to do so.
  • take for an idiot and take for a fool The idiom "take for an idiot and take for a fool" means to deceive or manipulate someone, treating them as someone who is easily fooled or gullible. It implies that the person being deceived is being underestimated in their ability to recognize the deceit or see through the manipulative tactics being used against them.
  • nobody's fool The idiom "nobody's fool" refers to a person who is not easily deceived, fooled, or manipulated. It implies that the individual is intelligent, shrewd, and able to see through deceitful or dishonest actions or intentions.
  • More fool! The idiom "More fool!" is an exclamation used to express disapproval of someone's foolish or silly behavior. It highlights that the person being talked about is even more foolish than initially presumed. It implies that they lack judgment or common sense.
  • make a fool of The idiom "make a fool of" means to cause someone to look silly or foolish by one's actions or words. It refers to embarrassing or humiliating someone, making them appear ridiculous or lacking in intelligence.
  • fool with The idiom "fool with" means to tamper with or play around with something or someone, often in a careless or thoughtless manner. It suggests engaging in unnecessary or mischievous behavior, typically without considering the potential consequences.
  • fool into The idiom "fool into" refers to tricking or manipulating someone into doing something or believing something that is not true or in their best interest. It involves deceiving or misleading someone by taking advantage of their gullibility or lack of knowledge.
  • be no fool The idiom "be no fool" means to not be gullible or easily deceived; to be wise, shrewd, or clever in avoiding being taken advantage of.
  • make a fool of yourself The idiom "make a fool of yourself" refers to behaving or acting in a way that is embarrassing, foolish, or ridiculous, often causing others to ridicule or laugh at you. It implies that someone's actions or words have displayed a lack of intelligence or common sense, resulting in a loss of dignity or respect.
  • make a fool (out) of sm The idiom "make a fool (out) of someone" refers to the act of causing someone to appear foolish, embarrassing them, or making them appear ridiculous in a situation or to others. It implies that someone's actions or behavior have led to another person being seen or regarded as a fool.
  • fool around with sth The idiom "fool around with something" typically means to engage in aimless or playful activities with something, without taking it seriously or achieving any meaningful result. It may involve experimenting, tampering, or playing with an object or idea without any specific purpose or intention.
  • fool around with sb To "fool around with someone" refers to engaging in playful or flirtatious activities with another person. It typically involves spending casual and enjoyable time together, possibly involving physical contact or romantic gestures, without any serious commitment or expectations of a relationship.
  • fool with sth To "fool with something" means to play or tamper with it in a careless or frivolous manner, often resulting in negative consequences. It implies engaging with something without taking it seriously or fully understanding its potential risks or importance.
  • fool with sb
  • fool (around) with sm or sth The idiom "fool (around) with someone or something" means to behave playfully, experimentally, or irresponsibly with someone or something, often without taking it seriously or understanding the potential consequences. It can also refer to spending time or engaging with someone or something in a frivolous or unproductive manner.
  • take sm for an idiot and take sm for a fool The idiom "take someone for an idiot" or "take someone for a fool" means to deceive or underestimate someone's intellect or intelligence. It suggests that the person being deceived or underestimated is considered gullible, unintelligent, or easily fooled.
  • be no/nobody's fool The idiom "be no/nobody's fool" means to be intelligent, shrewd, or clever, and not easily tricked or deceived by others. It refers to someone who is wise and cautious in their decision-making, not falling for manipulations or deceitful tactics.
  • fool away The idiom "fool away" means to waste or squander something, often time, money, or an opportunity, due to foolish or irresponsible behavior or decisions. It implies a sense of recklessness or thoughtlessness in handling or using something valuable.
  • a fool and his money are easily parted The idiom "a fool and his money are easily parted" means that someone who is foolish or not careful with their finances is likely to spend money recklessly or be easily convinced to part with their money. It implies that those who are gullible or lack financial wisdom are easily taken advantage of or manipulated by others in matters of money.
  • act/play the fool To "act/play the fool" means to behave in a silly, foolish, or nonsensical manner. It refers to someone intentionally behaving in an absurd or immature way, often for entertainment, attention, or to avoid serious situations.
  • any fool can/could…
  • be no/nobody’s fool The idiom "be no/nobody’s fool" means to be intelligent, wise, or shrewd, and not easily deceived or taken advantage of by others. It implies that a person is not gullible or naïve, but rather astute and discerning in their judgment.
  • make a fool of somebody The idiom "make a fool of somebody" means to embarrass or humiliate someone, often by making them look silly, foolish, or incompetent. It implies intentionally causing someone to appear foolish in front of others or manipulating them into behaving in a foolish manner.
  • more fool somebody (for doing something) The idiom "more fool somebody (for doing something)" is used to express disapproval or criticism towards someone for their foolish or unwise action or decision. It implies that the person should have known better or acted more intelligently.
  • (there’s) no fool like an old fool The idiom "(there's) no fool like an old fool" means that older people, despite their experience and wisdom, are sometimes known to behave foolishly, make naive decisions, or engage in foolish actions. It suggests that age does not guarantee wisdom or sound judgment, and that even experienced individuals can make foolish mistakes or fall victim to their own foolishness.
  • no fool like an old fool The idiom "no fool like an old fool" means that older individuals are particularly prone to making unwise decisions or behaving foolishly, often due to their naivety, stubbornness, or failure to learn from previous experiences. It suggests that wisdom should come with age, but in some cases, older individuals may continue to make foolish choices.
  • no fool like an old fool, there's The idiom "no fool like an old fool" means that older people sometimes make foolish or naïve decisions, often due to their experience or wisdom being outweighed by their stubbornness or lack of adaptability. It suggests that age does not necessarily guarantee wisdom or good judgment.
  • fool around with (someone or something) The idiom "fool around with (someone or something)" can have different meanings depending on the context, but the general definition is to engage in playful, casual, or often non-serious activities with someone or something. It can refer to spending time aimlessly or lightheartedly, engaging in activities without a specific purpose or goal, or engaging in a romantic or sexual relationship without commitment.
  • as a dog returns to his vomit, so a fool repeats his folly The idiom "as a dog returns to his vomit, so a fool repeats his folly" is a biblical proverb originating from the Book of Proverbs, specifically Proverbs 26:11. It metaphorically implies that just as a dog repeats the undesirable and revolting behavior of consuming its vomit, a fool tends to repeat their foolish actions or mistakes despite knowing better. It emphasizes the tendency of some individuals to repeat their errors or engage in self-destructive behaviors, often disregarding the negative consequences.
  • a fool may give a wise man counsel The idiom "a fool may give a wise man counsel" means that even someone who is generally foolish or lacking in intelligence may sometimes offer valuable advice or insight to someone who is wise or knowledgeable. It emphasizes the idea that wisdom and intelligence can come from unexpected sources and that one should be open-minded and willing to consider advice from unlikely individuals.
  • more fool you, them, etc. The idiom "more fool you, them, etc." is used to express criticism or disapproval of someone's foolish actions or decisions. It implies that the person being addressed lacks wisdom or judgment. It can be seen as a way of saying, "You are even more foolish than I originally thought."
  • a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client The idiom "a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client" suggests that individuals who represent themselves in legal matters are often perceived as foolish or unwise. It implies that it is generally better to seek professional help or advice rather than attempting to handle complex legal issues without proper knowledge or expertise.
  • flannelled fool The idiom "flannelled fool" typically refers to a person, often a man, who appears to be sophisticated, well-dressed, or well-spoken but lacks intelligence, substance, or competence. It implies that someone may present themselves as knowledgeable or influential but is, in actuality, foolish or pretentious. The phrase often suggests a sense of disdain or mockery towards such individuals. The term "flannelled" specifically refers to someone wearing flannel clothing, which was historically associated with the upper-class English male attire.
  • fool and his money are soon parted, a The idiom "a fool and his money are soon parted" means that someone who is not wise or careful with their money will quickly lose or squander it. It implies that foolish or impulsive actions will lead to financial loss or poor investments.
  • fool with (someone or something) The idiom "fool with (someone or something)" refers to engaging in teasing, playing around, or tampering with someone or something in a lighthearted or joking manner. It involves not taking a person or situation seriously and may involve provoking or jokingly annoying someone or tinkering with an object for amusement.
  • make a fool (out) of (someone or oneself) The idiom "make a fool out of (someone or oneself)" means to cause someone to appear foolish, ridiculous, or embarrassed through one's actions or words. It can also be used to describe someone unintentionally behaving in a foolish or embarrassing manner.
  • make a fool of somebody/yourself The idiom "make a fool of somebody/yourself" means to cause someone or oneself to appear foolish, ridiculous, or to be humiliated through one's actions, words, or behavior. It implies behaving in a manner that brings embarrassment or shame.
  • more fool (one) The idiom "more fool (one)" is used to express disapproval or criticism of someone's actions or decisions that are foolish or lacking in common sense. It is a way of calling someone a fool or expressing disapproval for their behavior.
  • play (one) for a fool The idiom "play (one) for a fool" means to deceive or trick someone, often by making them look or feel foolish or naive.
  • play someone for a fool The idiom "play someone for a fool" means to deceive or manipulate someone, taking advantage of their trust or naivety for personal gain or amusement. It implies treating someone as if they are stupid or easily fooled.
  • take (someone) for a fool The idiom "take (someone) for a fool" means to consider or treat someone as being easily deceived, gullible, or foolish. It suggests that the person being deceived is seen as lacking intelligence or being easily manipulated by others.
  • take someone for an idiot and take someone for a fool The idiom "take someone for an idiot" or "take someone for a fool" means to underestimate or consider someone to be unintelligent, gullible, or easily deceived. It implies that the person being referred to is not wise or intelligent enough to see through the deception or manipulation.

Similar spelling words for FOOL

Plural form of FOOL is FOOLS

Conjugate verb Fool

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have fooled
you would have fooled
he/she/it would have fooled
we would have fooled
they would have fooled
I would have fool
you would have fool
he/she/it would have fool
we would have fool
they would have fool

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been fooling
you would have been fooling
he/she/it would have been fooling
we would have been fooling
they would have been fooling

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would fool
you would fool
he/she/it would fool
we would fool
they would fool

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be fooling
you would be fooling
he/she/it would be fooling
we would be fooling
they would be fooling

FUTURE

I will fool
you will fool
he/she/it will fool
we will fool
they will fool

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be fooling
you will be fooling
he/she/it will be fooling
we will be fooling
they will be fooling

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have fooled
you will have fooled
he/she/it will have fooled
we will have fooled
they will have fooled

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been fooling
you will have been fooling
he/she/it will have been fooling
we will have been fooling
they will have been fooling

IMPERATIVE

you fool
we let´s fool

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to fool

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was fooling
you were fooling
he/she/it was fooling
we were fooling
they were fooling

PAST PARTICIPLE

fooled

PAST PERFECT

I had fooled
you had fooled
he/she/it had fooled
we had fooled
they had fooled

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been fooling
you had been fooling
he/she/it had been fooling
we had been fooling
they had been fooling

PRESENT

I fool
you fool
he/she/it fools
we fool
they fool

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am fooling
you are fooling
he/she/it is fooling
we are fooling
they are fooling

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

fooling

PRESENT PERFECT

I have fooled
you have fooled
he/she/it has fooled
we have fooled
they have fooled

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been fooling
you have been fooling
he/she/it has been fooling
we have been fooling
they have been fooling

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it fool

SIMPLE PAST

I fooled
you fooled
he/she/it fooled
we fooled
they fooled

Infographic

Add the infographic to your website: