How Do You Spell FOR?

Pronunciation: [fˈɔː] (IPA)

The word "for" in English is spelled with the letters F-O-R. It is pronounced as /fɔːr/ in British English and /fɔr/ in American English. The IPA transcription breaks down the sounds of the word, with the first sound being the /f/ sound made by bringing the bottom lip in contact with the top teeth, then blowing air out while vibrating the vocal cords. The second sound is the /ɔː/ or /ɔ/ sound made by rounding the lips and opening the mouth slightly. The final sound is the /r/ sound made by vibrating the vocal cords while shaping the tongue and lips.

FOR Meaning and Definition

  1. For is a versatile preposition, conjunction, and adverb with multiple meanings and uses in the English language. As a preposition, for indicates purpose, aim, or intention, denoting the reason or motive behind an action or event. For can also express benefit or advantage, indicating that something is done to benefit someone or something. Additionally, it can denote a period of time or length of duration.

    As a conjunction, for joins two clauses or phrases, indicating cause or reason. It introduces a subordinate clause explaining the reason or cause of the main clause.

    For can also function as an adverb, expressing a purpose, goal, or result. In this usage, it specifies an intended outcome or acts as a substitute for a purpose clause.

    Moreover, for is commonly used in idiomatic expressions and phrasal verbs, such as "for example," "for sure," "for the sake of," and "for turns."

    Overall, for is a fundamental word in English, carrying various meanings depending on its context. It is crucial for indicating purpose, benefit, reason, or duration in sentences, whether as a preposition, conjunction, or adverb.

Common Misspellings for FOR

Etymology of FOR

The word "for" is derived from the Old English word "foran", which means "before" or "in front of". It originated from the Proto-Germanic word "fura", meaning "in front" or "before". This term is also related to the Old High German word "fora" and the Old Norse word "fyri". Over time, "for" has developed various meanings and uses, including expressing purpose, indicating duration or time, or serving as a conjunction or preposition in modern English.

Idioms with the word FOR

  • there's little to be said for sth The idiom "there's little to be said for sth" means that there are few or no reasons or arguments in favor of something. It implies that the thing being discussed or considered has very limited or no positive qualities or advantages.
  • there's sth to be said for The idiom "there's something to be said for" means to recognize the value, merit, or favorable aspect of a particular thing, idea, or situation. It suggests that even though it may not be perfect or without drawbacks, there are valid points or advantages worth considering.
  • for its own sake The idiom "for its own sake" is used to express that something is done solely or purely for the inherent value or enjoyment it provides, and not for any external or practical reasons.
  • for old times' sake The idiom "for old times' sake" means doing something again or reminiscing about the past, usually for sentimental reasons or to recreate a sense of nostalgia and familiarity. It refers to reliving or revisiting past experiences, often with the intention of evoking positive memories or rekindling old relationships.
  • the same/that goes for sb/sth The idiom "the same/that goes for sb/sth" means that the same statement or rule applies to someone or something else. It suggests that whatever is stated or implied about a particular person or thing can be equally applied to another person or thing in a similar situation. It emphasizes the consistency or universality of a rule, characteristic, or circumstance.
  • scream (out) for sth The idiom "scream (out) for sth" means to strongly demand or urgently desire something. It implies that the person or situation is in dire need or craving for something immediately. The use of "scream" emphasizes the intensity and desperation of the need.
  • a sight for sore eyes The idiom "a sight for sore eyes" is used to describe something or someone that is very pleasant, beautiful, or comforting to behold, especially after a period of difficulty or absence. It implies that seeing the person or thing brings a sense of relief or joy to the eyes, as if they were tired or hurting before.
  • bay for blood The idiom "bay for blood" refers to a situation where a group of people or an individual is aggressively demanding retribution or revenge. It implies an intense desire for punishment, often fueled by anger or a sense of injustice.
  • for a song The idiom "for a song" means to acquire or obtain something at a very low cost or price, often significantly lower than its actual worth or value.
  • swing for it The idiom "swing for it" means to take a risk or make an all-out effort to achieve something, often in a determined and vigorous manner. It is derived from the action of swinging a bat or club with full force in an attempt to hit a ball, suggesting giving your best and aiming for success without holding back.
  • take sb for a ride The definition of the idiom "take someone for a ride" means to deceive, trick, or manipulate someone, often for personal gain or amusement. It can refer to taking advantage of someone's naivety or gullibility by leading them astray or misguiding them for one's own purposes.
  • that/there's ... for you The idiom "that/there's ... for you" is typically used to express a characteristic, behavior, or outcome that is typical or expected of someone or something. It suggests that the situation or behavior in question is consistent with the nature or reputation of the subject being discussed.
  • do sth for a bet The idiom "do something for a bet" means to perform an action or task with the motivation or incentive of winning money or some other form of reward. It implies that the individual does not have a personal preference or interest in carrying out the action, but is willing to do it solely for the sake of winning a bet.
  • do sth on a bet, at do sth for a bet The idiom "do something on a bet" or "do something for a bet" refers to engaging in an action or task as a result of a wager or a challenge. It implies that the individual is motivated to take part in an activity due to the possibility of winning a bet or the desire to prove themselves in a challenge.
  • play for time The idiom "play for time" refers to a strategy where someone purposely delays taking action or making a decision in order to gain more time or delay an undesirable outcome. It usually involves stalling, making excuses, or engaging in activities to prolong a situation or delay the progress of an event.
  • for the better The idiom "for the better" means that something has improved or become more favorable compared to its previous state or condition. It indicates a positive change or improvement in a particular situation, often suggesting that the outcome or result is more desirable or beneficial.
  • just the man/woman for the job The idiom "just the man/woman for the job" refers to someone who is perfectly suited or ideally qualified to handle a particular task or responsibility, usually due to their skills, expertise, or experience in that specific area.
  • word for word The idiom "word for word" means to repeat or quote something exactly as it was spoken or written, without any alteration or paraphrasing. It implies an exact replication of words without any deviation.
  • done for The idiom "done for" refers to a situation where someone is in serious trouble, imminent danger, or facing certain defeat or ruin. It implies that the person or subject is in a hopeless or irreversible condition.
  • ripe for The idiom "ripe for" means that something or someone is ready or in a suitable condition for a particular action or event to occur. It suggests that the circumstances are favorable or opportune for something to happen.
  • for luck The idiom "for luck" refers to doing something as a superstitious or symbolic act in hopes of bringing good fortune or success. It is often used when performing a small action or making a gesture to enhance the chances of a positive outcome.
  • for one The idiom "for one" is used to emphasize that someone has a particular opinion or characteristic, especially when it is different from others. It typically implies a contrast or distinction from others in a group or context.
  • for a laugh The idiom "for a laugh" means doing something for amusement or entertainment purposes, even if it may be silly, outrageous, or not entirely serious. It implies engaging in an activity purely for fun and enjoyment without any ulterior motives.
  • for dear life The idiom "for dear life" means to do something with great intensity, urgency, or effort in order to survive or avoid a dangerous situation. It usually implies a strong sense of fear or desperation.
  • for the rest The idiom "for the rest" is used to refer to the remaining part of something or someone, generally after mentioning specific aspects or individuals. It implies everything or everyone else beyond what has been mentioned previously.
  • jump for joy The idiom "jump for joy" means to be extremely happy or excited about something, often to the point of physical expression, such as jumping up and down enthusiastically.
  • mate for life The idiom "mate for life" typically refers to a relationship between two individuals who commit to being together for their entire lives, often implying a deep emotional and life-long partnership. It originates from the behavior of certain animals, such as swans or certain bird species, which form pair bonds and remain committed to their chosen mate for the entirety of their lives. In a broader context, the idiom can also be applied to humans, symbolizing unwavering loyalty, devotion, and commitment within a romantic relationship.
  • for my money The idiom "for my money" is an expression used to convey one's personal opinion or preference, often regarding the value or quality of something. It implies that the speaker believes their viewpoint or choice is the best or most worthwhile.
  • money for jam, at money for old rope The idiom "money for jam" often goes hand in hand with the variation "money for old rope." It refers to an effortless or easy way to earn money, often implying that the task or job is simple, enjoyable, or requires minimal effort while providing a good financial return.
  • room for doubt The idiom "room for doubt" means that there is a possibility of uncertainty or skepticism about a particular situation or belief. It suggests that there is a reasonable doubt or uncertainty that allows for alternative interpretations or viewpoints.
  • for (good) luck The idiom "for (good) luck" is used to describe an action or gesture done with the intention of bringing good fortune or favorable outcomes. It typically involves performing a specific action, such as wearing a lucky charm, saying a phrase, or engaging in a superstitious ritual, in the hopes of influencing a positive outcome in a situation.
  • more bang for your buck(s) The idiom "more bang for your buck(s)" means getting a greater value or benefit for your money or resources. It refers to obtaining more advantageous or higher quality goods or experiences in exchange for the amount of money spent.
  • is he/she for real? The idiom "is he/she for real?" is used to express skepticism or disbelief about someone's words, actions, or behavior. It implies questioning the genuineness or authenticity of the person in question.
  • for love nor money The idiom "for love nor money" refers to a situation where an activity or outcome is unattainable or cannot be obtained, regardless of the effort or willingness to pay for it. It signifies a condition where all attempts, motivations, or incentives have been futile or ineffective in achieving a desired outcome.
  • make a case for sth To "make a case for something" means to present reasons or arguments in support of a particular idea, proposition, or point of view. It involves providing evidence, logical reasoning, and persuasive arguments to support the validity or importance of something. This phrase is commonly used in discussions or debates where someone is trying to convince others of the merits or worthiness of a particular position or action.
  • leave the field clear for sb To "leave the field clear for someone" means to make way or give space for someone to do or achieve something without any competition or interference. It implies stepping aside or intentionally avoiding an activity or opportunity to let someone else take advantage of it. This idiom can be used in various contexts, such as in sports, business, or personal relationships, indicating one's willingness to let someone else have an opportunity without any obstruction or competition.
  • reach for the stars The idiom "reach for the stars" means to set ambitious goals or aspirations, and to strive for the highest level of achievement possible. It suggests aiming for something beyond one's current abilities or expectations, often with the belief that with hard work and determination, one can attain even the most challenging objectives.
  • jobs for the boys The idiom "jobs for the boys" refers to a situation where people in power or positions of authority prioritize or favor their friends, family members, or close associates when it comes to employment opportunities. It implies that qualifications and merit are often overlooked in favor of personal relationships or nepotism.
  • be a great one for sth The idiom "be a great one for sth" means that someone has a strong inclination or fondness for something. It implies that the person has a great interest or enthusiasm for a particular activity, subject, or habit. They are known to frequently engage in or pursue that particular thing.
  • keep your/an eye out for sb/sth The idiom "keep your/an eye out for sb/sth" means to continuously watch or pay attention in order to notice or find someone or something. It implies being vigilant or on alert to spot someone or something that may be of interest or importance.
  • keep your eyes open for sb/sth The idiom "keep your eyes open for sb/sth" means to be watchful, alert, and attentive in order to notice or discover someone or something. It suggests being observant and paying close attention to the surroundings in order to spot a specific person or thing.
  • one for the road The idiom "one for the road" refers to having one more drink or indulgence before leaving a place or embarking on a journey. It implies a final indulgence or enjoyment before departing.
  • be made for sb/sth The idiom "be made for sb/sth" means that a person or thing is perfectly suited or well-suited for a particular purpose, role, or situation. It implies that the person or thing is ideally designed or created for the specific needs or requirements.
  • money for old rope The idiom "money for old rope" means to make easy money or profit by doing something that requires little effort or skill, often by exploiting a situation or taking advantage of someone's gullibility. It suggests that the money gained is undeserved or acquired without much effort or value.
  • make a rod for your own back The idiom "make a rod for your own back" means to create a problem or difficulty for yourself through your own actions or choices. It implies that by choosing a certain course of action or behavior, you are setting yourself up for future consequences or difficulties. It suggests that the individual is responsible for the negative outcomes or troubles they encounter due to their own actions or decisions.
  • match sth pound for pound The idiom "match sth pound for pound" means to be equal or equivalent in value, quality, strength, or effectiveness to something else. It refers to comparing two things on an equal basis or evaluating them without any bias or advantage to one side.
  • act for The idiom "act for" refers to the act of representing or standing in for someone, usually in a professional or legal capacity. It commonly implies assuming the roles and responsibilities of another person temporarily, with the authority to make decisions and take actions on their behalf. This could involve acting as an attorney, an agent, a spokesperson, or a substitute in various contexts.
  • adapt sth for sth The idiom "adapt sth for sth" means to modify or make changes to something in order to suit a particular purpose or situation. It involves adjusting, customizing, or transforming something in a way that it can be used or applied effectively in a new context or for a different use.
  • admire sm for sth The idiom "admire someone for something" means to have a high regard or respect for someone specifically because of a particular quality, skill, action, or trait they possess or demonstrate. It implies acknowledging and appreciating that particular aspect of the person.
  • report for sth The idiom "report for sth" generally means to arrive or present oneself at a specific place or event, typically for a specific duty or purpose. It implies taking responsibility and appearing as required in order to fulfill a particular role or obligation.
  • reserve sth for sm or sth The idiom "reserve something for someone or something" means to keep, set aside, or allocate something specifically for a particular person or purpose, and not use or give it to anyone or anything else. It implies maintaining or safeguarding something for a specific time, person, or situation.
  • respect sm for sth The idiom "respect someone for something" means to admire or hold someone in high esteem because of a specific quality, skill, achievement, or attribute they possess or have demonstrated. It implies recognizing and valuing their abilities, accomplishments, or traits associated with a particular aspect, action, or circumstance.
  • send ahead for The idiom "send ahead for" means to arrange for something, usually by requesting or ordering it in advance and having it delivered or prepared for one's arrival. It commonly refers to requesting a service, item, or assistance to be ready or available upon reaching a specific destination.
  • return sth for sth The idiom "return something for something" means to give something in exchange for something else. It implies a reciprocal action where one thing is given or done in response to another. It suggests a mutual exchange or a fair trade-off.
  • reach for the sky The idiom "reach for the sky" typically means to aim high, set ambitious goals, or dream big. It encourages someone to strive for success, push boundaries, and make the most of their potential.
  • pant for air The idiom "pant for air" is used to describe someone who is desperately gasping or struggling to breathe due to a lack of oxygen or being in a suffocating or constrained environment. It can also be used figuratively to convey a sense of yearning, desperation, or intense need for freedom, relief, or escape from a difficult or oppressive situation.
  • gulp for air The idiom "gulp for air" means to take in a large and sudden breath of air, usually as a result of being shocked, scared, or overwhelmed by something. It implies a desperate attempt to regain composure or recover from a moment of intense emotion or shock.
  • gasp for air The idiom "gasp for air" means to struggle to breathe, often due to physical exertion, extreme surprise, or feeling overwhelmed. It implies a desperate need for air, usually accompanied by audible gasping sounds.
  • review for sth The idiom "review for sth" typically means to study or go over something in order to prepare for an upcoming test, exam, or evaluation.
  • reward sm for sth The idiom "reward someone for something" means to give or provide someone with a benefit, gift, or recognition as a result of something they have done, achieved, or contributed. It is a way of showing appreciation, acknowledgement, or gratitude for their actions or accomplishments.
  • too rich for sm's blood The idiom "too rich for someone's blood" typically refers to something that is too expensive or costly for someone to afford or be willing to pay for. It suggests that the person being referred to is not able to financially or emotionally handle the expense or investment.
  • Thanks for the ride The idiom "Thanks for the ride" is an expression of gratitude used when someone appreciates the assistance or support provided by another person throughout an endeavor or journey, whether it be literal or metaphorical. It is often used to acknowledge someone's help, guidance, or contribution in achieving a goal or completing a task.
  • for a spin The idiom "for a spin" means to take someone or something on a short trip, journey, or test drive, often for the purpose of experiencing or evaluating its capabilities or performance. It can also refer to trying something new or different for a brief period.
  • keep an ear out for The idiom "keep an ear out for" means to be attentive and listen carefully for a specific sound or information, usually in order to respond promptly or take action when necessary. It implies being alert and maintaining continuous awareness of a particular situation or occurrence.
  • ripe for sth The idiom "ripe for sth" refers to a situation or condition that is ready and optimal for something to happen, occur, or be undertaken successfully. It implies that the circumstances or conditions are fully favorable and conducive towards a particular outcome or action.
  • allow sth for sth The idiom "allow something for something" means to take into consideration or to make a provision for something when making plans, calculations, or estimations. It involves acknowledging a certain factor or circumstance that might affect the outcome or result.
  • make a dash for sm or sth The idiom "make a dash for something" means to move quickly and urgently towards a specific thing or destination. It typically implies a sense of urgency or determination in reaching the desired goal or object.
  • For Pete's sake! The idiom "For Pete's sake!" is an exclamation used to express frustration, annoyance, or surprise. It is a mild way of showing agitation or disbelief, similar to "for goodness' sake" or "for the love of God."
  • be money for old rope The idiom "be money for old rope" means to earn money easily or effortlessly, often by doing something that requires little skill or effort. It implies that the task or job is so simple and straightforward that it is almost like earning money for nothing.
  • run for The idiom "run for" is commonly used to describe the act of competing or participating in a race or election, typically to attain a specific position or office.
  • rush for sth The idiom "rush for something" generally means to eagerly or frenziedly seek or pursue something, often in a competitive or hurried manner. It can refer to a situation where there is a sudden high demand or desire for a particular thing, causing people to act hastily or aggressively to obtain it.
  • sth to be said for sth The idiom "something to be said for something" implies that there are valid or worthwhile reasons to consider a certain idea, option, or perspective. It suggests that there are advantages, merits, or positive aspects associated with a particular concept or point of view.
  • sail for sm place The idiom "sail for (someplace)" is used to express the act of departing or setting off towards a particular destination or place. It can be taken literally, referring to a ship setting sail towards a specific port or location, or metaphorically, symbolizing starting a journey or pursuing a goal.
  • forgive sm for sth The idiom "forgive someone for something" means to pardon or let go of any feelings of anger, resentment, or blame towards someone for a particular action or offense that they have committed. It implies granting forgiveness and choosing not to hold a grudge or seek revenge.
  • for goodness' sake "For goodness' sake" is an idiomatic expression used to convey frustration, emphasis, or urgency in a plea or command. It typically implies a degree of exasperation or exclamation, often requesting someone to do something or expressing annoyance at a situation.
  • for God's sake The idiom "for God's sake" is an exclamation used to express frustration, urgency, or emphasis. It is often used to emphasize the importance or urgency of a request or to convey strong exasperation or criticism.
  • for Christ's sake The idiom "for Christ's sake" is an exclamation used to convey frustration, anger, or desperation while emphasizing the importance or urgency of a situation. It is usually used to emphasize the speaker's plea or strong desire for something to happen or change. The phrase may also be used as an expression of surprise or disbelief.
  • for sth's own sake The idiom "for something's own sake" means doing or valuing something solely because of its inherent importance or value, without considering any other external factors or benefits. It implies that the action or behavior is motivated by a genuine desire to appreciate or prioritize the intrinsic worth or essence of the thing itself.
  • for one's (own) sake The idiom "for one's (own) sake" means to do something primarily or solely for the benefit or advantage of oneself. It implies that the action or decision is taken with self-interest in mind, often to promote personal well-being, preservation, or improvement.
  • for sm (or sth's) sake The idiom "for somebody's (or something's) sake" is an expression used to emphasize the importance or urgency of an action, often suggesting that the action should be taken or avoided for the benefit or well-being of the person or thing mentioned. It is commonly used as a plea, command, or a way to show frustration.
  • for sale The idiom "for sale" refers to something that is available for purchase or being offered to be sold. It means that an item or property is on the market and can be bought by interested buyers.
  • sit for an exam The idiom "sit for an exam" means to take or participate in an examination or test, typically in an academic or formal setting, where one's knowledge, skills, or abilities are assessed.
  • sit for The idiom "sit for" typically means to have one's portrait or photograph taken by an artist or photographer. It refers to the act of posing for a visual representation of oneself.
  • save for The idiom "save for" means to reserve or set aside something for a particular purpose or individual. It typically implies keeping something safe or secure until it is needed or used at a later time.
  • That's easy for you to say The definition of the idiom "That's easy for you to say" is a sarcastic remark made when someone suggests that something is simple or straightforward for another person, while disregarding the difficulties or challenges that the person actually faces.
  • say for The idiom "say for" typically means to suggest or propose an example or estimate as a way of illustrating or emphasizing a point. It is commonly used to introduce an approximation or hypothetical scenario.
  • score sth for sth The idiom "score sth for sth" typically means to obtain or achieve something as a result of a particular action, effort, or opportunity. It is often used when someone succeeds in acquiring or gaining something they desired or wanted. The term "score" is used metaphorically, suggesting a successful accomplishment or gain.
  • scream for sth The idiom "scream for something" is used to describe a situation where something is so desired or needed that it feels as if it is being loudly and desperately screamed for. It implies a strong and urgent demand or craving for a particular thing or action.
  • reach for the moon/stars The idiom "reach for the moon/stars" means to set ambitious goals or to aim for great achievements, often striving to achieve something beyond one's current capabilities or limitations. It implies the act of pursuing one's dreams or aspirations with determination and enthusiasm regardless of obstacles or challenges encountered.
  • ask/cry for the moon The idiom "ask/cry for the moon" means making an extravagant or unreasonable request or demand that is unlikely to be fulfilled or achieved. It refers to asking for something that is beyond one's reach or unrealistic.
  • search sth for sm or sth The idiom "search something for someone or something" means to examine or investigate something thoroughly to find a particular person or item. It refers to the act of looking carefully through a specific area or object in order to locate a specified individual or object.
  • search sm for sth The idiom "search someone for something" refers to the act of looking thoroughly or examining someone in order to find or discover something, usually an object or an item that may be hidden or concealed on their person. This can be done for various reasons such as security checks, law enforcement purposes, or finding a misplaced item.
  • as for The idiom "as for" is used to introduce or transition into a new topic or separate something from what has been previously discussed, often indicating a shift in focus or a change of subject. It is commonly used to express something that is unrelated or unconnected to what was previously mentioned.
  • ask for The idiom "ask for" means to request or seek something, usually by expressing one's desire or need for it. It denotes seeking assistance, advice, guidance, or any form of support by approaching someone or making a formal request.
  • ask sm for sth The idiom "ask someone for something" means to request or seek something from someone. It implies a direct appeal to a person for a specific item, favor, information, or assistance.
  • select sm or sth for sm or sth The idiom "select someone or something for someone or something" means to carefully choose or pick a specific person or thing to be used or given to someone else or for a particular purpose. It implies a deliberate or thoughtful decision in making the selection.
  • for my sins The idiom "for my sins" is used colloquially to express a self-deprecating or humorous emphasis on personal responsibility or involvement in a particular situation. It implies that the individual is willingly accepting or enduring some negative or difficult circumstances as a consequence of their own choices or actions.
  • send for The idiom "send for" means to request someone's presence by sending them a message or summoning them, typically because they are needed or wanted for a specific reason or purpose. It implies a sense of urgency or importance in the request.
  • send sm for sm or sth The idiom "send someone/something for someone or something" means to ask or request that someone or something be brought or delivered to a specific location. It implies the act of arranging for someone or something to be sent or fetched.
  • serve for The phrase "serve for" means to be used or have a specific purpose. It can also suggest being suitable or appropriate for a particular use or function.
  • set the stage for The idiom "set the stage for" means to create the conditions or circumstances necessary for something to happen or for a particular event or outcome to occur. It implies preparing or arranging the initial or necessary factors that will lead to a particular situation or result.
  • set the scene for To "set the scene for" means to prepare the environment or create the necessary conditions for something to happen or be understood. It involves providing the background information, context, or atmosphere that is required to set the stage or lay the foundation for a particular event, situation, or discussion. It is often used metaphorically to describe the act of establishing the initial circumstances or elements that will shape or influence subsequent events or actions.
  • set for life The idiom "set for life" typically means to be financially secure for the rest of one's life. It refers to a situation where someone has acquired enough wealth or financial resources to ensure a comfortable and stable future without worrying about financial constraints.
  • set for The idiom "set for" typically means being prepared or ready for something, usually referring to being prepared for a specific event, situation, or outcome.
  • For shame! The idiom "For shame!" is an expression of strong disapproval or disappointment towards someone's actions or behavior. It is used to criticize or rebuke someone for an action or behavior that is considered morally wrong, disgraceful, or embarrassing.
  • spoil the ship for a hap'orth of tar The idiom "spoil the ship for a hap'orth of tar" is a phrase that means to ruin or jeopardize something significant or valuable due to a small or insignificant oversight or omission. It refers to neglecting an essential detail that could have prevented a larger problem or failure. In a literal sense, a hap'orth refers to a halfpenny's worth of tar (a substance used to seal the hulls of wooden ships), while the ship symbolizes something of substantial importance. Thus, the idiom implies that neglecting even a minor aspect can have dire consequences.
  • shoot for The idiom "shoot for" means to aim or strive for a particular objective or goal. It implies setting ambitious aspirations and working towards achieving them.
  • bid (sth) for sth The idiom "bid (sth) for sth" refers to making an offer or attempt to acquire or attain something, often in a competitive or auction-like setting. It indicates an act of formally proposing a particular price, value, or effort in order to obtain or achieve the desired outcome.
  • short for The idiom "short for" means an abbreviated or shortened form of a longer word or phrase. It indicates that the mentioned term is a condensed version, often used as a nickname or an abbreviation.
  • for short The idiom "for short" is used to indicate a shortened or abbreviated version of a longer name or term. It suggests that a name or term is commonly used in a shorter form for convenience or simplicity.
  • more bang for buck The idiom "more bang for the buck" means obtaining more value or benefits from one's investment or expenditure. It signifies getting a greater return or advantage in comparison to the cost or effort put into something.
  • bang for the buck The idiom "bang for the buck" refers to the value or benefits one derives from an investment or expenditure, symbolizing the outcome or impact one receives in relation to the amount of money or effort put in. It implies maximizing the effectiveness or return on one's investment or expenditure.
  • sight for sore eyes The idiom "sight for sore eyes" refers to something or someone that is pleasant or gratifying to see after a period of not seeing anything enjoyable or beautiful. It often implies relief or comfort upon encountering something or someone that brings joy or comfort.
  • be a sight for sore eyes The idiom "be a sight for sore eyes" means to be a pleasant or welcome sight to see, especially after a long and tiring separation. It often refers to the joy and relief felt upon encountering someone or something that is dearly missed or brings comfort.
  • sign sth for sm The idiom "sign sth for sm" typically means to write one's signature on an item or document specifically for someone else. It implies that the person is authorizing, endorsing, or dedicating the item to the individual mentioned with the acronym "sm."
  • signal for sth The idiom "signal for something" means to indicate or request the need or occurrence of something. It implies an action or a gesture that serves as a sign or indication of a desired outcome or action.
  • signal for sm The idiom "signal for someone" means to indicate or communicate a message or sign to a specific person, typically to catch their attention or communicate a desired course of action.
  • a nose for The idiom "a nose for" refers to someone having a natural ability or intuition for something, particularly when it comes to perceiving or detecting something not easily noticeable or understanding something accurately. It implies having a keen sense or instinct in a particular area or skill.
  • battle for sth The idiom "battle for something" means to engage in a strenuous and determined effort to achieve or obtain that particular thing, often facing strong opposition or obstacles. It implies a competitive struggle or conflict in which one is heavily invested and committed to achieving success.
  • slate sm or sth for sth To "slate someone or something for something" means to strongly criticize or condemn someone or something for a specific action or behavior. It implies expressing disapproval or negative judgment towards the person or thing in question.
  • beg for sm or sth The idiom "beg for something" means to desperately or eagerly ask for something, often by pleading or requesting persistently. It implies a strong desire or need for the desired item or outcome.
  • take a turn for the better The idiom "take a turn for the better" means that a situation or someone's condition improves or becomes more positive than before. It implies a positive change or development that brings about a favorable outcome or improved circumstances.
  • for want of a better word The idiom "for want of a better word" is typically used to indicate that the word or term being used may not be the most accurate or suitable, but it is being used anyway due to a lack of a more appropriate alternative. It implies that the speaker is struggling to find the precise word to convey their intended meaning.
  • bill sm for sth The idiom "bill someone for something" means to charge someone a specified amount of money for a product, service, or expense. It is commonly used in the context of invoicing or billing customers for goods or services provided.
  • for the birds The idiom "for the birds" typically means that something is worthless, meaningless, or of no value or interest. It originally comes from the idea that birds' feed is often scattered on the ground, implying that only birds would be interested in it.
  • with for sm time The idiom "with for sm time" typically refers to a specific period of time during which something is done or happens. It implies that an activity or event occurred or continued for a specified duration.
  • leave for sm place The idiom "leave for sm place" means to depart or go to a specific destination or location. It indicates that someone is on their way to a particular place, typically indicating their departure from their current location.
  • do smhow for sm The idiom "do something for someone" means to perform an action or task on behalf of or to benefit someone else. It implies taking responsibility or initiative to help, support, or assist another person.
  • too rich for blood The idiom "too rich for blood" generally means that something is too expensive or costly for someone to afford or desire. It implies that the price or value of a particular thing is beyond someone's means or willingness to pay.
  • out for blood The idiom "out for blood" refers to someone who is intensely determined to seek revenge or to inflict harm on someone else. It implies a strong desire for justice or retribution, often associated with a vengeful or hostile attitude.
  • be out for blood The idiom "be out for blood" means to be extremely determined or eager to seek revenge or cause harm to someone. It suggests a strong desire for retaliation or to inflict harm and can be used figuratively or literally to describe someone who is fiercely aggressive or vengeful in their intentions.
  • speak for The idiom "speak for" means to express the opinion or represent someone or something else, often when making a statement or giving information on their behalf.
  • spell sth for sm To spell something for someone means to explain or clarify it in detail, usually by breaking down the information or steps for better understanding. It is used when someone needs assistance or is having trouble comprehending something.
  • make a bolt for sm or sth The idiom "make a bolt for (something or someone)" means to suddenly and hastily run towards or go after someone or something. It implies making a quick and determined movement or escape, often in order to reach a certain destination or to avoid a situation.
  • spoken for The idiom "spoken for" means that something or someone is already claimed, reserved, or committed to someone else. It typically refers to a person who is in a romantic relationship, engaged, or married, indicating that they are not available or interested in pursuing other relationships. It can also apply to objects or possessions that are already allocated to someone and not up for grabs.
  • bound for The idiom "bound for" refers to someone or something that is destined or intended to go to a particular place or achieve a specific outcome. It implies a determined or fixed direction of travel or purpose.
  • set the stage for sth The idiom "set the stage for something" means to create the necessary conditions or circumstances that make something possible or likely to happen. It refers to the preparation or arrangement of the situation in a way that leads to or enables a particular outcome or event.
  • stand for The idiom "stand for" typically means to represent, symbolize, or signify something.
  • swim for it The idiom "swim for it" means to make a desperate attempt to escape or avoid a difficult or dangerous situation by taking action that seems risky or daring. It can also refer to taking a chance or risking it all in order to achieve a goal or overcome an obstacle.
  • swim for sm or sth The idiom "swim for someone or something" means to make a concerted effort or take actions in order to attain or achieve someone or something desired. It implies putting forth great effort, sometimes against obstacles or challenges, to obtain a specific goal or reach a desired outcome.
  • swap sm or sth for (sm or sth else) The idiom "swap something for (something else)" means to exchange or trade one thing for another. It implies replacing or exchanging one item, idea, or concept with another, often involving a similar or equivalent value.
  • break for The idiom "break for" typically means to make a sudden or quick escape or dash in a particular direction. It can be used in various contexts to imply a hasty departure or to quickly separate from someone or something.
  • gasp for breath The idiom "gasp for breath" refers to the act of struggling for air or having difficulty breathing, often due to exhaustion, shock, physical exertion, or being in a state of surprise or intense emotion.
  • steer sth for sth The idiom "steer sth for sth" means to guide or direct something towards a particular aim, objective, or destination. It implies taking control and making the necessary decisions or actions to achieve a desired outcome. It can be used in a literal sense, like guiding a ship or vehicle towards a specific location, or in a figurative sense, indicating the act of managing or leading a project, situation, or organization in a particular direction.
  • fit for a king The expression "fit for a king" refers to something that is of the highest quality or standard, often describing items or experiences that are luxurious, opulent, or lavish. It implies that the object or situation being described is so impressive that it would be suitable for a king, who typically enjoys the best of everything.
  • play for keeps The idiom "play for keeps" means to engage in an activity or pursue a goal with great seriousness, determination, and with the intention of achieving long-lasting or permanent results. It implies a level of commitment and intensity where there are real or significant consequences involved.
  • play for a fool The definition of the idiom "play for a fool" is to deceive or trick someone by making them appear foolish or gullible. It is used to describe the act of manipulating or taking advantage of someone's trust or naivety.
  • play for The idiom "play for" typically means participating or engaging in a particular activity for a specific purpose, such as achieving a desired outcome or pursuing a specific goal. It is commonly used in the context of sports or games, indicating someone's commitment and dedication to playing on behalf of a particular team or cause.
  • make a play for The idiom "make a play for" means to make an attempt or effort to gain someone's affection, love, attention, or favor, typically in a romantic or competitive context. It is often used when someone knowingly or intentionally tries to attract or pursue another person.
  • sting sm for sth To "sting someone for something" is an idiomatic expression meaning to swindle, cheat, or deceive someone in order to obtain or extort something from them. It implies a sense of trickery or manipulation used by one person to exploit or take advantage of another person for personal gain.
  • budget sth for sm or sth To "budget something for someone or something" means to allocate or plan a specific amount of resources, such as money, time, or materials, for a particular person or purpose. It refers to setting aside or reserving a portion of one's resources to ensure that they are available for a specific use or individual. This idiom is commonly used in financial, project management, and planning contexts.
  • stop for The idiom "stop for" typically means to pause or take a break in order to do a particular activity or action.
  • strain for an effect The idiom "strain for an effect" means to make an excessive effort or force oneself in order to achieve a desired outcome or create a specific impression, often resulting in a contrived or unnatural result. It refers to attempting to reach a particular effect or outcome in a way that is apparent and lacks authenticity or genuineness.
  • burn for The idiom "burn for" means to have an intense desire or passion for something or someone. It suggests a strong longing or yearning for a particular thing or person.
  • strike for The idiom "strike for" means to actively pursue or work towards a particular goal or objective, often involving a collective effort or protest. It typically refers to taking a stand or making a deliberate, purposeful effort to achieve desired changes or outcomes.
  • strip for sth The idiom "strip for something" means to remove or take off one's clothing or outer layers in preparation for a specific activity or purpose. This can refer to getting undressed for a particular event, such as a performance or job, or it can simply imply the act of removing clothing for a specific reason or situation.
  • strive for sth The idiom "strive for sth" means to make a constant and determined effort to achieve or obtain something, usually a goal or a desired outcome. It implies actively working towards a particular objective with dedication and perseverance.
  • but for The idiom "but for" is used to indicate that something could have happened differently or that a particular event or circumstance was the only thing preventing a different outcome. It highlights the significance or impact of a specific factor in a situation.
  • Why buy a cow when you can get milk for free? The idiom "Why buy a cow when you can get milk for free?" means that one shouldn't commit or invest in something when they can benefit from it without any obligations or expenses. It suggests that there is no need to make a long-term commitment or purchase when one can enjoy the benefits without any strings attached. It is often used to caution against making unnecessary or imprudent decisions.
  • buzz for sm The idiom "buzz for" typically refers to generating excitement or creating a positive talk or gossip about someone or something. It suggests that there is a lot of enthusiasm or interest surrounding a particular subject.
  • sub for sm or sth The idiom "sub for sm or sth" means to act as a substitute, replacement or stand-in for someone or something in a given situation or task. It commonly refers to taking someone's place or fulfilling a particular role temporarily or in the absence of the original person or thing.
  • sub sm for (sm else) The idiom "sub sm for (sm else)" is an abbreviation for "substitute something for (something) else." It refers to the act of replacing or exchanging one thing or idea with another as a replacement or alternative.
  • for a price The idiom "for a price" usually means that something is obtainable or can be done or acquired, but it requires payment or some form of compensation.
  • call for The idiom "call for" means to require or demand something, often in a forceful or official manner. It can also refer to an action or decision that needs to be made in response to a specific situation or need.
  • sue for sth The idiom "sue for sth" means to legally pursue or seek something, typically referring to filing a lawsuit or taking legal action to obtain a desired outcome or compensation.
  • sue sm for sth The idiom "sue someone for something" means to initiate a legal action or lawsuit against someone in a court of law in order to seek compensation or resolve a dispute related to a particular issue or matter. It implies taking legal measures to hold someone accountable or seek financial restitution for damages or injuries caused by their actions.
  • commend sm for sth The idiom "commend sm for sth" means to praise or express approval for someone's actions, qualities, or achievements. It is a way of showing admiration or giving recognition for something someone has done or accomplished.
  • for sure The idiom "for sure" is an expression used to emphasize that something is certain, definite, or absolutely true. It is often used to convey a high level of confidence or assurance in a statement or belief.
  • That's for dang sure! The idiom "That's for dang sure!" is an emphatic expression used to assert that something is undeniably true or certain. It emphasizes strong agreement or conviction in the validity of a statement or assertion.
  • sweat for sth The idiom "sweat for sth" means to work hard and put in considerable effort in order to achieve or obtain something. It implies dedicating time, energy, and exertion to accomplish a particular goal or outcome.
  • swing for sth The idiom "swing for something" means to make a strong and determined attempt to achieve or accomplish something, even if it involves taking risks or facing challenges. It implies giving maximum effort or going all out towards a goal, often with the understanding that failure is a possibility. It can be used in various contexts, both literal and figurative.
  • care for The idiom "care for" typically means to like, have an affection for, or have an interest in someone or something. It can also refer to taking care of someone or something, or providing support and nurturing.
  • draw for The idiom "draw for" refers to a situation where people or contestants are selected randomly from a group or pool, typically through a lottery or raffle-style selection process. It means that individuals are chosen without any preference or bias, purely through luck or chance.
  • make a case for The idiom "make a case for" means to present a compelling argument or justification for something, often in a persuasive manner. It is mainly used when someone tries to convince others or provide evidence to support their viewpoint or position on a particular topic or issue.
  • race for sth The idiom "race for something" typically refers to a competitive situation where people or groups strive eagerly and competitively to achieve or obtain something before others do, often involving a sense of urgency and intense competition.
  • race sm for sth The idiom "race sm for sth" typically means to compete or participate in a contest or competition in order to achieve or obtain something specific. It often emphasizes the speed, urgency, or intensity with which one pursues a particular goal.
  • tailormade for sb/sth The idiom "tailor-made for sb/sth" refers to something that is perfectly suited or designed for a particular person or situation. It suggests that something is specifically created to meet someone's or something's unique needs or requirements.
  • give cause for sth The idiom "give cause for something" means to provide a reason or justification for something to happen or exist. It implies that certain actions, behaviors, or circumstances have led to a particular outcome or consequence.
  • come for The idiom "come for" generally refers to the act of visiting or arriving at a certain place or event with the specific purpose or intention of obtaining or experiencing something. It implies that the person is seeking or expecting something from the particular visit.
  • commit sm or sth for sth The idiom "commit sm or sth for sth" means to dedicate or pledge something, such as time, effort, resources, or money, for a particular purpose or cause. It implies a willingness to contribute or allocate something towards a specific goal or objective.
  • give eye teeth for The idiom "give eye teeth for" means to desire or crave something desperately, to the extent of being willing to sacrifice something valuable or precious to obtain it. The phrase is often used to express a strong and desperate longing for something.
  • for a change The idiom "for a change" refers to doing something differently or varying from the usual routine or pattern to add variety or break monotony. It suggests adopting a different approach, perspective, or behavior than what is customary or expected.
  • flip sm for sth The idiom "flip sm for sth" typically means to exchange or trade something for something else. It implies the action of turning or flipping one thing to acquire another thing in return.
  • charge (sth) for sth The idiom "charge (sth) for sth" typically means to require payment for a particular good or service. It refers to the act of setting a specific price or fee in exchange for obtaining or receiving something. It implies that the item or service is not given freely but instead incurs a financial cost.
  • test for sth The idiom "test for something" refers to the action of performing a task or assessment in order to determine or evaluate the presence, quality, or effectiveness of something. It involves actively seeking evidence or conducting experiments to verify or check a particular aspect or condition.
  • test sm or sth for sth The idiom "test someone or something for something" means to examine, investigate, or analyze someone or something in order to determine or assess a specific quality, attribute, capability, effect, or result.
  • cheer for sm or sth The idiom "cheer for someone or something" means to express support, encouragement, or enthusiasm for a person, team, cause, or idea. It often involves showing excitement, clapping, shouting, or expressing positive emotions to uplift and motivate the subject being cheered for.
  • count for The idiom "count for" means to have importance, significance, or value. It refers to the act of being considered or taken into account when evaluating a situation, making a decision, or assessing someone's worth or contribution. It implies that something or someone has an impact or holds meaning in a particular context.
  • for one thing The idiomatic expression "for one thing" is used to introduce a reason or point in a discussion, usually indicating that there are additional reasons or points to be mentioned. It suggests that the following statement is just one example or aspect among others that support the main idea being discussed.
  • think fit for The idiom "think fit for" means to consider something or someone suitable, appropriate, or deserving for a particular purpose or action. It implies making a judgment or decision based on one's own choice or opinion about what is best or proper.
  • cover sm or sth for sth The idiom "cover someone or something for something" typically means to provide protection, substitute, or financial compensation for a person or thing in the event of a loss, damage, or liability. It can refer to various situations, such as insurance coverage, liability coverage, or the act of taking responsibility for someone or something in a particular context.
  • cover (up) for sm The idiom "cover (up) for someone" means to protect or shield someone by taking responsibility for their actions or by providing an alibi to prevent them from facing consequences or blame. It implies assisting or defending someone, usually in a deceptive or dishonest manner.
  • choose sth for sm The idiom "choose something for someone" means to make a decision or select something on behalf of another person, usually with the intention of benefiting or pleasing them. It suggests taking into consideration the person's preferences, needs, or desires when making the choice.
  • choose sm or sth for sth The idiom "choose someone or something for something" means to select or pick a particular person or thing to fulfill a specific role or purpose. It implies the process of making a deliberate decision or selection based on specific criteria or requirements for a particular situation or task.
  • take credit for sth The idiom "take credit for something" means to claim responsibility or acknowledge oneself as the person who deserves recognition or praise for a particular action, accomplishment, or idea, regardless of whether or not one actually contributed to it.
  • credit sm or sth for sth The idiom "credit someone or something for something" means to acknowledge or give recognition to someone or something for a particular achievement, contribution, or positive quality. It implies attributing deserved praise, honor, or respect to the person or thing being discussed.
  • try for The idiom "try for" means to make an effort or attempt to achieve or obtain something.
  • cry for The idiom "cry for" means to represent a need or a call for something. It implies a strong desire or request for a particular action or outcome.
  • Crusade for sm or sth The idiom "crusade for someone or something" refers to engaging in a passionate and determined effort to support, advocate, or promote a particular cause, person, or idea. It suggests a persistent and unwavering commitment to fighting for or defending someone or something one strongly believes in, often with a fervent zeal.
  • time for The idiom "time for" refers to a specific moment or period considered suitable or appropriate for a particular action, event, or decision. It suggests that a certain situation or condition has arisen that necessitates or allows for the occurrence of something.
  • make time for The idiom "make time for" means to prioritize or allocate time for someone or something, regardless of a busy schedule or conflicting commitments. It suggests that one is willing to rearrange or adjust their routine in order to accommodate the person or task at hand.
  • curse sm for sth The idiom "curse someone for something" means to blame or hold someone responsible for a negative or unfortunate situation or outcome. It implies expressing anger, frustration, or disappointment towards someone for causing or contributing to a specific problem or difficulty.
  • cite sm for sth The idiom "cite sm for sth" refers to the act of mentioning, quoting, or referring to someone or something as a source of information, evidence, or support for a particular statement, argument, or claim. It is commonly used in academic and formal contexts to provide credibility and authority to what is being said or written.
  • claim sth for sth The idiom "claim sth for sth" generally means taking ownership or asserting a right or privilege to something. It often implies making a statement that something belongs to someone or should be attributed to them.
  • claim sth for sm or sth The idiom "claim something for someone or something" means to assert ownership, entitlement, or exclusive rights to something on behalf of a person or entity. It implies that the person or entity is staking a verbal or written claim to the thing in question, declaring it as their own or associating it with themselves or others.
  • pop for sth The idiom "pop for sth" means to unexpectedly or willingly pay for something, especially an expense or a treat, often without considering the cost or consequences involved. It implies a spontaneous or impulsive act of paying for something that may be seen as a luxury or unexpected expenditure.
  • toil for sth The idiom "toil for sth" refers to working extremely hard and exerting a great amount of effort in order to achieve or obtain something. It implies dedicated, laborious work done with persistence and determination to reach a specific goal.
  • toil for sm The idiom "toil for someone" means to work diligently and tirelessly on behalf of someone else, often without receiving any recognition, appreciation, or reward in return. It implies going through a great deal of effort and labor to fulfill the needs or requirements of another person.
  • leave the field clear for The idiom "leave the field clear for" means to leave a situation or opportunity open for someone else without getting involved or interfering. It refers to the act of withdrawing from competition, debate, or contention to allow another person to proceed without any obstruction or competition.
  • pound for pound The idiom "pound for pound" means when comparing individuals or things, considering their relative size or weight, or their achievements and abilities, regardless of their differences in size, weight, or advantages. It is used to emphasize the relative strength, ability, or quality of someone or something.
  • too close for comfort The idiom "too close for comfort" refers to a situation that is uncomfortably near, dangerous, or threatening. It implies that the proximity or intimacy is unsettling, causing discomfort or anxiety.
  • toss (sm) for sth The idiom "toss (someone) for something" can have two possible meanings: 1. To flip a coin to decide or determine something. When people "toss for something," they use a coin toss as a random method of making a decision or settling a matter. It is often used when there are two options and a fair or unbiased decision needs to be made. Example: "Since we both want to choose the movie, let's toss for it. Heads means we watch a comedy, and tails means we watch a thriller." 2. To be physically unable to sleep or rest due to anxiety, worry, or restlessness about something. When someone "tosses for something," it means they are unable to find peace or relaxation
  • touch for The idiom "touch for" means to ask, demand, or request for money from someone, often in a persistent or forceful manner. It implies seeking financial assistance or borrowing money from someone.
  • coach sm for sth The idiom "coach someone for something" means to train or prepare someone for a specific task, event, or competition. It often involves providing guidance, instructions, and practice to help the person improve their skills or performance in order to achieve success in the particular endeavor. The term "coach" in this context refers to someone who acts as a mentor or instructor, guiding and supporting the individual in their pursuit of a goal.
  • prepare sm for sth The idiom "prepare someone for something" means to make someone ready or equipped to handle or face a particular situation or outcome. It involves taking necessary actions or providing information to ensure that someone is adequately prepared mentally, emotionally, or physically for an upcoming event or experience.
  • prepare sm or sth for sth The idiom "prepare someone or something for something" means to make necessary arrangements or take necessary actions in order to be ready for a specific event, situation, or outcome. It implies getting someone or something in a suitable state or condition before a particular occurrence.
  • trade sm or sth for sm or sth The idiom "trade sm or sth for sm or sth" means to exchange or swap something or someone for something else. It implies giving up or getting rid of one thing in return for acquiring another thing.
  • train for sth The idiom "train for sth" means to undergo a period of preparation or practice specifically for a certain activity, skill, or event. It implies dedicating time and effort towards acquiring the necessary knowledge, abilities, or physical conditioning required for a particular purpose or goal.
  • train (sm or an animal) for sth The definition of the idiom "train (someone or an animal) for something" means to teach or prepare someone or an animal to perform a specific task or skill. It involves a deliberate process of instruction, practice, and repetition to develop the necessary abilities or behaviors required for a particular goal or activity.
  • collect (money) for sth The idiom "collect (money) for sth" means to gather or obtain money for a specific purpose or cause. It implies the act of soliciting or pooling funds from various sources or individuals in order to finance or support something, such as a charity, project, or event.
  • collect (money) for sm or sth The idiom "collect (money) for someone or something" refers to the act of gathering or raising funds on behalf of a person or a cause. It involves soliciting donations or contributions from individuals, groups, or organizations to support or finance a specific person, purpose, or project.
  • travel for sm or sth The idiom "travel for someone or something" typically means to make a journey or trip on behalf of someone or for a particular purpose or reason. It can refer to undertaking travel for the benefit or interests of someone or for the purpose of achieving or obtaining something specific.
  • comb sth for sm or sth The idiom "comb sth for sm or sth" means to search or examine something in a thorough and meticulous manner, usually with the aim of finding something specific. It implies a thorough search or investigation, as if combing through the area or object with a fine-toothed comb.
  • provide sth for sm or sth The idiom "provide something for someone or something" means to supply or give something to someone or something, typically with the intention of meeting their needs or fulfilling a requirement. It implies the act of offering support, assistance, or necessary items to ensure the well-being or satisfaction of the recipient.
  • pump sm for sth The idiom "pump [someone] for [something]" means to aggressively or persistently question or extract information, typically by interrogating or pressuring someone in order to obtain knowledge, details, or specific information on a particular subject or topic. It implies a forceful or intense effort to elicit the desired information.
  • push for The idiom "push for" means to advocate strongly or make a determined effort to achieve or promote something. It refers to taking action or exerting pressure in order to push for a specific outcome or desired result.
  • trust sm for sth The idiom "trust someone for something" means to rely on or have confidence in someone to handle or perform a specific task or responsibility. It implies having faith in someone's abilities, judgment, or integrity to accomplish a particular matter or fulfill a designated role. It signifies placing trust in someone's competence or reliability in a specific area or situation.
  • try sm for sth The idiom "try sm for sth" means to attempt or make an effort to do something in order to achieve a particular outcome or result. It implies putting in effort, experimenting or practicing in order to accomplish a goal or solve a problem.
  • unite for sth The idiom "unite for something" means to come together or join forces with others for a specific purpose, cause, or goal. It refers to individuals or groups setting aside differences or personal interests in order to work together towards a common objective.
  • use for The idiom "use for" typically refers to the purpose or function of something. It indicates the intended or suitable application or utilization of an object or concept.
  • value sm or sth for sth The idiom "value someone or something for something" means to appreciate or recognize the worth or importance of someone or something in a specific context or situation. It implies acknowledging the positive qualities, contributions, or significance of someone or something in a particular context or for a specific purpose.
  • head for The idiom "head for" means to move or go towards a specific destination or direction. It implies moving purposefully in that direction, often with a sense of determination or intention.
  • leave for dead The idiom "leave for dead" means to abandon someone or something with the belief that they are unlikely to survive or succeed. It implies a lack of concern or support for the person or thing being left behind.
  • hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life The idiom "hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life" means to cling tightly or hold tightly to something or someone in a perilous or life-threatening situation. It implies extreme desperation and the strong desire to survive or protect someone/something.
  • decide for sm or sth When someone "decides for someone or something," it means they make a decision on behalf of that person or thing without consulting or considering their opinion or input. It implies the act of assuming authority or making choices without taking into account the needs or preferences of others involved.
  • volunteer for sth The idiom "volunteer for something" means to willingly offer oneself to participate in or undertake a task, duty, or responsibility without being asked or compelled to do so. It indicates a willingness to freely give one's time, effort, or services for a specific cause, event, or initiative.
  • for miles The idiom "for miles" typically means a long distance or a vast extent. It implies that something can be seen, heard, or felt over a significant range or area.
  • want for The idiom "want for" typically means to lack or be in need of something. It implies a desire or a need for something that is currently missing or insufficient.
  • For want of a nail the shoe was lost for want of a shoe the horse ... The idiom "For want of a nail the shoe was lost for want of a shoe the horse was lost; for want of a horse the rider was lost, for want of a rider the battle was lost; for want of a battle the kingdom was lost" is a proverbial phrase that illustrates the significance of small actions and the consequences they can lead to. It emphasizes the idea that even the smallest negligence or oversight can eventually result in significant outcomes.
  • watch for The definition of the idiom "watch for" is to be on the lookout for something or someone, typically with the intention to anticipate, notice, or be aware of their arrival, approach, or occurrence.
  • desert (sm or sth) for (sm or sth else) The idiom "desert (someone or something) for (someone or something else)" means to abandon or leave behind someone or something that was previously relied upon in favor of someone or something else. It implies shifting loyalty or preference from one person or thing to another, often with a sense of betrayal or abandonment.
  • design sth for sth The idiom "design something for something" means to create or develop something with a specific purpose or intention in mind. It refers to the process of intentionally planning and constructing something to serve a particular function or fulfill a specific need.
  • design sth for sm The idiom "design something for someone" means to create or develop something specifically tailored to meet the needs or preferences of that person. It implies that the creation is customized and carefully crafted to suit the individual's requirements, tastes, or specifications.
  • detail sm for sth The idiom "detail someone for something" refers to assigning or selecting someone for a specific task or duty. This phrase is often used in military or organizational settings to designate individuals for particular responsibilities or missions.
  • weep for joy The idiom "weep for joy" refers to the act of crying tears of happiness or overwhelming emotion. It signifies being so deeply affected by a joyful event or experience that tears are shed.
  • weep for (sm or an animal) The idiom "weep for (someone or an animal)" means to feel deep sorrow or mourn for someone or an animal. It implies that the situation or circumstances are so tragic or upsetting that it evokes strong emotions of sadness or grief.
  • die for The idiom "die for" means to have an intense desire or strong craving for something or to consider something highly valuable or desirable. It emphasizes an extreme level of appreciation or longing for someone or something.
  • wire for sth The idiom "wire for something" typically means to prepare or make arrangements in advance for a particular event or situation. It suggests being ready or equipped with the necessary resources, information, or skills to handle or succeed in a specific task or challenge. The phrase originated from the idea of electrical wiring, implying the need to connect or organize components to function effectively.
  • wire sm or sth for sth The idiom "wire someone or something for something" refers to the act of sending or transferring money or funds electronically, usually for a specific purpose or to fulfill a specific need. It often involves the use of banking or financial systems to transmit the payment or transfer.
  • be for The idiom "be for" means to support, approve, or be in favor of something or someone. It often implies agreement or endorsement.
  • too for words The idiom "too for words" means that something is so extraordinary, astonishing, or impressive that there are no words to adequately describe or express it. It implies that the speaker is left speechless or overwhelmed by the magnitude or beauty of something.
  • Take my word for it The idiom "Take my word for it" means to trust or believe what someone is saying without any further evidence or proof.
  • lost for words The idiom "lost for words" means being unable to find or articulate the right words to express one's emotions, thoughts, or reactions, often due to surprise, shock, or overwhelming emotions.
  • work for The idiom "work for" typically means to be employed by or to be in a working relationship with a person or organization. It usually implies that someone is fulfilling their job responsibilities or duties in exchange for compensation or other benefits.
  • write for sth The idiom "write for sth" typically means to create or produce written content specifically for a particular purpose, audience, or medium. It refers to the act of composing or penning text that is intended for a specific publication, platform, or objective.
  • draft sm for sth The phrase "draft sm for sth" is not a common idiom. It seems to be a shortened or abbreviated form of a phrase that may vary depending on the context. Without further context, it is difficult to provide a specific definition. However, "draft" generally refers to the act of creating or writing something, while "sm" could possibly stand for "someone" or "something." Therefore, a possible generalized interpretation for "draft sm for sth" could be to create or write something for someone or something, possibly in the form of a document, proposal, or plan.
  • dress for sth The idiom "dress for sth" typically means to choose or wear clothing appropriate for a specific occasion, event, or situation. It emphasizes the idea of dressing in a way that is suitable or relevant to the purpose or context at hand.
  • dress for sm The idiom "dress for success" means to dress in a manner that indicates professionalism, ambition, or a desire to impress others, typically in order to succeed in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • goes for The idiom "goes for" means to apply or pertain to someone or something in a particular way. It can refer to a general characteristic, behavior, or attitude that consistently applies to someone or something.
  • fine for The idiom "fine for" typically means that something is acceptable or adequate for a particular purpose or situation. It suggests that a particular option or choice is satisfactory and will suffice.
  • yen for sm or sth The idiom "yen for" means to have a strong desire or craving for someone or something. It suggests an intense longing or yearning for a particular person, object, or experience.
  • last for The idiom "last for" means to continue or persist over a particular period of time, typically longer than expected or desired. It indicates the duration or endurance of something, often referring to how long a particular condition, event, or situation remains in effect.
  • dun sm for sth The idiom "dun someone for something" typically means to demand payment from someone for something they owe or have borrowed. It is often used when someone is persistently reminding or pressuring someone else to fulfill a financial obligation.
  • for free The idiom "for free" means to receive or obtain something without having to pay for it, at no cost.
  • read for The idiom "read for" has multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To be prepared or ready for something. Example: "She studied all night, she is read for the exam tomorrow." 2. To audition or try out for a specific role in a play, movie, or performance. Example: "He has been practicing for hours, he is going to read for the lead role in the play."
  • hold for The idiom "hold for" typically means to wait or pause for someone or something. It refers to temporarily delaying an action or decision until a specific person or circumstance is available or resolved.
  • honor sm for sth The idiom "honor someone for something" means to give recognition, respect, or reward to someone for a specific reason, achievement, or quality. It typically involves acknowledging and showing appreciation for a person's actions, accomplishments, or character traits.
  • leap for joy The idiom "leap for joy" means to jump and react with extreme happiness or excitement, often due to an overwhelmingly positive or joyful event or experience.
  • raise money for To "raise money for" means to gather or collect funds or financial resources through various means such as events, campaigns, donations, or initiatives. This idiom typically refers to the act of generating funds for a specific purpose, cause, organization, or project.
  • labor for sth The idiom "labor for sth" means to work diligently or put in a lot of effort towards achieving or obtaining something. It implies dedicating time, energy, and hard work in order to achieve a particular goal or desired outcome.
  • labor for sm or sth The idiom "labor for someone or something" means to work hard or put in a great amount of effort in order to achieve something or meet a specific goal. It implies dedicating time, energy, and hard work towards a particular person or cause.
  • exchange sth for sth The idiom "exchange something for something" means to trade or swap one thing for another thing. It refers to the act of giving up or replacing an item or an idea with another item or idea.
  • move for The idiom "move for" typically means to make a formal proposal or suggestion during a meeting or discussion. It is commonly used in parliamentary or legal contexts when someone formally puts forward a motion or advocates for a particular action to be taken.
  • sub for The idiom "sub for" means to act as a substitute or replacement for someone or something. It refers to filling in for someone who is unable to fulfill their role or taking over a task or responsibility temporarily.
  • pass for The idiom "pass for" means to be accepted or mistaken as something or someone else. It implies that someone is able to successfully portray or be perceived as something they are not.
  • for keeps The idiom "for keeps" means something that is permanent, lasting, or intended for a long time. It can also refer to a situation where there are no second chances or opportunities for reversal.
  • fix sth for (a meal) The idiom "fix something for (a meal)" means to prepare or cook something for a meal. It refers to the act of making or arranging food in order to have a meal.
  • hint for sth The idiom "hint for sth" refers to providing a small or subtle clue or suggestion regarding something. It implies indirectly indicating or suggesting information or advice about a specific subject or matter.
  • offer sth for sth The idiom "offer something for something" means to propose or suggest an exchange or trade where one thing is provided or given in return for another thing. It can refer to a formal or informal arrangement where something of value is offered or presented as a bargaining chip, compensation, or incentive in exchange for something else.
  • fight for The idiom "fight for" means to engage in a struggle or battle in order to protect or advocate for something, whether it be an idea, a cause, a belief, or a person. It typically implies a strong dedication, determination, and effort to overcome challenges and obstacles in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • pose for sm or sth The phrase "pose for someone or something" means to position oneself in a particular way while being photographed or painted, in order to be the subject or model for someone or something. It denotes assuming a specific posture or stance in order to be captured artistically.
  • long for The idiom "long for" means to desire strongly or yearn for someone or something. It represents a deep longing or a strong feeling of wanting something that is currently absent or unattainable.
  • expect sm or sth for sth The idiom "expect something or someone for something" means to anticipate or await a certain outcome or consequence in a given situation. It refers to having a specific expectation in terms of receiving or experiencing something in return for a particular action, event, or circumstance.
  • take sm for a ride The idiom "take someone for a ride" typically means to deceive or cheat someone, often by tricking them into believing false information or promises.
  • for a lark and on a lark The idiom "for a lark" or "on a lark" means doing something purely for fun, amusement, or entertainment, often without any particular purpose or serious intention. It implies engaging in a spontaneous or impulsive act just for enjoyment or to experience a sense of adventure.
  • match for (sm, sth, or an animal) The idiom "match for (someone, something, or an animal)" typically means that the person, thing, or animal being referred to is of equal or comparable strength, ability, or quality as the other person, thing, or animal mentioned. It suggests that they are evenly matched in terms of prowess or capability.
  • expend sth for sth The idiom "expend sth for sth" typically refers to the act of using or allocating something, such as money, time, effort, or resources, in exchange for something else or to achieve a specific purpose or goal. It implies making a deliberate investment or sacrifice of something valuable in order to obtain a desired outcome.
  • pay for The idiom "pay for" typically means to face consequences or endure the negative outcomes of one's actions or decisions. It implies that the person is held accountable for or bears the cost, figuratively or literally, of something they have done.
  • pull for The idiom "pull for" means to support, root for, or cheer for someone or something. It implies a desire for someone or something to be successful or victorious in a given situation.
  • probe sth for sth To "probe something for something" means to search or investigate something in order to find or uncover a specific thing or piece of information. It typically implies a careful and thorough exploration or examination of the subject to gain deeper insight or understanding.
  • hope for The idiom "hope for" refers to holding anticipation or desire for something to happen or to be achieved. It implies having an optimistic outlook or expectation that a particular outcome, result, or circumstance will come to fruition.
  • hang for The idiom "hang for" typically means to suffer or face severe consequences for one's actions or wrongdoings. It often implies that the punishment or outcome will be significant, possibly leading to dire circumstances or even death.
  • keep an eye out for The idiom "keep an eye out for" means to be watchful, alert, and vigilant in order to notice or find something specific. It suggests actively searching for something or being aware of your surroundings to spot or be prepared for a particular person, event, or thing.
  • eye for an eye The idiom "eye for an eye" refers to a principle or customary law in which retaliation or punishment should be equivalent to the harm or injury inflicted upon oneself or others. It denotes the concept of seeking justice or revenge in a manner that mirrors the initial offense or harm.
  • An eye for an eye The idiom "an eye for an eye" means that a punishment or retaliation should be of equal measure or degree as the offense committed. It implies seeking retribution or justice in a manner that mirrors the harm or wrongdoing inflicted upon oneself or others.
  • reach for the moon The idiom "reach for the moon" means to set extremely high goals or aspirations, often beyond what is considered easily achievable. It encourages individuals to aim for greatness and dream big, even if the possibility of success seems unlikely or challenging. The phrase symbolizes the act of pursuing one's dreams, regardless of obstacles or limitations.
  • reach for The definition of the idiom "reach for" is to strive for or try to achieve something, often with determination or ambition.
  • (Are you) ready for this? The idiom "(Are you) ready for this?" is typically used to inquire whether someone is prepared or mentally prepared for what is about to happen or be presented. It implies that what follows may be surprising, challenging, or significant in some way, and is asking if the person is prepared to handle or experience it.
  • fit for The idiom "fit for" means suitable or appropriate for a particular purpose or situation. It implies that something or someone has the necessary qualities, skills, or characteristics required for a specific task or role.
  • pinchhit for The idiom "pinch hit for" refers to someone stepping in or substituting for another person or taking their place, typically in a challenging or unexpected situation.
  • pan for sth The idiom "pan for sth" typically means to search or hunt for something diligently or carefully, often in a methodical or systematic manner. It originates from the process of panning for gold, where miners carefully sift through riverbeds or streams using a pan to separate gold particles from other materials. In a figurative sense, "pan for sth" implies a similar process of searching, sifting, or investigating in order to discover or acquire something desired.
  • for fear of sth The idiom "for fear of sth" is used to express that someone refrains from doing something or takes precautionary measures due to a particular fear or concern. It implies that the fear or concern is a strong motivating factor behind an action or decision.
  • look for The idiom "look for" means to search or seek something or someone, either physically or figuratively. It involves actively trying to find or discover something that may be hidden, lost, or desired.
  • feel for The idiom "feel for" means to sympathize with someone or to understand and share their emotions or experiences, especially when they are experiencing hardship or difficulties.
  • press for The idiom "press for" means to exert pressure or make a forceful request or demand for something. It implies the act of insisting, pushing, or advocating strongly for a particular outcome or response.
  • fish for The idiom "fish for" means to subtly or indirectly seek information, opinions or compliments from someone, usually by asking leading questions or making suggestive comments, in order to satisfy one's curiosity or receive desired responses.
  • know one for what one is The idiom "know one for what one is" means understanding or recognizing someone's true character, qualities, or intentions. It suggests the ability to assess someone accurately, without being deceived by appearances or false pretenses.
  • lust for sth The idiom "lust for sth" refers to a strong and intense desire or craving for something, often associated with passion, excitement, or an insatiable urge to attain or experience it.
  • lay for To lay for someone is an idiom that means to wait and prepare to catch or confront them, often with the intention of causing harm or seeking revenge. It implies strategic planning and lurking in order to ambush or surprise the targeted person.
  • opt for sth The idiom "opt for sth" means to choose or select something from a set of options or alternatives. It signifies making a decision in favor of a particular choice or preference.
  • for good The idiom "for good" means permanently or forever.
  • not for love nor/or money The idiom "not for love nor/or money" means that something is impossible to obtain or achieve no matter how much effort or resources are used. It implies that the desired outcome is not available under any circumstances or offers.
  • for the most part The idiom "for the most part" means primarily or mostly, with few exceptions. It implies that something is generally true or applicable, but there may be some minor variations or exceptions.
  • and one for luck The idiom "and one for luck" refers to the act of doing or having an additional attempt, action, or item as a superstition or additional measure to increase one's chances of success or good fortune. It usually suggests that after a certain number of attempts or actions, an extra one is added for good measure.
  • for the fun of it The idiom "for the fun of it" means doing something without a specific reason or purpose, purely for enjoyment or amusement. It suggests engaging in an activity for the sheer pleasure it brings, rather than for any practical or necessary outcome.
  • for kicks The idiom "for kicks" refers to doing something as a form of amusement, entertainment, or simply for fun without any specific purpose or goal. It implies engaging in an activity purely for the enjoyment or thrill of it.
  • lucky for you The idiom "lucky for you" is used to emphasize that someone is fortunate or lucky in a specific situation or circumstance. It often implies that the person speaking believes the situation could have turned out differently or more negatively for the other person, but due to some stroke of luck or favorable circumstances, things worked out in their favor.
  • grist for the mill The idiom "grist for the mill" means that something is useful or valuable material for a particular purpose or situation, often implying that it will contribute to ongoing discussions, debates, or activities. It can refer to information, ideas, or experiences that can be used to promote further thought, analysis, or productivity.
  • good for The idiom "good for" typically means helpful or beneficial for someone or something. It implies that a particular action, situation, or object is advantageous or constructive.
  • for the good of The idiom "for the good of" means to act in a way that benefits or promotes the overall well-being, welfare, or interest of someone or something else. It implies making decisions or taking actions with a selfless intention, usually putting aside personal goals or desires for the greater good.
  • mark for life The idiom "mark for life" means to leave a lasting impact or permanent impression on someone typically due to a significant event or experience. It implies that the person will always remember or be influenced by that particular event, often in a negative or traumatic way.
  • for life The idiom "for life" refers to a commitment or obligation that lasts indefinitely or until death. It implies a long-term or permanent agreement, relationship, or condition that is not easily or readily changed or terminated.
  • preserve sth for sm or sth The idiom "preserve something for someone or something" means to protect, maintain, or save something for a specific person or purpose. It implies keeping something intact or in a good condition to ensure its availability or use at a later time. This idiom can refer to physical objects, personal belongings, natural resources, or even intangible things like traditions or memories.
  • how's that for The idiom "how's that for" is used to express satisfaction or to boast about something. It often indicates that the result or outcome exceeds expectations or serves as a successful response or solution to a situation.
  • pinchhit for sm To "pinch-hit for someone" refers to the act of substituting or taking over someone's role or duty temporarily, typically in an unexpected or emergency situation. It originates from baseball, where a pinch hitter is a player who replaces another player in the batting order to take their turn at bat. This idiom is now used in various contexts outside of baseball to describe stepping in for someone else when they are unable to fulfill their responsibilities.
  • pinch sm for sth The idiom "pinch someone for something" means to steal or take something from someone without their permission or knowledge.
  • mean for The idiom "mean for" can have several interpretations depending on the context, but generally, it means to intend, design, or have a specific purpose for something or someone. It can refer to an action, statement, or object that was created or aimed at achieving a particular goal or outcome. It is often used when discussing intentions, objectives, or intended recipients of something.
  • milk sm for sth The idiom "milk someone/something for something" means to extract or obtain as much benefit or advantage as possible from a situation, person, or resource, often in a cunning or overly-subservient manner. It implies exploiting someone or something to their fullest extent for personal gain or advantage.
  • short for sth The idiom "short for sth" means that a word or name is a shortened version or abbreviation of something longer. It implies that the mentioned shorter version represents the meaning or essence of the longer word or name.
  • mine for sth The idiom "mine for sth" typically refers to the act of searching or exploring in order to discover or obtain something valuable, useful, or desired. It suggests a metaphorical digging or excavation process where one is actively seeking what they are looking for.
  • live for The idiom "live for" means to have a strong passion or commitment towards something, to prioritize or derive great fulfillment and purpose from a particular aspect of life or a specific endeavor. It implies dedicating one's time and energy to pursuing or engaging in that particular thing, making it a central focus of one's existence.
  • lack for sth The idiom "lack for something" means to not have enough or sufficient amount of something, usually referring to a resource, material, or quality. It implies a state of shortage or insufficiency.
  • name sm or sth for sm or sth The definition of the idiom "name someone or something for someone or something" is to give someone or something a particular name as a way to honor or commemorate another person or thing. It is a gesture of recognizing the importance or influence that someone or something had on the named person or thing.
  • leave for The idiom "leave for" refers to the act of departing or setting off towards a particular destination or purpose.
  • touch sm (up) for sth The idiom "touch someone (up) for something" means to ask or approach someone in order to request or borrow something, especially money. It implies seeking financial assistance or borrowing from someone.
  • Not for my money The idiom "Not for my money" means that the person speaking does not support or value something or someone. It implies that the person has a different opinion or perspective and would not choose to spend their money on it.
  • want sth for sm or sth The idiom "want something for someone or something" typically means to desire or seek a particular outcome, benefit, or advantage for someone or something. It implies an intention to obtain something that is beneficial or advantageous for a specific person or situation.
  • want sm for sth The idiom "want something for something" means to desire or expect a specific thing or benefit in exchange for a particular action, task, or favor. It often implies a trade-off or negotiation where one party seeks compensation or reciprocation for what they have done or are about to do.
  • name for The idiom "name for" typically refers to a phrase or term used to identify or describe someone or something. It signifies assigning a particular name or designation to a person, place, or thing based on their attributes, characteristics, or qualities.
  • make a name for The idiom "make a name for" means to establish or achieve a reputation, usually by accomplishing noteworthy or remarkable things that gain recognition and respect from others. It refers to the act of becoming well-known, respected, or renowned in a particular field or context.
  • tailormade for The idiom "tailor-made for" means specifically designed or perfectly suited for a particular purpose, situation, or individual. It suggests that something is tailored or customized to meet the needs or requirements of a specific person or situation effectively.
  • made for The idiom "made for" refers to someone or something that is perfectly suited or designed for a particular purpose or situation. It indicates a strong compatibility or alignment between the person or thing and the circumstances or task at hand.
  • be made for The idiom "be made for" typically means that something or someone is perfectly suited or designed for a particular purpose or role. It implies a strong compatibility or natural affinity between an individual or an object and its intended function.
  • pant for The idiom "pant for" refers to a strong and intense desire or longing for something or someone, often accompanied by an intense and desperate need or craving. It conveys a sense of yearning, typically for something unattainable or distant.
  • for real The idiom "for real" is often used to express disbelief, surprise, or genuine confirmation about something. It indicates that something is genuine, true, or serious, rather than a joke, exaggeration, or pretense.
  • ready for this? The idiom "ready for this?" is an expression used to communicate excitement or anticipation before sharing or presenting something remarkable or surprising. It is often used to build suspense or grab someone's attention before revealing unexpected or entertaining information.
  • for part The idiom "for part" means to indicate that the opinion, statement, or action being expressed is valid or representative of a specific person or group involved. It suggests that the viewpoint expressed may not necessarily apply to everyone, but is true or valid from the perspective of the individual or group mentioned.
  • prescribe sth for sth The idiom "prescribe something for something" means to recommend or provide a specific remedy, treatment, or solution for a particular problem or situation. It is often used in a medical or therapeutic context, where a doctor or healthcare professional prescribes a medication, therapy, or course of action to address a specific illness or condition. However, it can also be used metaphorically to suggest providing advice or a solution for non-medical issues as well.
  • prescribe sth for sm The idiom "prescribe something for someone" means to recommend or provide a specific solution, treatment, or remedy to help someone with a particular problem or condition. It often refers to a medical professional giving instructions or recommendations for medication or therapy for a patient. However, it can also be used more figuratively to suggest providing advice or a solution in any context.
  • prospect for sth The idiom "prospect for sth" refers to the act of searching or exploring for something, often with the intention of finding valuable or desirable outcomes. It involves investigating or evaluating the potential or likelihood of obtaining a particular thing or achieving a certain result. This idiom is commonly used in the context of business, mining, real estate, or any situation where one is actively seeking opportunities or possibilities.
  • not for quids The idiom "not for quids" is a colloquial expression used mainly in Australian English. It means that something is not worth the price or cost, implying that one would not do it or participate in it under any circumstances.
  • up for The idiom "up for" typically means being willing or available to participate in or undertake something, usually referring to an activity, task, or challenge. It signifies being ready or prepared for a particular opportunity or event.
  • take someone's word for it The idiom "take someone's word for it" means to believe or trust what someone says without requiring any further evidence or proof. It implies accepting their statement as true based solely on their reputation, authority, or honesty.
  • for a wonder The idiom "for a wonder" means that something is surprising or unexpected. It implies that the described event or situation deviates from what is typically or commonly observed.
  • in for The idiom "in for" means to be about to experience or face something, typically something difficult, uncomfortable, or negative. It implies that a person has committed to or is bound to go through a particular situation or consequence.
  • set one's cap for The idiom "set one's cap for" means to be determined to attract or pursue the romantic interest of someone, typically with the intention of forming a romantic relationship or getting married to them.
  • hold a brief for The idiom "hold a brief for" means to argue in favor of or support someone or something, often by providing arguments or evidence on their behalf. It is often used in a legal context, referring to a lawyer presenting a case on behalf of their client. Figuratively, it can also refer to advocating for or championing a particular cause, idea, or opinion.
  • for hire The idiom "for hire" refers to someone or something that is available to be employed or rented out in exchange for payment. It indicates that a person or object is offering their services or abilities in exchange for compensation.
  • for one's part The idiom "for one's part" refers to expressing or stating one's personal opinion, viewpoint, or action in a particular situation, emphasizing that it may differ from others involved. It is used to indicate individual stance or perspective in relation to a specific matter.
  • out for The idiom "out for" typically refers to being on a mission or seeking something specific. It can mean pursuing a particular goal or objective with determination and focus, often at the expense of others. It may also imply being actively engaged in a certain activity, such as seeking revenge or pursuing personal interests.
  • for love The idiom "for love" typically means to do something purely out of affection, passion, or a strong emotional attachment, without any expectation of material gain or reward. It signifies acting selflessly, driven by the power of love rather than personal benefit.
  • for the love of The idiom "for the love of" is typically used to express frustration, exasperation or disbelief about a situation or someone's actions. It implies that the speaker is struggling to understand or find a rational explanation for the behavior in question.
  • for rent The idiom "for rent" refers to a property or object that is available for temporary use in exchange for payment. It suggests that something is readily available and can be occupied or used by someone by paying a specified fee.
  • give one credit for The idiom "give one credit for" means to acknowledge or recognize someone's efforts, achievements, or positive qualities. It implies acknowledging and appreciating someone's actions or attributes, often in a situation where it may not be expected or where others may not have done the same.
  • for ever and ever The idiom "for ever and ever" is used to express a concept or notion that will last indefinitely or for an extremely long time. It often indicates everlasting or eternal duration.
  • for heaven's sake! The idiom "for heaven's sake!" is an exclamation or interjection used to express frustration, annoyance, or surprise. It is typically used to emphasize the urgency or importance of a request or command.
  • make for The idiom "make for" has several meanings depending on the context, but here is a general definition: "Make for" means to move or proceed towards a particular place, destination, or objective. It implies taking action or making progress in a specific direction, whether it's physical movement or figurative advancement towards a goal. It can also suggest creating or contributing to a certain outcome or result.
  • for show The idiom "for show" refers to something that is done, displayed, or performed solely to create a certain impression or appearance, often without any real substance or meaningful purpose. It implies that the actions or objects are superficial or only done to please others.
  • in the mood for The idiom "in the mood for" means to have a desire or inclination to do or experience something specific. It suggests that a person is mentally or emotionally prepared or eager for a particular activity, food, or experience.
  • end for end The idiom "end for end" means to reverse or flip something completely, typically referring to a physical object or situation. It implies turning or rearranging something so that it faces the opposite direction or order.
  • speak well for To "speak well for" means to express positive qualities or characteristics about someone or something that may contribute to their reputation, credibility, or effectiveness. It implies that the person or thing in question has demonstrated commendable behavior, skills, or achievements, which can be vouched for or endorsed by others.
  • for example The idiom "for example" is used to introduce or provide an illustration of something. It is generally used to give specific instances or scenarios that can clarify or exemplify the point being made.
  • for fear of The idiom "for fear of" typically means to avoid or refrain from doing something because of a perceived negative consequence or outcome. It implies a sense of caution or anxiety about the potential consequences of taking action.
  • for all The idiom "for all" typically means despite or regardless of a particular situation or condition. It suggests that something is true or valid even under certain circumstances.
  • O! for The idiom "O! for" is a phrase used to express a longing or a strong desire for something. It typically highlights a feeling of yearning or a wish for a particular circumstance.
  • allow for The idiom "allow for" typically means to take into consideration or include something when making plans or calculations. It implies allowing enough time, space, or resources for possible eventualities or variables that may arise.
  • take for The idiom "take for" means to assume or consider someone or something to be something specific, often mistakenly. It implies forming an incorrect impression or perception about someone or something.
  • for fun The idiom "for fun" refers to engaging in an activity or doing something purely for enjoyment or amusement, without any serious or practical purpose.
  • go for The idiom "go for" typically means to actively strive or make an effort to achieve or obtain something. It can refer to pursuing a goal, aim, or desired outcome with determination and eagerness. In some contexts, it can also imply supporting or advocating for someone or something.
  • for once The idiom "for once" is used to express that something is happening differently or in an unusual manner compared to how it typically occurs. It implies that there is a deviation from the usual or expected situation, and is often used to convey surprise, relief, or satisfaction about this change.
  • gun for The idiom "gun for" means to actively pursue or aim to defeat, outdo, or harm someone or something, usually in a competitive or aggressive manner. It refers to someone who is determined to achieve success or get revenge by focusing all their efforts and resources on a specific target or goal.
  • dish fit for the gods The idiom "dish fit for the gods" refers to an exceptionally delicious or impeccably prepared meal of the highest quality, like that which would be fit for gods or deities. It implies that the dish is extraordinary and beyond compare in taste, presentation, or overall culinary excellence.
  • Van Gogh’s ear for music The idiom "Van Gogh’s ear for music" does not exist in common usage. It seems to be a play on words, combining the name of the famous artist Vincent Van Gogh, who famously cut off a portion of his own ear, with the phrase "ear for music," which typically means having a good ability to appreciate or understand music. As a whole, it might be interpreted as a humorous or sarcastic way of describing someone who has a poor or unconventional taste in music, or perhaps someone who is not very musically inclined.
  • too cool for school The idiom "too cool for school" refers to someone who behaves or presents themselves as being superior, confident, or detached, often with an air of indifference or nonchalance, particularly in situations involving education, authority, or societal norms. This phrase is typically used to describe individuals who appear uninterested or unaffected by conventional rules, expectations, or social pressures.
  • blow/sod that for a lark The idiom "blow/sod that for a lark" is an expression of annoyance, dismissal, or refusal. It implies that the speaker is rejecting an idea, plan, or situation because it seems useless, unappealing, or inconvenient. The phrase "blow/sod that" is a slang term and can be considered a milder alternative to more explicit expletives. The "for a lark" part of the idiom adds emphasis to the sentiment by suggesting that the mentioned action or suggestion is not worth the effort or trouble, even for a playful or trivial reason.
  • out for the count The idiom "out for the count" means to be unconscious or in a deep sleep. It is typically used to describe someone who is completely unaware of their surroundings or unable to respond due to exhaustion, injury, or other factors.
  • down for the count The idiom "down for the count" means to be knocked down and unable to continue in a physical fight or contest. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone who is defeated, overwhelmed, or incapacitated in a situation and unable to recover or continue.
  • for (so) long The idiom "for (so) long" means a significant period of time or an extended duration. It implies that something has been happening, continuing, or existing for a considerable amount of time. It can be used to express a sense of impatience, weariness, or anticipation regarding the duration of a particular situation.
  • (just) for love The idiom "(just) for love" means doing something purely out of affection or passion, without any expectation of personal gain or reward. It implies that the act is driven by genuine feelings or devotion for a particular person, cause, or activity.
  • not for love or/nor money The idiom "not for love or money" means that something is absolutely impossible to obtain or achieve, regardless of any efforts or resources one might use. It implies that no amount of desire or money can make a particular thing happen.
  • for your life The idiom "for your life" means doing something with extreme effort or urgency, often in a desperate attempt to avoid a dangerous or life-threatening situation. It implies that one is putting in maximum effort in order to preserve their life or avoid severe consequences.
  • money for jam/old rope The idiom "money for jam/old rope" refers to an effortless or easy way to earn or acquire money. It suggests that the task or job at hand requires little skill or effort, yet yields significant financial gain.
  • (all) grist for the/somebody’s mill The idiom "(all) grist for the/somebody's mill" typically means that everything, including seemingly insignificant or unfavorable things, can be useful or advantageous to someone. It refers to the notion that any material or information can be processed, used, or turned to one's advantage, much like grain being ground into flour in a mill.
  • spoil the ship for a ha’p’orth/ha’pennyworth of tar The idiom "spoil the ship for a ha’p’orth/ha’pennyworth of tar" means to ruin or damage something significant due to a lack of investment or attention to detail. It originates from the practice of using tar to waterproof and maintain wooden ships. The phrase implies that neglecting to spend a small amount of money on good quality tar could lead to costly repairs or even the loss of an entire ship.
  • ask, cry, etc. for the moon The idiom "ask, cry, etc. for the moon" means to request or desire something that is unattainable, unrealistic, or highly improbable. It implies wishing for something that is beyond one's reach, like asking for the impossible or demanding the unachievable.
  • for a start The idiom "for a start" means to introduce or mention only one out of several possible options or reasons in a discussion, implying that there are more points to consider or additional things to say.
  • (match somebody) stride for stride The idiom "(match somebody) stride for stride" means to stay at the same level or pace as someone, often in a competitive or challenging situation. It suggests keeping up with or competing with someone closely and in a balanced manner, not falling behind or pulling ahead.
  • fit for purpose The idiom "fit for purpose" means that something is suitable or appropriate for its intended use or task. It denotes that a particular object, system, or solution is able to effectively serve its intended function or fulfill its purpose.
  • there’s/that’s… for you The idiom "there's/that's... for you" is used to express agreement or affirmation of a particular characteristic or quality of someone or something that is being discussed, often highlighting a consistent or typical behavior or outcome. It emphasizes the certainty or predictability of that person's or thing's traits or actions in a given situation.
  • bang for your buck The idiom "bang for your buck" means getting good value or worth for the money you have spent or invested. It implies receiving a desirable outcome or benefit in proportion to the amount of money paid.
  • for somebody’s benefit The idiom "for somebody's benefit" means doing something to help or further someone's best interests or to provide an advantage or advantage to them. It suggests taking actions or making decisions that prioritize the well-being or advancement of a particular person.
  • be after/out for somebody’s blood The expression "be after/out for somebody’s blood" means to be seeking revenge or to be determined to harm or punish someone, often because of anger or a desire to get even for a wrongdoing or offense.
  • make a bolt for it The idiom "make a bolt for it" is used to express the act of making a quick and sudden escape or getaway from a situation or place. It implies a sense of urgency and often refers to a situation where one is trying to evade or avoid something or someone.
  • hang/hold on for dear life To "hang/hold on for dear life" means to grip or cling tightly to something in order to prevent oneself from falling or losing control. It is often used metaphorically to describe a situation where someone is desperately holding on, whether physically or emotionally, to survive, withstand, or overcome a dangerous or challenging circumstance.
  • ache for The idiom "ache for" means to have a deep longing or yearning for something or someone. It implies a strong desire or craving, usually associated with intense emotional or physical pain.
  • adapt (something) for The idiom "adapt (something) for" typically refers to modifying or altering something to make it suitable or applicable for a particular purpose or audience. It implies making adjustments or changes to ensure compatibility or functionality in a different context.
  • admire (one) for The idiom "admire (one) for" means to have respect, appreciation, or high regard for someone because of a specific quality, skill, achievement, or action they have demonstrated.
  • be after/out for somebody's blood The idiom "be after/out for somebody's blood" means to seek revenge or harbor intense anger and a strong desire to harm or punish someone.
  • for the ages The idiom "for the ages" means something that is extraordinary or significant, often considered to be of timeless importance or historical significance. It refers to events, achievements, or works that will be remembered and celebrated for generations.
  • aim for The idiom "aim for" means to strive or work towards a specific goal or target. It implies setting one's sights on achieving a particular objective with focus and determination.
  • cause for alarm The idiom "cause for alarm" means a reason or indication that something is potentially dangerous, troubling, or concerning, and thus warrants attention or concern. It implies that there is a justifiable reason for being anxious or worried about a particular situation or event.
  • A for effort The idiom "A for effort" is used to give praise or recognition to someone's attempt, even if it did not lead to the desired outcome or success. It highlights the person's hard work, diligence, or good intentions rather than focusing solely on the result.
  • a Roland for an Oliver The idiom "a Roland for an Oliver" refers to a situation or exchange in which one person or side is treated or paid back in a similar manner to what they have inflicted on others. It suggests a form of reciprocation or revenge, where deeds or actions are mirrored or returned. The phrase originates from the medieval legends of the knights Roland and Oliver, known for their fierce rivalry and their continuous back-and-forth battles.
  • eye for an eye, an The idiom "an eye for an eye" is derived from the principle of retaliation or retributive justice, originating from the Old Testament of the Bible. It implies that punishment should be proportionate and equal to the harm or offense that was committed. It emphasizes the concept of reciprocal justice, where the severity of punishment should match the severity of the wrongdoing or injury inflicted on someone.
  • keep an eye out for (something or someone) The idiom "keep an eye out for (something or someone)" means to be watchful, alert, or vigilant in order to notice or find something or someone. It implies actively paying attention and being on the lookout for specific things or individuals.
  • and one (more) for luck The idiom "and one (more) for luck" is used to express the act of adding or doing one more thing for good fortune or an increased chance of success. It suggests that adding an extra item or action may bring additional luck or improve the outcome of a situation.
  • answer for The idiom "answer for" refers to taking responsibility for one's actions, decisions, or behavior, especially when facing consequences or accountability. It implies being held liable for the consequences of one's actions and being required to provide an explanation or justification.
  • be a recipe for (something) The idiom "be a recipe for (something)" means that something is likely to result in or cause a particular outcome or consequence, which is generally negative or problematic. It implies that the situation or actions being described will lead to an undesirable or troublesome outcome.
  • make a long arm for (something) The idiom "make a long arm for (something)" typically means to reach out or make an effort to obtain or achieve something that is desired or required. It can refer to both literal and figurative actions. The phrase implies stretching oneself to grasp or attain something that might otherwise be out of reach.
  • cry/ask for the moon The idiom "cry/ask for the moon" means to make an impossible or unreasonable request or demand, often desiring something that is unattainable or beyond the realm of possibility.
  • back for The idiom "back for" typically refers to someone returning or making a comeback to a certain activity, place, or situation after being away or absent for a period of time. It implies an individual's intention to resume or revisit something they have previously engaged in or experienced.
  • make a rod for (one's) own back The idiom "make a rod for (one's) own back" means to unnecessarily create difficulties or problems for oneself through one's own actions or decisions. It refers to the idea that one's own actions can result in negative consequences or self-imposed burdens.
  • battle for The idiom "battle for" typically means to engage in a fierce or prolonged struggle or competition in order to achieve or gain control over something. It often implies a determination to overcome obstacles or opponents in a determined way.
  • all for The idiom "all for" typically means to strongly support or be in favor of something. It implies that one is completely in agreement or willing to do anything to promote or achieve a specific outcome.
  • be (all) for (someone or something) The idiom "be (all) for (someone or something)" means to strongly support or advocate for someone or something. It implies being in favor of their actions or decisions, and to provide assistance or encouragement whenever needed.
  • bang for (one's)/the buck The idiom "bang for (one's)/the buck" means getting value, benefit, or satisfaction from something relative to the amount of money or effort invested. It refers to the idea of receiving a good return on investment, where "bang" symbolizes impact or effectiveness, and "buck" represents money or resources. Therefore, getting "bang for your buck" implies maximizing the benefit or outcome compared to the cost or input.
  • more bang for (one's) buck The idiom "more bang for (one's) buck" refers to getting a greater value or benefit for the money spent. It implies getting a significant return or advantage for the amount of money invested or used.
  • more bang for the buck The idiom "more bang for the buck" means getting more value or benefit from the money or resources invested. It reflects the idea of obtaining a greater return or advantage for the amount of money spent or effort exerted.
  • more bang for your buck The idiom "more bang for your buck" refers to getting more value, benefit, or effectiveness out of your investment or money spent. It implies maximizing the return on investment or getting the best possible outcome for the amount of money or resources utilized.
  • beat (or bang) the drum for (or of) The idiom "beat (or bang) the drum for (or of)" means to advocate for, promote, or strongly support a particular cause, idea, or person. It suggests actively and enthusiastically spreading the word or raising awareness about something. The phrase originates from the idea of beating a drum to draw attention or gather a crowd, emphasizing the active effort employed in gaining support or publicity for a cause.
  • beg for (someone/something) The idiom "beg for (someone/something)" is typically used to describe situations where someone is desperately pleading or making a heartfelt request for someone or something. It implies a desperate desire or need for assistance, attention, forgiveness, or a specific outcome.
  • change for the better The idiom "change for the better" refers to a positive transformation or improvement in a situation or someone's life. It suggests that the change being made will result in a more advantageous or favorable outcome compared to the previous state.
  • take a turn for the better/worse The idiom "take a turn for the better/worse" means a sudden change or shift in a situation, which can either improve it significantly or make it worse. It refers to a shift in circumstances or events that could lead to a more positive or negative outcome than what was previously expected or experienced.
  • turn for the better The idiom "turn for the better" means a positive change or improvement in a situation or someone's life. It signifies a shift from a negative or undesirable state to a more favorable or advantageous one.
  • bid (something) for (something) The idiom "bid (something) for (something)" means making an offer or proposal, often in a competitive context, to acquire or win something. It refers to the act of presenting an amount or suggestion as a potential exchange or agreement for a particular item or opportunity.
  • bill (one) for (something) The idiom "bill (one) for (something)" means to charge someone a specific amount of money for goods or services provided. It refers to the act of presenting a bill or invoice for payment.
  • bill for The idiom "bill for" typically refers to the act of invoicing or charging someone for goods or services provided. It often implies the action of presenting a bill or invoice to someone for payment.
  • make a bolt for The idiom "make a bolt for" means to make a sudden, quick, and often impulsive movement or escape in a specific direction. It implies a sense of urgency or desperation in trying to reach a particular destination or achieve a goal.
  • make a bolt for (someone or something) The idiom "make a bolt for (someone or something)" means to move quickly or suddenly towards someone or something with great determination, often with the intention of catching or reaching them. It implies a sudden and determined rush towards a particular target or destination.
  • make a bolt/dash for it/something The idiom "make a bolt/dash for it/something" means to suddenly run or move quickly in a particular direction, often with the intention to escape or reach a specific target. It implies a sense of urgency and haste in an attempt to achieve a certain objective or avoid a difficult situation.
  • a turn-up for the book The idiom "a turn-up for the book" refers to an unexpected or surprising event or outcome that was contrary to what was expected or predicted. It typically implies that the situation or development is noteworthy or remarkable enough to be recorded or mentioned in a book.
  • a turn-up for the book(s) The idiom "a turn-up for the book(s)" refers to an unexpected or surprising outcome or event that is beyond what was anticipated or imagined. It often implies that the outcome is remarkably advantageous or beneficial. The expression originates from horse racing, where a "turn-up" referred to an unexpected victory. The addition of "for the book(s)" emphasizes that the outcome is uncommon or remarkable enough to be written about in books.
  • one for the (record) book(s) The idiom "one for the (record) book(s)" refers to an extraordinary or remarkable event or accomplishment that is noteworthy enough to be recorded in history or in a notable collection of records. It suggests that the event or achievement is so impressive or significant that it would be remembered and talked about for a long time.
  • one for the book "One for the book" is an idiom used to describe an event, experience, or situation that is noteworthy, exceptional, or extraordinary enough to be recorded or remembered. It usually refers to an unusual or unexpected occurrence that is worth preserving in memory or history.
  • that's a turn-up for the book(s) The idiom "that's a turn-up for the book(s)" is typically used to express surprise or astonishment at an unexpected or surprising event or outcome. It suggests that the situation is so unexpected that it could be written as an interesting or unexpected plot twist in a book.
  • that's one for the (record) book(s) The idiom "that's one for the (record) book(s)" refers to something extraordinary, exceptional, or remarkable, often used to describe an event, achievement, or experience that is notable and unusual enough to be recorded or remembered for future reference. It implies that the occurrence is significant enough to be included in a special record or compilation of noteworthy events.
  • there's a turn-up for the book(s) The idiom "there's a turn-up for the book(s)" means that an unexpected or surprising event has occurred, often contrary to what was initially expected or predicted. It refers to a situation where the outcome or circumstances deviate significantly from what was anticipated, typically in a positive or surprising way. The phrase "turn-up" is derived from the world of gambling, where a sudden unexpected result in a game, such as drawing a winning card, is called a "turn-up." The inclusion of "for the book(s)" suggests that the event is noteworthy or remarkable enough to be recorded or mentioned in a book, further emphasizing its unexpected nature.
  • there's one for (record) the book(s) The idiom "there's one for the book(s)" is used to describe an extraordinary, remarkable, or memorable event or achievement that is worth noting or recording. It suggests that the particular incident or accomplishment is significant enough to be included in a collection of notable instances or experiences.
  • spring for The idiom "spring for" means to pay for something, especially when it involves a significant expense or is unexpected. It implies going beyond what is customary or expected in order to treat someone or make a generous gesture.
  • bound for (somewhere or something) The idiom "bound for (somewhere or something)" typically means that someone or something is heading or destined to reach a particular destination or achieve a specific goal. It implies a sense of purpose or direction towards a specific outcome.
  • brace (oneself) for (something) The idiom "brace (oneself) for (something)" means to prepare or mentally ready oneself for an upcoming difficult, challenging, or unpleasant event. It implies being emotionally or mentally prepared to face a potentially distressing or uncomfortable situation.
  • buck for The idiom "buck for" typically means to strive or work hard towards achieving a particular goal or desired outcome. It implies putting in effort, often in a determined manner, in order to advance or succeed in a specific pursuit.
  • budget (something) for (something) The idiom "budget (something) for (something)" refers to the act of setting aside a specific amount of money, time, or resources for a particular purpose or expense. It involves estimating and allocating funds to accommodate anticipated expenses or goals, ensuring that sufficient resources are available for the planned activity.
  • budget for The idiom "budget for" means to plan or allocate finances or resources for a particular purpose or expense. It involves setting aside an appropriate amount of money or resources to meet a specific financial goal or obligation.
  • burn for (someone or something) The idiom "burn for (someone or something)" means to have a strong desire or intense passion for someone or something. It refers to feeling deeply attracted, infatuated, or captivated by a person, object, goal, or idea.
  • but for (something) The idiom "but for (something)" is used to express a situation or outcome that would be different if not for a particular factor or circumstance. It implies that something has prevented a certain scenario or result from occurring.
  • but for somebody/something The idiom "but for somebody/something" is used to express that if someone or something had not been involved or present, a situation or outcome would have been different or not possible. It implies that someone or something played a crucial role or had a significant impact on the outcome of a particular situation.
  • buzz for (one) The idiom "buzz for (one)" typically means to create excitement, interest, or anticipation on behalf of someone, often with the aim of generating support or attention for them. It can refer to generating positive word-of-mouth, media coverage, or general awareness about an individual.
  • he/she can talk/eat, etc. for England The idiom "he/she can talk/eat, etc. for England" is used to describe someone who possesses an exceptional ability or capacity to perform a particular action. It implies that the person can engage in the described activity to an extraordinary extent or with great proficiency. It often suggests that the person in question is highly skilled, knowledgeable, or accomplished in the mentioned action.
  • set (one's) cap for (someone) The idiom "set one's cap for someone" means to work deliberately towards capturing the romantic interest or affection of a particular person. It implies that one is determined to pursue a romantic relationship with someone and is actively making efforts to win their love or attention.
  • set cap for The idiom "set cap for" means to establish a goal or target to be reached. It is often used to express the act of determining one's ambition or aspiration.
  • make a case for (something) The idiom "make a case for (something)" means to present arguments or evidence in favor of a particular idea, action, or decision. It involves building a logical and convincing argument to support a certain position or viewpoint.
  • give cause for The idiom "give cause for" means to provide a reason or justification for something, typically in a negative or undesirable sense. It implies that an action, event, or behavior has prompted or provoked a particular reaction or consequence.
  • that's (someone or something) for you The idiom "that's (someone or something) for you" is used to express a characteristic, behavior, or trait that is typical or expected of a certain person or thing. It implies that the described action or quality aligns with the person's or thing's nature or reputation. It can be used in a positive or negative context, depending on the intended meaning.
  • too rich for someone’s blood The idiom "too rich for someone's blood" means that something is too expensive or costly for someone's budget or financial means. It suggests that the item or situation is beyond what the person can afford or is willing to spend.
  • charge (something) for (something) The idiom "charge (something) for (something)" means to require payment or set a price for a particular good, service, or activity. It describes the act of asking someone to pay a specific amount of money in exchange for something provided or offered.
  • charge for The idiom "charge for" refers to the act of requiring payment in exchange for a product, service, or use of something. It implies the setting of a specific price or fee for the item or service being provided.
  • cheer for (someone or something) To "cheer for (someone or something)" means to show support, encouragement, or approval for a person, team, or cause, typically by expressing joy, excitement, or applause. It refers to the positive and enthusiastic display of one's backing or loyalty towards someone or something. This can be done verbally by shouting words of encouragement or applause, or through physical actions like clapping, raising one's hands, or jumping up and down.
  • choose (someone or something) for (someone or something) The idiom "choose (someone or something) for (someone or something)" means to intentionally select or opt for a particular person or thing for a specific purpose or role. It often indicates making a deliberate decision in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • cite (one) for (something) The definition of the idiom "cite (one) for (something)" is to officially acknowledge or recognize someone's actions, achievements, or qualities, especially in a positive way. It often implies giving credit, praise, or commendation to someone for a specific reason.
  • claim (something) for (oneself or something) The idiom "claim (something) for (oneself or something)" means to assert ownership, control, or possession of something or to lay a valid or exclusive right to it. It implies staking a claim on something and not allowing others to have access or control over it.
  • leave the field clear for (someone) The idiom "leave the field clear for (someone)" means to step aside, withdraw, or remove oneself from a situation or competition so that someone else can have an advantage or opportunity. It implies giving up or abandoning a desired outcome, position, or contention in favor of another person.
  • too close/high, etc. for comfort The idiom "too close/high, etc. for comfort" means being too near or at a level that causes uneasiness, worry, or anxiety. It implies that a situation or proximity has crossed a threshold where it becomes unsettling or distressing for someone.
  • too for comfort The idiom "too close for comfort" means a situation or experience that makes someone feel worried, anxious, or uneasy because it is potentially dangerous or threatening, or because it involves being too intimate, personal, or close for comfort. It implies that something is beyond a person's comfort zone or crosses a boundary, making them feel uneasy or concerned.
  • coach (someone) for (something) The idiom "coach (someone) for (something)" means to provide training, guidance, or support to someone in order to help them prepare for a particular event, task, or accomplishment. It involves assisting and instructing someone to improve their skills, knowledge, or performance in a specific area.
  • collect for (someone or something) The idiom "collect for (someone or something)" refers to the act of gathering money or funds on behalf of a person, organization, or cause. It often implies that the person is requesting or seeking donations or contributions from others.
  • comb (something) for (someone or something) The idiom "comb (something) for (someone or something)" means to carefully and thoroughly search through a particular area, place, or thing in an attempt to find someone or something specific. It implies a meticulous and detailed search, similar to systematically running a comb through one's hair to ensure every strand is examined.
  • commend (someone) for (something) The idiom "commend (someone) for (something)" means to praise or approve someone for a particular action, achievement, or behavior. It indicates showing approval, admiration, or recognition for someone's positive qualities or actions.
  • commit (oneself or something) for The idiom "commit oneself or something for" means to dedicate or pledge oneself or something to a particular cause, task, or action. It involves making a strong commitment or promise to fully devote time, effort, resources, or support to achieve a desired outcome.
  • count for (something) The idiom "count for (something)" means to have significance, importance, or influence in a particular situation or context. It implies that one's actions, opinions, or contributions are taken into consideration and can make a difference or have an impact on something.
  • cover for The idiom "cover for" means to provide an excuse or explanation for someone's absence, mistakes, or wrongdoing, usually to protect them from facing any consequences or to deflect blame onto oneself.
  • cram for (something) The idiom "cram for (something)" means to study intensively and quickly for an examination or test, typically in a short period of time right before the test takes place. It refers to the act of trying to memorize a large amount of information in a short amount of time in order to perform well on the test.
  • credit for The idiom "credit for" means to acknowledge, recognize, or give someone proper recognition or praise for their actions, accomplishments, or contributions. It is used when attributing deserved acknowledgment or acknowledgment for something.
  • credit for (something) The idiom "credit for (something)" means recognizing or acknowledging someone for their contribution, achievement, or effort in a particular situation or outcome. It implies giving someone deserved recognition or praise for their involvement in a positive or successful result.
  • get credit for The idiom "get credit for" means to receive acknowledgement, recognition, or praise for something that one has done or achieved. It refers to being recognized as the person responsible for a particular action or accomplishment.
  • get credit for (something) The idiom "get credit for (something)" means to receive acknowledgment or recognition for an achievement, action, or contribution. It involves being acknowledged or given due recognition for something one has done.
  • take credit for The idiom "take credit for" means to claim responsibility or acknowledgment for something that has been accomplished or achieved, often in a boastful or self-aggrandizing manner. It refers to someone claiming or accepting recognition for an accomplishment or success that may not solely be their own.
  • cry (or ask) for the moon To "cry (or ask) for the moon" means to make an unreasonable or impractical demand; to ask for something that is impossible or extremely difficult to obtain. It implies seeking something that is beyond reach or highly unlikely to be fulfilled.
  • crusade for (someone or something) The idiom "crusade for (someone or something)" means to strongly advocate or campaign for a particular cause, person, or belief, often with a great deal of passion, dedication, and determination. It implies taking active and relentless measures to support or promote that cause or individual.
  • curse (someone or oneself) for (something) The idiom "curse (someone or oneself) for (something)" means to express intense anger, frustration, or disappointment towards someone or oneself for a particular action or event. It often involves blaming or scolding oneself or others for what has happened. This expression highlights the strong negative emotions associated with feeling upset or regretful about a situation.
  • for ever and a day The idiom "for ever and a day" is a phrase used to describe a very long or indefinite period of time. It implies that something will last for an extended duration, sometimes even beyond what is conceivable or realistically possible.
  • for dear (or your) life The idiom "for dear (or your) life" refers to performing an action with extreme effort, determination, or urgency in order to survive or avoid a dangerous situation. It implies taking any possible measures to ensure one's safety or well-being, often associated with a high level of fear or intensity.
  • decide for (someone or something) The idiom "decide for (someone or something)" means to make a decision on behalf of someone or something, taking responsibility for the outcome and potentially overriding their own input or desires. It implies that the decision-making authority is solely in the hands of the person using the idiom.
  • desert (someone or something) for (someone or something) The idiom "desert (someone or something) for (someone or something)" means to abandon or leave behind a person or thing in favor of another one. It implies forsaking or betraying the loyalty or commitment one had towards someone or something originally, in order to shift their allegiance or focus onto someone or something else.
  • design (something) for (someone or something) The idiom "design (something) for (someone or something)" means to create or plan something specifically suited for a particular person or purpose. It implies tailoring or customizing a design to meet the specific needs, preferences, or requirements of someone or something.
  • detail for (something) The idiom "detail for (something)" typically means to provide specific and thorough information or instructions related to a particular task, assignment, or topic. It implies a need for careful attention to specific details, often in a systematic or organized manner.
  • dig a pit for The idiom "dig a pit for" means to deliberately create a situation or set of circumstances that can harm or sabotage someone, often with the intention of causing their downfall or defeat. It implies cunning and malicious intent to trap or deceive someone.
  • dig for The idiom "dig for" means to search or seek something diligently, often requiring effort or persistence. It can be used both literally, referring to physically digging in the ground, and figuratively, in the sense of searching or investigating thoroughly.
  • do for The idiom "do for" has multiple meanings and can be used in different contexts. Here are a few possible definitions for the idiom "do for": 1. To take care of someone or attend to their needs. Example: "My mother does everything for me, from cooking meals to doing my laundry." 2. To cause harm or damage to someone or something. Example: "That accident surely did for his chances of winning the race." 3. To be in a state of extreme fatigue or exhaustion. Example: "After running a marathon, he was completely done for." 4. To handle or manage a task or responsibility. Example: "I can't do for all the chores on my own, we need to divide the tasks."
  • do not spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar The idiom "do not spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar" means that one should not ruin or jeopardize something valuable or important by being stingy or neglecting to take necessary precautions or actions. It emphasizes the importance of addressing a small issue or investing a small amount of effort or resources to prevent potential larger problems or disasters in the future. In this phrase, "tar" refers to a small amount of tar used for maintenance or repairs on a ship, while "ha'porth" is a contraction of "halfpenny's worth," suggesting a small, insignificant value.
  • leave the door open for The idiom "leave the door open for" means to give a possibility or opportunity for something to happen or be considered in the future. It suggests allowing future options, actions, or decisions to remain open or available.
  • open the door for The idiom "open the door for" refers to creating opportunities or providing assistance for someone to achieve a goal or succeed in a particular endeavor. It implies helping someone to attain a chance or advantage that may have otherwise been difficult or inaccessible.
  • draft (someone) for (something) The idiom "draft (someone) for (something)" means to choose or select someone for a particular task, duty, or role, usually by persuading or convincing them to take on that responsibility. It often implies that the person did not initially want or consider taking on the task but is persuaded or convinced to do so by others. It is similar to recruiting or enlisting someone to join a team or participate in a specific endeavor.
  • draw for (something) The idiom "draw for (something)" typically refers to the act of selecting or determining something randomly or by chance, usually through a lottery or raffle system. It implies that the outcome is uncertain and dependent on luck.
  • dress for The idiom "dress for" means to wear a particular type of clothing that is suitable or appropriate for a specific occasion, event, or situation. It refers to the act of selecting and wearing garments that conform to a specific dress code or social expectation.
  • dress for (someone or something) The idiom "dress for (someone or something)" refers to the act of selecting clothing or attire that is appropriate for a particular person, event, or occasion. It implies putting effort into dressing appropriately and in a way that is suitable for the expectations or standards set by the individual or situation in question.
  • dress for success The idiom "dress for success" means to dress in a way that is appropriate and professional in order to create a positive impression and increase one's chances of succeeding in a particular endeavor, such as a job interview or a business meeting. It implies choosing clothing and accessories that convey competence, confidence, and respect for the situation or environment.
  • dun (someone) for (something) The idiom "dun (someone) for (something)" means to repeatedly ask or demand payment from someone for a debt or money owed. It implies persistently or harassingly seeking payment until the amount is settled.
  • eat for two The idiom "eat for two" typically means to eat a large portion of food, indicating that one person is consuming enough food for two individuals. It is often used humorously or figuratively to express excessive or indulgent eating.
  • for England The idiom "for England" is often used to describe someone's extreme dedication, enthusiasm, or passion for a particular activity, sport, or cause. It implies that the person's commitment is so fervent that they could be representing their country or competing on behalf of England. It signifies wholehearted and unwavering support or dedication.
  • a recipe for disaster, success, etc. The idiom "a recipe for disaster, success, etc." is used to describe a situation, plan, or set of circumstances that is likely to result in a certain outcome, either negative or positive. It implies that certain elements or factors are combined in a way that will lead to a predictable and almost inevitable outcome, whether it be disastrous, successful, or any other desired result.
  • be pressed/pushed for money, space, time, etc. The idiom "be pressed/pushed for money, space, time, etc." refers to a situation where someone is experiencing a shortage or a lack of something, usually resources such as money, space, time, etc. It implies that the person is feeling pressured or compelled due to the limited availability of the desired resource.
  • for God's, heaven's, pity's, etc. sake The idiom "for God's, heaven's, pity's, etc. sake" is an exclamation usually used to express frustration, despair, or urgency. It is a way of pleading or imploring someone to consider and respond to a situation with compassion or urgency. It can be seen as an emphatic way of saying "please" or "for the love of God." This phrase is often used when one feels strongly about a matter or when seeking respite or assistance.
  • for my, his, etc. part The idiom "for my, his, etc. part" is used to express an individual's personal opinion or contribution to a discussion or situation. It signifies that the statement being made is specific to the person mentioned and may differ from those of others involved. It implies the speaker is expressing their perspective or viewpoint on the matter at hand.
  • I, you, etc. for one The idiom "I, you, etc. for one" is used to express a personal opinion or preference, often in contrast to what others might think or believe. It indicates that the speaker (or whoever is mentioned) holds a particular stance or viewpoint, even if it may not align with the majority opinion. It emphasizes the individual's perspective or choice, asserting that they feel strongly about it, regardless of what others might say or think.
  • there's a lot/much to be said for (something) The phrase "there's a lot/much to be said for (something)" means that something has many valid points or positive qualities worth considering or acknowledging. It suggests that there are strong arguments or advantages supporting a particular perspective or option.
  • too funny, sad, etc. for words The idiom "too funny, sad, etc. for words" is used to express a strong feeling or emotion that is difficult to articulate or describe. It suggests that the situation or event in question is so extreme or extraordinary that it surpasses the capacity of language to capture its full impact.
  • exchange for (something) The idiom "exchange for (something)" refers to the act of giving something in return for receiving something else. It implies a trade or swap, where one item or condition is substituted or replaced with another. It could involve trading goods, services, or even ideas.
  • expect (someone or something) for (something) The idiom "expect (someone or something) for (something)" can be defined as anticipating or preparing for a particular outcome or result from someone or something. It refers to having certain expectations or hopes regarding someone or something's performance or behavior in a certain situation.
  • expend (something) for (something) The idiom "expend (something) for (something)" means to use or spend a particular resource, usually money or effort, in order to obtain or achieve a desired outcome or result. It implies the intentional allocation of resources for a specific purpose or goal.
  • a feast for the eyes The idiom "a feast for the eyes" is used to describe something that is visually stunning, captivating, or exceptionally beautiful. It refers to a sight or an experience that is incredibly pleasing or satisfying to the eyes, similar to the enjoyment one derives from a delicious feast.
  • give (one's) eye teeth for (something) The idiom "give (one's) eye teeth for (something)" means to desire something intensely or to be willing to make a great sacrifice in order to obtain it. It conveys the idea of being willing to give up something extremely valuable, such as one's eye teeth (canine teeth), which are highly prized, in exchange for the desired object or experience.
  • give your eye teeth for The idiom "give your eye teeth for" means to be extremely willing to sacrifice or give up something valuable or meaningful in order to obtain or achieve something desired. It portrays a strong desire or longing for a particular thing or outcome.
  • sight for sore eyes, a The idiom "a sight for sore eyes" refers to something or someone that is pleasant or refreshing to see after a period of difficulty, fatigue, or unhappiness. This can be used to express relief, joy, or excitement upon encountering a comforting or beloved person, place, or thing.
  • know for a fact The idiom "know for a fact" means to have absolute certainty or knowledge about something, typically based on concrete evidence or personal experience. It implies a strong conviction or assurance regarding the truth of a particular statement or information.
  • fend for The idiom "fend for" means to take care of oneself without relying on assistance from others. It implies being able to manage and provide for one's own needs and navigate through difficult circumstances independently.
  • file for The idiom "file for" typically means to submit official documents or paperwork to initiate a legal or administrative process, such as filing for a divorce, bankruptcy, or a patent.
  • fit for the gods The idiom "fit for the gods" is used to describe something that is of the highest quality or excellence, often referring to beauty, luxury, or extravagance. It implies that whatever is being referred to exceeds normal human standards and is suitable even for deities or divine beings.
  • fix for The idiom "fix for" typically means having a strong preference or craving for something or being in need of a particular thing or activity. It implies that one has a strong desire or addiction for something.
  • flip for The idiom "flip for" means to make a decision or determine a winner by flipping a coin. It refers to a method where two or more individuals agree to let chance or luck decide an outcome.
  • food for worms The idiom "food for worms" refers to the concept that when someone dies, their body becomes nourishment (food) for worms and decomposes in the earth. It symbolizes the idea of mortality and the natural cycle of life and death.
  • play (one) for a fool The idiom "play (one) for a fool" means to deceive or trick someone, often by making them look or feel foolish or naive.
  • take (someone) for a fool The idiom "take (someone) for a fool" means to consider or treat someone as being easily deceived, gullible, or foolish. It suggests that the person being deceived is seen as lacking intelligence or being easily manipulated by others.
  • A for B The idiom "A for B" refers to using the item or object represented by B as a substitute or symbol for A. It suggests that A shares similar qualities or characteristics with B, often used to explain or compare complex notions with simpler or more relatable ones.
  • a great one for The idiom "a great one for" is used to describe someone who has a strong liking or inclination towards a particular activity, habit, or behavior. It implies that the person frequently or enthusiastically engages in that activity, often to an excessive or exaggerated extent.
  • adapt for The idiom "adapt for" means to modify or adjust something to suit a different purpose, circumstance, or audience. It refers to the act of making changes or alterations to make something compatible or appropriate for a specific situation or context.
  • admire for The idiom "admire for" means to hold high regard or respect for someone or something due to their particular qualities, accomplishments, or attributes.
  • angle for To "angle for" means to subtly or indirectly attempt to achieve something, typically by strategically maneuvering or influencing situations or conversations in one's favor. It refers to the act of trying to obtain or gain something without openly expressing one's intentions.
  • be in it for To be in it for something means to be motivated or interested in pursuing or gaining a particular outcome or benefit from a situation or activity. It implies that a person is engaged or committed to achieving a specific goal or purpose.
  • be money for jam The idiom "be money for jam" means an easy or effortless way to earn money or achieve something without much effort or skills required. It implies that the task or opportunity is simple and lucrative, akin to obtaining delicious jam by effortlessly picking low-hanging fruit from a tree.
  • beg for The idiom "beg for" means to plead or request desperately for something, often showing intense desire or need. It can imply a strong urging or begging that suggests desperation or a significant longing for a particular outcome or item.
  • bid for The idiom "bid for" refers to the act of competing or making an offer in order to acquire something, usually by participating in an auction or a competitive process where individuals or entities submit their proposals or prices to obtain a specific item or opportunity.
  • bleed for The idiom "bleed for" can be defined as having intense compassion or empathy for someone or being deeply moved by their suffering or difficulties. It implies feeling their pain as if it were one's own.
  • buzz for The idiom "buzz for" means to generate excitement or interest about someone or something. It refers to the positive gossip or attention created around a particular person, event, or product, often leading to increased awareness or popularity.
  • cheer for The idiom "cheer for" means to support or show encouragement for someone or something, typically by expressing positive emotions or cheering loudly. It often refers to rooting for a sports team or expressing enthusiasm for a particular person's success or achievement.
  • claim for The definition of the idiom "claim for" is to assert one's rights or ownership over something, usually in a legal or official manner. It refers to making a formal demand or declaration for something to be recognized as rightfully one's own.
  • coach for The idiom "coach for" typically means to train or prepare someone, often in a specific skill or field. It involves providing guidance and support to help individuals or groups improve their performance and reach their goals.
  • collect for The idiom "collect for" typically refers to the act of gathering or receiving payment, often on behalf of someone else or for a specific purpose. It implies the action of obtaining money owed or dues, either personally or as a representative.
  • comb for The idiom "comb for" means to carefully search or examine something in a thorough and meticulous manner, usually in order to find or uncover specific information, evidence, or details. It implies a systematic and exhaustive approach to investigating or analyzing a subject.
  • commend for The idiom "commend for" means to praise, recognize, or express approval for someone's actions, qualities, or achievements. It signifies acknowledging and speaking highly of a person's efforts or accomplishments.
  • Crusade for The idiom "crusade for" means to advocate strongly or passionately for a particular cause or belief, often involving taking action or fighting for it vehemently. It implies a sense of dedication and determination to achieve a goal or to bring about change.
  • curse for The idiom "curse for" refers to something or someone that is considered a cause of misfortune or bad luck. It is often used when describing a situation, object, or person that consistently brings negative consequences or outcomes.
  • decide for The idiom "decide for" means to make a choice or reach a decision on behalf of someone or something. It implies taking responsibility for determining the outcome or making a final decision.
  • desert for The idiom "desert for" does not exist in English. However, if you meant "desert someone", it means to abandon or leave someone, often in a difficult or challenging situation.
  • design for The idiom "design for" typically refers to the act of creating or planning something with a specific purpose or user in mind. It implies that careful thought and consideration have been given to the intended functionality, usability, or aesthetic aspects of a product, system, or solution.
  • draft for The phrase "draft for" does not seem to be a commonly used idiom with a specific definition. "Draft" generally refers to a preliminary version of a document, plan, or written work. However, without more context, it is difficult to provide a specific meaning for "draft for."
  • dun for The idiom "done for" typically means being in a situation where one is facing imminent defeat, destruction, or ruin. It suggests that there is no hope or possibility of recovery or survival.
  • for (one's) life The idiom "for (one's) life" means to do something with maximum effort or dedication. It suggests that someone is doing something as if their life depends on it, giving it their utmost commitment and determination.
  • for (one's) money The idiom "for (one's) money" is an expression used to indicate someone's opinion or preference on a particular matter. It implies that the speaker is about to give their own viewpoint or judgment based on their personal belief or experience.
  • for one's (own) part The idiom "for one's (own) part" means expressing one's own opinion or perspective, typically in a contrasting or clarifying manner. It is often used when there are different viewpoints or positions being discussed, and allows someone to express their individual stance on a particular matter.
  • for somebody’s/something’s sake The idiom "for somebody's/something's sake" means doing something primarily or solely for the benefit or well-being of that person or thing. It implies that the action is being done out of consideration, love, or concern for someone or something, often in a selfless or sacrificial manner.
  • front for The idiom "front for" refers to a situation or business that serves as a cover or disguise for illegal or disreputable activities. It involves using a legitimate or lawful entity as a façade to hide the true nature or purpose of an operation.
  • for fuck's sake The idiom "for fuck's sake" is an exclamation used to express frustration, anger, annoyance, or disbelief towards a situation or someone's behavior. It is a vulgar and emphatic way of conveying strong emotions or emphasizing the severity of a situation.
  • get a yen for (something) The idiom "get a yen for (something)" means to have a strong desire or craving for something. It originated from the concept of the yen, which is the currency of Japan, and is often used metaphorically to describe an intense longing for or hankering towards a particular thing or experience.
  • for pity's sake The idiom "for pity's sake" is an exclamatory phrase used to express frustration, annoyance, or urgency. It is often used when appealing to someone's compassion or empathy in a desperate or pleading manner.
  • for the sake of The idiom "for the sake of" means doing something or taking an action for the purpose, benefit, or interest of someone or something. It implies that the motivation behind the action is to attain a desired outcome or to ensure the well-being of someone or something.
  • for the ride The idiom "for the ride" means to participate in an activity without fully understanding or having a vested interest in its purpose or outcome. It refers to being involved or going along with something simply for the experience or to not miss out on the opportunity.
  • for (one's) (own) good The idiom "for (one's) (own) good" refers to doing something that may seem unpleasant or restrictive, but is ultimately beneficial or advantageous for the person involved. It often implies that the action is taken with the best intentions, despite potential initial resistance or disagreement from the person for whom it is done.
  • for your good The idiom "for your good" means that something is being done or said for the benefit or advantage of someone, even if they may not initially recognize or appreciate it. It implies that the action or decision is being made with the best intentions in mind, despite any potential short-term discomfort or disagreement that may arise.
  • a great one for (doing something) The phrase "a great one for (doing something)" refers to a person who enjoys or regularly engages in a specific activity, often to an excessive or notable degree. It indicates that someone has a particular fondness, passion, or habit for doing something.
  • be a great one for (doing something) The idiom "be a great one for (doing something)" refers to someone who has a strong inclination or tendency to frequently engage in a particular activity or behavior. It implies that the person is enthusiastic, proficient, or dedicated to that specific action.
  • grist for (one's) mill The idiom "grist for (one's) mill" means to provide useful or beneficial material for someone's work, argument, or cause. It refers to any information, ideas, or experiences that can be utilized for one's advantage or to support their perspective or purpose.
  • grist for The idiom "grist for" refers to something that provides valuable material, information, or content for a specific purpose or activity. It can also imply that the subject or content is useful in furthering a certain goal or agenda.
  • grub for The idiom "grub for" typically means searching or seeking for something persistently or diligently, especially with regard to material possessions or necessities. It carries the connotation of working hard or making great efforts to obtain what is desired.
  • spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar The idiom "spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar" refers to the act of neglecting or jeopardizing something substantial or important due to a small or insignificant issue. It suggests that failing to address a minor problem can have significant, negative consequences. The phrase originates from the practice of applying tar to the hulls of ships to protect them from water damage. Failing to apply a tiny amount of tar, although inexpensive, would result in significant damage to the ship. Therefore, the idiom warns against overlooking small details that could potentially ruin a larger endeavor.
  • ask (someone) for (one's) hand The idiom "ask (someone) for (one's) hand" refers to the act of proposing marriage to someone. It implies that the person who is "asking for their hand" is requesting the other person's hand in marriage, seeking their consent and agreement to be married.
  • see (one) for what (one) (really) is The idiom "see (one) for what (one) (really) is" means to perceive or understand someone's true character, intentions, or nature, often after initially having a different or mistaken impression of them. It involves making an accurate judgment about someone's true personality or motives rather than being deceived or influenced by superficial appearances or facades.
  • commit (oneself or something) for (something) The idiom "commit (oneself or something) for (something)" means to dedicate or devote oneself or something to a particular cause, goal, or course of action. It implies a strong commitment, often involving time, effort, or resources, to ensure the desired outcome or result.
  • make a name for (oneself) The idiom "make a name for (oneself)" means to become well-known or famous for one's actions or achievements. It refers to someone who establishes a reputation or gains recognition in a particular field or area.
  • see for (oneself) The idiom "see for oneself" means to personally observe or experience something in order to fully understand or determine its truth, accuracy, or quality, rather than relying on others' accounts or opinions.
  • think for (oneself) The idiom "think for oneself" means to independently form one's own opinions and make decisions, rather than simply accepting or following the thoughts or ideas of others. It emphasizes the importance of critical thinking and individual judgment.
  • too (something) for comfort The idiom "too (something) for comfort" is used to describe a situation or action that makes someone uncomfortable or uneasy because it goes beyond what is considered acceptable, safe, or normal. It suggests that a certain aspect or level of something exceeds a person's comfort zone or raises concern.
  • hit (one) for six The idiom "hit (one) for six" originates from cricket and is used to describe someone being completely caught off guard or shocked by something unexpected or devastating. It refers to a powerful shot in cricket that sends the ball flying out of the field, which often results in scoring six runs. Therefore, when something hits someone for six, it means that it has a tremendous impact on them, leaving them disoriented or overwhelmed.
  • hit/knock somebody/something for six The idiom "hit/knock somebody/something for six" is derived from the sport of cricket and is often used in informal or colloquial conversations. It means to completely overwhelm or greatly shock someone, causing a significant impact or disruption to their state of mind or circumstances. It refers to the powerful strike of a ball in cricket that sends it out of the field for six runs, leaving the opposition at a disadvantage.
  • honor for The idiom "honor for" typically means to recognize or give respect to someone for their achievements, qualities, or actions, often through some form of public acknowledgment or ceremony. It signifies showing admiration, appreciation, or esteem for someone's accomplishments or character.
  • too hot for (one) The idiom "too hot for (one)" means a situation or task that is too challenging, difficult, or intense for someone to handle or endure. It implies that the person is overwhelmed or unable to cope with the situation or task.
  • how's this/that for (something)? The idiomatic phrase "how's this/that for (something)?" is used to emphasize or present something as an example or suggestion, typically in a rhetorical or challenging manner. It is often employed when offering an idea, opinion, or demonstration with a sense of pride or satisfaction, inviting others to consider or evaluate it.
  • how's this/that for a...? The idiom "how's this/that for a...?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise, excitement, or admiration about something. It is often employed to introduce or showcase something impressive, unexpected, unusual, or exemplary.
  • hurt for The idiom "hurt for" refers to experiencing a strong desire, need, or longing for something. It can also imply a lack or shortage of something necessary or important.
  • if it weren't for (someone or something) The idiom "if it weren't for (someone or something)" refers to acknowledging someone's or something's importance or contribution in a specific situation. It implies that without the mentioned person or thing, the outcome or situation would be significantly different or unfavorable.
  • be (a) one for (something) The idiom "be (a) one for (something)" means to have a tendency or inclination toward a particular behavior, activity, or characteristic. It suggests that someone frequently engages in or exhibits that particular thing. It often implies that the behavior or characteristic is not necessarily considered positive or desirable.
  • money for jam The idiom "money for jam" refers to an effortless or easy way to make money, often indicating a task or job that requires minimal effort but yields significant financial gain. It suggests obtaining money or profit with little or no exertion.
  • keep an eye out for (someone or something) The idiom "keep an eye out for (someone or something)" means to remain watchful or vigilant in order to locate, find, or notice a particular person or thing. It implies being observant and actively looking for someone or something, often in order to offer assistance, identify a desired outcome, or avoid potential danger.
  • for a kick-off The idiom "for a kick-off" typically means "as a starting point" or "as a first step" towards something. It is frequently used to imply that an action or decision is just the beginning of a larger plan or process.
  • lack for The idiom "lack for" means to be in need or to not have enough of something. It indicates a scarcity or shortage of a particular item or quality.
  • blow that for a lark The idiom "blow that for a lark" refers to a situation where someone decides not to do or pursue something because it is not enjoyable, interesting, or worth the effort. It conveys a sense of dismissal or rejection of an activity or idea. The word "blow" here is slang for dismissing or disregarding something, while "lark" refers to a carefree or playful activity.
  • sod that for a lark The idiom "sod that for a lark" is an exclamation used to express strong disapproval or rejection of an idea, plan, or action. It conveys a sense of refusal or refusal to engage in something for the sake of amusement or a casual endeavor. It implies that the speaker is not willing to entertain or participate in the mentioned activity under any circumstances.
  • leave for some place The idiom "leave for some place" means to depart or set off to a particular destination or location. It implies the act of beginning a journey or travel to another place.
  • leave the field clear for (one) To "leave the field clear for (one)" means to remove oneself or step aside in order to make way for someone else to have an opportunity or to avoid competition with them. It expresses the act of creating a situation where there is no opposition, interference, or hindrance for the other person.
  • lust for life The idiom "lust for life" refers to an intense desire or passion for living life to its fullest. It suggests a strong and enthusiastic zest for experiencing the joys and pleasures that life has to offer.
  • cast about for The idiom "cast about for" means to search or seek something in various directions or methods, often when trying to find a solution or answer. It involves exploring different possibilities, options, or resources in order to find what one is looking for.
  • there's no rest for the wicked The idiom "there's no rest for the wicked" is often used to convey that those who engage in immoral or sinful behavior rarely find peace or respite from their actions. It implies that individuals who engage in wrongdoing will face consequences or ongoing challenges as a result of their actions, preventing them from finding rest or tranquility.
  • a turn-up for the books The idiom "a turn-up for the books" means a surprising and unexpected outcome or event. It refers to a situation that is considered exciting, unusual, or memorable, usually in a positive way. It indicates a twist or a surprise that deviates from what was anticipated, leading to an outcome that is noteworthy or remarkable enough to be recorded or remembered.
  • put in a good word for sb The idiom "put in a good word for sb" means to speak favorably or give positive feedback about someone to another person, usually in order to help them obtain a desired outcome or to improve their reputation or standing.
  • Nothing for me, thanks. The idiom "Nothing for me, thanks" is a polite way of declining an invitation or an offer. It expresses that the person does not wish to partake in or receive something that has been offered to them.
  • reimburse sm for sth The idiom "reimburse someone for something" means to repay or compensate someone for the money they have spent, typically in relation to expenses or costs incurred on behalf of another person or company.
  • never marry for money, but marry where money is The idiom "never marry for money, but marry where money is" essentially means that while one should not solely seek out a partner based on their wealth or financial status, it is beneficial to consider someone who is financially stable or comfortable. It suggests that marrying someone solely for their money can lead to dissatisfaction and a lack of genuine connection, but being with someone who has financial stability can bring security and ease to a relationship.
  • bleed for sb/sth The idiom "bleed for sb/sth" means to feel strong empathy or sympathy for someone or something. It implies that you are deeply affected by the suffering, pain, or difficult situation of another person or a particular cause.
  • like turkeys voting for (an early) Christmas The idiom "like turkeys voting for (an early) Christmas" is used to describe a situation where someone unknowingly or foolishly contributes to their own downfall or demise. It refers to turkeys voting for an early Christmas, which would imply that they are willingly participating in their own slaughter.
  • eat sb for breakfast The idiom "eat someone for breakfast" is a metaphorical expression that implies dominating or showing complete superiority over someone, usually in a competitive or confrontational situation. It suggests the idea of easily defeating or overcoming someone, just as one would consume a meal without any difficulty or hesitation.
  • apologize (to sm) for (sm) The idiom "apologize (to someone) for (something)" means to express regret or say sorry to someone for a mistake, offense, or wrongdoing that one has committed.
  • call for sth The idiom "call for sth" means to require or demand something, specifically through an action or request. It implies that a particular situation or circumstance necessitates a specific response or solution.
  • devil (someone or something) for (something) The idiom "devil (someone or something) for (something)" typically means to bother, annoy, or torment someone excessively or relentlessly. It implies causing trouble or making someone's life difficult.
  • deserve credit for something The phrase "deserve credit for something" means that someone should be recognized or acknowledged for their actions, efforts, or achievements. It suggests that the person has done something praiseworthy or worthy of admiration and should be given appropriate recognition or acknowledgment for it.
  • art for art's sake The idiom "art for art's sake" refers to the concept of creating or appreciating art purely for its own sake, without any ulterior motive or purpose. It emphasizes the idea that art should be valued and pursued purely for its intrinsic beauty, aesthetic pleasure, or creative expression, rather than being driven by external factors such as commercial gain, social or political agenda, or moral lessons.
  • gunning for sth The idiom "gunning for something" means to be determined or actively pursuing a particular goal, objective, or target. It implies a strong desire or intention to achieve something, often in a competitive or aggressive manner. It can also indicate a person's readiness to engage in confrontation or competition.
  • What else can I do for you? The idiom "What else can I do for you?" is a polite and courteous way of asking if there is anything additional that one can assist or help with.
  • leave the door open for (something or doing something) The idiom "leave the door open for (something or doing something)" means to retain the possibility or opportunity for a specific action or outcome in the future. It suggests not closing off any options or alternatives, allowing for flexibility and potential changes.
  • provide for sb The idiom "provide for sb" means to take care of or support someone, usually in terms of their financial and basic needs. It refers to ensuring that someone has the necessary resources, such as food, shelter, and money, to live comfortably or fulfill their needs.
  • fall for sm The idiom "fall for someone" means to develop romantic feelings or to become infatuated with someone. It implies being captivated or emotionally invested in someone.
  • stand in for The idiom "stand in for" means to temporarily take someone's place or perform their duties or responsibilities. It refers to acting as a substitute or replacement for someone.
  • time off for good behavior The idiom "time off for good behavior" generally refers to a reduction in a person's punishment or sentence due to their satisfactory conduct or adherence to rules while serving a sentence in prison or confinement. This phrase implies that someone is being rewarded or granted a leniency in their punishment based on their good behavior or positive actions.
  • bode ill for (someone or something) The idiom "bode ill for (someone or something)" means to predict or indicate negative or unfortunate consequences for someone or something. It suggests that the circumstances or developments are likely to result in an unfavorable outcome or bring harm or misfortune.
  • fish for compliments The idiom "fish for compliments" refers to the behavior of seeking acknowledgment, admiration, or praise from others by indirectly or subtly prompting them to give compliments about oneself, usually in an insecure or self-centered manner.
  • aim for the sky The idiom "aim for the sky" means to set high goals or ambitions for oneself, to strive for the best outcome, or to have lofty aspirations. It is about aiming for success or aiming to achieve something significant.
  • can't see the forest for the trees, at can't see the wood for the trees The idiom "can't see the forest for the trees" (or "can't see the wood for the trees") means to be so focused on small or insignificant details that one fails to see or understand the larger picture or main point of a situation or problem. It implies that someone is too immersed in the minutiae to grasp the overall concept or recognize the broader implications. Essentially, the idiom suggests that an individual is missing the forest (or the wood) because they are too fixated on the individual trees.
  • hold good for The idiom "hold good for" means that something remains true or valid for a particular situation or circumstance. It suggests that a particular rule, principle, or condition applies and will continue to apply in the specified case.
  • clamor for someone or something The idiom "clamor for someone or something" means to demand someone or something eagerly and noisily. It refers to expressing a loud and persistent desire or outcry for a certain person or thing.
  • look for a dog to kick The idiom "look for a dog to kick" refers to the act of seeking someone or something to blame or criticize without reasonable cause or provocation. It suggests a tendency to seek out and express frustration or anger towards others, often as a means to feel superior or alleviate one's own problems.
  • for all intents and purposes The idiom "for all intents and purposes" means essentially or practically. It refers to a situation in which something can be considered true or effective even if it is not completely or technically accurate.
  • collect (money) for something The idiom "collect (money) for something" refers to the act of gathering or soliciting money from people for a specific purpose or cause. It involves accumulating funds through various means, such as donations, contributions, or sales, in order to support a particular endeavor, such as a charity, event, project, or organization.
  • go on for an age The idiom "go on for an age" typically refers to a situation or event that lasts for an excessively long time, possibly seeming endless. It implies a feeling of impatience or boredom due to the significant duration of the occurrence.
  • be baying for blood The idiom "be baying for blood" means to be seeking revenge or eager to punish someone, often exhibiting strong anger or aggression towards them. It implies a desire for justice or retribution, usually driven by a vengeful or fierce attitude.
  • not for nothing The idiom "not for nothing" means that there is a valid reason or evidence for a certain belief or statement. It suggests that something should not be disregarded or dismissed lightly.
  • save (something) for a rainy day The idiom "save (something) for a rainy day" means to set aside something, usually money or resources, for future use or in anticipation of difficult times or emergencies. It emphasizes the importance of being prepared and having a reserve when needed.
  • arrange for sth The idiom "arrange for sth" means to make plans or preparations for something to happen or be provided. It refers to the act of organizing or coordinating something in advance to ensure its successful execution or availability.
  • be off for sth The idiom "be off for something" means to have enough or plenty of something, especially in terms of a particular resource or supply. It indicates that there is an adequate amount of the desired item or that sufficient arrangements have been made for it.
  • have use for The idiom "have use for" means to have a practical need or purpose for something or someone. It refers to the idea of finding value, usefulness, or relevance in a particular person, thing, or idea.
  • hell-bent for The idiom "hell-bent for" means to be fully determined or resolved to achieve or accomplish something, often without considering the potential consequences or dangers involved. It implies an intense and relentless pursuit towards a goal, often characterized by a reckless or unwavering commitment.
  • for a man/woman/person of his/her years The idiom "for a man/woman/person of his/her years" refers to someone who behaves, looks, or possesses certain qualities that are more typical of a person much younger or older than their actual age. It suggests that the person defies the expectations or stereotypes associated with their age group.
  • disqualify (someone or something) for (something) The idiom "disqualify (someone or something) for (something)" means to declare or determine that a person or thing is not eligible or suitable for a specific role, position, opportunity, or competition due to certain reasons or criteria. It typically involves ruling out someone or something because they do not meet the required standards, qualifications, or prerequisites necessary for the particular context.
  • thank sm for sth The idiom "thank sm for sth" refers to expressing gratitude or appreciation towards someone for something they have done or provided.
  • run for life The idiom "run for life" typically means to flee or escape a dangerous or life-threatening situation as quickly as possible in order to preserve one's own life.
  • come/go along for the ride The idiom "come/go along for the ride" refers to accompanying someone or participating in an activity without having a specific role or purpose. It means to join others in an event or undertaking without actively contributing or being fully aware of the purpose or details involved. It indicates being a passive participant or simply going with the flow.
  • yearn for sm or sth The idiom "yearn for someone or something" means to have a strong and intense desire or longing for someone or something. It implies a deep emotional or sentimental attachment or longing that often cannot be easily fulfilled.
  • compete for sm or sth The idiom "compete for something" means to engage in a contest or rivalry with others to achieve or obtain a particular thing or goal. It implies striving against competitors in order to prove oneself as the best or most deserving.
  • what's the drill for sth? The idiom "what's the drill for sth" is generally used to inquire about the procedure, instructions, or protocol for a particular task or situation. It is seeking information about the established or customary way of doing something.
  • for all you are worth The idiom "for all you are worth" means to do something with maximum effort, intensity, or enthusiasm. It suggests giving or contributing everything one possesses or is capable of.
  • be up for grabs The idiom "be up for grabs" means that something is available, attainable, or open to anyone who wishes to take advantage of it. It often refers to opportunities, prizes, or objects that are free for anyone to claim or compete for.
  • a run for money The idiom "a run for money" means to be a strong competitor or challenger in a competition or contest, testing or challenging someone's abilities or skills to a considerable extent. It implies that someone provides significant competition, making others work hard to succeed or achieve their goals.
  • destine sm for sth The idiom "destine someone for something" means to determine or set someone on a course or purpose for a specific outcome or role. It implies that someone is meant or predetermined to achieve or experience a particular thing in their life.
  • scratch for (one)self The idiom "scratch for (one)self" means to rely on one's own efforts, skills, or resources to survive or achieve something without expecting assistance from others. It implies being self-reliant and independent in dealing with challenges or achieving goals.
  • not for love or money The idiom "not for love or money" means that something cannot be obtained or achieved no matter how much one desires it or is willing to pay for it. It implies that the situation or object is unattainable or impossible to acquire, regardless of the effort or resources invested.
  • be an apology for To be an apology for something or someone means to be a poor or inadequate representation or substitute. It suggests that the thing or person being referred to is unsatisfactory or does not meet expectations.
  • what's good for the goose is good for the gander The idiom "what's good for the goose is good for the gander" means that what is considered acceptable or beneficial for one person should be equally acceptable or beneficial for another, especially when referring to equal treatment between men and women. It indicates the principle of fairness and equal opportunities for all.
  • have a lot of time for sb To have a lot of time for someone means to highly esteem, respect, or admire them and be willing to spend time with them. It suggests that one values the person's company and considers them important or worthy of attention.
  • carry a torch for The idiom "carry a torch for" refers to having strong romantic feelings or being in love with someone who does not share the same feelings or is no longer available. It implies an enduring and unrequited love, often with a sense of longing or pining for the person.
  • if knows what's good for The idiom "if knows what's good for" typically implies that someone should take a certain action or behave in a certain way in order to avoid negative consequences or to receive benefits. It suggests that the person should be aware of their best interest and act accordingly.
  • interview sm for sth The phrase "interview someone for something" typically refers to the act of conducting an interview or conversation with someone in order to assess their suitability or qualifications for a particular position, role, or task. It is commonly used in the context of job interviews, where employers evaluate candidates to determine their compatibility with a specific job opportunity.
  • be for it The idiom "be for it" typically means to be in favor or support of something, for example, a decision, action, or idea. It suggests that someone is in agreement and stands behind a certain proposition or course of action.
  • examine someone or something for something The idiom "examine someone or something for something" means to carefully inspect or scrutinize someone or something in order to find or discover a particular thing or quality. It implies a thorough search or investigation to uncover specific information, traits, or evidence.
  • be gagging for it The idiom "be gagging for it" typically means to have a strong desire or craving for something, often in a physical or sexual context.
  • try for sth The idiom "try for sth" means to attempt or make an effort to achieve or obtain something. It implies striving or working towards a specific goal, often with determination and perseverance.
  • feel sorry for (someone) The idiom "feel sorry for (someone)" means to sympathize or have empathy for someone who is in a difficult or challenging situation. It implies feeling compassion or pity for the person and understanding their suffering or hardships.
  • be for sm or sth The idiom "be for someone or something" means to support, approve, or advocate for someone or something. It implies being in favor of a specific person, cause, idea, or action.
  • compete for The idiom "compete for" means to participate in a competition or rivalry with the goal of achieving a certain outcome, such as winning a prize, gaining recognition, or attaining a desired position. It usually involves striving to outperform or outdo others who are also vying for the same objective.
  • devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose The idiom "devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose" refers to the idea that someone with malicious intentions or hidden motives may manipulate or misuse religious texts or teachings to support their own agendas or justify their wrongful actions. It emphasizes the importance of discernment and critical thinking when interpreting and applying religious teachings.
  • have a head for (something) The idiom "have a head for (something)" means to possess a natural talent or aptitude for a particular skill, subject, or activity. It suggests that a person has a natural ability to understand, grasp, or excel in that specific area.
  • put in for The idiom "put in for" means to formally request or apply for something, typically referring to a position, job, promotion, or a desired outcome. It implies making a formal submission or expressing one's interest in being considered for a particular opportunity.
  • shoot for sth The idiom "shoot for sth" means to aim or strive for something, usually a goal or target. It implies setting high aspirations or ambitions and making an effort to achieve them.
  • starve for sm or sth The idiom "starve for someone or something" typically means to yearn or desire someone or something strongly. It describes a strong craving or longing for something that is desired or needed intensely.
  • do anything for a quiet life The idiom "do anything for a quiet life" means that someone is willing to go to great lengths or make significant sacrifices in order to avoid conflict, stress, or disturbance and live in peace and tranquility.
  • might as well be hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb The idiom "might as well be hung for a sheep as (for) a lamb" means that if one is already facing severe consequences or punishment for a small offense, they might as well commit a larger offense since the consequences will be the same. In other words, if the punishment is going to be severe regardless, there is no difference in the severity of the offense committed.
  • fumble for sth The idiom "fumble for something" refers to the act of clumsily or clumsily attempting to find or retrieve an object, often when under pressure or in a panicked state. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the process of struggling or being uncertain in finding a solution or understanding something.
  • go in for The idiom "go in for" means to have an interest in or enjoy a particular activity, hobby, or pursuit. It can also refer to actively participating or supporting something.
  • have a good run for your money The idiom "have a good run for your money" means to receive a satisfying or worthwhile experience, typically in a competitive situation or when facing a challenge, despite not ultimately achieving victory or success. It suggests that even if someone doesn't achieve their intended outcome, they had a fair chance and made the most of their opportunities.
  • send for sm or sth The idiom "send for someone or something" means to request the presence or delivery of a person or thing, typically through a message or communication, so that they can be brought to the speaker's location or situation. It implies the need or desire for someone or something to be brought or sent for a particular purpose.
  • head for tall timber The idiom "head for tall timber" means to flee or escape a dangerous or threatening situation quickly. It originates from the idea of seeking refuge in a dense forest or wooded area, where it is believed to be safer from harm.
  • be curtains for (someone or something) The idiom "be curtains for (someone or something)" means that someone or something is near the end or about to come to a definite, often negative, conclusion. It implies that the person or thing is facing imminent failure, defeat, demise, or death. Similar expressions include "be finished" or "be done for."
  • have it in for sb The idiom "have it in for sb" means to harbor ill feelings towards someone, to hold a grudge against them, or to have a spiteful and malicious intent towards them.
  • an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth The idiom "an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" refers to the principle of justice or retaliation in which the punishment should be equal to the harm or injury caused. It suggests that retribution should be proportional to the offense committed, and the offender should experience the same injury or harm they inflicted upon others.
  • appear for someone The idiom "appear for someone" means to come forward or show up on behalf of someone in a particular situation, usually in a legal or formal context. It implies providing support, representation, or testimony for that person.
  • gun for someone To "gun for someone" is an idiomatic expression that means to pursue, target, or seek to surpass or defeat someone, often with intense determination or aggression. It implies a deliberate effort to outperform or outdo the other person, usually in a competitive context.
  • indict sm for sth The idiom "indict someone for something" refers to formally charging or accusing someone of a wrongdoing or crime, typically by a legal authority such as a grand jury. It implies that there is enough evidence to support the accusation, and the legal process will proceed to determine the guilt or innocence of the person being indicted.
  • be meant for each other The idiom "be meant for each other" means that two people are perfectly suited or destined to be together, usually in a romantic relationship. It implies a strong, natural connection and compatibility between individuals.
  • lay for someone or something "Lay for someone or something" is an idiomatic expression that means to wait or watch for someone or something with the intention of capturing, attacking, or confronting them. It implies a sense of anticipation and readiness to take action.
  • a miserable, poor, etc. excuse for sth The idiom "a miserable, poor, etc. excuse for something" refers to an inadequate or unsatisfactory representation or example of something. It implies that the quality or performance of the said thing is so low or disappointing that it can be considered a pitiful excuse or a feeble attempt.
  • be too close for comfort The idiom "be too close for comfort" means to be uncomfortably close or near to someone or something, usually indicating a feeling of unease or anxiety. It refers to a situation or proximity that makes one feel uneasy, threatened, or overwhelmed.
  • good on you!, at good for you! The expression "good on you!" or "good for you!" is an idiom used to express approval or admiration for someone's actions or accomplishments. It is often used to celebrate someone's success, achievements, or positive behavior. It conveys a sense of praise, encouragement, and recognition for the person's efforts.
  • for the devil of it The idiom "for the devil of it" means performing an action or doing something just to be mischievous, to cause trouble, or for no particular reason other than to annoy or provoke others.
  • celebrate someone for an accomplishment The idiom "celebrate someone for an accomplishment" means to acknowledge and honor someone's achievement or success. It involves expressing joy, admiration, and praise towards an individual who has accomplished something noteworthy or significant. This celebration can take various forms, including parties, ceremonies, awards, public recognition, or simply showing appreciation and support for their achievements.
  • cry for sm or sth The idiom "cry for someone or something" means to express a strong desire or need for someone or something. It suggests that the person or thing being sought is essential or highly valued, leading to a plea or request for their presence or acquisition.
  • strike a blow for The idiom "strike a blow for" means to take action or make an effort in support of a particular cause, belief, or principle, with the intention of making progress or bringing about change. It often implies taking a stand against something unjust or oppressive.
  • produce sth for sth The idiom "produce something for something" means to create, manufacture or generate something specifically for a particular purpose or event. It implies the act of making or providing something in response to a specific requirement or need.
  • If you want peace, (you must) prepare for war. The idiom "If you want peace, (you must) prepare for war" means that one must be strong and ready to defend themselves in order to discourage aggression from others. It suggests that being well-prepared and having a strong defense can serve as a deterrent to potential threats, ultimately ensuring peace and safety.
  • adjourn for The idiom "adjourn for" means to temporarily suspend or halt a meeting, discussion, or activity with the intention of resuming it at a later time. It implies a temporary break or recess before continuing with the proceedings.
  • witness for sm or sth The idiom "witness for someone or something" means to provide evidence, testimony, or personal experience that supports or confirms the truth or validity of someone or something. It refers to being a firsthand witness who can vouch for the credibility, integrity, or correctness of a person or object.
  • have a passion for sm or sth To have a passion for something means to have a very strong and intense enthusiasm, interest, or love for a particular activity, hobby, or subject. It implies being deeply devoted, committed, and dedicated to pursuing and enjoying that specific area of interest.
  • can't say for sure The idiom "can't say for sure" means that one is uncertain or lacks the necessary information to provide an exact answer or assurance regarding a particular situation or outcome. It implies that one cannot confidently determine or predict the truth or certainty of something.
  • scrounge (around for someone or something) The idiom "scrounge around for someone or something" means to search or rummage in a haphazard or desperate manner in order to find someone or something, often with the implication of seeking things of little value or importance. It can suggest a sense of scavenging or gathering whatever is available.
  • have it in for The idiom "have it in for" means to have a strong dislike or animosity towards someone, leading to a persistent desire to harm or cause difficulties for them. It suggests a deep-seated grudge or ill will.
  • care for sm or sth The idiom "care for someone or something" means to have a liking or fondness for someone or something, to have concern or interest in their well-being, or to take care of or provide for them in a responsible manner.
  • care for sth The idiom "care for something" means to have an interest in, like, or enjoy something. It implies a level of concern or preference towards a particular thing or activity.
  • employ for The idiom "employ for" generally means to use or utilize someone or something for a particular purpose or task. It suggests hiring or engaging someone or something in order to achieve a specific objective or benefit from their services or qualities.
  • for the long haul The idiom "for the long haul" means to commit to a task, project, or relationship for an extended period of time, remaining committed and dedicated even when facing challenges or difficulties along the way. It implies a willingness to endure and persist in order to achieve a goal or desired outcome.
  • wait for dead men's shoes The idiom "wait for dead men's shoes" means to wait for someone to die or step down from a position in order to acquire their role or opportunity. It implies a patient and hopeful waiting for a chance to become available.
  • have an appetite for To have an appetite for something means to have a strong desire or inclination towards it. It implies a strong interest or craving for a particular thing, whether it be literal food or a metaphorical desire for something else, such as success, adventure, knowledge, etc.
  • take for granted The idiom "take for granted" means to not show appreciation or value for something or someone, assuming it will always be available or present without considering its possible loss or absence.
  • be a dead ringer for sb/sth The idiom "be a dead ringer for sb/sth" means to closely resemble or strongly resemble someone or something else, often in terms of physical appearance. It suggests that the resemblance is so striking that it is as if the person or object being compared is identical or a twin of the other.
  • work out for the best The idiomatic phrase "work out for the best" means that despite experiencing difficulties or uncertainty in a situation, it is believed or hoped that the end result will be positive or advantageous. It implies having faith or optimism that things will ultimately turn out well, even if the path to reach that outcome may be unclear or challenging.
  • for all the world as if/though... The idiom "for all the world as if/though..." is used to describe a situation or behavior that appears exactly or exactly like something else, even though it may not be true or accurate. It emphasizes how convincing or realistic the resemblance or similarity is.
  • sell sth for a certain price The idiom "sell something for a certain price" means to exchange or offer something in return for a specific amount of money. It implies that the specified price is the agreed-upon value at which the item or service will be sold.
  • trouble for "Trouble for" typically refers to a situation where someone is likely to experience difficulties or problems as a result of their actions or decisions. It suggests that the person may face consequences or unfavorable circumstances due to their choices or behavior.
  • lay aside for The phrase "lay aside for" typically means to set something or keep something apart for future use or reference. It implies putting something aside, such as money, time, or resources, for a specific purpose or reserve, often for a later time when it may be needed. It involves saving or allocating something with the intention of using it at a later point.
  • hold still for The idiom "hold still for" means to stay calm or remain motionless, usually in order to allow someone to complete a task or action. It often implies a request for cooperation or patience from someone.
  • not see the forest for the trees, at not see the wood for the trees The idiom "not see the forest for the trees" means that someone is so focused on the small details or individual components of a situation that they fail to see or understand the overall or big picture. They become overly consumed by the minor aspects that they overlook the broader perspective or main issue. Essentially, it implies that one is too close to a situation to see it objectively and with clarity. "Not see the wood for the trees" is essentially synonymous with this idiom.
  • for what it is worth The idiom "for what it is worth" refers to something that may not hold much value or importance, but is still being offered or shared. It implies that although the information or opinion being shared may not be highly valuable or influential, it is still being provided.
  • There's no peace for the wicked! The idiom "There's no peace for the wicked!" is a phrase used to convey that individuals who engage in immoral or dishonest actions will face ongoing trouble or difficulties as a consequence of their actions. It implies that those who act wickedly or commit wrongful deeds cannot expect to find peace or tranquility in their lives.
  • criticize someone for something The idiom "criticize someone for something" means to express disapproval or negative judgment towards someone regarding a specific action, behavior, quality, or decision they have made. It often involves pointing out flaws, shortcomings, or mistakes with the intention of highlighting the person's perceived faults or errors.
  • make it hot for somebody The idiom "make it hot for somebody" means to create a difficult or uncomfortable situation for someone, typically through criticism, punishment, or intense pressure. It implies making it challenging for the person involved, often causing distress or trouble.
  • There's no peace/rest for the wicked! The idiom "There's no peace/rest for the wicked" is typically used to convey that those who engage in wrongdoing or immoral actions can never find peace or respite. It implies that individuals who have done something wrong are destined to face the consequences or disturbances in their lives, preventing them from finding inner peace or tranquility.
  • speak for itself/themselves The idiom "speak for itself/themselves" means that something is so obvious or clear that it does not need any explanation or additional commentary. The evidence or facts are sufficient to convey the intended meaning or message.
  • not for publication The idiom "not for publication" is used to indicate that certain information or content is not intended to be made available to the public or shared beyond a specific group of people. It implies that the information should be kept confidential, not written about or shared in media publications, or otherwise kept private, usually due to its sensitive or confidential nature.
  • argue for sm or sth To "argue for something or someone" means to present reasons or evidence in support of a particular idea, belief, or stance. It involves advocating or defending a particular viewpoint or position in a persuasive or logical manner.
  • come up for The idiom "come up for" generally means to present oneself or be considered or discussed in a particular context or situation. It can be used to describe someone or something being evaluated, reviewed, or assessed for a specific purpose, such as an examination, interview, promotion, parole hearing, trial, etc. Overall, it implies that the person or thing is being brought forward for evaluation or consideration.
  • hunger for sm or sth The idiom "hunger for something" means to have a strong and intense desire or craving for something, whether it is a tangible object, an experience, or an abstract concept. It implies a sense of yearning and longing that cannot be easily satisfied.
  • be on course for sth The idiom "be on course for something" means to be heading or moving in the direction of achieving or attaining something. It implies that progress is being made and that one is likely to achieve their desired outcome or goal.
  • substitute for sm or sth The idiom "substitute for someone or something" refers to finding or using a replacement that serves the same purpose as the person or thing being replaced. It implies finding an alternative that can fulfill the same function or achieve similar results.
  • for all (one) knows The idiom "for all (one) knows" means that the information or understanding one has is limited or uncertain. It suggests that an outcome or situation may exist or occur, but it is not known or understood by someone.
  • for all is worth The idiom "for all it's worth" is used to express giving or doing something to the maximum extent or taking full advantage of a situation, often implying that no effort or expense will be spared. It can also suggest trying one's best or making the most of an opportunity.
  • ply for hire The idiom "ply for hire" refers to actively seeking or soliciting employment or work, often by offering one's skills, services, or goods for hire. It implies actively searching for opportunities to gain employment or secure business transactions.
  • blame for The idiom "blame for" refers to holding someone responsible or accountable for something negative or wrong that has occurred. It suggests attributing fault or assigning guilt to a particular individual or group for a specified action or outcome.
  • have no use for The idiom "have no use for" means to not find something or someone useful, valuable, or necessary. It implies a lack of interest, usefulness, or relevance in relation to the topic or person being referred to.
  • made for each other The idiom "made for each other" refers to a perfectly compatible or well-suited couple or pair. It suggests that the individuals were seemingly designed or destined to be together due to their deep connection, harmonious nature, and strong chemistry.
  • be spoiled for choice The idiom "be spoiled for choice" means to have many options or alternatives to choose from, making it difficult to make a decision due to the abundance of possibilities.
  • barter for sth The idiom "barter for something" refers to the act of exchanging goods or services directly, without using money. It involves negotiating and trading items or services of equal or similar value between two parties, where both parties mutually agree on the terms of the trade.
  • not take anything for granted The idiom "not take anything for granted" means to not assume or expect things to always remain the same or be readily available without appreciating their value or understanding the effort required to obtain or maintain them. It encourages gratitude and mindfulness in acknowledging and valuing the blessings, opportunities, relationships, or privileges one has, without assuming they will always be there or come easily.
  • have the hots for someone The idiom "have the hots for someone" means to have a strong sexual or romantic attraction towards someone. It implies an intense desire or infatuation for that person.
  • on course for something/to do something The idiom "on course for something/to do something" is commonly used to indicate that someone or something is progressing or advancing toward a specific goal, objective, or outcome. It implies that the person or thing is following the intended path or track without any significant deviation. It suggests that the individual or entity is poised to achieve the desired result or is currently making satisfactory progress in that direction.
  • ask for sth (bad or dire) The idiom "ask for something (bad or dire)" is typically used to describe a situation where someone is knowingly or unknowingly inviting or bringing about negative consequences or trouble upon themselves. It implies that the person's actions or choices are likely to lead to negative outcomes or consequences.
  • assume liability for The definition of the idiom "assume liability for" is to accept responsibility for a particular action, task, or outcome, typically involving legal or financial obligations. It means taking on the burden or accountability for any potential damages, losses, or debts that may result from a certain situation or event.
  • (just) for the love of something The idiom "(just) for the love of something" refers to doing something purely out of passion, without any expectation of reward or personal gain. It implies that the person engaging in the activity is driven by their intense affection or enthusiasm for it.
  • starve for sm food The idiom "starve for sm food" refers to a strong desire or intense craving for a specific type of food. It suggests a level of hunger or longing that cannot easily be satisfied until that particular food is consumed.
  • for all it's worth The idiom "for all it's worth" means to do something to the greatest extent or with maximum effort, often in order to obtain as much benefit or advantage as possible. It suggests giving something one's utmost effort, utilizing all possible resources or extracting the maximum value from a situation.
  • have (something) for The idiom "have (something) for" typically means to possess a particular attribute, quality, or characteristic that is described or implied. It suggests ownership or possession of the mentioned thing.
  • if one knows what’s good for one The idiom "if one knows what’s good for one" implies that someone should make a wise or beneficial choice, action, or decision to ensure their own well-being or quality of life. It can also suggest that taking advice or heeding warnings from others is advisable for personal benefit.
  • for all (one) is worth The idiom "for all (one) is worth" means doing something with all of one's energy, effort, or ability. It signifies giving one's best effort or maximizing one's potential in a particular situation.
  • send away for (something) The idiom "send away for (something)" means to request or order something by mail, usually through a catalog or by filling out a form or sending a letter. It suggests the act of sending a request to a specific place or organization in order to receive the desired item or information through mail or delivery services.
  • the worse for drink The idiom "the worse for drink" refers to someone who is noticeably affected by alcohol, usually implying that they are intoxicated or heavily under the influence of alcohol.
  • pave the way for sth The idiom "pave the way for sth" means to make it easier or create favorable conditions for something to happen or be achieved. It implies preparing the groundwork or removing obstacles that could hinder the progress or success of a specific event, idea, or development.
  • fall for something hook, line and sinker The idiom "fall for something hook, line and sinker" means to completely and unquestionably believe or be deceived by something, without showing any doubt or skepticism. It is often used to describe someone who falls for a lie, trick, or deception without realizing it.
  • admonish someone for something To admonish someone for something means to caution, reprimand, or scold them for a specific action, behavior, or mistake they have made. It implies expressing disapproval or dissatisfaction towards someone's actions and advising or warning them against repeating such behavior in the future.
  • declare (oneself) for sm or sth To "declare oneself for someone or something" means to announce or state one's support, allegiance, or preference for a particular person, idea, cause, or position. It signifies publicly expressing one's stance or choice.
  • pave the way for The idiom "pave the way for" means to prepare or create favorable conditions for something to happen or someone to achieve success. It involves making initial efforts or taking necessary actions to facilitate or make something possible in the future.
  • a poor excuse for The idiom "a poor excuse for" means that something or someone is considered to be a weak or insufficient justification for a particular action or behavior. It implies that the reasoning or explanation provided is unconvincing, insincere, or lacking in credibility. It suggests disappointment or dissatisfaction with the excuse given.
  • stick up for sm or sth The idiom "stick up for someone or something" means to defend or support someone or something, particularly in a challenging or confrontational situation. It implies taking a stand and standing up against opposition or criticism in order to protect and advocate for the person or thing being defended.
  • be no match for somebody/something The idiom "be no match for somebody/something" means to be unable to compete with or defeat someone or something due to being significantly weaker, less skilled, or less capable. It signifies a clear mismatch in abilities or strengths between two entities.
  • renounce sm for sth The idiom "renounce sm for sth" means to give up or reject something, usually a belief, principle, or possession, in exchange for something else. It implies sacrificing or abandoning one thing in order to obtain or prioritize another.
  • as for someone or something The idiom "as for someone or something" is used to introduce a new topic or to redirect the conversation towards a specific person or thing. It indicates a shift in focus to address or discuss a particular individual or object.
  • educate sm for sth The idiom "educate someone for something" refers to the act of providing someone with the necessary knowledge, skills, or training in a specific area or for a particular purpose. It emphasizes the process of imparting education or instruction to enable someone to understand and proficiently handle a certain task, responsibility, or situation.
  • account for sm or sth The idiom "account for someone or something" has two main definitions: 1. To explain or provide reasons for someone's actions, behavior, or whereabouts. It involves giving a satisfactory explanation or justification for someone's actions or the existence or whereabouts of something. Example: "He was asked to account for his absence from work yesterday." 2. To take into consideration or include someone or something as part of a total or overall number or amount. In this context, it means to acknowledge or include someone or something as a factor while analyzing or calculating a situation. Example: "The increasing sales accounted for the company's success this quarter."
  • rehearse for sth The idiom "rehearse for sth" means to practice or prepare oneself for something, such as a performance, event, or activity, in advance. It involves going through the motions, practicing the necessary skills, or familiarizing oneself with the required steps or procedures in order to be better prepared and improve one's performance when the actual event or situation occurs.
  • announce for The idiom "announce for" typically means to publicly declare or make known one's intention or candidacy for a particular position or role. It is commonly used when a person officially expresses their desire to run for political office or seek a job or appointment.
  • deserve credit for (someone or something) The idiom "deserve credit for (someone or something)" typically means that someone should receive recognition or acknowledgment for their actions or contributions towards someone or something. It implies that the person has done something praiseworthy or noteworthy and should be given credit or appreciation for it.
  • file for something The idiom "file for something" typically refers to the act of making an official request or initiating a legal or bureaucratic process in order to obtain or attain something.
  • live for sth The idiom "live for something" means to have a very strong passion or commitment towards a particular thing or activity. It implies that one's life revolves around the chosen interest, and it serves as a source of motivation and fulfillment.
  • ask for something (bad or dire) The idiom "ask for something (bad or dire)" means to intentionally or unknowingly invite or bring about an unfavorable or unfortunate situation or consequence. It implies that the person's actions, behavior, or choices have made them susceptible to negative outcomes or problems.
  • see somebody/something for what they are/it is The idiom "see somebody/something for what they are/it is" means to perceive or understand someone or something as they truly are, without any illusions or false perceptions. It implies having an objective and clear perception of someone's true character or recognizing the true nature or characteristics of something.
  • good for you! The idiom "good for you!" is an expression used to offer praise or approval to someone for their achievements, accomplishments, or positive actions. It is a way to acknowledge and commend someone for their efforts or success.
  • (there’s) no peace/rest for the wicked The idiom "(there's) no peace/rest for the wicked" is used to convey that those who engage in immoral or wrongful activities will not receive any respite or tranquility. It implies that individuals who are involved in wrongdoing will constantly be plagued by troubles or consequences, thus denying them peace or rest.
  • stall for time The idiom "stall for time" means to intentionally delay or prolong a situation, discussion, or action in order to gain more time or avoid making a decision. It involves using tactics or strategies to buy oneself or others additional time without revealing one's true intentions or motives.
  • have eyes for The idiom "have eyes for" means to be attracted to or interested in someone or something. It suggests having romantic or admiration towards a particular person or object.
  • line up for The idiom "line up for" typically means to form a queue or wait in line for a particular event, opportunity, or service. It implies that people are waiting patiently and in a structured manner for their turn.
  • cry out for (someone or something) The idiom "cry out for (someone or something)" means to strongly need or require someone or something, often implying a deep longing or necessity for assistance, attention, or a specific solution to a problem.
  • bully for you, etc. The idiom "bully for you, etc." is an expression used to express insincere or sarcastic congratulations or admiration for someone's achievement or success. It is often used to convey a sense of envy, resentment, or a lack of genuine happiness for the person being addressed.
  • draw straws for The idiom "draw straws for" means to determine or decide something by a random or chance-based method, often by selecting a short or long straw from a bundle. It is typically used when there are multiple options or individuals and a fair or impartial selection process is necessary.
  • advertise for someone or something The idiom "advertise for someone or something" refers to actively seeking or searching for a person or thing by promoting or publicizing them in order to attract attention or interest. It may involve placing advertisements, making announcements, or using other means of communication to actively promote and seek the desired person or thing.
  • too big for your britches The idiom "too big for your britches" refers to someone who believes themselves to be more important, skilled, or knowledgeable than they actually are. It implies that the person's sense of superiority is exaggerated or unwarranted.
  • What do you know for sure? The idiom "What do you know for sure?" is a rhetorical question that is used to express a sense of skepticism or doubt. It implies that one is questioning the certainty or validity of the information or situation at hand.
  • have your guts for garters The idiom "have your guts for garters" is an old-fashioned and rather graphic way of threatening extreme harm or punishment to someone. It emphasizes the speaker's anger, indicating that they are so furious or offended that they could metaphorically tear out the other person's guts and use them as makeshift garters. It is a hyperbolic expression meant to convey strong hostility or vindictiveness.
  • be (one's) for the asking The idiom "be (one's) for the asking" means that something is readily available or easily obtainable. It implies that the person can have or get something without any effort or difficulty.
  • babysit for The idiom "babysit for" refers to the act of caring for someone's children temporarily and responsibly in their absence for a certain period of time.
  • have a soft spot for (someone or something) The idiom "have a soft spot for (someone or something)" means to have a fondness or affection for someone or something. It implies that someone is more lenient, sympathetic, or forgiving towards a particular person or thing due to personal feelings or emotions.
  • not stand for it The idiom "not stand for it" means to refuse to accept or tolerate a particular behavior, action, or situation. It suggests a strong opposition or resistance to something that is considered unacceptable or unfair.
  • look around for The idiom "look around for" means to search or explore one's surroundings in order to find something or someone. It implies actively seeking and examining various options or possibilities.
  • recruit sm for sth The idiom "recruit sm for sth" typically means to actively seek and bring in someone who possesses a specific skill, talent, or quality needed for a particular task, project, or endeavor. It implies the act of finding and enlisting someone who can contribute to the success or improvement of a specific thing or situation.
  • a dead ringer for sb/sth The idiom "a dead ringer for someone/something" means that someone or something bears an extremely close resemblance or looks almost identical to another person or thing. It implies that the similarity is so striking that it is as if the two are identical or could be mistaken for each other.
  • a penchant for sth The idiom "a penchant for sth" refers to a strong liking or inclination towards something. It suggests a preference or tendency to enjoy or gravitate towards a particular activity, interest, or behavior.
  • maneuver for sth The idiom "maneuver for sth" generally refers to an intentional or strategic action taken by someone to position themselves favorably or gain an advantage in a particular situation or towards achieving a specific outcome. It often involves using skillful tactics, clever manipulation, or calculated moves to manipulate circumstances in one's own favor.
  • be an apology for sth The idiom "be an apology for sth" means to be a poor or inadequate representation or example of something. It describes something or someone that is seen as inferior, substandard, or not worthy of approval or respect.
  • your heart bleeds for someone The idiom "your heart bleeds for someone" means that you feel great sympathy or compassion towards someone who is going through a difficult or painful situation. It implies that you genuinely care about their well-being and feel their pain as if your heart is physically bleeding.
  • groom sm for sth The idiom "groom sm for sth" refers to the act of preparing, training, or developing someone specifically for a certain role, responsibility, or situation. It usually involves providing guidance, mentorship, and support in order to enhance their skills or abilities, ensuring they are well-equipped for the task or opportunity at hand.
  • stall sm or sth for sth The idiom "stall someone or something for something" means to intentionally delay or hold off on the progress, completion, or discussion of someone or something in order to wait for or buy time for something else. It involves postponing or prolonging a situation or action in order to gain an advantage or give more time for preparation.
  • for the present The idiom "for the present" means for the time being or for now. It refers to a temporary or current situation, implying that things may change in the future.
  • be too many for The idiom "be too many for" means to overwhelm or overpower someone or something. It indicates a situation where the challenges, difficulties, or obstacles are too numerous or intense for someone to handle or cope with successfully.
  • not be cut out for sth The idiom "not be cut out for something" means that a person is not naturally or inherently suited or capable of doing or being successful at a particular task, occupation, role, or activity. This phrase suggests that the individual lacks the necessary qualities, skills, or temperament to excel in the given area.
  • for reasons best known to himself (or herself, etc.) The idiom "for reasons best known to himself (or herself, etc.)" is used to describe a situation where someone's motives or intentions are not obvious or clear to others. It implies that the person has a specific, perhaps personal, reason for their actions or decisions that is only known to them.
  • a poster child for something The idiom "a poster child for something" refers to a person or thing that is a prime or ideal representation of a particular quality, characteristic, or situation. It suggests that the individual or object embodies the best or most extreme example of a specific trait or circumstance.
  • an eye for the main chance The idiom "an eye for the main chance" means that someone is always seeking opportunities for personal gain or advancement. It refers to a person's intense focus on opportunities that can lead to success or betterment, often at the expense of others.
  • augur well for sm or sth The idiom "augur well for someone or something" means to indicate or predict a positive outcome or success for someone or something in the future. It suggests that certain signs or indications are pointing towards a favorable outcome.
  • cut out for (something) The idiom "cut out for (something)" means to be naturally suited or predisposed for a particular task, activity, or profession. It implies that an individual possesses the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities to excel in a specific area.
  • not for hire The idiom "not for hire" is used to describe something or someone that is not available or not open for employment or engagement. It indicates that the person, object, or service is not interested in being employed or utilized for a particular purpose.
  • for two cents The idiom "for two cents" means expressing one's opinion or suggestion, often in a casual or light-hearted manner. It implies that the person is willing to offer their thoughts or advice, even if their input may not be highly valued or asked for.
  • care nothing for (someone or something) To "care nothing for someone or something" means to have no interest, concern, or regard for them. It implies a lack of emotional attachment, indifference, or disregard towards the person or thing in question.
  • claim something for someone or something The idiom "claim something for someone or something" means to declare ownership or right to something on behalf of a person or entity. It is often used when someone asserts their entitlement or asserts that someone/something belongs to them.
  • live for sm or sth The idiom "live for someone or something" means to dedicate one's life or find purpose in someone or something. It implies a strong devotion or passion towards that person or thing, where it becomes the central focus of one's existence.
  • pay for itself The idiom "pay for itself" means that something will eventually generate enough financial benefits or savings to cover its own cost or expenses. Essentially, an investment or expenditure proves to be worthwhile and profitable over time.
  • for a living The idiom "for a living" typically refers to the way a person earns money or sustains themselves financially. It emphasizes someone's occupation or profession that provides them with their primary source of income.
  • in return for (someone or something) The idiom "in return for (someone or something)" means to give or do something as a repayment or exchange for someone or something else. It implies a reciprocal action or mutually beneficial outcome.
  • for the moment The idiom "for the moment" means a temporary or brief period of time. It suggests that something is true or applicable only at the present time and may not necessarily hold true in the future.
  • condemn (someone or something) for (something) The idiom "condemn (someone or something) for (something)" means to express strong disapproval or criticism towards a person or thing due to a specific action, behavior, or quality they possess. It often implies passing judgment and holding the person or thing accountable for their perceived wrongdoing.
  • be in for a treat The idiom "be in for a treat" means to anticipate or expect to enjoy something pleasant, exciting, or special. It suggests that the person is about to experience something delightful or rewarding.
  • hit someone up for something The idiom "hit someone up for something" means to ask someone, usually in a casual or direct manner, for something, typically a favor, money, or some other resource. It implies making a request or seeking assistance from someone.
  • hold on for dear life The idiom "hold on for dear life" means gripping or clinging tightly to something or someone in order to avoid falling or losing control, often in a situation of extreme danger or distress. It conveys the idea of desperately holding onto something as if one's life depends on it.
  • a glutton for punishment, work, etc. The idiom "a glutton for punishment, work, etc." refers to a person who willingly and excessively subjects themselves to difficult or challenging situations, tasks, or circumstances, often with a sense of enjoyment or satisfaction. They willingly endure hardships or undertake demanding activities without complaint, displaying a masochistic tendency to seek out or willingly accept punishment or labor.
  • condemn sm for sth The idiom "condemn someone for something" means to express strong disapproval or criticism towards someone for a particular action, behavior, or decision. It implies that the person is being judged negatively and held accountable for their actions.
  • watch out for sm or sth The idiom "watch out for someone or something" means to be cautious or alert about a particular person or thing that may pose a potential danger, harm, or difficulty. It implies the need to pay attention and take necessary precautions to avoid any negative consequences or unwanted circumstances.
  • bat for the other side The idiom "bat for the other side" typically means that someone is supporting or advocating for a different group, cause, or perspective than the one they are expected or assumed to support. It is often used to refer to someone who is not heterosexual but instead identifies as LGBTQ+.
  • allow for sth The idiom "allow for something" means to consider, take into account, or make provisions for something in advance. It implies being mindful of a particular factor, circumstance, or possibility when making plans, decisions, or calculations. By allowing for something, one acknowledges its existence and aims to accommodate or adjust accordingly.
  • sign for sth The idiom "sign for something" means to officially acknowledge or accept something by affixing one's signature on a document or form, usually indicating receipt, agreement, or responsibility. It often implies taking ownership or becoming accountable for the item or information in question.
  • go (in) for the kill The idiom "go (in) for the kill" is used to describe someone who is determined to take decisive action or to achieve a decisive victory. It is often used in contexts where someone is pursuing their goal with relentless effort or relentless focus, without holding back or showing any mercy or restraint. It can refer to both physical and metaphorical situations where someone is seeking to achieve an ultimate or final victory.
  • affinity for The definition of the idiom "affinity for" is having a natural liking, inclination, or a strong connection to something or someone. It refers to a deep affinity or attraction towards a particular thing, activity, or individual.
  • answer for someone The idiom "answer for someone" means to take responsibility or be held accountable for someone's actions, decisions, or behavior. It implies that someone has to provide an explanation or justification on behalf of another person.
  • you, etc. can whistle for it The idiom "you can whistle for it" is an expression that means someone is not going to get something they want or expect, regardless of their efforts or requests. It implies that the desired outcome or item is not going to be given or provided. The phrase is often used to dismiss or reject a request or demand.
  • my heart bleeds for sb The idiom "my heart bleeds for sb" is an expression used to convey deep sympathy or empathy towards someone who is going through a difficult or unfortunate situation. It suggests that the person expressing the idiom feels genuine sorrow and compassion for the other person's suffering.
  • do well for (oneself) The idiom "do well for oneself" means to achieve success or prosperity, often through one's own efforts. It indicates an individual's ability to excel and make progress in their personal or professional life by attaining financial stability, social status, or personal satisfaction.
  • have nothing to say for yourself The idiom "have nothing to say for yourself" means to be unable or unwilling to justify or explain one's actions, often resulting in feelings of embarrassment or guilt. It implies that the person lacks a valid excuse or explanation for their behavior or situation.
  • come up for air The idiom "come up for air" means to take a break or pause from a busy or intense situation in order to rest, relax, or regain composure. It conveys the idea of briefly stepping away from something demanding or overwhelming in order to gain perspective or relieve stress.
  • enlist for The idiom "enlist for" generally means to voluntarily sign up or join a particular cause, organization, or endeavor, typically of a military or social nature, with a specific purpose or commitment in mind. It usually implies willingly offering one's services or support towards achieving a goal or being part of a collective effort.
  • a dead ringer for somebody The idiom "a dead ringer for somebody" means that someone looks extremely similar or identical to another person, often to the extent that they could be mistaken for each other. It implies a remarkable resemblance in physical appearance between two individuals.
  • will eat for breakfast The idiom "will eat for breakfast" is a figurative expression used to indicate something or someone easily overcoming or dominating a particular situation or person. It implies superiority, strength, or mastery.
  • repay sm for sth The idiom "repay someone for something" means to compensate or give back to someone in return for a favor, kindness, or an action done for you in the past. It implies showing appreciation or gratitude by doing something similar or making an equivalent gesture towards the person.
  • time and tide wait for no man The idiom "time and tide wait for no man" means that the passing of time and the occurrence of natural events, such as tides, do not stop or wait for anyone. It emphasizes the importance of seizing opportunities and taking action promptly, as time cannot be delayed or controlled. It serves as a reminder to make the most of the limited time one has and not to procrastinate.
  • what's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander The idiom "what's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander" means that the same standards, rules, or treatment should apply to both men and women or to both genders equally. It suggests that if something is acceptable or permissible for one person, it should be equally acceptable or permissible for another person in a similar situation. The idiom emphasizes the importance of equality and fairness.
  • thanks a bunch, at thanks for nothing The idiom "thanks a bunch, and thanks for nothing" is a sarcastic or angered expression used to convey dissatisfaction or disappointment towards someone who has failed to meet expectations or has not been helpful despite being asked for assistance. It sarcastically acknowledges gratitude while simultaneously expressing frustration, bitterness, or resentment towards the person's actions or lack thereof.
  • cover for someone The idiom "cover for someone" means to provide protection, support, or excuses for someone, often by taking their place or assuming their responsibilities temporarily, in order to protect them from negative consequences or consequences that may arise due to their actions or mistakes.
  • advertise for sm or sth The idiom "advertise for someone or something" means actively seeking or looking for someone or something by way of placing advertisements or publicized notices. It often refers to the act of publishing an advertisement or announcement with the specific intention of attracting the attention or interest of potential candidates or items.
  • be asking for trouble The idiom "be asking for trouble" means engaging in actions or behaviors that are likely to result in problems, difficulties, or negative consequences. It implies that someone is taking unnecessary risks or acting in a way that will likely lead to trouble or troublemakers coming their way.
  • not able to get for love or money The idiom "not able to get for love or money" means that something is very difficult or impossible to obtain or acquire, regardless of the efforts made or the resources available. It emphasizes the extreme challenges or obstacles faced in trying to obtain or achieve a particular thing, often implying that it is completely unattainable.
  • fixed for life The idiom "fixed for life" refers to being in a situation or condition that is set and unchangeable, typically in a positive or advantageous way. It implies a state of permanence or security, suggesting that one's needs or desires are fulfilled for the rest of their life without any worries or uncertainties.
  • not hold still for (something) The idiom "not hold still for (something)" means to not tolerate or accept something, to resist or refuse to comply with it, or to be stubbornly unwilling to listen or cooperate with a particular idea, task, or situation.
  • confession is good for the soul The idiom "confession is good for the soul" means that openly admitting one's wrongdoings or confessing a hidden truth can have a cathartic or cleansing effect on one's conscience and overall well-being. It suggests that by acknowledging and taking responsibility for one's mistakes or secrets, one can find relief, inner peace, and a sense of personal growth.
  • (one) would be forgiven for (doing something) The idiom "(one) would be forgiven for (doing something)" means that it is understandable or justifiable for someone to do a particular action considering the circumstances. It implies that the action is reasonable and would not be seen as wrong or deserving punishment.
  • have a flair for sth The idiom "have a flair for something" means to have a natural talent or ability for a particular activity or skill. It implies that someone possesses an inherent aptitude or instinct that allows them to excel or perform exceptionally well in that specific area.
  • be a dead ringer for The idiom "be a dead ringer for" means to closely resemble someone or something, often in terms of appearance or overall characteristics. It suggests that the similarity is so remarkable that it can be easily mistaken or confused with the original.
  • excuse sm for sth The idiom "excuse someone for something" means to forgive or overlook someone's mistake, offense, or wrongdoing. It implies accepting someone's reasoning or justification for their action and not holding it against them.
  • my kingdom for a horse The idiom "my kingdom for a horse" is a phrase used to express extreme desperation or the willingness to give up something valuable or substantial in exchange for a relatively simple or insignificant item. It refers to a situation where someone desires or needs something so desperately that they are willing to offer or sacrifice everything they have, even something as significant as a kingdom or dominion, simply to obtain the thing they covet.
  • zone sth for sth The idiom "zone sth for sth" refers to the act of designating or dividing an area based on a specific purpose, activity, or use. It involves creating distinct zones or areas within a larger space to serve different functions or cater to different needs.
  • poised for sth The idiom "poised for something" means being in a state or position where one is ready or prepared for something to happen. It suggests being in a situation where you are on the verge of achieving or experiencing something significant.
  • be in for The idiom "be in for" means to anticipate or prepare oneself for something, usually something unpleasant or difficult, that is about to happen or occur.
  • the facts speak for themselves The expression "the facts speak for themselves" means that the evidence or information available is so clear and conclusive that it requires no further explanation or interpretation. It suggests that the truth or reality of a situation is evident through the objective evidence presented.
  • for nothing The idiom "for nothing" means doing something without receiving any benefit, reward, or compensation in return. It refers to an action or effort that is futile, pointless, or without any value or purpose.
  • How is someone fixed for something? The idiom, "How is someone fixed for something?" refers to asking about someone's availability or possession of a particular item or resource. It essentially means inquiring if someone has enough or satisfactory amount of something.
  • not able to see the forest for the trees The idiom "not able to see the forest for the trees" means being unable to see the bigger picture or understand the overall situation due to being too focused on small details or individual parts. It refers to someone who is so consumed by insignificant or minor aspects that they miss the broader context or fail to grasp the main point.
  • hot enough for you? The idiom "hot enough for you?" is a quick, casual way of asking someone if they find the current temperature or weather to be uncomfortably hot. It is often used as a lighthearted conversation starter or a playful remark.
  • can't (do something) for nuts The idiom "can't (do something) for nuts" is used to express a complete inability or lack of skill in doing a particular activity or task. It implies that one is incapable or incompetent in carrying out the action, often due to a lack of knowledge or experience.
  • read for sth The idiom "read for something" generally means to be prepared or ready for a specific event, task, or situation. It implies being mentally or emotionally prepared to face or tackle something.
  • be not long for this world The idiom "be not long for this world" is used to describe someone or something that is unlikely to survive or exist for much longer. It implies that the person or thing is nearing the end of their life or existence.
  • for all I, you, etc. know The idiom "for all I, you, etc. know" means that the speaker or person in question has no information or knowledge about a particular situation or subject. It emphasizes uncertainty or lack of awareness regarding the matter being discussed.
  • have an itch for something The idiom "have an itch for something" means to have a strong desire or urge to do or have something. It refers to a feeling of restlessness or craving for a specific activity or possession that one cannot ignore.
  • go down for the third time The idiom "go down for the third time" typically refers to experiencing a repeated failure, setback, or downfall in a situation or endeavor. It alludes to the act of drowning, where a person tries to stay afloat after twice going beneath the water's surface but eventually succumbs and sinks on the third attempt. Metaphorically, it implies relentless adversity or being unable to recover from repeated difficulties.
  • one's for the asking The idiom "one's for the asking" means that something is readily available or easily obtainable by simply requesting or asking for it. It implies that the desired thing or opportunity is accessible without much effort or difficulty.
  • mourn for sm or sth The idiom "mourn for someone or something" means to feel deep sadness or sorrow over the loss or absence of someone or something. It involves expressing anguish and grieving for the person or thing being mourned, usually following their death or departure. It is a way to show deep respect, honor, and sorrow for the loss experienced.
  • famous for fifteen minutes The idiom "famous for fifteen minutes" refers to a concept popularized by artist Andy Warhol, suggesting that someone or something can enjoy a brief period of fame or notoriety before fading into obscurity. It implies that the fame is fleeting and short-lived, highlighting the transient nature of popularity in today's society.
  • be a recipe for disaster/happiness/success etc. The idiom "be a recipe for disaster/happiness/success, etc." means that a particular situation, course of action, or combination of elements is likely to result in negative or positive outcomes. It emphasizes that the circumstances or components involved are poised to lead to a particular result, often quite strongly.
  • break for something The idiom "break for something" typically means to leave or take a short pause or interruption in order to do or achieve something, often referring to a break taken during work or a planned activity.
  • make arrangements for sm The idiom "make arrangements for sm" is an expression used to describe the act of planning or organizing something for someone or on behalf of someone. It involves taking care of all the necessary tasks or details related to a particular event, arrangement, or situation to ensure its smooth execution or occurrence.
  • not be cut out for something The idiom "not be cut out for something" means that a person lacks the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities to successfully perform a certain task, activity, or role. It implies that someone is ill-suited or unsuited for a particular endeavor based on their natural abilities or disposition.
  • good for (someone or something) The idiom "good for (someone or something)" means that something is beneficial, advantageous, or helpful for a person or thing. It implies that a particular action, situation, or outcome has positive implications or consequences for the subject being referred to.
  • not for (anything in) the world The idiomatic expression "not for (anything in) the world" means that someone is unwilling to do or give up something under any circumstances. It conveys a strong sense of determination or refusal, indicating that there is absolutely nothing that could convince or compel the person to change their mind or take a particular action.
  • be all the worse for wear The idiom "be all the worse for wear" means to be in a significantly worse condition after experiencing an event or situation. It implies that something or someone has suffered damage, deterioration, or negative consequences, causing their overall condition or state to deteriorate.
  • set the stage for something The idiom "set the stage for something" means to create the circumstances or conditions that are necessary for a particular event or situation to happen, or to anticipate and prepare for something. It often refers to the action of arranging or planning something in advance to create the right environment, context, or foundation for a future occurrence or outcome.
  • depart for (some place) The idiom "depart for (some place)" means to leave or set out on a journey to a specific destination. It implies the act of beginning a trip or starting a departure towards a particular location.
  • know what's good for you The idiom "know what's good for you" means to have an understanding of what is beneficial or advantageous for oneself. It implies having the awareness or knowledge to make wise decisions or choices that will ultimately lead to a positive outcome or well-being.
  • have it out for (someone) The idiom "have it out for (someone)" means to have a strong, often negative, animosity or hostility towards a particular person. It implies that the person has a vendetta or grudge and is determined to cause harm, seek revenge, or create difficulties for the individual in question.
  • advertise sth for (a price) The idiom "advertise something for a price" means to promote or publicize something with the intention of selling it at a specific cost. It refers to marketing or making a product or service known to potential customers, typically by means of advertisements or promotional efforts, indicating its price.
  • cover someone or something for something The idiom "cover someone or something for something" typically means to bear the costs, responsibilities, or duties on behalf of someone or something in a particular situation. It implies taking care of or substituting for someone or something in the given context.
  • fall for sth hook, line, and sinker The idiom "fall for something hook, line, and sinker" means to completely and unquestioningly believe or be fooled by something, often a story or an idea, without any skepticism or doubt. It refers to the imagery of a fish taking the bait (hook), getting caught on the fishing line, and getting fully swallowed by the fishing sinker.
  • can (just) whistle for sth The idiom "can (just) whistle for sth" means to have no chance or hope of receiving or obtaining something, or to be unable to expect or demand something. It conveys a sense of disregard or dismissal towards the particular thing or request.
  • take it for granted The idiom "take it for granted" means to not appreciate or value something properly, often assuming that it will always be available or that it will not change. It refers to the act of not recognizing the true worth or significance of someone or something, leading to neglect or indifference.
  • chide (one) for (something) The idiom "chide (one) for (something)" means to scold, rebuke, or reprimand someone for their actions, words, or behavior. It involves expressing disapproval or criticism towards someone due to their perceived fault or wrongdoing.
  • affinity for sm or sth The idiom "affinity for something or someone" refers to having a natural fondness, liking, or attraction towards a particular thing or person. It reflects a strong inclination or preference towards that particular person, object, activity, or subject.
  • no prizes for guessing sth The idiom "no prizes for guessing" implies that something is extremely obvious or easy to predict. It suggests that there is no need for special recognition or reward for correctly guessing or figuring out something so obvious.
  • bode somehow for The idiom "bode somehow for" means to predict or indicate a certain outcome or future event, generally in a negative or ominous way. It implies that something is likely to happen or turn out in a particular manner, often with negative consequences.
  • give someone a run for their money The idiom "give someone a run for their money" means to provide someone with strong competition, challenge, or difficulty, often surpassing their expectations. It suggests that despite another person's strong skills, abilities, or achievements, someone else is capable of giving them a tough time or matching their performance.
  • cut out for The idiom "cut out for" refers to someone being naturally suited or fit for a particular task, role, or profession. It implies that the person possesses the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities to excel in that specific endeavor.
  • come out for (someone or something) The idiom "come out for (someone or something)" typically means to publicly express support, approval, or endorsement for someone or something. It implies openly declaring one's favor or allegiance towards a person, cause, or idea.
  • write away for sth The idiom "write away for sth" means to request or order something by mail or email, typically through written correspondence. It implies initiating communication with a person or organization in order to obtain specific information, materials, or products.
  • open for business The idiom "open for business" typically refers to indicating that a person or establishment is ready and available to conduct or receive business transactions. It implies that the individual or organization is prepared, accessible, and willing to engage in commercial activities.
  • not for the life of (one) The idiomatic expression "not for the life of (one)" means that someone is unwilling or unable to do something, no matter how much they are asked or persuaded to do so. It conveys a strong sense of refusal or resistance.
  • Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die. The idiom "Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die" essentially means to enjoy life and indulge in pleasure while you can, as life is short and uncertain. It emphasizes the idea of seizing the present moment and appreciating the joys in life, as the future or one's mortality is uncertain.
  • lunge for sm or sth The idiom "lunge for something or someone" refers to making a sudden and aggressive movement or advance towards a specific target or objective. It implies a sudden and often forceful attempt to grasp, catch, or seize something. This phrase is typically used to describe a quick and determined action, often accompanied by reaching out or making a sudden forward movement.
  • worse for wear The idiom "worse for wear" means to be in a deteriorated or worn-out condition. It is usually used to describe a person, object, or situation that has undergone damage, exhaustion, or deterioration, resulting in a visibly worn or impaired state.
  • testify for sm The idiom "testify for someone" means to provide evidence or give a statement, usually in a legal context, in support or defense of someone's character, actions, or version of events. It implies acting as a witness or offering testimony to affirm the credibility or innocence of the individual in question.
  • on the hook for The idiom "on the hook for" is used to describe a situation in which a person is responsible or accountable for something, usually a debt, obligation, or responsibility. It implies that one is obligated to bear the consequences for a particular situation or action.
  • petition sm or sth for sth The idiom "petition sm or sth for sth" means to formally request or appeal to someone or something in order to obtain or achieve something. It involves submitting a written or formal request to an authority or organization for a specific purpose, usually in a plea for assistance, redress, or change.
  • make a break for it The idiom "make a break for it" means to attempt to escape from a difficult or challenging situation or to make a quick and sudden escape.
  • prepare the ground for The idiom "prepare the ground for" means to make the necessary arrangements or create favorable conditions for something to happen or be successful. It involves taking preliminary or initial steps to ensure that the situation or circumstances are suitable for the desired outcome.
  • It's ill waiting for dead men's shoes. The idiom "It's ill waiting for dead men's shoes" means that it is unwise or futile to anticipate or wait for someone else's position or role to become available, especially if that person is not showing any signs of relinquishing it anytime soon. It highlights the notion that one should focus on their own opportunities and progress rather than hoping for circumstances to change in their favor due to someone else's misfortune or departure.
  • for all (the world) to see The idiom "for all (the world) to see" means that something is clearly and openly visible or known to everyone, without any effort to hide or conceal it. It implies that something is readily apparent and easily accessible, leaving no room for ambiguity or secrecy.
  • smooth the way for sb/sth The idiom "smooth the way for sb/sth" means to make something easier or eliminate obstacles for someone or something. It refers to facilitating a process, making it more efficient or enabling it to progress without difficulties. It can involve clearing hurdles, reducing complications, providing support, or resolving any issues to ensure a smooth and hassle-free experience.
  • give pause for thought The idiom "give pause for thought" means to cause someone to stop and think carefully about something, often implying that something surprising, concerning, or thought-provoking has been said or revealed. It suggests that the information or statement presented requires contemplation before drawing conclusions or making decisions.
  • be good for something The idiom "be good for something" refers to an individual or thing possessing a particular quality, skill, or usefulness in a specific context or situation. It implies that the person or thing has some value or purpose and is capable of achieving a desired outcome.
  • hanged for a sheep as a lamb, might as well be The idiom "hanged for a sheep as a lamb, might as well be" means that if one is already facing severe consequences or punishment for a small offense, they might as well commit a greater offense since the punishment will not significantly differ.
  • criticize for The idiom "criticize for" means to express disapproval, judgment, or negative feedback about someone or something. It indicates the act of pointing out faults, flaws, or shortcomings in a particular person, action, decision, or object.
  • itch for sth The idiom "itch for sth" means to have a strong desire or craving for something. It implies a feeling of restlessness or anticipation to engage in or acquire something.
  • fall for something The idiom "fall for something" means to believe or be deceived by something that is not true or genuine. It implies being tricked or misled into accepting or endorsing something, often due to naivety or gullibility.
  • not see (one) for dust The idiom "not see (one) for dust" means to fail to keep up with someone who is moving very quickly or leaving in a hurry. It implies that the person is moving so fast that they are leaving a trail of dust behind them, making it impossible for others to catch up or keep track of them.
  • enlist someone for something The idiom "enlist someone for something" means to persuade or recruit someone to participate, support, or assist in a particular activity, task, or cause. It refers to seeking someone's involvement and cooperation for a specific purpose or endeavor.
  • give your right arm for something/to do something The idiom "give your right arm for something/to do something" refers to a strong desire or willingness to sacrifice a significant amount in order to obtain or achieve something. It implies being extremely desperate or willing to give up a valuable or important asset, often used figuratively to emphasize the intensity of the person's desire or determination.
  • be hit for six The idiom "be hit for six" is primarily used in British and Commonwealth English and it has its origins in the game of cricket. It is used metaphorically to express the idea of being greatly surprised, shocked, or emotionally affected by something unexpected or devastating. The phrase comes from the sport's terminology, where "hitting for six" refers to a batsman scoring the maximum number of runs by hitting the ball beyond the boundary rope. Therefore, to be hit for six figuratively means to be caught off guard or deeply impacted by an unforeseen event or revelation.
  • have a gift for (doing) sth The idiom "have a gift for (doing) something" means having a natural talent or ability to do a particular thing exceptionally well. It suggests that someone possesses innate skills or aptitude in a specific area, enabling them to excel in it effortlessly.
  • be thankful for small mercies The idiom "be thankful for small mercies" means to appreciate or express gratitude for the little or lesser benefits or good things one receives or experiences, especially in difficult situations or circumstances. It emphasizes the importance of finding joy or contentment in modest or unremarkable blessings amidst challenges or hardships.
  • not for want/lack of trying The idiom "not for want/lack of trying" means that despite putting in great effort and making attempts to achieve or solve something, one's efforts were ultimately unsuccessful. It implies that the person tried their best or made sincere attempts, but external factors or circumstances prevented them from succeeding.
  • an apology for something The idiom "an apology for something" refers to someone or something being a poor or inadequate representation or example of a certain thing or quality. It describes a situation where someone or something falls short of meeting expectations or lacks the desired attributes. It suggests that the person or thing is not worthy or suitable for the purpose or standard it should meet.
  • scheme for sth The idiom "scheme for sth" means to make a plan or devise a strategy in order to achieve or obtain something, usually with a hint of deviousness or manipulation. It implies scheming or plotting to achieve a particular goal or outcome.
  • play something for laughs The idiom "play something for laughs" means to perform or present something in a way that is intended to provoke laughter or amusement. It involves emphasizing humorous elements, incorporating comedic timing, or using comedic devices to entertain an audience.
  • do for (someone) The idiom "do for (someone)" typically means to provide assistance or perform a service for someone. It implies taking care of someone's needs or fulfilling tasks on their behalf.
  • have an eye for The idiom "have an eye for" generally means to possess a natural talent or ability to recognize, appreciate, or perceive certain qualities, particularly in areas such as art, design, fashion, aesthetics, or anything related to visual or artistic elements. It implies having a keen sense of taste, discernment, or an innate skill to notice and understand the finer details or beauty in something.
  • have a lot, something, nothing, etc. going for you The idiom "have a lot, something, nothing, etc. going for you" means to possess several positive qualities, advantages, or opportunities that contribute to one's success or well-being. It suggests having various favorable circumstances, skills, resources, or attributes that give someone an advantage or increase the likelihood of achieving their goals.
  • for certain The idiom "for certain" means to be completely sure or confident about something, without any doubt or uncertainty.
  • desert (someone or something) for (someone or something else) The idiom "desert (someone or something) for (someone or something else)" means to abandon or leave someone or something in favor of someone or something else. It implies a betrayal or abandonment of loyalty or commitment.
  • get an amount of money for The idiom "get an amount of money for" means receiving or acquiring a specific sum of money in exchange for something. It implies that an individual is being compensated financially for a particular service, item, or action.
  • hell for leather The idiom "hell for leather" is used to describe someone or something going at full speed or with great intensity, often in a reckless or uncontrolled manner. It denotes intense and hurried movement or action, without regard for the consequences.
  • stick up for sb/sth The idiom "stick up for sb/sth" means to support, defend, or protect someone or something, especially in a difficult or challenging situation. It implies standing up for their rights, beliefs, or interests in a forceful or outspoken manner.
  • have no heart for The idiom "have no heart for" means to lack the emotional desire or motivation to engage in or pursue something due to a lack of interest, enthusiasm, or compassion.
  • celebrate (one) for (something) The idiom "celebrate (one) for (something)" refers to acknowledging, appreciating, or giving recognition to someone for a particular achievement, quality, or action. It signifies praising or honoring someone for a specific reason or accomplishment.
  • will not take no for an answer The idiom "will not take no for an answer" means that someone is determined and persistent in achieving their goal, even if others try to refuse or reject them. They are unwilling to accept a negative response or be deterred by obstacles or opposition.
  • knock (one) for a loop The definition of the idiom "knock (one) for a loop" is to utterly surprise or shock someone, leaving them feeling confused, disoriented, or overwhelmed. It refers to the physical or mental impact of being caught off guard or experiencing an unexpected event or news.
  • press for sth The idiom "press for sth" means to strongly advocate, demand, or urge for something to happen, usually in a persistent or forceful manner. It implies the act of applying pressure or pushing for a particular outcome or result.
  • bounce for something The idiom "bounce for something" typically refers to taking the blame or facing consequences for a mistake, action, or decision on behalf of someone else. It means accepting responsibility or suffering the repercussions that would have otherwise fallen on another person.
  • for (or in) a coon's age The idiom "for a coon's age" is an informal expression used to convey a long period of time. It originates from the colloquial term "coon's age," which is derived from "raccoon's age." The extension of time is metaphorically implied as the raccoon's age is presumed to be significantly long. Thus, when someone says "for a coon's age," they mean a substantial length of time has passed, usually to emphasize a significant duration.
  • there's no help for (something) The idiom "there's no help for (something)" means that a situation or problem is beyond assistance or cannot be changed or improved. It implies that nothing can be done to remedy or alter the circumstances.
  • write away for The idiom "write away for" means to send a written request or order for something to a particular place or person. It implies taking the initiative to request information, products, or services by mail or email.
  • try sth on for size, at try sth for size The definition for the idiom "try sth on for size" or "try sth for size" is to test or experiment with something to see if it fits, works, or meets one's requirements. It is often used when trying out an idea, suggestion, or solution to see if it is suitable or satisfactory. It involves giving something a trial or giving it a go to determine its effectiveness or suitability.
  • argue for someone or something The phrase "argue for someone or something" means to present reasons, evidence, or a case in support of a particular person or idea during a discussion or debate, often advocating for their viewpoint or perspective. It involves presenting convincing arguments or making persuasive statements to enhance the understanding or acceptance of the person or subject being defended.
  • have a good run for (one's) money The idiom "have a good run for (one's) money" means to have a fair opportunity to compete or succeed, particularly in a challenging or competitive situation. It suggests that someone has gotten their money's worth or experienced a worthwhile endeavor.
  • be in line for something The idiom "be in line for something" means to have a good chance or be next in line to receive or achieve something, usually an opportunity, a promotion, a reward, or an inheritance. It implies being in a favorable position or on track to attain a specific outcome or benefit.
  • appropriate for The idiom "appropriate for" refers to something that is suitable, fitting, or proper for a particular purpose, occasion, or individual. It implies that the item, action, or behavior is in line with the expected norms, standards, or requirements of the situation.
  • destine someone for something The idiom "destine someone for something" refers to the belief or assumption that someone is meant or predetermined to do or achieve a particular thing in their future. It suggests that their fate or purpose has been prearranged or destined.
  • sit still for sth The idiom "sit still for sth" means to tolerate, accept, or agree to something without complaint or resistance. It implies calmly enduring or accommodating a situation or request, often in circumstances where one might have preferred not to do so.
  • trouble someone for The idiom "trouble someone for" means to inconvenience or inconvenience someone, usually by asking them for something or making a request. It implies that the person being troubled might be put in a difficult or inconvenient situation as a result of the request.
  • not give tuppence for sth The idiom "not give tuppence for something" means to have a very low or negligible value or concern about something. It implies that one has little or no interest, importance, or regard for a particular thing or situation.
  • for all the world as though (someone or something) The idiom "for all the world as though (someone or something)" is used to describe something or someone that strongly resembles or imitates another person or thing. It implies that the resemblance is so striking that it appears as if the mentioned person or thing is exactly the same as the one being compared to.
  • stop for sm The idiom "stop for someone/something" means to pause or briefly halt one's actions or progress in order to accommodate or attend to someone or something.
  • hit someone for something The idiom "hit someone for something" typically means to ask someone for or request something, especially money or assistance.
  • If ifs and ands were pots and pans (there'd be no work for tinkers' hands). The idiom "If ifs and ands were pots and pans (there'd be no work for tinkers' hands)" is a saying used to express that excessive speculation or hypothetical situations are futile, as they do not contribute to practical or productive outcomes. It suggests that if all the uncertainties and possibilities in life could be substituted with objects or material possessions ("pots and pans"), then the occupation of tinkers (people who repair utensils and other household items) would be unnecessary because nothing would require fixing. In other words, the idiom implies that it is more valuable to focus on actual tasks and solutions instead of indulging in endless hypothetical scenarios.
  • come for someone The idiom "come for someone" typically means to confront or challenge someone, often with the intention of causing harm, engaging in an argument, or seeking revenge. It implies that someone is preparing to hold another person accountable for their actions or words.
  • a man for all seasons The idiom "a man for all seasons" refers to someone who has the ability to adapt and thrive in any situation or time period. It describes an individual who possesses versatile skills, knowledge, and qualities that enable them to excel in various circumstances or tasks, much like being suited for every season of the year. This phrase often emphasizes a person's resilience, adaptability, and versatility.
  • a run for one's money The idiom "a run for one's money" means a challenging or competitive situation that tests someone's abilities or skills, often implying that the outcome is uncertain and may result in a close competition. It refers to a situation where someone faces tough competition and has to work hard or perform exceptionally well to achieve success or victory.
  • make a break for something/for it The idiom "make a break for something/for it" means to attempt to escape or run towards something quickly and urgently, often in a desperate or determined manner. It typically implies taking a sudden and decisive action to achieve a desired outcome or to avoid a difficult situation.
  • adore (one) for The idiom "adore (one) for" means to highly admire or have an intense affection for someone due to a specific characteristic, quality, or action. It expresses a deep appreciation and fondness towards someone for a particular reason.
  • wait for it The idiom "wait for it" suggests the need for patience or anticipation as something noteworthy or significant is about to happen or be revealed, usually after a brief delay or when unexpected.
  • come up for (something) The idiom "come up for (something)" means that a particular event or occurrence is approaching or is in the near future. It often refers to a scheduled or anticipated event, such as a meeting, appointment, or important decision. In this context, "come up" implies that the event is upcoming or on the horizon.
  • bargain for sth The idiom "bargain for something" means to expect or anticipate something, usually negative or unexpected, but often used to express surprise or shock at an outcome.
  • Good-bye for now The idiom "Good-bye for now" is an expression used to bid someone farewell or express temporary departure. It suggests that the current separation is not permanent and implies the hope or expectation of meeting or seeing the person again in the future.
  • spring for something The idiom "spring for something" means to pay for or provide something, often in a generous or unexpected manner. It implies stepping forward to cover the cost or treat someone to something without being asked or obligated to do so.
  • clear the way for The idiom "clear the way for" means to remove obstacles or create a path for something or someone. It implies making space or removing hindrances to facilitate progress or ease someone's movement or passage.
  • not see somebody for dust The idiom "not see somebody for dust" is used to express that someone hasn't seen or encountered a particular person for a significant amount of time. It implies that the person being referred to has been absent or physically distant for a long period, often suggesting that they have been intentionally avoiding or neglecting their presence.
  • barter for something The idiom "barter for something" refers to the act of trading or exchanging goods or services without the use of money. It involves negotiating and swapping items or services of equivalent value, in order to obtain something desired or needed.
  • for peanuts The idiomatic expression "for peanuts" means to do or receive something for a very low or meager amount of money, value, or compensation. It suggests that the amount being offered or received is inadequate or not enough.
  • be for someone or something The idiom "be for someone or something" means to support, favor, or advocate for a particular person or thing. It indicates being in favor of or on the side of someone or something, showing approval or agreement.
  • ply for hire/trade/business The idiom "ply for hire/trade/business" refers to actively seeking employment or engaging in a particular occupation or profession in order to earn a living. It implies actively offering one's services, skills, or products for hire or trade in order to generate income or attract customers.
  • be one for something/for doing something The idiom "be one for something/for doing something" typically means to have a preference or inclination towards a particular activity or thing. It implies that a person enjoys or is interested in a specific action or hobby.
  • have to show for The idiom "have to show for" means to have tangible or visible results, achievements, or possessions as a result of one's effort, investment, or experience. It implies that there is something substantial to demonstrate or prove the value or success of one's actions or endeavors.
  • have something/anything to say for (oneself) The idiom "have something/anything to say for oneself" refers to someone's ability or willingness to provide justification, explanation, or argument to defend their actions, opinions, or decisions. It suggests that the person is expected to have a valid defense or a coherent and persuasive response in a given situation.
  • feel sorry for (oneself) To "feel sorry for oneself" means to constantly indulge in self-pity or to excessively lament one's own misfortunes or difficulties. It refers to the act of feeling excessively sorry for oneself, often ignoring or disregarding the struggles of others.
  • there’s no accounting for taste The idiom "there’s no accounting for taste" means that personal preferences and opinions about what is attractive or appealing vary greatly among individuals, and sometimes these preferences cannot be logically explained or understood by others.
  • for evermore The idiom "for evermore" is used to emphasize that something will continue indefinitely or for a very long time. It implies eternity or an everlasting state.
  • That's one for the books The idiom "That's one for the books" means that something remarkable or extraordinary has happened, worthy of being recorded or remembered as an exceptional event. It implies that the situation or experience is unique, noteworthy, or significant in a way that stands out from the ordinary or usual occurrences.
  • my heart bleeds for you The idiom "my heart bleeds for you" is a figure of speech used to express sympathy or compassion towards someone who is going through a difficult or unfortunate situation. It signifies a deep understanding and an emotional response towards the person's suffering, indicating the speaker's genuine concern and empathy.
  • look for sm or sth The idiom "look for someone or something" means to search or seek out someone or something, usually with the intention of finding or obtaining them. It implies actively and attentively seeking a specific person or thing.
  • be cut out for The idiom "be cut out for" means to be naturally suited or talented for a particular activity or occupation. It implies that a person has the necessary qualities, abilities, or characteristics for a given role or task.
  • account for The idiom "account for" has multiple definitions, depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To provide an explanation or justification for something: In this sense, "account for" means to give a reason or rationale for an action, decision, or occurrence. Example: "Can you account for the missing money?" 2. To make up or constitute a specific proportion or part of something: In this sense, "account for" means to represent or contribute to a particular amount or percentage. Example: "The cost of labor accounts for a significant portion of the company's expenses."
  • come along for the ride The idiom "come along for the ride" means to join or accompany someone in an activity or journey, often without actively participating or contributing. It refers to being a passive observer or participant without taking any responsibility or making any significant efforts.
  • leave oneself wide open for sth The idiom "leave oneself wide open for sth" means to put oneself in a vulnerable or defenseless position, making it easy for something negative or harmful to happen or be taken advantage of. It implies being unprotected and lacking foresight or precautions.
  • one in the eye for The idiom "one in the eye for" refers to an action or event that serves as a personal victory or achievement against someone else, often resulting in embarrassment, setback, or surprise for the other person. It implies a sense of triumph or satisfaction over a rival or opponent, accomplishing something that undermines their expectations or objectives.
  • have no stomach for something The idiom "have no stomach for something" means to not have the desire, courage, or inclination to do or endure something. It indicates a lack of enthusiasm or willingness towards a particular activity or situation.
  • in the market for sth The idiom "in the market for sth" refers to someone who is actively looking to buy or acquire something, usually a product or service. It implies that the person is currently interested in making a purchase and exploring options available to them.
  • only have eyes for someone The idiom "only have eyes for someone" means to be completely infatuated or deeply in love with someone, to the point where they are the sole focus of one's attention and affection. It implies that one is unable to see or be attracted to anyone else because of their strong feelings for that specific person.
  • be asking for it/trouble The idiom "be asking for it/trouble" typically means to behave or act in a way that invites or provokes negative consequences or difficulties.
  • make things hot for (someone) The idiom "make things hot for (someone)" means to create difficulties, challenges, or troubles for someone. It refers to the act of causing stress, pressure, or unfavorable circumstances that make someone's situation uncomfortable or difficult to handle.
  • baying for blood The idiom "baying for blood" refers to a situation where a group of people are aggressively seeking revenge or punishment for someone, usually with great anger and intensity. It implies a collective demand for justice or retribution, often involving violent or aggressive actions.
  • allow something for something The idiom "allow something for something" means to consider or factor in a particular circumstance, condition, or possibility when making a decision, estimation, or calculation. It involves taking into account a specific variable or allowance to ensure accuracy, fairness, or preparedness.
  • the better for something The idiom "the better for something" refers to a situation or outcome that is improved or enhanced as a result of a particular action, circumstance, or experience. It suggests that the mentioned thing has had a positive influence or effect on the subject, leading to an overall improved state or condition.
  • one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind The idiom "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" refers to a significant individual action or achievement that has a profound impact on society as a whole. It highlights the idea that even a seemingly insignificant step taken by an individual can have a monumental impact on the progress and advancement of humanity as a whole. The phrase gained popularity when astronaut Neil Armstrong used it to describe his first step on the moon during the Apollo 11 moon landing in 1969.
  • have a (good) nose for sth The idiom "have a (good) nose for something" means to possess a strong ability to detect something, usually referring to having a keen sense of intuition or instinct in recognizing or finding something specific, often based on experience or expertise in a certain area. It implies that the person has a natural talent or skill of being able to identify or perceive certain things accurately.
  • bully for somebody! The idiom "bully for somebody!" is an expression used to express admiration or congratulations for someone's achievement or success. It conveys enthusiasm and approval towards the accomplishments of the person being referred to.
  • cut out for (someone or something) The idiom "cut out for (someone or something)" means that someone is suited or well-suited for a particular task, role, or activity. It implies that the person has the necessary abilities, skills, or qualities to excel in that particular endeavor.
  • speaks for itself The idiom "speaks for itself" means that something is so clear, evident, or self-explanatory that it needs no further explanation or justification. It suggests that the facts or evidence presented are sufficient to support or convey the intended meaning or message.
  • ask for trouble The idiom "ask for trouble" means to intentionally or foolishly invite problems or difficulties by acting in a way that could cause trouble.
  • only have eyes for (one) The idiom "only have eyes for (one)" means to be completely infatuated or devoted to a specific person, usually in a romantic or affectionate manner. It signifies being highly focused on and interested in that individual, to the exclusion of others.
  • advertise something for something The idiom "advertise something for something" typically means to promote or publicize a product, service, or event in order to attract attention, generate interest, or seek a particular outcome or result. It implies actively marketing or making information known to a target audience or the general public.
  • deserve credit for sth The idiom "deserve credit for something" means that someone should be recognized, acknowledged, or given praise for their actions, achievements, or contributions in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • be in the market for The idiom "be in the market for" means to be interested in buying or acquiring something. It is typically used when referring to a specific purchase or item that someone is actively looking for or considering.
  • make up for lost time The idiom "make up for lost time" means to make the most of the present by working or acting more intensely or effectively than usual, in order to compensate for time that has been wasted or lost in the past. It emphasizes the urgency and determination to catch up on missed opportunities or to overcome delays.
  • Every man for himself The idiom "Every man for himself" is used to convey a situation or scenario where individuals are expected to primarily or solely look out for their own interests, without regard for others. It implies a sense of competition or self-preservation, suggesting that in difficult or challenging circumstances, people are on their own and should prioritize their own well-being above all else.
  • persecute sm for sth The idiom "persecute someone for something" means to oppress, harass, or mistreat someone consistently or with hostility because of a particular reason or action. It implies subjecting someone to unjust treatment, discrimination, or ongoing negative actions due to a specific aspect of their identity or behavior.
  • close enough for government work The idiom "close enough for government work" is a saying that is used to convey a lack of precision, attention to detail, or quality in a task or outcome. It suggests that something is done adequately but not perfectly, implying that government work does not always prioritize perfection or fine-tuning. This phrase is often used humorously or sarcastically to criticize work that is subpar or done with minimal effort.
  • not do anything/a lot/much for somebody The idiom "not do anything/a lot/much for somebody" refers to a situation where someone's actions or efforts do not have a significant positive impact or provide significant help or benefit to another person. It suggests that their actions are either ineffective or insufficient in addressing the needs or expectations of the other person.
  • a run for your money The idiom "a run for your money" is used to describe a situation where someone faces strong competition or experiences a challenge that exceeds their expectations or abilities. It implies that someone is in a situation where they have to put forth significant effort or face tough competition in order to achieve their desired outcome or be successful.
  • announce (one's support) for someone or something The idiom "announce (one's support) for someone or something" means publicly declaring or expressing one's support or endorsement for a particular person, cause, idea, or entity. It typically involves making a formal statement or proclamation to make one's stance or position on the matter known to the public or relevant individuals.
  • care nothing for The idiom "care nothing for" means to have a complete lack of interest, concern, or regard for something or someone.
  • make a beeline for sb/sth The idiom "make a beeline for sb/sth" means to move quickly and directly towards someone or something, often expressing a strong desire or sense of urgency. It implies a straight and focused path towards the intended target, similar to the flight of a bee towards a flower.
  • for starters The idiom "for starters" is commonly used to indicate that something is just the beginning or the first in a list or series of things. It implies that there are more things, ideas, or actions to follow.
  • I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb. The idiom "I might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb" means that since the outcome or consequences are likely to be severe regardless of the action taken, one might as well take a greater risk or choose a more daring option instead of a safer one. It suggests that if one is going to face punishment for a minor offense, they might as well commit a more significant act and accept the consequences.
  • substitute sm for (sm else) The idiom "substitute sm for (sm else)" means to replace or use one thing or person instead of another thing or person. It implies that something or someone is being exchanged or substituted for an alternative.
  • be out for scalp The idiom "be out for scalp" refers to a person who is determined to seek revenge, typically by defeating or undermining someone they consider their rival or opponent, often in a competitive or confrontational manner. It implies a strong desire to win or inflict harm on the other person.
  • make it hot for sm The idiom "make it hot for someone" means to make things difficult, unpleasant, or uncomfortable for someone. It implies creating a situation where the person faces challenges, pressure, or negative consequences.
  • announce (one's support) for sm or sth The idiom "announce (one's support) for someone or something" means to publicly declare or express one's backing or endorsement for a particular person, cause, idea, or thing. It implies making an official statement or publicizing one's allegiance or approval.
  • make life miserable for The idiom "make life miserable for" refers to the act of deliberately causing distress, trouble, or hardship for someone, often by consistently and intentionally making their situation difficult or unpleasant.
  • might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is already facing severe consequences for a small wrongdoing, they might as well commit a larger offense since the punishment would be similar. Essentially, it suggests that if the risks and consequences are already high, one may choose to take more chances or go further, as the end result would be the same.
  • only have eyes for The idiom "only have eyes for" means to be completely focused on or attracted to a particular person, showing no interest in others. It implies a strong romantic or affectionate interest and often suggests exclusivity in one's feelings or attention.
  • discipline sm for sth The idiom "discipline someone for something" means to punish or reprimand someone for a particular action or behavior. It refers to enforcing rules, regulations, or consequences in order to curb or correct someone's wrongdoings or inappropriate actions.
  • compensate for sth The idiom "compensate for something" means to provide something good or positive in order to make up for or balance out the negative effects or shortcomings of something else. It implies the act of counteracting or offsetting a loss, deficiency, or disadvantage with a corresponding gain, advantage, or adjustment.
  • too big for (one's) boots The idiom "too big for (one's) boots" means that someone is behaving or thinking they are more important, talented, or powerful than they actually are. It refers to a person who is arrogant, overconfident, or has an inflated sense of their own abilities and achievements.
  • for openers The idiom "for openers" is used to introduce or begin a list or sequence of things or actions, implying that what follows is just the beginning or the first part. It suggests that there is more to come.
  • stop for sth The idiom "stop for something" typically means to pause or take a break in order to attend to or acquire something. It can also refer to stopping briefly during a journey to accomplish a particular task or pick up something of importance.
  • not have the stomach for (something) The idiom "not have the stomach for (something)" means to not have the courage, determination, or ability to handle or tolerate a particular situation, task, or experience. It implies a lack of emotional or mental strength to confront or endure something challenging or unpleasant.
  • come up for sth The idiom "come up for sth" typically means to face or undergo a specific event or experience, especially when it involves an examination, trial, or review. It can refer to a situation where an individual is scheduled to participate in something or to be considered for something, such as an interview, a test, a hearing, or even a parole. It implies the occurrence of the event for which someone has been waiting or preparing.
  • in mistake for something The idiom "in mistake for something" means to wrongly or inaccurately perceive or confuse something for something else. It refers to an error or misconception in identifying or recognizing one thing as another.
  • for all practical purposes The idiom "for all practical purposes" means that something is considered true, effective, or applicable in almost all practical situations or circumstances. It suggests that although there might be technical or theoretical exceptions or limitations, the stated statement or situation is valid and can be relied upon in most practical or everyday scenarios.
  • make way for The idiom "make way for" means to create space or clear a path for someone or something, typically by moving out of the way or making room for them to pass. It can also imply giving someone or something priority or allowing them to proceed without obstruction.
  • One hand for oneself and one for the ship. The idiom "One hand for oneself and one for the ship" means that in a challenging or dangerous situation, an individual should prioritize their personal well-being while also contributing to the collective effort. It emphasizes the importance of balancing self-interests and the needs of a group or community. This expression is often used in the context of teamwork, emphasizing the need for individuals to support themselves while also working together for a common goal.
  • hone for sm or sth The idiom "hone for someone or something" refers to a strong desire or craving for someone or something. It suggests an intense longing or yearning to have or be with a particular person or thing.
  • bully for —! The idiom "bully for -!" is used to express congratulations or enthusiasm towards someone's achievement or success. It is typically used in a sarcastic or ironic manner to convey insincerity or lack of genuine enthusiasm.
  • brace oneself for sth The idiom "brace oneself for sth" means to mentally and emotionally prepare or steel oneself for something challenging, difficult, or unpleasant that is about to happen. It implies being ready to face or endure a situation with strength and determination.
  • hold no brief for somebody/something To hold no brief for somebody/something means to have no sympathy, support, or favor towards someone or something. It implies a lack of advocacy or endorsement.
  • put your hands together for someone The idiom "put your hands together for someone" means to applaud or show appreciation for someone, usually by clapping or raising one's hands in approval or admiration. It is often used as an exhortation to encourage others to demonstrate their support or recognition for an individual's achievement, performance, or contribution.
  • have a flair for something The idiom "have a flair for something" means to possess a natural talent or ability in a specific area or skill. It implies that someone has an innate aptitude, skill, or inclination for a particular task, displaying proficiency or expertise without much effort.
  • be curtains for sb The idiom "be curtains for someone" means that someone or something is doomed or finished, often implying that they are facing a negative or dire consequence. It suggests that there is no hope or future for the person or thing mentioned.
  • not miss for the world The idiom "not miss for the world" means that there is absolutely no chance of someone wanting to miss or skip an event, opportunity, or experience. It expresses a strong desire, enthusiasm, or determination to participate in something, emphasizing the importance or value attached to it.
  • not for (a) lack of trying The idiom "not for (a) lack of trying" means that despite putting in great effort, attempting earnestly, or making a genuine attempt, the desired outcome or success was not achieved. It implies that the person made every effort they could, but external factors or circumstances prevented them from succeeding.
  • be strapped for cash The idiom "be strapped for cash" means to have a shortage or lack of money, implying financial difficulties or being in a tight financial situation.
  • lay down your life for sth The idiom "lay down your life for something" refers to the willingness to sacrifice one's own life for a particular cause, principle, or person. It implies an extreme act of selflessness and devotion, where a person is prepared to give up their life to protect, defend, or support something they believe in deeply. This expression is often used metaphorically to emphasize the depth of commitment or dedication towards a specific purpose.
  • get more than (one) bargained for The idiom "get more than (one) bargained for" means to receive or experience something, typically a consequence or result, that is unexpected, excessive, or overwhelming compared to what was originally anticipated or agreed upon.
  • be/do something for your sins The idiom "be/do something for your sins" refers to the notion of doing something difficult or undesirable as a form of punishment or penance for one's past wrongdoings or mistakes. It implies accepting the consequences of one's actions or making amends for any harm caused. It suggests that the action being undertaken is a deserved or necessary consequence of previous actions or behavior.
  • won't take no for an answer The idiom "won't take no for an answer" means that someone is persistent and refuses to accept refusal or rejection. They are determined to get what they want and will not be easily discouraged by setbacks or negative responses.
  • come/go/be along for the ride The idiom "come/go/be along for the ride" means to join or participate in an activity or situation, typically without having much control or influence over the outcome. It implies that the person is merely accompanying others or going with the flow without actively contributing or making decisions.
  • good for nothing The idiom "good for nothing" refers to someone or something that is completely useless, unproductive, or of no value or worth.
  • break for sth The idiom "break for something" typically means to quickly move or rush towards a particular thing or destination. It implies taking a short break or interrupting an activity in order to pursue or reach the desired goal or object.
  • can (just) whistle for (something) The idiom "can (just) whistle for (something)" means that someone can forget about receiving or getting what they desire or expect, as it is highly unlikely or impossible to happen. It implies that the person should not have any hope or expectations of obtaining a particular thing or outcome.
  • spoil the ship for a ha'p'orth of tar The idiom "spoil the ship for a ha'p'orth of tar" means to ruin or harm something significant or important because of a small, insignificant, or preventable mistake or neglect in its care or maintenance. It originates from the practice of applying tar, a protective substance, to wooden ships to prevent them from deteriorating. If a ship is not properly maintained and protected with tar due to negligence or saving cost on a small amount of tar (ha'p'orth is a shortened form of "halfpenny's worth"), it can lead to significant damage, indicating the foolishness or shortsightedness of prioritizing short-term savings over long-term preservation.
  • store up trouble, etc. for yourself The idiom "store up trouble, etc. for yourself" means to engage in actions or behavior that will ultimately lead to negative consequences or problems in the future. It implies that one's current actions or decisions are setting the stage for trouble or difficulty later on.
  • watch out for sm The idiom "watch out for someone" means to be cautious or careful about someone's actions, behavior, or intentions because they may pose a potential threat or danger. It suggests staying alert and keeping a close eye on the person to avoid any negative consequences.
  • provide for sth The idiom "provide for something" means to make the necessary arrangements or take actions to ensure that something is adequately taken care of, supported, or provided for. It often refers to fulfilling financial or material needs, but can also encompass emotional or other forms of support.
  • (just) for the record The idiom "(just) for the record" is used to assert that what is being said or done is being recorded officially or officially noted, often to ensure accuracy or to avoid misunderstandings. It is commonly used when someone wants to clarify or emphasize a point or fact that they want to be remembered accurately.
  • not/never want for anything The idiom "not/never want for anything" means that a person has everything they need or desire and lacks nothing. They have an abundance of resources or opportunities, and there is no lack or shortage in their life.
  • have a weakness for someone or something The idiom "have a weakness for someone or something" means to have a strong attraction or fondness for a particular person or thing, even if it may not always be logical or beneficial. It suggests having a vulnerability or susceptibility to being influenced or drawn towards someone or something, often to an extent that it may override reason or self-control.
  • throw sm for a loss The idiom "throw someone for a loss" means to surprise or confuse someone, usually causing them to be unsure or unable to respond effectively. It can also imply causing someone to make a mistake or fail to anticipate a situation.
  • demonstrate for The idiom "demonstrate for" refers to the act of participating in a public or organized gathering, typically involving a group of people who gather to express their support or opposition towards a particular cause, issue, or belief. It usually involves marching, protesting, or advocating for something in a visible and public manner.
  • go to the stake for (something) The idiom "go to the stake for (something)" refers to a strong commitment and willingness to defend or support a particular belief, principle, or cause, even at great personal risk or sacrifice. It is often used to express a person's unwavering dedication and readiness to face adversity or persecution for what they believe in. The phrase originates from the historical practice of burning people at the stake as a punishment for heresy or holding unorthodox beliefs, suggesting that the person is willing to endure extreme consequences to uphold their convictions.
  • exchange something for something The idiom "exchange something for something" means to trade or swap one thing for another thing, typically of equal value or in a mutually beneficial manner.
  • clear (something) for publication The idiom "clear (something) for publication" means to approve or authorize something, such as an article, book, or other form of media, to be released or made available for public viewing. It refers to the process of ensuring that the content is suitable and complies with any relevant guidelines or policies before it can be published or distributed.
  • lack for something The idiom "lack for something" means to not have enough of something or to be in short supply. It implies a situation where there is a scarcity or insufficiency of a particular thing or resource.
  • pay too dearly for (one's) whistle The idiom "pay too dearly for (one's) whistle" means to pay a high price or suffer significant consequences for something that ultimately brings only limited pleasure or satisfaction. It implies that the person has expended a great deal of time, effort, or resources for something that turns out to be of little value or not worth the cost.
  • speaking for oneself The idiom "speaking for oneself" means expressing one's own thoughts, opinions, or personal experiences, rather than making a statement on behalf of others or assuming the same perspective applies universally. It is a way of emphasizing that one's statements reflect their personal viewpoint and may not necessarily represent the views of others.
  • each man for himself The idiom "each man for himself" means that in a difficult or dangerous situation, everyone is expected to look out for their own interests and welfare, without concern for others. It indicates a lack of cooperation or teamwork, and emphasizes individualism and self-preservation.
  • cover for sm The idiom "cover for someone" means to provide an excuse or a false alibi for someone's actions or behavior, usually to protect them from getting into trouble or to help them avoid blame or negative consequences.
  • demonstrate for (someone or something) The idiom "demonstrate for (someone or something)" means to publicly show support, usually in the form of a protest or rally, to advocate on behalf of a cause, person, or idea. It involves expressing one's opinions, beliefs, or demands for the benefit or representation of someone or something.
  • have a gift for (doing) something The idiom "have a gift for (doing) something" means to possess a natural talent, ability, or exceptional skill in a specific area or activity. It implies that the person has an innate capacity or knack for accomplishing or excelling in that particular task or pursuit.
  • make way for sth, at give way to sth The idiom "make way for something" or "give way to something" means to allow or create space or opportunity for another thing to happen or be prioritized. It implies yielding or stepping aside to allow something else to take precedence or proceed without obstruction.
  • fight for (one's) life The idiom "fight for (one's) life" means to engage in a desperate struggle or battle in order to survive or overcome a life-threatening situation or extreme difficulty. It refers to exerting maximum effort, determination, and resilience to stay alive or prevail against an imminent danger or overwhelming challenge.
  • strictly for the birds The idiom "strictly for the birds" means that something is worthless, pointless, or not worth considering. It implies that the thing being referred to is trivial and of no real value or importance.
  • file for sth The idiom "file for something" refers to the act of officially submitting or applying for something, such as legal documents, paperwork, or a claim.
  • take a/the fall for sb To "take a/the fall for someone" means to accept blame or punishment on behalf of someone else, usually to protect or shield them from the consequences of their actions. It involves assuming responsibility for someone else's wrongdoing or mistakes, even if it results in negative consequences for oneself.
  • intend something for someone or something The idiom "intend something for someone or something" means to plan or have a specific purpose, usage, or goal in mind for someone or something. It conveys the idea of designing or directing something to be utilized or directed towards a particular person or object.
  • lay up trouble for yourself The idiom "lay up trouble for yourself" means to knowingly or inadvertently create or invite problems or difficulties for oneself in the future by engaging in actions or behaviors that could lead to negative consequences or unwanted outcomes. It implies that the individual is causing complications or obstacles that they will eventually have to face or deal with.
  • if one knows what's good for one The idiom "if one knows what's good for one" is used to suggest that someone should act in a particular way or make a certain decision if they are aware of what is in their best interest or if they possess common sense. It implies that taking the recommended course of action is the wisest or most advantageous choice.
  • itch for sth, at itch to do sth The idiom "itch for something" or "itch to do something" refers to a strong desire, craving, or urge to have or do something. It implies a feeling of restlessness or impatience, as if one cannot wait any longer to obtain or pursue what they want. It often indicates a yearning or longing for a particular thing or action.
  • be gunning for sb The idiom "be gunning for sb" means to be determined or actively pursuing someone with the intention of defeating, outperforming, or causing harm to them in a competitive or confrontational situation. It implies having a strong desire to surpass or challenge someone.
  • take my word for it, at take it from me The definition of the idiom "take my word for it" or "take it from me" is to believe or accept something based solely on the speaker's assurance or authority, without further evidence or proof. It implies that the speaker is trustworthy and knowledgeable on the subject at hand.
  • (Open) confession is good for the soul. The idiom "(Open) confession is good for the soul" means that openly admitting one's wrongdoings or secrets can have a purifying or therapeutic effect on one's conscience or well-being. It suggests that by confessing, one can alleviate feelings of guilt, shame, or burden.
  • mistake (someone) for (someone else) The idiom "mistake (someone) for (someone else)" means to incorrectly identify or confuse someone with another person, usually due to their similarities in appearance, behavior, or other distinguishing characteristics.
  • front for sm or sth The idiom "front for sm or sth" typically refers to a legitimate or legal business or organization that is used as a cover or disguise for illegal activities or operations. In such cases, the front acts as a facade to divert attention and maintain the appearance of legitimacy.
  • come in for (something) The idiom "come in for (something)" means to receive or experience something, often something negative or undesired, usually as a result of one's actions or circumstances. It can also imply facing criticism, punishment, or consequences for a particular behavior.
  • (all) for someone or something The idiom "(all) for someone or something" means to be fully supportive, willing to do anything, or completely in favor of someone or something. It implies intense dedication, loyalty, or enthusiasm towards the mentioned person or thing.
  • the devil finds work for idle hands to do The idiom "the devil finds work for idle hands to do" suggests that when a person has nothing productive or constructive to occupy their time, they are more likely to engage in mischief, misbehavior, or troublesome activities. It implies that people who are idle or have too much free time are prone to getting into trouble or participating in negative behavior.
  • head for (or take to) the hills The idiomatic expression "head for (or take to) the hills" means to escape, flee, or run away from a dangerous or unbearable situation, often when the situation becomes overwhelming or threatening. The phrase originates from the image of seeking refuge or safety in the hills or mountains, which are seen as remote and secluded places.
  • hope for the best, but prepare for the worst The idiom "hope for the best, but prepare for the worst" signifies a mindset or approach aimed at being optimistic about a situation's outcome but taking precautionary measures or planning for any potential negative or unforeseen circumstances that may arise. It emphasizes the importance of remaining hopeful while simultaneously acknowledging the need to be ready for any unfavorable or challenging outcomes.
  • sell something for a certain price The idiom "sell something for a certain price" means to offer or exchange a product or service in return for a specific amount of money. It implies determining and agreeing upon a fixed value or cost for the item being sold.
  • no accounting for tastes, there's The idiom "no accounting for tastes, there's" means that personal preferences or tastes can vary greatly among individuals, and it is impossible to explain or understand why people have different likes and dislikes. It suggests that one person's preferences cannot be judged or rationalized by others, as taste is a subjective matter.
  • draw straws for sth The idiom "draw straws for something" means to use a random or chance-based method to determine who will receive or do something when there are multiple participants or choices. It typically involves each participant pulling or picking a straw of varying lengths, with the shortest or longest straw indicating the winner or loser of the selection process.
  • be grateful for small blessings The idiom "be grateful for small blessings" means to appreciate and show gratitude for the small or modest things in life. It implies that one should not take these small blessings for granted, as they can often bring joy and contentment in everyday circumstances. It emphasizes the importance of recognizing and acknowledging the positive aspects of one's life, no matter how insignificant they may seem.
  • scold sm for sth The idiom "scold someone for something" means to express strong disapproval or anger towards someone for a certain action, behavior, or mistake. It implies rebuking, reprimanding, or criticizing someone for their wrongdoing or for doing something that is perceived as unacceptable.
  • be not for the faint-hearted The idiom "be not for the faint-hearted" means that something is demanding, challenging, or intense, and may require a strong heart or courage to face or accomplish. It implies that the task or situation might be overwhelming or difficult for those who are easily discouraged or lack resilience.
  • for all I, you, etc. care The idiom "for all I, you, etc., care" is a phrase used to express indifference, lack of concern, or disregard for someone or something. It signifies that one does not have any interest or opinion about a particular matter.
  • destine for The idiom "destine for" refers to when something or someone is believed or intended to have a particular fate or outcome. It implies a predetermined future or purpose for that entity.
  • sit for portrait The idiom "sit for a portrait" refers to the act of posing or sitting still for the purpose of having one's portrait painted, drawn, or photographed. It implies that someone is willingly and patiently sitting in a stationary position, typically maintaining a specific posture or expression, as an artist captures their likeness on canvas or in another artistic medium. This idiom can also be used figuratively to mean giving someone undivided attention or cooperating willingly in a particular situation.
  • What's sauce for the goose The idiom "What's sauce for the goose" refers to the notion that what is deemed acceptable or appropriate for one person should also be considered acceptable or appropriate for another person in a similar situation. It implies that the same rules or standards should apply to everyone involved.
  • be badly off for something The idiom "be badly off for something" typically means to be in a state of lacking or having a shortage of something. It suggests that there is a significant scarcity or insufficiency of a particular resource, item, or quality.
  • go bail for The idiom "go bail for" refers to acting as a surety or providing financial security on behalf of someone who has been arrested or accused of a crime. It means to offer oneself as a guarantor by paying a sum of money for their release from custody until their trial or legal proceedings take place.
  • try sth for size The idiom "try something for size" means to evaluate or assess something, usually by testing or experiencing it, in order to determine if it is a good fit or suitable. It is often used when trying out clothes or other items to see if they are the right size or style. However, it can also be used metaphorically to refer to evaluating or sampling any situation, task, or opportunity.
  • a candidate for a pair of wings The idiom "a candidate for a pair of wings" refers to someone who is likely to die soon or who is in a critical condition. It suggests that such a person may be close to becoming an angel, symbolized by the wings, implying their imminent departure from life.
  • the worse for wear The idiom "the worse for wear" means to be in a bad or deteriorating condition, usually referring to a person or an object that has seen significant wear, damage, or has been through difficult experiences. It suggests that something or someone is not as good or functioning as well as they used to be due to age, use, or mistreatment.
  • be riding for a fall The idiom "be riding for a fall" means to be behaving in a way that is likely to lead to failure, disappointment, or a negative outcome. It suggests that someone's actions or decisions are setting them up for a significant setback or downfall.
  • have going for one The idiom "have going for one" refers to the positive aspects, qualities, or advantages that a person possesses in a particular situation or endeavor. It implies having favorable circumstances or attributes that can contribute to success or make someone stand out.
  • have work cut out for The idiom "have work cut out for" means to have a difficult or challenging task ahead. It implies that the person has various responsibilities and a demanding workload to accomplish.
  • for sm reason The idiom "for some reason" is commonly used to express that there is an unidentified or unspecified cause or explanation for a certain situation or behavior. It implies that there is an unknown rationale behind a specific action, event, or feeling.
  • not see someone for dust The idiom "not see someone for dust" means that a person is moving or leaving very quickly, not giving others a chance to catch up or keep pace with them. It suggests that the person is in such a hurry or urgency that they leave behind a trail of dust, metaphoric for their rapid departure.
  • furnish sth for sth The idiom "furnish something for something" means to provide or supply something that is needed for a particular purpose or situation. It refers to offering or making available the necessary items, resources, or support required to accomplish a specific task or goal.
  • bode well for (someone or something) The idiom "bode well for (someone or something)" means to indicate or suggest a positive or favorable outcome or future for someone or something. It implies that current signs or circumstances are indicating a good or promising future outcome.
  • have somebody's guts for garters The idiom "to have somebody's guts for garters" is an expression used to express extreme anger, hostility, or a strong desire for revenge towards someone. It implies that the speaker is so furious with the person referenced that they would metaphorically disembowel them and use their intestines as garters (a type of strap used to hold up stockings in the past). It conveys a strong sense of threat or punishment.
  • in for a penny (in for a pound) The idiom "in for a penny (in for a pound)" means that once someone has committed to doing something, especially if it involves a risk or cost, they might as well fully commit and take all necessary actions, even if it requires additional effort or resources. The phrase implies that since a small amount of money (a penny) has already been invested, it would be illogical to hesitate about investing a larger amount (a pound) if it could potentially yield better results or outcomes.
  • obtain sth for sm or sth The idiom "obtain something for someone or something" means to acquire or get something specifically for the benefit, use, or value of a person or thing. It implies that the person or thing will possess, receive, or have access to the obtained item.
  • go to the stake for sth The idiom "go to the stake for sth" means to strongly support or defend something, even if it leads to extreme consequences, sacrifices, or personal risk. It alludes to the historical practice of burning people at the stake as punishment for heresy or holding controversial beliefs.
  • the blame for (something) The idiom "the blame for (something)" refers to taking responsibility or attributing fault to someone or something for a particular action, mistake, or outcome. It implies holding someone accountable or pointing them out as the cause or reason for an undesired situation or result.
  • thank you for a lovely time The idiom "thank you for a lovely time" is a polite expression used to express gratitude and appreciation towards someone for creating a delightful or enjoyable experience or event. It is commonly used after attending a gathering, party, outing, or any occasion where one had a pleasant time.
  • as for sb/sth The idiom "as for sb/sth" is used to introduce or specify someone or something in a conversation or statement. It is often used to shift the focus or address a particular aspect of a topic. It indicates that the following information or discussion is specifically about the mentioned person or thing.
  • hold terror for The idiom "hold terror for" means to cause extreme fear or fright in someone. It implies that something or someone is extremely frightening or intimidating to a particular individual.
  • curtains for The idiom "curtains for" means to indicate the end, demise or conclusion of something or someone, typically implying that there is no hope for continuation or success. It suggests that the situation or person is about to come to a final, irreversible end.
  • give up for lost The idiom "give up for lost" means to abandon hope or expectation of finding or seeing someone or something that is missing or lost, usually because the chances of recovering it are extremely low or unlikely.
  • plead for sth To plead for something is an idiomatic expression that means to make a sincere and desperate request or appeal for something, usually in a heartfelt and emotional manner. It implies a strong desire and urgency to obtain or achieve that thing, often making a passionate argument or begging for it to be bestowed or granted.
  • (one's) good deed for the day The idiom "(one's) good deed for the day" refers to a kind or charitable act performed by someone, usually with the intention of doing something positive or helping someone in need. It implies that by doing this act, the person believes they have fulfilled their responsibility for goodness or helpfulness for that particular day.
  • pass for sth The idiom "pass for something" means to be accepted or regarded as something, especially when it is not entirely accurate or true. It implies that someone or something is able to be seen or considered as a particular thing, even if it may not possess all the qualities or characteristics typically associated with it.
  • barter (sth) for (sth else) The idiom "barter (sth) for (sth else)" refers to the act of exchanging or trading one item or service for another, without involving the use of money. It involves a direct swap of goods or services between two parties, where each party gives up something they own or offer in order to obtain something else they desire. It is a method of trade that relies on negotiation and mutual agreement rather than currency.
  • bode somehow for someone or something The idiom "bode somehow for someone or something" means to indicate or predict a particular outcome or future developments for someone or something. It implies that certain signs or events are seen as indicators of either positive or negative circumstances that lie ahead.
  • arrange sm music for sth The idiom "arrange sm music for sth" refers to the act of adapting or modifying a piece of music in order to suit a specific purpose or context. It involves making changes to the composition, instruments, or style of the music to fit a particular arrangement or situation.
  • do duty for The idiom "do duty for" means to serve as a substitute or temporary replacement for someone or something. It implies taking on the responsibilities, tasks, or roles of another person or object in their absence or unavailability.
  • answer for sth The idiom "answer for something" means to accept responsibility, provide an explanation or justification, or face the consequences for one's actions or decisions. It implies being accountable or held liable for the outcome or circumstances surrounding a specific matter or situation.
  • be grateful/thankful for small mercies The idiom "be grateful/thankful for small mercies" means to appreciate or express gratitude for even the smallest or least significant positive things or blessings in one's life or situation, especially when faced with difficulties or challenging circumstances. It emphasizes finding contentment in the little things and not taking them for granted.
  • have an eye for someone or something The idiom "have an eye for someone or something" means to possess a particular talent or knack for recognizing or appreciating someone's qualities, skills, or the intrinsic value of something. It implies being perceptive and having a keen sense of judgment in evaluating people or things.
  • close in for the kill The idiom "close in for the kill" is typically used to describe a situation where someone or something is gradually and relentlessly advancing towards its objective or victory, particularly when the outcome seems inevitable or certain. It can be used metaphorically to describe a person or group gradually overpowering their opponents, achieving a goal, or successfully completing a task. The idiom often alludes to a predatory animal that closes in on its prey as a final step to secure the kill.
  • would give your right arm for something/to do something The idiom "would give your right arm for something/to do something" means to be willing to sacrifice or give up something extremely valuable or important in order to obtain or achieve something desired. It emphasizes a strong desire or longing for a particular outcome or possession.
  • for the life of (one) The idiom "for the life of (one)" typically means that someone is unable to do or understand something, no matter how hard they try. It implies a great level of difficulty or inability to achieve a particular task or comprehend a specific concept.
  • too big for your boots The idiom "too big for your boots" refers to someone who acts or behaves arrogantly or with excessive self-importance, considering themselves superior to others, often due to an inflated sense of their abilities or achievements.
  • fall for hook, line and sinker The idiom "fall for hook, line and sinker" means to completely or unquestioningly believe a story, lie, or deception, without any skepticism or doubt. It refers to someone being easily fooled or deceived. It is often used to describe someone who is gullible or naive. The phrase is derived from fishing, where "hook, line, and sinker" are the necessary equipment to catch a fish, and falling for it implies being caught completely.
  • have a good run for money The idiom "have a good run for money" means to have a successful or productive period, usually in a competitive context, where one performs well and achieves favorable results in exchange for their efforts or investment. It can be used in various situations like sports, business, or any endeavor where there is a notion of competition and reward.
  • be hard up for something The idiom "be hard up for something" means to be lacking or in need of something, often referring to a scarcity of resources, such as money, time, or resources. It indicates a situation where someone is struggling or facing difficulty due to a limited supply or shortage of a specific item or resource.
  • couldn't have asked for more The idiom "couldn't have asked for more" means that someone feels extremely satisfied or content with the current situation or outcome. It implies that everything has gone perfectly or met their expectations, and they have no further desires or needs.
  • be (strictly) for the birds The idiom "be (strictly) for the birds" means that something is worthless, trivial, or unimportant. It implies that the thing being referred to is of no value or significance, similar to how birds may be seen as inconsequential in certain contexts.
  • take an amount of money for The idiom "take an amount of money for" means to receive or accept payment in exchange for something, often a product or service. It suggests that a specified sum of money is required or agreed upon for the transaction to occur.
  • too big for boots The idiom "too big for boots" means that someone has an exaggerated sense of their own importance, skills, or abilities. It refers to someone who is arrogant, self-important, or overconfident.
  • good enough for jazz The idiom "good enough for jazz" means that something is acceptable or satisfactory, often implying a level of flexibility or improvisation. It refers to the characteristic of jazz music where musicians often improvise and adapt their playing style, making it more open-minded and inclusive. Thus, if something is "good enough for jazz," it suggests that it meets the required standard, even if it may not be perfect or exactly as expected.
  • give (one) food for thought The idiom "give (one) food for thought" means to provide someone with something to think about or consider seriously. It refers to sharing an idea, argument, or perspective that challenges or stimulates the person's thinking, prompting them to reflect or ponder on it.
  • be/get too big for your boots The idiom "be/get too big for your boots" means to behave arrogantly or confidently in a way that exceeds one's actual abilities, skills, or importance. It suggests that a person has an inflated perception of their own capabilities and may be overestimating themselves or acting in a way that is inappropriate or presumptuous.
  • hellbent for leather The idiom "hellbent for leather" means to be in a hurry, moving extremely fast or with extreme determination. It often implies a sense of recklessness or a single-minded pursuit of a goal, disregarding any obstacles or consequences.
  • whistle for sm or sth The idiom "whistle for someone or something" means to wait in vain for someone or something that will never come or happen. It suggests that the person or thing being waited for is unlikely to arrive or be achieved.
  • knock for a loop The idiom "knock for a loop" means to completely surprise or stun someone, often leaving them confused, bewildered, or completely taken aback. It refers to the feeling of being physically or mentally thrown off balance, as if being hit unexpectedly by a powerful blow.
  • no call for The idiom "no call for" means that there is no need or justification for something. It suggests that a certain action or behavior is unwarranted given the circumstances. It implies that the situation does not demand or require a specific response or action.
  • examine (someone) for (something) The idiom "examine (someone) for (something)" means to investigate or look closely at someone with the intention of determining whether they possess or display a particular characteristic, condition, or quality. It often implies a thorough or detailed scrutiny of an individual in search of specific attributes or signs.
  • good for you, him, etc. The idiom "good for you, him, etc." is a phrase used to express approval or admiration towards someone's achievements, actions, or accomplishments. It is a way of acknowledging and congratulating someone on their success or positive behavior.
  • appropriate sth for sth The idiom "appropriate something for something" means to choose or select something that is suitable, fitting or relevant for a particular purpose, situation, or audience. It implies the act of determining the most appropriate or best option among a variety of choices to meet a specific need or requirement.
  • embark for The idiom "embark for" means to begin a journey or undertake a new task or endeavor. It implies the act of setting off or initiating a course of action towards a particular destination or goal.
  • be in line for The idiomatic expression "be in line for" means to be in a position to receive or likely to receive something, such as an opportunity, award, promotion, or success. It suggests that someone is next in line or has a good chance of achieving or obtaining something.
  • qualify sm for sth The idiom "qualify someone for something" means to enable or make someone eligible or suitable for a particular thing or situation. It can refer to meeting the necessary requirements or criteria, acquiring the skills or knowledge needed, or fulfilling the conditions to participate or be considered for something.
  • admire someone for something The idiom "admire someone for something" means to have a high level of respect and appreciation for someone due to a specific quality, skill, achievement, or characteristic they possess. It implies acknowledging the person's excellence in a particular aspect and having a positive admiration towards them.
  • chide for The idiom "chide for" means to scold, criticize, or reprimand someone for a specific action or behavior. It indicates expressing disapproval or admonishing someone for something they have done or said.
  • speaks for The idiom "speaks for" means to express or represent the thoughts, opinions, or preferences of someone or something accurately. It suggests that the person or thing being discussed is a clear and authentic spokesman for a particular viewpoint or group.
  • cast around for The idiom "cast around for" means to search or look for something or someone diligently and earnestly. It refers to the act of making an effort to find or discover something by carefully considering different options or possibilities.
  • carry a torch for somebody The idiom "carry a torch for somebody" means to have strong feelings of love or infatuation towards someone, often for a long period of time, even if the romantic feelings are not reciprocated or the relationship has ended. It implies that the person "carrying the torch" still harbors affection and longing for the other person.
  • make a break for The idiom "make a break for" means to attempt to escape or exit a situation suddenly and urgently, often with the intention of avoiding something negative or seizing an opportunity. It usually implies taking a risk or acting quickly and decisively.
  • stand up for The idiom "stand up for" means to defend or support someone or something, especially in a situation where they are being treated unfairly or facing opposition or criticism. It entails speaking or acting on behalf of someone or something to ensure their rights, interests, or well-being are upheld.
  • headed for something The idiom "headed for something" typically means moving or progressing towards a particular destination, outcome, or situation, often with a sense of inevitability or an impending event. It implies that the person or subject is on a direct path towards the mentioned goal or result.
  • stump for sm The idiom "stump for someone" means to actively support or promote someone or their cause, often by making speeches or engaging in campaigning activities, especially in a political context. It originates from the practice of politicians giving speeches while standing on a tree stump to elevate themselves and gain attention from the crowd during campaign rallies.
  • not give much for sb's chances The idiom "not give much for sb's chances" means to have a pessimistic or negative view regarding someone's likelihood of success or achieving a desired outcome. It implies that the speaker has a low estimation of the person's abilities or the likelihood of their success.
  • can't do sth for toffee The idiom "can't do something for toffee" is a British colloquial expression used to describe someone's inability or lack of skill in performing a particular task. It suggests that the person is not capable of doing something well, often implying clumsiness, ineptitude, or a complete lack of talent in that area. The term "toffee" in this context is used metaphorically to convey that the person's capability or competence is as poor as their ability to earn or receive toffee as a reward.
  • criticize (one) for (something) The idiom "criticize (one) for (something)" refers to the act of expressing disapproval, fault-finding, or negative comments towards someone regarding a particular action, behavior, quality, or decision made.
  • stand up for sm or sth The idiom "stand up for someone or something" means to support, defend, or advocate for someone or something, especially in a situation where they are being treated unfairly or being criticized. It implies taking a stance and speaking out on behalf of the person or thing in question.
  • have a weak spot for sb/sth The idiom "have a weak spot for sb/sth" means to have a particular fondness or susceptibility towards someone or something. It suggests that the person has a soft spot or a special liking for a certain individual or thing, often leading to a willingness to overlook flaws or give preferential treatment.
  • more than bargained for The idiom "more than bargained for" refers to a situation where someone unexpectedly receives or experiences something in greater quantity, intensity, or complexity than they anticipated or agreed upon. It implies a sense of surprise, often suggesting that the outcome is more challenging or demanding than initially expected.
  • go for the jugular The idiom "go for the jugular" means to attack or criticize someone or something ruthlessly and with maximum force, aiming to inflict a decisive or fatal blow. It is often used to describe an aggressive and uncompromising approach or action taken in a confrontation or competition.
  • a glutton for punishment The idiom "a glutton for punishment" refers to someone who willingly and repeatedly puts themselves in difficult or unpleasant situations, often as a result of their own actions or choices. This person seems to be attracted to or enjoy the challenges and hardships they face, even though others may find it unreasonable or unnecessary.
  • search for sm or sth The idiom "search for someone or something" means to look for or seek out a specific person or thing that is missing or desired. It implies actively seeking, exploring, or investigating various possibilities or locations in order to find what is being searched for.
  • there's a first time for everything The idiom "there's a first time for everything" means that new experiences or opportunities can occur at any time, regardless of how unlikely or unusual they may seem. It suggests that one should be open to trying new things and not limit themselves based on previous lack of experience.
  • Goodbye for now The idiom "Goodbye for now" means that temporary farewells are being said, indicating that the speaker is leaving or relationships are being put on hold, with the implication that there is a possibility of reuniting in the future.
  • be/get done for something/for doing something The idiom "be/get done for something/for doing something" means to be punished, accused, or held accountable for committing a certain action or offense. It implies facing legal consequences or being caught in the act of doing something wrong or illegal.
  • give somebody/something up for lost The idiom "give somebody/something up for lost" means to abandon hope or belief in the recovery or survival of someone or something, assuming they are permanently lost or beyond rescue. It implies accepting the notion that there is no chance of finding or retrieving what is lost.
  • make a pitch for sth To make a pitch for something means to make a persuasive or enthusiastic presentation or argument in support or promotion of a particular idea, product, cause, or opinion. It often involves trying to convince others to support or invest in something.
  • have sth going for you The idiom "have something going for you" means to possess certain advantages, qualities or positive attributes that increase chances of success or enable one to achieve their goals. It suggests having an edge, support or favorable circumstances that work in one's favor.
  • be make or break for sb/sth To be make or break for someone or something means that a particular situation or event will determine their success or failure. It implies that the outcome of that situation or event is crucial and has the potential to either make or break their future prospects, goals, or chances of success.
  • hang on for dear life The idiom "hang on for dear life" means to grip or hold onto something tightly, often in a desperate or fearful manner, in order to stay safe or survive in a dangerous or challenging situation. It implies a sense of urgency and the need to exert maximum effort or strength to maintain a secure position.
  • a good word for everybody The idiom "a good word for everybody" means speaking positively or praise about all people, be it in a general sense or in a specific situation. It refers to offering favorable comments or recommendations for everyone involved, without any negative or critical remarks. It denotes being unbiased, supportive, and having an optimistic attitude towards others.
  • sell (one's) birthright for a bowl of soup The idiom "sell (one's) birthright for a bowl of soup" refers to the act of giving up or sacrificing something of great value or privilege for immediate, temporary gratification or satisfaction. It alludes to the biblical story in which Esau, son of Isaac and brother of Jacob, sold his birthright as the eldest son to his younger brother in exchange for a simple meal of lentil soup. This idiom is used to criticize someone who makes shortsighted decisions, neglecting long-term benefits or important assets for momentary gains.
  • go for a song The idiom "go for a song" means to be sold at a very low price, much lower than its actual value or worth. It often refers to the selling or purchasing of an item or property for a bargain or a ridiculously low price.
  • sound the death knell for The idiom "sound the death knell for" means to signify or announce the end or downfall of something or someone. It suggests that the said thing or person is about to face imminent demise or failure. It often implies a significant and irreversible change leading to the ultimate demise.
  • not take no for an answer The idiom "not take no for an answer" means to be persistent and refuse to accept or be discouraged by a negative response or refusal. It refers to someone who is determined to achieve their goal, regardless of the initial rejection or opposition they may face.
  • hold terror for sm The idiom "hold terror for someone" means to deeply frighten or intimidate someone. It implies that a person or situation causes extreme fear and anxiety in the individual.
  • carry the torch for (someone) The idiom "carry the torch for (someone)" means to have strong love or affection for someone, often in a romantic sense, even if the feelings are unrequited or the relationship is not possible. It implies continuing to have feelings and remain loyal to that person despite the circumstances.
  • substitute for someone or something The idiom "substitute for someone or something" means to act as a replacement or alternative for someone or something. It refers to stepping into a role or function typically performed by another person or being used in place of a particular object or item.
  • hit (or go) for the cycle The idiom "hit (or go) for the cycle" originated in baseball and refers to a player successfully hitting a single, double, triple, and home run in the same game. In a broader sense, the phrase is used to describe accomplishing a series of tasks or achieving a set of goals consecutively or in succession.
  • for two pins I'd The idiom "for two pins I'd" is an expression used to convey one's strong desire or inclination to do something, often implying a willingness to take risks or face consequences. It suggests that the speaker is almost on the verge of doing something regardless of the possible negative outcomes.
  • campaign for The idiom "campaign for" means to actively promote or advocate for a cause, idea, or goal with sustained and organized effort. It often involves activities such as public speaking, organizing events, engaging in advertising or publicity, lobbying, or mobilizing supporters to generate support and influence for the cause.
  • brace oneself for The idiom "brace oneself for" means to prepare mentally or emotionally for something difficult, challenging, or potentially painful that is about to happen. It implies the act of fortifying oneself and gathering inner strength and determination to face a situation head-on.
  • pardon me for doing something The idiom "pardon me for doing something" is an expression used to apologize for an action or behavior that may have been improper, offensive, or inconvenient. It acknowledges that the speaker is aware of their mistake or transgression and seeks forgiveness or understanding from others.
  • head for sm or sth The idiom "head for sm or sth" means to move or go towards a particular destination or location with a specific purpose or intention in mind. It implies setting a course or direction, often with determination, to reach a desired place or engage in a particular activity.
  • rebuke sm for sth The idiom "rebuke someone for something" means to express disapproval or criticism toward someone for their actions, behavior, or an mistake they made. It involves admonishing or reproaching someone for a specific thing they have done or said.
  • vote for sm or sth The idiom "vote for someone or something" refers to the act of expressing support or preference for a person, idea, or decision by casting one's vote in favor of them or it. It signifies giving one's approval, endorsement, or agreement through the democratic process of voting.
  • taken for dead The idiom "taken for dead" refers to a situation where someone is presumed to be deceased or not alive, often leading others to overlook or ignore their existence, capabilities, or potential contribution. It can also imply being underestimated or undervalued due to initial appearances or assumptions about one's capabilities.
  • for donkey's years The idiom "for donkey's years" is used to express a long period of time. It means for a very long time, often referring to a duration that feels like an eternity.
  • make a life for oneself The idiom "make a life for oneself" refers to the process of building and creating a meaningful and fulfilling existence for oneself. It implies embarking on a journey of personal growth, achieving goals, pursuing dreams, and establishing a sense of integrity, purpose, and independence in various aspects, such as career, relationships, and overall lifestyle. It emphasizes taking charge of one's own destiny and charting a path that aligns with one's aspirations and values.
  • for all one’s trouble The idiom "for all one's trouble" means despite the efforts, difficulties, or problems one has gone through or encountered. It emphasizes that despite the troubles faced, there was little or no reward or outcome to justify the efforts put in.
  • live for (someone or something) The idiom "live for (someone or something)" means to prioritize and dedicate one's life and actions solely for the benefit or satisfaction of a specific person or thing. It implies that an individual's primary purpose or motivation revolves around another entity, often demonstrating a strong emotional or passionate attachment.
  • for a coon's age The idiom "for a coon's age" is an informal expression that is used to describe a very long period of time. It is derived from the word "coon," which is a shortened form of "raccoon." However, it is important to note that the term "coon" can also be considered offensive or racially insensitive when used as a derogatory term for a person of color in some contexts.
  • have (something) to show for (something) The idiom "have (something) to show for (something)" means to have tangible or visible evidence or results of one's efforts, achievements, or actions. It often implies that there is something substantial or meaningful that can be displayed or demonstrated as a result of the specific endeavor or experience.
  • a nose for something The idiom "a nose for something" typically refers to someone's natural ability or instinct to detect, recognize, or find a particular thing or situation. It suggests that the person has an intuitive or perceptive skill in identifying or discovering something.
  • no call for (something) The idiom "no call for (something)" means that there is no need, justification, or appropriate reason for a specific action or thing to occur. It implies that the mentioned thing is unnecessary or unwarranted in a given situation.
  • works for me The idiom "works for me" is an informal expression used to indicate that a particular suggestion, plan, or solution is acceptable or suitable to the speaker. It means that the proposed idea aligns with one's preferences, desires, or needs.
  • have no use for sb/sth The idiom "have no use for someone/something" means to have no interest, need, or value for someone or something. It implies a lack of appreciation, regard, or usefulness towards a person or thing.
  • arrange some music for The idiom "arrange some music for" typically means to adapt or rework a piece of music, often written for a specific instrument or group, so that it can be performed by a different instrument or group of instruments. It involves rearranging or transcribing the original composition to suit the capabilities and characteristics of the new performers or ensemble.
  • earmark sth for sm or sth The idiom "earmark something for someone or something" means to designate or reserve something specifically for a particular person or purpose. It implies setting something aside for a particular use or individual, often with distinct intentions or restrictions attached to it.
  • So much for that The idiom "So much for that" is used to express disappointment or resignation when one's hopes, plans, or expectations have been proven wrong or have failed to materialize. It suggests that the mentioned thing or situation is no longer relevant or worth considering due to its failure.
  • be dying for something/to do something The idiom "be dying for something/to do something" means to have a strong, intense desire or longing for something or to do something. It implies a great eagerness or craving, often used to express extreme excitement or anticipation.
  • care for another (something) The idiom "care for another (something)" typically refers to having a liking or affection for something or someone. It signifies taking an interest in, appreciating, or having a sincere connection with a particular thing or person.
  • have eyes only for The idiom "have eyes only for" means to be completely devoted or infatuated with someone or something, often to the point of having little or no interest in anyone or anything else. It implies a strong focus or attraction towards a specific person or object.
  • devil for The idiom "devil for" typically means a person who is extremely adept, skilled, or inclined toward a particular activity or behavior, often to an excessive or intense degree. It suggests that the person is highly enthusiastic or obsessed with the mentioned activity or behavior.
  • compensate for The idiom "compensate for" means to make up for or offset a deficiency, loss, or disadvantage by providing something else as a substitute or by taking corrective measures. It implies the act of trying to restore a balance or compensate for a particular circumstance or situation.
  • not for any account The idiomatic phrase "not for any account" means absolutely not or under no circumstances. It emphasizes a strong refusal or unwillingness to do something or participate in a certain activity. It implies that there is no possibility of the described action occurring.
  • make sm the scapegoat for sth The idiom "make someone the scapegoat for something" means to unfairly blame or hold someone responsible for a problem or mistake, often in order to divert attention or avoid taking responsibility oneself. It implies that the person being blamed is innocent or less culpable, but is being used as a convenient target for blame.
  • famous for being famous The idiom "famous for being famous" refers to someone who attains widespread recognition, attention, or popularity solely based on their status or reputation rather than any notable achievements, skills, or talents.
  • have the hots for (someone or something) The idiom "have the hots for (someone or something)" means to have a strong or intense sexual or romantic desire for someone or to be very attracted to something.
  • take word for it The idiom "take [someone's] word for it" means to believe what someone says without requiring further evidence or proof. It implies trust in the person's honesty or reliability.
  • in the market for The idiom "in the market for" means to be actively looking to purchase or acquire something, usually referring to a specific item or service. It implies that a person has a desire or need for the mentioned item or service and is exploring options or seeking opportunities to make a purchase.
  • demonstrate for sm or sth The idiom "demonstrate for someone or something" generally means to publicly display support or opposition by participating in a protest or rally. It refers to the action of taking to the streets or gathering in a public space with a specific cause or message. The purpose is to draw attention and convey a collective opinion or demand.
  • front for someone or something The idiom "front for someone or something" means to act as a cover or a façade for someone or something, typically used in a deceptive or illegal manner. It refers to the role of a person, business, group, or organization that presents a legitimate or innocent appearance while actually supporting or enabling illicit activities or individuals.
  • give (someone or something) up for lost The idiom "give (someone or something) up for lost" means to accept that someone or something cannot be found or saved, usually in a situation where hope or rescue is lost. It implies that there is little chance or possibility of finding or recovering the person or item, and the situation is considered hopeless or beyond help.
  • up for sale The idiom "up for sale" refers to the act of putting something on the market or making it available for purchase. It indicates that the item or property is being offered for sale and is open to potential buyers.
  • consider sm for sth The idiom "consider someone for something" means to think about or evaluate someone as a potential candidate or option for a particular role, position, task, or opportunity. It suggests that the person is being considered as a possible choice or solution.
  • put in a good word for The idiom "put in a good word for" means to speak positively about someone or recommend someone to another person, typically to help them gain a favorable impression or improve their chances of success in a particular situation. It involves vouching for someone's character, abilities, or qualifications to influence a decision or outcome in their favor.
  • enlist for (something) The idiom "enlist for (something)" typically means to voluntary join or sign up for a particular cause, activity, or commitment. It is often used in the context of joining the military or becoming a member of an organization or team. It implies a willingness to dedicate oneself to the specified purpose or objective.
  • (It's) different strokes for different folks. The idiom "(It's) different strokes for different folks" means that people have different preferences, opinions, or ways of doing things. It emphasizes the need to respect and accept the diversity of opinions, tastes, and choices among individuals.
  • I might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "I might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb" means that if one is going to be punished or face consequences for a particular action, they may as well engage in a more extreme or daring act that yields greater benefits or satisfaction. It is essentially saying that since the punishment or consequence will be the same, there's no harm in taking a bigger risk or going further to attain what one desires.
  • care for (someone or something) The idiom "care for (someone or something)" refers to the act of looking after, protecting, or showing concern for someone or something. It can involve providing physical, emotional, or material support, and often implies a sense of responsibility or affection towards the person or thing being cared for.
  • give sm tit for tat The idiom "give someone tit for tat" means to respond to someone's actions or behavior by retaliating in a similar manner. It suggests that when someone treats you badly or unfairly, you respond by treating them the same way or seeking revenge.
  • Ciao, for now The idiom "Ciao, for now" is a casual way of saying goodbye, indicating that the speaker will be leaving temporarily but expects to see or talk to the other person again in the near future. "Ciao" is an Italian word commonly used as a casual way to say both hello and goodbye. The phrase "for now" adds the meaning of "temporarily" or "until next time." Therefore, "Ciao, for now" implies a farewell with the expectation of reconnecting soon.
  • run for it The idiom "run for it" means to escape or flee hastily in order to avoid trouble, danger, or any undesirable situation. It implies quickly running away in an attempt to find safety or evade a difficult situation or confrontation.
  • so much for sth The idiom "so much for sth" is used to express disappointment or to acknowledge that something has not turned out as expected or planned. It indicates that a particular idea, plan, or expectation has failed or is no longer valid or relevant.
  • go for the throat The idiom "go for the throat" means to aggressively pursue and attack a vulnerable target or weak point to win or achieve a desired outcome. It often refers to taking decisive action or using aggressive tactics to overpower or defeat an opponent or adversary.
  • answer for someone or something To "answer for someone or something" is an idiom that means to take responsibility or be held accountable for the actions, behavior, or consequences of someone or something. It implies being required to provide explanations, justifications, or defenses on behalf of another person or thing.
  • barter for The idiom "barter for" means to exchange or trade goods or services without using money. It refers to negotiating a deal or swapping items directly, where both parties agree on the value of what they are exchanging.
  • all present and accounted for The idiom "all present and accounted for" means that everyone who is expected or required to be present is indeed there. It is often used in situations such as roll calls or headcounts to confirm that no one is missing or unaccounted for.
  • denounce (someone) for (something) The idiom "denounce (someone) for (something)" refers to publicly and strongly expressing disapproval or condemnation of someone's actions, behavior, or beliefs. It implies making a formal accusation or criticism against someone for a specific wrongdoing or fault.
  • lay something for someone or something The idiom "lay something for someone or something" typically means to prepare or set up something specifically for someone or something. It often implies creating a situation, circumstances, or groundwork that will benefit or accommodate the person or thing in question.
  • for a/some reason/reasons best known to himself, herself, etc. The idiom "for a/some reason/reasons best known to himself, herself, etc." is used when someone does something unexpected or unusual, and the motive behind their actions is unknown or unclear. It implies that the person involved has their own personal, undisclosed reasons for behaving in that particular manner.
  • use your head for more than a hatrack The idiom "use your head for more than a hatrack" is a figurative expression that means to think or use one's intelligence and common sense rather than just using one's head as a place to hold a hat. It implies that a person should engage in critical thinking, problem-solving, or logical reasoning rather than being only concerned with superficial or trivial matters. It encourages individuals to utilize their intellect and make thoughtful decisions or judgments.
  • more than one bargained for The idiom "more than one bargained for" means to receive or experience more difficulty, complications, or undesirable consequences than initially expected or prepared for.
  • be heading for a fall The idiom "be heading for a fall" means to be on a path or trajectory that is leading towards failure, trouble, or a negative outcome. It implies that the person's actions or choices are likely to result in a downfall or setback.
  • cruising for a bruising The idiom "cruising for a bruising" typically means deliberately or carelessly seeking or provoking trouble or a confrontation, usually resulting in unpleasant consequences or physical harm. It implies that someone is behaving in a way that is likely to lead to an altercation or negative outcome.
  • look for high and low The idiom "look for high and low" means to search thoroughly or extensively in all possible places and options in order to find something or someone. It implies that one is searching in both obvious and hidden or unexpected places with great determination and persistence.
  • (I) can't say for sure. The idiom "(I) can't say for sure" means that one cannot state something with complete certainty or confidence. It implies that there may be doubts or lack of enough information to make a definitive statement or conclusion.
  • it says a lot for sb/sth The idiom "it says a lot for someone/something" means that someone or something has a significant or impressive characteristic, quality, or accomplishment. It implies that the particular person or thing is deserving of praise or admiration due to these notable attributes or achievements.
  • interview (with sm) for sth The idiom "interview (with someone) for something" refers to the process where a person meets with another individual or a group of people to discuss or be assessed for a specific position, job, scholarship, or opportunity. It entails answering questions, providing qualifications, and demonstrating suitability for the desired role or purpose.
  • for the hell of it The idiom "for the hell of it" means to do something without any particular reason or purpose, often done for fun, excitement, or simply out of curiosity. It implies acting on a whim or indulging in an activity just for the sake of doing it, even if it may seem unconventional or insignificant.
  • sing for your supper The idiom "sing for your supper" means to perform a task or work in exchange for receiving something, usually a favor, reward, or benefit. It implies that one must prove their worth or contribute significantly to earn what they desire.
  • desperate times call for desperate measures The idiom "desperate times call for desperate measures" means that when a situation becomes extremely difficult or urgent, one must be willing to take extreme actions or make unconventional choices in order to solve the problem or achieve a desired outcome.
  • good for a laugh The idiom "good for a laugh" means something or someone that is amusing, funny, or likely to elicit laughter. It refers to situations, jokes, anecdotes, or individuals that have the ability to create amusement or humor.
  • grounds for The idiom "grounds for" refers to a reason or justification for something, typically used to describe a situation where there is enough evidence or basis to support a particular action or claim. It indicates that there is a valid or legitimate cause for a particular consequence or outcome.
  • place for everything, and everything in its place The idiom "place for everything, and everything in its place" means that things should be properly organized and arranged in their designated locations, and that everything should be kept neat and in order. It suggests the importance of maintaining order and discipline in managing one's belongings or tasks.
  • bring (one) up for (something) The idiom "bring (one) up for (something)" means to formally accuse or charge someone with a wrongdoing or offense. It refers to the act of presenting someone for disciplinary action or legal proceedings.
  • knock someone for a loop The idiom "knock someone for a loop" means to shock or surprise someone greatly, often leaving them feeling disoriented or emotionally overwhelmed. It suggests a sudden and unexpected impact that disrupts the person's usual state of mind or emotions.
  • save/keep money for a rainy day The idiom "save/keep money for a rainy day" means to set aside or save money for future unforeseen or difficult circumstances or emergencies. It implies being financially prepared for unexpected or challenging situations that may arise in the future.
  • stand for sth The idiom "stand for sth" means to represent or symbolize something, usually an idea, concept, or value. It implies that something is being used as a symbol or indicator of a larger idea or principle.
  • apply for Chiltern Hundreds The idiom "apply for the Chiltern Hundreds" refers to the act of formally resigning from a position in the British Parliament. The Chiltern Hundreds is one of two nominal paid offices in the UK that can be used as a legal device to facilitate resignations. By applying for the Chiltern Hundreds, a Member of Parliament effectively gives up their seat, allowing them to step down from their position.
  • groom someone for something The idiom "groom someone for something" means to prepare or train someone intensively for a specific role, position, or task in order to make them suitable or qualified for it. It typically involves providing guidance, mentorship, education, or experience with the intention of helping the person achieve success or excel in their desired pursuit.
  • for the asking The idiom "for the asking" means that something is easily obtainable or available upon request or demand, without any effort or struggle.
  • root for sm or sth The idiom "root for someone or something" means to show support, encouragement, and enthusiasm for someone's success or for the success of something. It implies the desire for them to do well or achieve their goals.
  • recommend sm for sth The idiom "recommend someone for something" generally means to suggest or endorse a person's suitability or aptitude for a particular task, position, or opportunity. It could involve expressing an opinion about someone's abilities, skills, qualities, or previous experiences that make them suitable or deserving of being considered or chosen for something.
  • disqualify for The idiom "disqualify for" means to render someone or something ineligible or incapable of participating or being considered for a particular purpose, opportunity, position, or task, usually due to not meeting certain requirements, criteria, or standards.
  • be too many for (someone) The idiom "be too many for (someone)" means to be too overwhelming, challenging, or difficult for someone to handle or cope with. It implies that a situation or task is beyond the capabilities or capacity of an individual.
  • give up for dead The idiom "give up for dead" means to assume that someone or something is dead or beyond hope of recovery. It suggests that all efforts to save or revive them have been abandoned or deemed futile.
  • carry a torch for sb To "carry a torch for someone" means to have strong feelings of love or affection for someone, especially when those feelings are not reciprocated or acknowledged by the other person. It implies that even though the person may be aware that their feelings are unlikely to be returned, they continue to hold a flame of love or longing for that individual.
  • go for a spin (to some place) The idiom "go for a spin (to some place)" means to take a leisurely drive or ride to a particular destination, usually for pleasure or recreation. It implies going for a short, casual trip in a vehicle, often without a specific purpose or agenda.
  • if it hadn't been for (someone or something) The idiom "if it hadn't been for (someone or something)" refers to a situation where someone acknowledges that without the assistance, intervention, or presence of a particular person or thing, the outcome or circumstances would have been different. It signifies giving credit or recognition to someone or something that made a significant impact or played a crucial role in altering or influencing the outcome.
  • have fears for sb/sth The idiom "have fears for sb/sth" means to express concern or worry about someone or something. It implies that one has reservations or doubts about the well-being, safety, or success of someone or something.
  • be sb's for the asking The idiom "be sb's for the asking" means that someone or something is readily available or easily obtained by someone if they simply ask for it or request it. It implies that the person has unconditional access or possession without any obstacles or challenges.
  • compete for (someone or something) The idiom "compete for (someone or something)" refers to a situation where multiple individuals or entities strive to obtain or win someone's favor, attention, or possession. It implies engaging in a competitive process or rivalry in order to be chosen or selected.
  • account for something The idiom "account for something" means to provide an explanation or a justification for something, or to give a detailed report or record of something. It can also refer to being responsible for something or taking it into consideration.
  • denounce sm for sth The idiom "denounce someone for something" means to publicly criticize or condemn someone for a particular action, behavior, or belief. It involves making a strong and public statement against someone, expressing disapproval or disavowal of their conduct or views.
  • That's enough for now The idiom "That's enough for now" means that the current amount or level of something is sufficient or satisfactory and there is no need for further action or continuation at the moment. It indicates that a limit or appropriate amount has been reached and implies the desire to pause or stop the current activity or discussion for the time being.
  • anything in it for (one) The idiom "anything in it for (one)" typically refers to a situation or opportunity where someone is interested in knowing if they will personally benefit or gain something from it.
  • prepare the ground for sth To "prepare the ground for something" is an idiomatic expression that means to make necessary arrangements or lay the necessary foundation before a particular action, event, or plan can be successfully executed. It involves taking actions or setting things in motion in order to create favorable conditions or circumstances for a specific outcome or objective.
  • go for the fences The idiom "go for the fences" means to put in maximum effort, take a bold or daring action, or aim for a great achievement or success. It often refers to giving one's best attempt or striving for something with utmost determination without holding back. The phrase is derived from baseball, where hitters try to hit the ball out of the stadium and over the outfield fences to score a home run.
  • be par for the course The idiom "be par for the course" means to be normal, usual, or expected. It is derived from the game of golf, where "par" refers to the number of strokes a skilled golfer is expected to take to complete a hole. In a broader sense, the phrase implies that something is following a predictable pattern or meeting typical standards.
  • have a passion for someone or something The idiom "have a passion for someone or something" means to have a deep and intense emotional attachment, enthusiasm, or love for a particular person or thing. It reflects a strong and enduring interest or affection that goes beyond mere liking or enjoyment.
  • have a head for heights The idiom "have a head for heights" means to feel comfortable and not get scared or dizzy when in high or elevated places. It refers to someone who is not afraid of heights and can easily cope with tall or precarious situations without feeling anxious or fearful.
  • ache for sm or sth The idiom "ache for someone or something" means to yearn or long for someone or something intensely. It reflects a strong desire or craving to have someone or something that is currently absent.
  • let oneself in for something The idiom "let oneself in for something" means to voluntarily or unknowingly involve oneself in a difficult or unpleasant situation, usually by agreeing to or taking on a task or responsibility without fully understanding the challenges or consequences associated with it.
  • go hell for leather The idiom "go hell for leather" means to go at maximum speed or with great determination and reckless abandon. It often refers to moving or acting with a sense of urgency or intensity, disregarding potential risks or consequences.
  • Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. The idiom "Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed" means that one should not have high or unrealistic expectations because it can often lead to disappointment. By having no expectations, one can avoid disappointment and feel content with whatever outcomes or circumstances they encounter.
  • hope for something The idiom "hope for something" means to have a desire or expectation for something to happen or to be achieved. It expresses a longing or optimism for a particular outcome or result.
  • (one's) heart bleeds for (someone) The idiom "(one's) heart bleeds for (someone)" is used to express profound sympathy or compassion towards someone who is experiencing pain, suffering, or hardship. It signifies deep empathy and a strong emotional response to someone's unfortunate situation.
  • clear sth for publication The idiom "clear something for publication" means to give permission or approval for something to be published, usually after reviewing and ensuring it meets the necessary standards, guidelines, or legal requirements for public release.
  • make a run for it The idiom "make a run for it" means to attempt to escape from a situation, usually by running away quickly or swiftly. It implies a sense of urgency or desperation in trying to evade something or someone.
  • try sth (on) for size The idiom "try sth (on) for size" means to test or evaluate something, such as an idea, plan, or option, to see if it fits or suits one's needs or preferences. It involves experimenting with or considering something before making a final decision or commitment. The phrase often implies a level of experimentation or exploration.
  • carry a torch for (one) The idiom "carry a torch for (one)" means to have feelings of love or attraction for someone, especially when those feelings are not reciprocated or when the relationship has already ended. It implies a lingering, unrequited love or a continued infatuation with that person.
  • not see the wood for the trees The idiom "not see the wood for the trees" means to be so focused or consumed by small details or specific parts of a situation that one fails to see or understand the overall picture or main point. It refers to being too engrossed in minor aspects that one overlooks the bigger perspective or context.
  • keep a weather eye on something/open for something The idiom "keep a weather eye on something/open for something" means to remain alert, vigilant, or watchful for any changes, developments, or opportunities related to a particular situation or circumstance. It suggests being attentive and observant to anticipate any potential consequences or advantages. The term "weather eye" alludes to sailors being watchful for changes in weather conditions that could affect their voyage, emphasizing the need to be prepared and proactive.
  • bully for sb The idiom "bully for sb" is an expression used to convey enthusiastic congratulations or approval towards someone for their accomplishments or achievements. It is often used sarcastically to mask genuine feelings of jealousy or indifference.
  • eat someone for breakfast The idiom "eat someone for breakfast" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone's ability or intention to easily defeat or overcome someone else, typically in a competitive or confrontational setting. It implies that the person is so powerful, skilled, or dominant that they would metaphorically devour their opponent in a contest or encounter.
  • make it hot for (someone) The idiom "make it hot for (someone)" means to make someone's life difficult or uncomfortable, usually through criticism, punishment, or intense opposition. It implies the act of putting pressure or causing trouble for someone to force a specific outcome or to make them regret their actions.
  • Pardon me for breathing! The idiom "Pardon me for breathing!" is a sarcastic or humorous expression used to convey that a person feels excessively guilty or apologetic for merely existing or taking up space in a situation. It is often used to mock exaggerated or unwarranted apologies.
  • I felt like a penny waiting for change The idiom "I felt like a penny waiting for change" means feeling unnoticed, unimportant, or insignificant, akin to being a small, insignificant coin waiting to be used or exchanged. It conveys a sense of being disregarded or undervalued in a particular situation.
  • thirsty for sth The idiom "thirsty for something" means to have a strong desire or craving for something, whether it be tangible or intangible. It conveys a sense of yearning or hunger, similar to how a person may feel physically thirsty for water. It can be used to describe someone's intense longing for success, knowledge, power, recognition, or any other kind of ambition.
  • be (all) for the best The idiom "be (all) for the best" means that a particular situation or outcome, although difficult or undesirable in the present, is ultimately the best or most favorable option in the long term or overall. It suggests that even though a specific circumstance may be challenging or disappointing at the moment, it is likely to bring about positive results or benefits eventually.
  • discipline (someone) for (something) The idiom "discipline (someone) for (something)" means to punish or reprimand someone for a particular action or behavior. It involves taking corrective measures or enforcing consequences in response to someone's wrongdoing or misconduct.
  • enlist (oneself) for something The idiom "enlist oneself for something" means to voluntarily join or sign up for a specific purpose, cause, or task, often involving a commitment of time, effort, or support. It can refer to joining an organization, participating in a project, or taking on a responsibility willingly and actively.
  • go to bat for sb/sth The definition of the idiom "go to bat for someone/something" means to defend or support someone or something, especially in a difficult situation. It originates from the sport of baseball, where players take turns batting or hitting the ball, and when a teammate or coach "goes to bat" for someone, they step in to support or advocate for them.
  • for (or to) all intents and purposes The idiom "for (or to) all intents and purposes" means that something is essentially or practically true or accurate, even if it may not be strictly or technically true. It refers to a situation or condition that is treated as if it were true or real, regardless of any minor discrepancies or technicalities.
  • as for sm or sth The idiom "as for someone or something" is used to introduce or shift the focus of discussion to a particular person or topic. It is often used when providing additional information or expressing one's opinion or perspective on a specific matter.
  • be shooting for the same target The idiom "be shooting for the same target" means that two or more individuals or groups have the same goals, objectives, or desires in a given situation or endeavor. It implies that they are working towards a common purpose or outcome, often with shared efforts and cooperation.
  • can't for the life of me The idiom "can't for the life of me" means being unable to accomplish or understand something, even after putting in great effort or trying one's hardest. It expresses frustration or exasperation at the inability to achieve a certain task or comprehend a particular concept.
  • no prizes for guessing what..., who..., etc. The idiom "no prizes for guessing what..., who..., etc." means that something is very obvious or predictable, and there is no need for any special effort or intelligence to figure it out. It implies that the answer or solution is so clear that anyone can easily understand or guess it.
  • hold for ransom The idiom "hold for ransom" refers to the act of keeping someone or something captive in exchange for a specified sum of money as a ransom. It can also be used metaphorically to describe situations where someone or something is being held or controlled until a demand or condition is met.
  • have an eye for the main chance The idiom "have an eye for the main chance" means to have a shrewd ability to spot and seize opportunities for personal gain or advancement. It refers to having a keen sense of spotting the most advantageous situations and taking advantage of them to further one's own interests.
  • have going for you The idiom "have going for you" means to possess certain advantages or positive aspects that contribute to one's success or favorable circumstances. It refers to the strengths, qualities, or resources that someone possesses or can rely on to their benefit.
  • a place for everything and everything in its place The idiom "a place for everything and everything in its place" means that things should be organized and stored in a designated location where they belong and should be returned to that location after use. It emphasizes the importance of orderliness and tidiness in maintaining a well-organized and efficient environment.
  • to die for The idiom "to die for" is used to describe something that is highly desirable or exquisite. It implies that the thing being referred to is so good that it is worth sacrificing everything for.
  • have a soft corner for somebody/something The idiom "have a soft corner for somebody/something" means to have a special affection, sympathy, or fondness for a particular person or thing. It suggests that someone has a weak spot or a gentle, emotional attachment towards that person or thing.
  • sell (one's) birthright for a mess of pottage The idiom "sell (one's) birthright for a mess of pottage" is derived from a biblical story and refers to someone who trades or sacrifices something of great value or significance for something that is of little or no worth. It signifies making a foolish or shortsighted decision by giving up a valuable possession or opportunity for an immediate but insignificant gain.
  • all the more reason for (doing sth) The idiom "all the more reason for (doing something)" is used to emphasize that a particular reason or circumstance makes it even more necessary or desirable to do something. It suggests that the situation described strengthens the argument or justifies the action being discussed.
  • lecture someone for something The idiom "lecture someone for something" means to speak sternly or at length to criticize, scold, or rebuke someone for a particular action, mistake, or behavior. It involves delivering a long and tedious speech with a condescending or instructional tone in order to convey disapproval or offer advice.
  • arrange sth for sm time The idiom "arrange sth for sm time" means to schedule or plan something to occur or be done at a specific time in the future. It implies that someone has organized or set up the necessary details or arrangements for the event or activity to take place at the designated time.
  • interpret for someone The idiom "interpret for someone" means to explain or translate something, usually language or information, to someone who does not understand it or is unable to comprehend it. It involves providing a clear and understandable explanation or translation to aid in communication or comprehension.
  • (something) speaks for itself The idiom "(something) speaks for itself" means that there is no need for explanation or interpretation because the facts or evidence are clear and self-evident.
  • campaign for (someone or something) The idiom "campaign for (someone or something)" means actively advocating or working to promote and support a particular person, cause, or idea. It involves taking deliberate actions and making efforts to gain public support and achieve a desired outcome, similar to the efforts made during a political campaign.
  • send for sb To "send for someone" means to request that someone come to a particular location, usually because they are needed or their presence is required. It implies summoning or inviting someone to come and join or assist in a specific situation.
  • have (a) use for someone or something The idiom "have (a) use for someone or something" means to find someone or something useful or beneficial in a specific situation or purpose. It implies that the person or thing being referred to serves a practical function or meets a particular need.
  • angle for sth The idiom "angle for sth" means to make calculated moves or attempts to achieve or obtain something, typically through indirect or manipulative means. It refers to someone subtly or strategically planning and maneuvering in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • can't do sth for nuts The idiom "can't do sth for nuts" means incompetent or unable to do something at all, regardless of one's efforts or skills. It suggests a complete lack of ability or proficiency in performing a particular task.
  • move in for the kill The idiom "move in for the kill" refers to taking decisive action or making a decisive move to secure a victory or achieve one's goal, typically in a competitive or confrontational situation. It implies being strategic, assertive, and determined to overpower or defeat an opponent decisively or achieve success.
  • make a play for sth/sb The idiom "make a play for something/someone" means to make a strong, often aggressive, attempt to obtain or win a particular thing or person. It refers to making an effort to achieve a desired outcome, often with a sense of determination or competition.
  • be good for sth The idiom "be good for sth" means to have a positive or beneficial effect or outcome on something or someone. It implies that the particular thing or action mentioned will be helpful, advantageous, or improve the situation in some way.
  • earmark for (someone or something) The idiom "earmark for (someone or something)" means to designate or reserve something specifically for a particular person or purpose. It implies setting something aside or allocating it to ensure it is used in a predetermined way or for a specific individual.
  • gear up for The idiom "gear up for" means to prepare or get ready for a particular event, activity, or situation, often involving making necessary arrangements, gathering resources, or adopting a suitable mindset or attitude. It implies taking the necessary steps or actions to be fully prepared and equipped for what is to come.
  • go for broke The idiom "go for broke" means to risk everything or put all of one's efforts, resources, or energy into achieving a desired outcome, often in a gambling or competitive context. It suggests a willingness to take extraordinary risks and make the utmost effort to obtain success, often without regard for the potential consequences or losses involved.
  • care for sm The idiom "care for someone" generally means to have affection, concern, or fondness for someone. It indicates a level of emotional investment and attentiveness towards another person's well-being and happiness. It can refer to a range of relationships, including romantic partners, family members, friends, or even pets.
  • for somebody's eyes only The idiom "for somebody's eyes only" refers to information or communication that is intended exclusively for the person mentioned, and should not be seen or disclosed to others. It implies confidentiality and restricted access.
  • for (a/some) reason(s) best known to (oneself) The idiom "for (a/some) reason(s) best known to (oneself)" refers to a situation where someone does something, but the true motivation or rationale behind their action is unclear or unfathomable to others. It implies that the person in question has a specific reason, known only to themselves, which they choose not to disclose or explain.
  • be lost for words The idiom "be lost for words" is used to describe a situation where a person is unable to find or express the appropriate words to convey their feelings or thoughts. It implies a sense of astonishment, shock, or being overwhelmed by a specific event or situation that renders one speechless.
  • bargain for something The idiom "bargain for something" means to expect or anticipate something, especially an outcome or circumstance, often without considering potential complications or consequences. It refers to having a particular understanding or assumption about a situation, but reality turns out differently than anticipated.
  • have a lot going for The idiom "have a lot going for" means to possess many positive or advantageous qualities, characteristics, or opportunities that can contribute to one's success or prosperity in a particular situation or endeavor. It refers to having a variety of favorable factors that work in one's favor.
  • register sm for sth The idiom "register someone for something" means to officially sign up or enroll someone for a particular event, course, or activity. It involves submitting the necessary information or completing required forms to indicate interest or participation in a specific program or event.
  • go to bat for sb The idiom "go to bat for someone" means to support, defend, or help someone in a difficult or challenging situation, often when they are unable to do so themselves. It is typically used to express one's willingness to advocate for or stand up on behalf of another person. The phrase is derived from the sport of baseball, where a batter's teammate takes their turn at batting to assist them.
  • try for size The idiom "try for size" means to try out or test something, usually to see if it fits or suits someone's needs or preferences. It is often used in a figurative sense to describe the act of evaluating or assessing something before making a decision or commitment.
  • have an appetite for something The idiom "have an appetite for something" means to have a strong preference, keen interest, or desire for something, often referring to a specific topic, activity, or type of food.
  • cold enough for you? The idiom "cold enough for you?" is a rhetorical question often used as a remark or a sarcastic comment to emphasize how incredibly cold the weather is. It implies that the speaker believes the weather is extremely frigid, usually when it may be uncomfortable or undesirable for most people.
  • curtains for sm or sth The idiom "curtains for someone or something" means that the person or thing in question is finished or doomed. It suggests that there is no hope for them or it and implies that the end is near.
  • for the taking The idiom "for the taking" means that something is available or easily obtainable for anyone who wants or is willing to seize the opportunity. It implies that the object or opportunity in question is readily accessible and there are no significant obstacles preventing someone from attaining it.
  • (just) for the heck of it The idiom "(just) for the heck of it" means to do something without a particular reason or purpose, solely for fun, curiosity, or amusement. It implies doing something just for the sake of doing it, without any underlying motive or intention.
  • legislate for something The idiom "legislate for something" means to create laws or regulations specifically intended to address a particular issue, concern, or situation. It involves the process of enacting legislation to deal with a specific matter, reflecting the need for a formal legal framework in order to address the identified problem or to establish guidelines for a specific area or activity.
  • once and for all The idiom "once and for all" is used to express the idea of finally settling a matter conclusively or definitively, often implying that it should not be revisited or questioned again in the future.
  • take sb's word for it, at take sb at their word The definition for the idiom "take sb's word for it" or "take sb at their word" means to believe or accept what someone says without questioning or doubting their honesty or integrity. It implies that you trust and rely on the person's statement as true or accurate without needing further proof or evidence.
  • Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains. The idiom "Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains" means that true genius is not solely reliant on innate ability or talent. Instead, it is the result of an individual's unwavering determination, hard work, and the willingness to put in an immense amount of effort to achieve greatness.
  • dead ringer for someone The idiom "dead ringer for someone" refers to a person who looks extremely similar to another person, to the point of being mistaken for them. It suggests a strong resemblance, often in terms of physical appearance, but can also imply similarities in behavior, mannerisms, or other characteristics.
  • feel for someone The idiom "feel for someone" means to empathize with someone, to understand and share their emotions or experience, often in a difficult or challenging situation. It conveys a sense of compassion, concern, and support for the person.
  • cry for (someone or something) The idiom "cry for (someone or something)" means to show a strong need or desire for someone or something. It implies that there is a longing or yearning for a particular person or thing.
  • run for cover The idiom "run for cover" means to seek protection or safety from imminent danger or an unfavorable situation. It implies moving quickly or urgently to a place of safety or finding shelter to avoid harm or negative consequences.
  • except for The idiom "except for" means excluding or not including a particular person, thing, or factor in a given situation or context. It indicates that everything or everyone is included except for the mentioned exception.
  • carry a torch for someone The idiom "carry a torch for someone" means to have strong feelings of love or infatuation for someone, typically for a long period of time, even when they do not feel the same way or after the relationship has ended.
  • for what it's worth The idiom "for what it's worth" is used to preface a statement or piece of information that may not hold much value or significance, but the speaker still feels the need to share it. It is often employed to indicate that the speaker understands the limited relevance of their input or opinion, but they still want to express it for consideration or to contribute to a discussion.
  • scavenge (around) for sm or sth The idiom "scavenge (around) for something" refers to the act of searching or rummaging around in order to find something, typically in a haphazard or desperate manner. It often implies that the item being searched for is valuable or necessary, but requires effort and determination to locate.
  • make a beeline for something To "make a beeline for something" means to move quickly and directly towards a specific destination or goal, without any detours or distractions. It emphasizes the intention to reach the desired target as efficiently and swiftly as possible.
  • babysit for sm The idiom "babysit for someone" means to temporarily take care of someone's young child or children, usually by watching over them and ensuring their safety in their absence.
  • hunt for someone or something The idiom "hunt for someone or something" refers to the act of actively searching or looking for a specific person or thing, typically with a great deal of determination or effort. It implies that the search is rigorous and thorough, often involving a pursuit or investigation in order to locate the desired individual or item.
  • make a beeline for something/somebody The idiom "make a beeline for something/somebody" means to head directly or quickly towards a particular thing or person, usually with a strong sense of purpose or urgency. It suggests a focused and direct approach without any deviation or hesitation in reaching the desired destination or target.
  • send out for The idiom "send out for" means to request or order something to be delivered, typically referring to food or goods. It implies seeking external assistance rather than obtaining or doing something oneself.
  • excuse (someone) for (something) The idiom "excuse (someone) for (something)" means to pardon or forgive someone for a mistake, error, or wrongdoing. It implies understanding and leniency towards the person's action, granting them a justification or exemption for their behavior.
  • (Well,) pardon me for living! The idiom "(Well,) pardon me for living!" is a sarcastic and slightly humorous expression typically used to respond to criticism or an accusation. It conveys a sense of exaggerated guilt or apology, implying that the speaker feels unjustly blamed for simply existing or trying to live their life. Overall, it is a way of dismissing criticism and rejecting the idea that one should feel guilty or sorry for their actions.
  • be into (someone) for (something) The idiom "be into (someone) for (something)" typically means owing someone a certain amount of money or being indebted to someone for something, such as a favor, service, or monetary transaction. It suggests that the person has a financial or social obligation towards the other person.
  • measure for drapes The idiom "measure for drapes" refers to preparing or planning for a specific outcome or situation without considering or understanding the actual requirements or needs. It signifies a superficial or inadequate approach to solving a problem or meeting a particular need.
  • be/feel sorry for yourself The idiom "be/feel sorry for yourself" refers to the act of excessively dwelling on one's misfortunes or problems and expressing self-pity. It suggests that someone is constantly focused on their own difficulties, often disregarding or being oblivious to the circumstances and concerns of others.
  • hold sm for ransom The idiom "hold someone/something for ransom" is an expression that means to demand a large sum of money or any valuable possession as a condition for the release of a person or thing that has been captured or taken hostage. It implies using a hostage situation as a means to extort money or gain some other advantage. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone demanding a substantial price or concession in exchange for the return or release of something or someone.
  • be one in the eye for The idiom "be one in the eye for" means to inflict a defeat, setback, or humiliation on someone, often unexpectedly or undeservedly. It implies giving someone an unexpected blow or disappointment, leaving them surprised or with a bruised ego.
  • thirst for sth The idiom "thirst for something" means to have a strong or intense desire or craving for something. It is often used metaphorically to describe a strong and persistent longing or passion for a particular thing, whether it is knowledge, success, power, love, fame, or any other objective or pursuit.
  • hope for the best The idiom "hope for the best" means to remain optimistic and anticipate a positive outcome or result in a situation, while acknowledging that there are no guarantees or certainties.
  • for all I care The idiom "for all I care" is used to express indifference or lack of concern about something or someone.
  • in return for (sm or sth) The idiom "in return for (something or someone)" means that someone does or gives something with the expectation of receiving something of equivalent value in exchange. It implies a reciprocal action or exchange where one party provides something in order to receive something in return.
  • never have a good word to say for (someone of something) The idiom "never have a good word to say for (someone or something)" is used to describe someone who consistently speaks negatively or critically about someone or something and seldom makes positive or complimentary remarks. It implies that this person lacks the ability or willingness to find anything praiseworthy or to give credit where it is due.
  • bargain for The idiom "bargain for" means to anticipate or expect something, often with the implication that the outcome or result was surprising, unexpected, or undesired. It refers to not being prepared or considering all possibilities beforehand.
  • It's for a fact. The idiom "It's for a fact" typically means that something is undeniably true or confirmed. It emphasizes certainty and implies that there is no doubt or speculation involved in the statement.
  • (someone) is not going to thank you for The idiom "(someone) is not going to thank you for" refers to a situation or action that someone is unlikely to appreciate or acknowledge positively. It implies that the person who performed a particular action or gave a specific response is not expected to receive any gratitude or acknowledgment in return.
  • bode smhow for sm or sth The idiom "bode well/ill for someone or something" means to indicate or suggest a positive or negative outcome or future events for someone or something. It typically refers to a sign or premonition that can be interpreted as a prediction or forecast.
  • exercise for the reader The idiom "exercise for the reader" refers to written material or a problem that is deliberately left unresolved or incomplete, requiring the reader to use their critical thinking skills and knowledge to come up with a solution or complete the task. It serves as mental stimulation or a challenge to engage the reader's intellectual capabilities and encourage active participation.
  • cram for an examination The idiom "cram for an examination" means to study intensively and quickly in a short period of time, usually just before a test or exam. It refers to the act of trying to learn or memorize a large amount of information in a limited amount of time, often by reviewing notes, textbooks, or other study materials intensely.
  • pardon sm for sth The idiom "pardon someone for something" means to forgive or excuse someone for a mistake, offense, or wrongdoing they have done.
  • beg for someone or something The idiom "beg for someone or something" means to desperately plead or request someone or something, usually in a subservient or desperate manner. It implies a feeling of extreme need or desire, often in a figurative sense rather than literal begging.
  • hold still for (something) The idiom "hold still for (something)" means to tolerate or endure something, usually an unpleasant experience or situation, without causing trouble or resistance. It implies remaining calm and cooperative despite the circumstances.
  • reprove sm for sth The idiom "reprove someone for something" means to express disapproval or criticism towards someone for a particular action, behavior, or mistake they have made. It implies admonishing or reproaching someone in order to correct or discourage their actions.
  • for safekeeping The idiom "for safekeeping" means to keep something in a secure place to protect it from damage or theft. It implies the act of entrusting something to someone's care to ensure its preservation and security.
  • have a yen for (something) The idiom "have a yen for (something)" means to have a strong desire or craving for something, usually a particular food, activity, or object. It implies a feeling of longing or yearning for that specific thing.
  • not miss sth for the world The idiom "not miss something for the world" means to consider something extremely important or valuable and would not want to miss it under any circumstances. It emphasizes the strong desire or determination to be present or participate in an event or opportunity, indicating that nothing can prevent someone from experiencing or being a part of it.
  • like turkeys voting for Christmas The idiom "like turkeys voting for Christmas" refers to a situation where someone or a group of people unknowingly or willingly supports or chooses something that is detrimental or harmful to them. It implies a sense of foolishness, as turkeys are traditionally associated with being the main course for Christmas dinners, so for them to vote in favor of such an event would be against their own self-interest. Thus, the idiom is used to highlight situations where people or entities act against their own well-being.
  • get an amount of money for sth The idiom "get an amount of money for sth" means to receive or obtain a specific sum of money in exchange for something. It implies the act of selling or trading an item, service, or asset to acquire a specific monetary value.
  • be yours for the taking The idiom "be yours for the taking" means that someone or something is readily available or accessible for you to have or claim without much effort or opposition. It implies that the desired outcome or opportunity is attainable and there are no significant obstacles in acquiring it.
  • give an arm and a leg for The idiom "give an arm and a leg for" means to be willing to sacrifice or pay a very high price, either literally or metaphorically, for something desired. It implies being willing to make a significant and often extreme sacrifice in order to obtain or achieve a particular goal or item.
  • be for the best The idiom "be for the best" means that a particular situation or outcome may seem unfortunate or undesirable at the time, but it will ultimately result in a better, more favorable outcome or resolution.
  • would not do sth for all the tea in China The idiom "would not do something for all the tea in China" is used to express strong reluctance or refusal to do a particular action, emphasizing that the person would not do it under any circumstances or for any amount of incentive or reward. It implies that the action is completely undesirable, and compares it to the idea of refusing such a valuable commodity as all the tea in China, which was historically highly prized and sought after.
  • knock/throw sb for a loop The idiom "knock/throw someone for a loop" means to surprise or shock someone, causing them to be confused or caught off guard. It refers to a sudden unexpected event or information that disrupts the person's normal state of mind or plans.
  • riding for a fall The idiom "riding for a fall" generally refers to a situation where someone is engaging in risky or reckless behavior that is likely to result in negative consequences or failure. It suggests that the individual is on a course that will eventually lead to a significant setback or downfall.
  • fend for yourself The idiom "fend for yourself" means to take care of oneself independently, without relying on anyone else for support or help. It implies self-sufficiency and the ability to handle one's own needs and challenges.
  • settle for sth The idiom "settle for something" means to accept or be content with something less than desired or expected. It implies compromising or making do with a less ideal or satisfactory outcome or option.
  • take no for an answer The idiom "take no for an answer" means to refuse to accept or respect someone's negative response, rejection, or refusal. It signifies persistent persuasion or insistence despite being told no.
  • what wouldn't I give for sth, at what I wouldn't give for sth The idiom "what wouldn't I give for something" or "at what I wouldn't give for something" is an expression used to convey an intense desire or longing for something. It signifies that the person is willing to do almost anything or give up a lot to obtain or experience that particular thing. It highlights a strong, sometimes exaggerated, yearning or wish.
  • get hit for six The idiom "get hit for six" originates from the sport of cricket. In cricket, hitting the ball for a maximum of six runs by sending it over the boundary without bouncing is considered a significant achievement. Thus, the idiom "get hit for six" figuratively implies being caught off guard or greatly surprised by a shock or unexpected event that surpasses one's anticipation or ability to handle. It signifies being overwhelmed or completely defeated, much like being hit for the maximum six runs in cricket.
  • go for your tea The idiom "go for your tea" typically means to go and have a break or take a rest, especially after working hard or exerting oneself. It implies going to have a cup of tea, but the phrase can also be used more generally to refer to taking a break in any form.
  • set (one) up for life The idiom "set (one) up for life" typically means to provide someone with enough money, resources, or opportunities to ensure a secure and comfortable future for the rest of their life. It suggests that the person will not have to work or worry about financial stability anymore.
  • penny for your thoughts The idiom "penny for your thoughts" is a way of asking someone to share their thoughts or feelings. It is typically used when someone appears deep in thought or seems preoccupied, and is seeking insight into what they might be thinking or feeling.
  • queer for sth The idiom "queer for sth" means to have an unusual or strong interest in something, often to the point of obsession or enthusiasm. It implies a strong liking or passion for a particular thing or topic. The word "queer" in this context is used in a colloquial sense, indicating something unconventional or distinct.
  • run for sth The idiom "run for something" generally means to seek or campaign for a particular position or office, typically in a political context. It refers to the act of actively pursuing and competing for a specific role, such as running for president, running for mayor, or running for a seat in Congress.
  • furnish sth for sm or sth The idiom "furnish something for someone or something" means to provide or supply something to fulfill a need or requirement for a particular person or situation. It typically refers to offering essential items, information, or resources to someone or something.
  • be one in the eye for sb The idiom "be one in the eye for sb" means to inflict harm or cause damage to someone, often by achieving success or attaining something that will upset or disappoint them. It implies a sense of triumph or satisfaction in proving someone wrong or outdoing them.
  • care for someone To care for someone means to feel affection, concern, and responsibility for their well-being. It often implies taking care of them, offering support, and being emotionally invested in their happiness and welfare.
  • throw someone for a loop The idiom "throw someone for a loop" means to surprise, confuse, or disorient someone unexpectedly. It refers to a situation or event that disrupts someone's expectations or plans, leaving them unsure how to react or handle the situation.
  • pressed for money The definition of the idiom "pressed for money" is to be in a situation of financial difficulty or hardship, lacking enough money to meet one's needs or obligations.
  • gear up for sm or sth The idiom "gear up for something" means to prepare or make arrangements for a specific event, task, or activity. It implies getting ready or making necessary changes to ensure the successful completion of the upcoming event or task.
  • clamor for sm or sth The idiom "clamor for something" means to demand or request something in a loud, noisy, or persistent manner. It suggests a strong desire or urgency for that particular thing.
  • so much for The idiom "so much for" is used to express disappointment or frustration when something does not meet one's expectations or does not turn out as planned. It implies that the previously mentioned subject or idea has been disregarded or invalidated.
  • angle for (something) The idiom "angle for (something)" means to subtly or indirectly try to obtain or achieve something, typically by manipulating a situation or conversation in order to gain advantage or favor. It implies that the person is using strategic tactics or persuasion to get what they desire without directly asking for it.
  • not see the forest for the trees The idiom "not see the forest for the trees" means to be so focused on the small details or individual components of a situation that one fails to see or understand the larger context or overall perspective. It refers to being overly preoccupied with minor things while being oblivious to the bigger picture or main idea.
  • open the way for The idiom "open the way for" means to create an opportunity or remove obstacles that allow progress, advancement, or success in a particular endeavor. It refers to making it possible for something to happen or paving the path for further developments.
  • make allowance for The idiom "make allowance for" means to take into consideration or to allow for something, especially when making plans or judgments. It implies recognizing and accommodating certain factors or circumstances that might affect the outcome or decision-making process.
  • knock sm for a loop The idiom "knock someone for a loop" means to surprise or shock someone to such a degree that it temporarily overwhelms or confuses them. It refers to a situation or event that takes someone completely off guard and leaves them disoriented or emotionally affected.
  • be heading/riding for a fall The idiom "be heading/riding for a fall" means that someone is on a course of action or behavior that will inevitably lead to failure, disaster, or negative consequences. It implies that the person's actions or decisions are unsustainable or ill-advised and will result in a negative outcome.
  • leave for another occasion The idiom "leave for another occasion" means to postpone or delay dealing with something, usually with the intention of addressing it at a later, more appropriate time or situation.
  • leave something for (someone or an animal) The idiom "leave something for (someone or an animal)" means to intentionally save or set aside something for the benefit or use of another person or creature. It can involve leaving some food, money, opportunities, or any resource that can be shared or passed on to someone else.
  • be spoiling for The idiom "be spoiling for" typically means to be eagerly or impatiently seeking or desiring something, usually a fight, confrontation, or opportunity to prove oneself.
  • come for (someone or something) The idiom "come for (someone or something)" means to approach or pursue a person or thing in an aggressive, confrontational, or threatening manner. It can imply an intention to challenge, attack, criticize, or confront someone or something.
  • be sorry for (someone) The idiom "be sorry for (someone)" means to feel sympathy, compassion, or empathy towards someone who is in a difficult or unfortunate situation. It signifies a genuine concern and understanding for their hardships or suffering.
  • adore sm for having sth The idiom "adore someone for having something" means to have a deep affection, admiration, or love for someone because they possess a particular quality, characteristic, or possession. It emphasizes the admiration or appreciation one feels towards someone due to the presence of a specific attribute or possession.
  • arrange for sm time The idiom "arrange for sm time" means to schedule or organize a specific period or duration for someone to use or spend on a particular activity or purpose. It implies making plans or preparations to ensure an allocated amount of time is dedicated to the individual's needs or desires.
  • agitate for sth The idiom "agitate for sth" means to actively and vocally support or campaign for something; to promote a particular cause or idea with enthusiasm and persistence.
  • take no for an answer, not The idiom "take no for an answer, not" is a playful and sarcastic way of saying that someone is persistent and unwilling to accept rejection or a negative response. It implies that the person will continue to pursue their desired outcome despite being told "no" or facing obstacles.
  • fall for (someone or something) The idiom "fall for (someone or something)" means to be strongly attracted to or infatuated with someone or something. It implies being emotionally or romantically interested in someone or being easily deceived or fooled by something.
  • design something for something The idiom "design something for something" means to create or plan something with a specific purpose or intention in mind. It refers to the act of tailoring or customizing a design to cater to a particular function, requirement, or desired outcome.
  • may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "may/might as well be hanged/hung for a sheep as a lamb" suggests that if a person is going to face severe consequences or punishment for a small offense, they might as well commit a greater offense since the punishment will be the same. It implies that the outcome will be equally negative regardless of the actions taken, so one might take further risks in pursuit of a greater gain.
  • make allowance(s) for something The idiom "make allowance(s) for something" means to consider or take into account certain circumstances, possibilities, or variables when making plans, decisions, or judgments, in order to accommodate or allow for the potential effects or consequences of those factors. It implies to prepare or adjust for potential difficulties or uncertainties that may arise.
  • thank you for a lovely evening The idiom "thank you for a lovely evening" is a polite expression of gratitude toward someone for a pleasant or enjoyable time spent together during an evening event or outing.
  • want for sth The idiom "want for sth" means to lack or be in need of something. It implies a feeling of longing or desire for something that is missing or not available.
  • a kind word for everybody The idiom "a kind word for everybody" means to treat everyone with kindness and respect, regardless of their personality, background, or disposition. It refers to having a positive and supportive attitude towards others in all circumstances.
  • ask for the moon The idiom "ask for the moon" means to make an unreasonable or impossible request, often seeking something that is beyond one's reach or simply not feasible. It signifies an unrealistic desire or expectation.
  • study for sth The idiom "study for something" means to prepare or review information, materials, or subjects in order to acquire knowledge or skills related to a specific topic or upcoming event or examination. It implies the act of dedicating time and effort to engage in focused learning or revision.
  • dig for sth The idiom "dig for something" means to search or seek persistently or diligently for something, often information or answers. It implies a thorough or determined effort to uncover or discover something that may be hidden or difficult to find.
  • speak for myself, himself, etc. The idiom "speak for myself, himself, etc." means to express one's own opinions, beliefs, or experiences, without claiming that they represent the views of others. It is often used to clarify that one's statement is personal and not representative of a larger group or collective perspective.
  • (one) could be forgiven for (doing something) The idiom "(one) could be forgiven for (doing something)" means that someone would understand, excuse, or rationalize why a person did a particular thing due to the circumstances or context. It implies that the action or behavior is justifiable or understandable.
  • send for sth The idiom "send for sth" means to request or order something to be delivered or brought to you, especially by someone else. It implies making a formal or official request for something to be sent or summoned to a specific location or person.
  • play it for all it's worth The idiom "play it for all it's worth" means to take maximum advantage or utilize to the fullest extent a particular situation, opportunity, or advantage in order to achieve the best possible outcome. It often suggests making the most of a situation by putting forth the utmost effort, skill, or determination to maximize the benefits or results.
  • assume liability for sth The idiom "assume liability for sth" means to willingly accept or take on responsibility for something, typically referring to legal, financial, or moral obligations. It implies acknowledging and being accountable for the consequences, costs, or potential risks associated with a particular action or situation.
  • go for the kill The idiom "go for the kill" means to make a decisive and relentless move or take action in order to eliminate or defeat someone or something completely or achieve a final victory or success. It is often used metaphorically to describe a person's determination and ruthlessness to achieve their goals or objectives by doing whatever it takes.
  • have no time for sb The idiom "have no time for sb" means that someone has a lack of interest, patience, or tolerance towards another person. It implies that the person does not want to engage with or spend time with that individual.
  • for good (and all) The idiom "for good (and all)" means permanently or forever. It implies that something will come to an end definitively and there is no chance of reversal or return.
  • hold no brief for The idiom "hold no brief for" means to not support or defend someone or something. It suggests having a negative or critical stance towards a particular person, idea, or cause.
  • hungry for sth The idiom "hungry for something" refers to a strong desire or craving for something, typically not related to food. It conveys a sense of eagerness, ambition, or a longing for a particular experience, success, knowledge, or achievement.
  • be there for someone The idiom "be there for someone" means to provide support, comfort, or assistance to someone, especially during challenging or difficult times. It implies being present, emotionally available, and ready to offer help or understanding whenever needed.
  • take for an idiot and take for a fool The idiom "take for an idiot and take for a fool" means to underestimate or deceive someone by assuming they are unintelligent or gullible. It implies treating someone with disrespect or attempting to manipulate them due to their perceived lack of intelligence.
  • adapt something for something The idiom "adapt something for something" means to modify or make changes to something in order to make it suitable or appropriate for a specific purpose, context, or situation. It involves customizing or adjusting an existing thing or idea to better fit a particular use or requirement.
  • will eat sm for breakfast The idiom "will eat someone/something for breakfast" is a figurative expression that means to easily defeat, dominate, or overcome someone or something. It suggests that the person or thing being referenced is so strong, skilled, or powerful that they can handle others effortlessly.
  • go in for (something) The idiom "go in for (something)" typically means to actively participate in or pursue something, usually as a hobby or interest. It implies a willingness to engage in the mentioned activity or undertake a particular course of action.
  • for all the world as if (someone or something) The idiom "for all the world as if (someone or something)" means behaving or appearing as if someone or something is true or really happening, despite it being unlikely or untrue. It conveys an exaggerated manner of acting or pretending.
  • be (one's) for the taking The idiom "be (one's) for the taking" means that something is available or accessible to be acquired, obtained, or claimed by someone. It implies that there is an opportunity or advantage that can be seized or utilized by the person mentioned.
  • have no time for (someone or something) The idiom "have no time for (someone or something)" means to not have any interest, patience, or tolerance for someone or something. It indicates a lack of willingness or availability to engage or invest time in a particular person or thing.
  • too funny for words The idiom "too funny for words" is used to describe something so hilarious or amusing that it is difficult or impossible to express verbally. It signifies that the humor is beyond description or explanation.
  • good enough for The idiom "good enough for" means that something or someone meets the minimum requirements or standards for a particular situation or purpose.
  • for all to see The idiom "for all to see" means that something is easily noticeable, apparent, or visible to everyone. It implies that there is no attempt to hide or conceal an action, behavior, or fact.
  • Excuse me for breathing! The idiom "Excuse me for breathing!" is an expression used sarcastically or ironically to convey a sense of self-deprecation, suggesting that the speaker feels unworthy or apologetic for simply existing or taking up space. It implies a humorous exaggeration of one's supposed insignificance or unimportance in a given situation.
  • have something for something The idiom "have something for something" means to possess or possess a certain quality, skill, ability, or resource that is required or suited for a particular purpose or situation. It implies being well-prepared or well-equipped to handle or address something specific.
  • account for someone or something The idiom "account for someone or something" means to provide an explanation or justification for an individual or something that has happened or is missing. It refers to being responsible for explaining the whereabouts, actions, or circumstances surrounding someone or something.
  • badly off for (something) The idiom "badly off for (something)" means having a scarcity or lack of something. It indicates that there is a shortage or insufficiency of a particular thing or resource.
  • be in no mood for sth/to do sth The idiom "be in no mood for sth/to do sth" means to not feel inclined or ready to engage in something or to have a lack of interest or desire for a certain situation or activity. It implies being unwilling or unprepared for a particular action or experience.
  • lay wait for The idiom "lay wait for" means to plan and wait for someone or something in order to ambush, attack, or trap them. It commonly implies a premeditated action to harm or catch someone off guard.
  • all for the best The idiom "all for the best" means that a situation or outcome, even if it appears negative or disappointing at first, is ultimately for the greater good or is the most advantageous in the long run. It implies that things happen or unfold in a certain way for a reason, and that eventually, it will lead to a positive outcome or benefit.
  • go for (the) gold The idiom "go for (the) gold" is a phrase commonly used to describe someone's pursuit of the highest level of achievement or success in a particular endeavor. It originates from the Olympics, where athletes strive to win a gold medal, symbolizing excellence and victory. In a broader context, it means to strive for the best possible outcome and give one's absolute best effort to achieve great success.
  • horses for courses The idiom "horses for courses" means that different people or things are suited to different situations or tasks. It suggests that what may work well for one person or situation may not necessarily be suitable for another.
  • not have a good word to say for (someone of something) The idiom "not have a good word to say for (someone or something)" means to have a negative or unfavorable opinion about someone or something and being unable to find anything positive or praiseworthy to say about them/it. It implies a complete lack of approval or admiration.
  • have an appetite for sth The idiom "have an appetite for something" means to have a strong desire, interest, or liking for something, typically non-literal. It implies having a keen craving or enthusiasm for a particular thing, such as knowledge, success, adventure, or even certain types of food.
  • send in for The idiom "send in for" typically means to order or request something to be delivered or obtained. It implies the act of submitting an order or application for something, often through mail or a formal process.
  • for all I know The idiom "for all I know" means that someone lacks knowledge or information about a particular situation, event, or fact. It signifies that the speaker cannot provide any certainty or definitive answer because they do not possess any additional understanding or insight.
  • for good or ill The idiom "for good or ill" means regardless of whether the outcome is positive or negative. It indicates that something will happen or someone will do something, regardless of the consequences or potential outcomes.
  • hit up for The idiom "hit up for" typically means to approach someone with a request, particularly for money or favors, often implying repeated or persistent asking. It suggests seeking assistance or support from someone, often expecting or hoping to receive a positive response.
  • have a soft spot for somebody/something The idiom "have a soft spot for somebody/something" means to have a fondness, affection, or sentimental attachment for someone or something. It implies a special emotional vulnerability towards that person or object, often leading to leniency, understanding, or favoritism.
  • hold someone for ransom The idiom "hold someone for ransom" means to detain or capture someone in order to demand a large sum of money or valuable items as payment for their release. It typically refers to a criminal act where the captor seeks financial gain by using the life or freedom of the hostage as leverage.
  • except for (someone or something) The idiom "except for (someone or something)" means excluding or excluding the mentioned person or thing. It refers to a situation where everything or everyone is included, with the exception of the specified individual or item.
  • tender sth for sth The idiom "tender sth for sth" typically refers to the act of submitting or presenting something, such as a proposal, bid, or offer, for consideration or acceptance in a formal process. It often involves offering a specific item, service, or price in response to a request or requirement, usually within a competitive context.
  • not for (all) the world The idiom "not for (all) the world" refers to something that one would never do or agree to, under any circumstance. It implies that even if offered all the world's riches or benefits, the person would still reject the proposition or action. It emphasizes the strong refusal or unwillingness to engage in a particular situation or act.
  • envy sm for sm or sth The idiom "envy someone for something" means to feel a strong desire to possess or have the same qualities, possessions, or circumstances that someone else has. It indicates a feeling of resentment or dissatisfaction towards someone because they possess something desirable that you do not.
  • too big for britches The idiom "too big for britches" means that someone is behaving arrogantly, self-importantly, or in a way that exceeds their actual abilities or status. It refers to someone who is acting as if they have more power, authority, or skill than they actually possess.
  • ask for trouble/it The idiom "ask for trouble" or "ask for it" means to intentionally or unnecessarily do something that invites or provokes trouble, difficulties, or negative consequences. It refers to engaging in actions or behaviors that are likely to lead to problems or harm.
  • beeline it for (some place) The idiom "beeline it for (some place)" means to move quickly and directly towards a specific destination or location, without deviating or getting distracted. It implies a straight and focused path towards the intended goal or destination.
  • take (something) for gospel The idiom "take (something) for gospel" means to believe something completely and without question, as if it is unquestionably true or authoritative. It implies a level of trust and acceptance without seeking further evidence or questioning its accuracy.
  • be there for sb The idiom "be there for someone" means to provide emotional support, assistance, or help to someone in need, especially during difficult or challenging times. It implies being available, reliable, and ready to offer support or guidance when someone requires it.
  • Keep a thing seven years and you'll find a use for it The idiom "keep a thing seven years and you'll find a use for it" suggests that one should hold onto an item for an extended period of time, as it may eventually prove to be useful or valuable. It implies that even if something appears to have no immediate purpose, circumstances or needs may change over time, making the item valuable or necessary later on.
  • aim for sth The idiom "aim for something" means to set a specific target or goal and exert efforts to achieve or reach it. It implies focusing on a particular objective and dedicating oneself to attaining it.
  • design something for someone The idiom "design something for someone" means to create or plan something specifically catering to an individual's needs, preferences, or requirements. It involves tailoring a product, service, or solution to suit someone's unique specifications or desires.
  • I might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb The idiom "I might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb" means that if someone is going to be punished or criticized for doing something wrong, they might as well do something more significant or daring as the consequences would be the same. It suggests that since the punishment or criticism would be severe regardless of the action, one might as well take a bigger risk or go further in their actions.
  • take an amount of money for sth The idiom "take an amount of money for something" means to accept or receive a specific sum of money in exchange for something, typically a product, service, or favor. It implies that someone is willing to pay a certain amount to obtain or avail of something.
  • for the duration The idiom "for the duration" means for the entire period of time that something lasts or continues, without any interruptions or changes. It refers to a commitment or obligation to be involved or present throughout the entire event or activity.
  • speak for itself The idiom "speak for itself" means that something is self-evident or does not require explanation or interpretation because its qualities, characteristics, or results are obvious or clear.
  • up for reelection The idiom "up for reelection" refers to the process or condition where an elected official's term is about to end, and they are seeking to be reelected or voted into office again. It commonly refers to a politician or government official who is eligible to run for another term in the same position.
  • mark out for The idiom "mark out for" means to identify or designate someone for a specific purpose or future success. It suggests that someone's abilities, qualities, or potential have been recognized and singled out for a particular role or achievement.
  • for fear of something The idiom "for fear of something" means doing or avoiding something because of a strong feeling of fear or apprehension about the potential consequences or outcome. It implies that an action or decision is motivated by an intense desire to avoid a particular eventuality.
  • ask for it The idiom "ask for it" typically means to intentionally do something that will result in negative consequences or trouble. It implies that someone is knowingly inviting or provoking a particular outcome.
  • claim something for something The idiom "claim something for something" means to assert ownership or right over something for a specific purpose or reason. It implies staking a claim or declaring that something belongs to or is relevant to a particular cause, idea, or group.
  • have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself The idiom "have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself" means to either have a reasonable explanation, defense, or response for one's actions or behavior, or to be unable to offer any valid or convincing explanation, defense, or response. It implies that one's ability to articulate their thoughts or feelings about a particular situation is being questioned or challenged.
  • despise (someone) for (something) The idiom "despise (someone) for (something)" refers to a strong feeling of dislike or contempt towards someone due to a specific quality, characteristic, or action they possess or display. It implies disdain or intense disapproval of that aspect of the person's behavior, beliefs, choices, or traits.
  • cry out for To cry out for something means to strongly desire or require it. It refers to a situation or condition that is so evident or necessary that it demands attention, action, or a solution.
  • poise oneself for The idiom "poise oneself for" means to prepare oneself mentally, emotionally, or physically for a particular event, situation, or task. It implies gathering one's focus, composure, and readiness in order to face or deal with something effectively.
  • one for the (record) books The idiom "one for the (record) books" is used to describe something extraordinary, exceptional, or unprecedented. It refers to an event, accomplishment, or experience that is noteworthy and remarkable enough to be recorded or remembered for a long time. It implies that the subject in question is so remarkable that it would be worth mentioning and documenting.
  • the devil finds work for idle hands The idiom "the devil finds work for idle hands" means that when people have nothing productive or meaningful to do, they are more likely to engage in mischief, trouble, or negative activities. It suggests that idleness can lead to trouble or immoral behavior.
  • freedom of/room for manoeuvre The idiom "freedom of/room for manoeuvre" refers to the ability or flexibility to make decisions or take action in a certain situation. It implies having space or options to act, without being restricted or limited by external constraints or rules. It is often used in discussions related to politics, negotiations, or personal choices.
  • utilize sm or sth for sth The idiom "utilize someone or something for something" means to make use of or employ someone or something for a particular purpose or task. It implies using the person or thing in a specific way or utilizing their abilities or resources to achieve a desired outcome or goal.
  • be in no mood for something/for doing something The idiom "be in no mood for something/for doing something" means to be unwilling or uninterested in engaging in a particular activity or dealing with a particular situation. It suggests a lack of enthusiasm, interest, or readiness to participate.
  • advertise something for (a price) The idiom "advertise something for (a price)" means to make a public announcement or promotion of something with a specified price. It refers to the act of informing or notifying potential buyers or consumers about a product or service for sale and its associated cost or value.
  • for the record The idiom "for the record" means to state or mention something officially or formally, often to ensure that it is documented or noted accurately. It is used to emphasize the importance of what is being said, as if adding it to a permanent record for future reference.
  • fish for a compliment The idiom "fish for a compliment" means to seek or subtly try to obtain praise or admiration from others, often by making comments or engaging in behaviors that are intended to prompt others to compliment or flatter them.
  • have a hankering for (something) The idiom "have a hankering for (something)" means to have a strong desire or craving for something. It is often used when someone is longing for or wanting something specific.
  • watch for sm or sth The idiom "watch for someone or something" means to be alert or cautious in order to notice or anticipate the presence or occurrence of a particular person or thing. It implies paying close attention and being vigilant to avoid missing something important or significant.
  • for all the difference sth makes The idiom "for all the difference something makes" is used to express the insignificance or lack of impact that a particular thing or action has on a given situation or outcome. It implies that the said thing or action does not have a noticeable or significant effect on the overall result.
  • sod this/that for a game of soldiers The idiom "sod this/that for a game of soldiers" is a colloquial expression used to convey that a particular task or situation is so unappealing, troublesome, or undesirable that one would rather avoid or abandon it completely. It suggests a strong sense of frustration or discontent towards a situation, as well as a lack of willingness to engage in it. The phrase can be seen as a more emphatic version of "forget this/that" or "to hell with this/that."
  • decorate for The idiom "decorate for" typically means to adorn or embellish something in preparation for a specific event or occasion. It refers to the act of adding decorative elements to create a festive or themed atmosphere, often involving the use of ornaments, lights, banners, or other decorative items.
  • be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc. The idiom "be a recipe for disaster, trouble, success, etc." means that a certain course of action or situation is likely to result in a particular outcome, whether positive or negative. It suggests that the combination of elements or factors involved will create or lead to the specified result, just like following a recipe creates a specific dish.
  • give (one) pause for thought The idiom "give (one) pause for thought" means to cause someone to stop and carefully consider or contemplate something. It implies that something has been said or done that prompts the person to pause and reflect before making a decision or forming an opinion. It suggests that the action or statement has given them a reason to reconsider their previous assumptions or beliefs.
  • labor for someone or something The idiom "labor for someone or something" generally means to work or exert effort on behalf of someone or something, usually with dedication, persistence, or self-sacrifice. It implies putting in hard work, often for a specific cause, person, or goal, with the intention of achieving desired results.
  • knock for six The idiom "knock for six" has its origins in cricket and is often used in informal language. It means to completely surprise or shock someone, leaving them stunned or unable to respond. It derives from the literal action of hitting a cricket ball so that it goes far beyond the boundary, thereby scoring six runs, and leaving the opposing team in awe or disarray.
  • arrange for (someone to do something) The idiom "arrange for (someone to do something)" means to make plans or set up a situation in which someone will do a particular task or take part in a certain activity. It involves organizing or coordinating the necessary arrangements or preparations for someone to fulfill a specific role or responsibility.
  • despise sm for sth The idiom "despise someone for something" means to strongly dislike or have a profound contempt or disgust for someone based on their actions, qualities, or behavior, particularly related to a specific thing or attribute. It implies a feeling of intense disdain or aversion towards that person because of the mentioned reason.
  • compensate for (something) The idiom "compensate for (something)" means to make up for, counterbalance, or offset a deficiency, loss, or disadvantage. It involves taking actions or measures to mitigate the negative effects or consequences of a particular situation or circumstance.
  • augur well for The idiom "augur well for" is used to imply that something seems promising or is likely to lead to a positive outcome or future success. It suggests that the current circumstances or indications are encouraging and can be interpreted as a positive sign for the future.
  • sell sth for a song The idiom "sell something for a song" means to sell an item for a very low price or at a bargain. It suggests that the price being offered is extremely low, almost as if it were the cost of a song.
  • fall for someone The idiom "fall for someone" means to develop strong romantic feelings or to become infatuated and emotionally invested in someone.
  • cry for the moon The idiom "cry for the moon" means to make an impossible or unrealistic request, demand, or expectation. It refers to asking for something that is beyond one's reach or extremely unlikely to happen.
  • a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client The idiom "a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client" means that someone who chooses to represent themselves in a legal matter is not making a wise decision. It implies that it is foolish and unwise to rely on oneself for legal expertise, as the outcome is likely to be unfavorable due to lack of knowledge, objectivity, or experience.
  • consider for The idiom "consider for" usually means to think about someone or something for a particular purpose or role, often implying that the person or object is being evaluated or taken into consideration as a potential option or candidate.
  • go to bat for somebody The definition for the idiom "go to bat for somebody" is to support, defend, or advocate for someone, often in a situation where they are facing criticism, opposition, or unfair treatment. It implies standing up for someone's interests or rights, even when it may be challenging or unpopular to do so. The idiom originates from the sport of baseball, where "going to bat" refers to stepping up to hit the ball and help the team score runs.
  • intend sth for sm or sth The idiom "intend something for someone or something" means to have a purpose or plan in mind for someone or something. It signifies that you have a specific target or goal regarding their usage or outcome.
  • advertise sth for sth To "advertise something for something" means to promote or publicize something in order to find or attract a particular type of thing or person. It refers to the act of placing an advertisement or making information available to inform and generate interest or awareness about a specific aspect or purpose.
  • spoilt for choice The idiom "spoilt for choice" means to have so many options or alternatives available that it becomes difficult to make a decision. It implies being in a fortunate position of having a wide range of choices, making it challenging to select one because they all seem appealing.
  • ask someone for something The definition of the idiom "ask someone for something" is to make a request or seek something from someone, typically implying that you desire their assistance, a favor, or an object.
  • head for the last roundup The idiom "head for the last roundup" typically refers to someone or something nearing the end or approaching the final stage of a process or situation. It may suggest that the person or thing is reaching a point of no return or inevitable conclusion.
  • have nothing going for The idiom "have nothing going for" means to lack any positive qualities, advantages, or prospects. It implies a situation or individual that possesses no favorable attributes or favorable circumstances.
  • do well for yourself The idiom "do well for yourself" means to achieve success or prosperity in one's personal or professional life, often implying financial stability or social advancement. It suggests that an individual has made significant progress or has attained a high level of achievement and is thriving in various aspects of life.
  • have a lot of time for The idiom "have a lot of time for" means to have a great deal of respect, admiration, or affection for someone or something. It implies that one appreciates or highly values the person or thing being referred to.
  • an apology for The idiom "an apology for" means an inferior or inadequate representation or example of something. It suggests that the thing being described is not up to the expected or desirable standard.
  • eat sb/sth for breakfast The idiom "eat sb/sth for breakfast" means to easily overpower or defeat someone or something without any difficulty. It suggests that the person or thing in question is weak, vulnerable, or no match for the other party.
  • go out for someone or something The idiom "go out for someone or something" typically means to have affectionate feelings towards someone or to show support or enthusiasm for something or someone. It often implies having a romantic interest or pursuing a romantic relationship with someone.
  • dig for (something) The idiom "dig for (something)" typically means to search or look for something diligently or thoroughly. It can be used both literally, when physically digging in the ground to find something, and metaphorically, when searching or investigating diligently to find information or uncover something hidden or unknown.
  • strike a blow for (something) The idiom "strike a blow for (something)" refers to taking action or making an effort to support or defend a particular cause, principle, or belief. It involves actively expressing one's disagreement with or opposition to something by taking a stand or initiating some form of action that promotes the desired outcome or change.
  • advertise for The idiom "advertise for" means to publicly seek or solicit something, such as a job, product, service, or assistance, by placing advertisements or making it known through various means. It refers to actively promoting or making a request for something in a public manner to attract attention and responses.
  • too big for one's britches The idiom "too big for one's britches" is used to describe someone who is arrogant, conceited or has an inflated sense of self-importance. It implies that the person's opinion of themselves exceeds their actual capabilities or accomplishments. It suggests that the individual is behaving in a way that is above their station or beyond what is justified by their abilities or position.
  • a dead ringer for someone The idiom "a dead ringer for someone" means that a person looks extremely similar to another person, so much so that they could be mistaken for being the same individual. It implies an uncanny resemblance or resemblance to the point of being identical.
  • there but for the grace of God (go I) The idiom "there but for the grace of God (go I)" is an expression of gratitude or humility, and it refers to acknowledging that a negative or unfortunate situation could have easily happened to oneself if not for divine intervention or luck. It implies that one is aware of their own vulnerability and recognizes that they are not exempt from misfortune.
  • wish for sm or sth The idiom "wish for something" means to desire, hope for, or want something strongly. It implies that someone has a strong longing or yearning for a particular thing or situation.
  • be on course for The idiom "be on course for" means to be progressing or moving towards a particular goal or outcome in a steady and planned manner. It suggests that a person or situation is heading in the right direction and is likely to achieve the desired result.
  • be somebody's for the taking The idiom "be somebody's for the taking" means that someone or something is easily or readily available for someone to acquire, control, or take advantage of. It implies that the person or thing in question lacks any real resistance or defense against being taken.
  • it says a lot, very little, etc. for somebody/something The idiom "it says a lot, very little, etc. for somebody/something" means that a particular action, behavior, characteristic, or situation reveals important information or conveys a significant message about someone or something. It implies that even a small piece of evidence or observation can provide a deep understanding or insight into the essence or true nature of the subject being discussed.
  • bleed for (someone or something) The idiom "bleed for (someone or something)" means to feel deep sympathy or compassion for someone or something, often to the point of experiencing emotional pain or suffering on their behalf. It implies a strong willingness to empathize and support the person or cause.
  • be asking for it The idiom "be asking for it" typically means deliberately or recklessly seeking trouble, negative consequences, or punishment by one's actions or behavior. It implies that the person is inviting or provoking negative outcomes due to their choices or actions.
  • have sth/nothing to show for sth The idiom "have something/nothing to show for something" means to either have achieved or gained something tangible as a result of a particular effort or endeavor, or to have achieved and gained nothing substantial. It is used to express whether or not there are visible or measurable results or accomplishments from one's actions or investments.
  • (one) can't win for losing The idiom "(one) can't win for losing" is used to describe a situation where someone's efforts to improve or succeed seem to constantly backfire or result in further difficulty or failure. It implies that no matter what they do or how hard they try, they cannot achieve the desired outcome or find success.
  • be (one) too many for someone The idiom "be (one) too many for someone" means to overpower or overwhelm someone by being too difficult, challenging, or burdensome for them to handle. It suggests that a situation or task exceeds the capabilities or endurance of the person involved.
  • ask for sm or sth The idiom "ask for someone or something" means to make a request, seek, or invite a particular person or thing to be involved or present in a given situation or event.
  • declare for The idiom "declare for" means to publicly announce or reveal one's allegiance, support, or preference for a particular cause, side, or position. It usually implies a clear and explicit statement of support or commitment to a specific choice or belief.
  • for better or (for) worse The idiom "for better or (for) worse" refers to a commitment or promise made to support someone or continue a course of action, regardless of whether the situation improves or becomes more challenging. It signifies a willingness to endure the good times and the bad times, remaining faithful and dedicated throughout.
  • for all someone knows The expression "for all someone knows" means that the person is uncertain or has limited knowledge about a certain situation or fact. It implies that someone does not have complete information or understanding, resulting in a lack of certainty or awareness.
  • Would you care for something? The idiom "Would you care for something?" is a polite way of asking someone if they would like or be interested in something. It is often used when offering or suggesting something to someone.
  • save (sth) for a rainy day The idiom "save (something) for a rainy day" means to set aside or save something, usually money or resources, for future use or in case of a future need or emergency. It implies being prepared for difficult times or unexpected situations that may arise.
  • for chicken feed The idiom "for chicken feed" typically means to do something for a very small amount of money or something that is considered insignificant in value.
  • not for nothing do I, will they, etc.... The idiom "not for nothing do I, will they, etc...." is used to emphasize that there is a good reason or purpose behind someone's actions or decisions. It implies that the action or decision is not taken lightly, and reflects a deeper understanding or knowledge.
  • look to for The idiom "look to for" means to rely on someone or something for support, guidance, assistance, or solutions to problems. It implies seeking help, advice, or assistance from a particular source in times of need or uncertainty.
  • come for sm The idiom "come for sm" typically refers to someone's intention or desire to confront or challenge someone or something. It suggests a purposeful visit or encounter with the specific goal of addressing or dealing with a particular person or issue.
  • too big for one's breeches The idiom "too big for one's breeches" means to have an exaggerated or inflated sense of one's own importance, abilities, or status. It refers to someone who is behaving arrogantly, presuming themselves to be more capable or influential than they actually are. The phrase originates from the literal concept of wearing oversized breeches, which suggests a person's ambition or self-perception has outgrown their actual capacity or position.
  • enlist sm for sth The idiom "enlist someone for something" typically refers to recruiting or engaging someone's help, assistance, or participation in a specific task, project, or cause. It implies seeking support or involvement from someone in order to achieve a particular objective or complete a task successfully.
  • can't see the wood for the trees The idiom "can't see the wood for the trees" means being unable to see or understand the overall or bigger picture because of being too focused on small or trivial details. It refers to someone who is so engrossed in the minor aspects that they fail to grasp the main idea or fail to consider the broader perspective.
  • dig a grave for yourself The idiom "dig a grave for yourself" means to engage in actions or make decisions that are likely to lead to one's own downfall or failure. It implies creating a situation that will ultimately result in negative consequences or ruin. It signifies self-destructive behavior or choices that harm oneself in the long run.
  • push for sth The idiom "push for something" means to exert effort or pressure in order to achieve or promote something. It implies a determined and persistent effort towards a particular goal or outcome.
  • the devil can quote scripture for his own purpose The idiom "the devil can quote scripture for his own purpose" means that even someone with wicked intentions or ulterior motives can selectively use parts of religious or moral teachings to support their own agenda or justify their actions. It warns against blindly accepting any argument or interpretation solely based on the citation of relevant religious texts without considering the underlying intentions or context correctly.
  • your good deed for the day The idiom "your good deed for the day" refers to a phrase used to humorously acknowledge or appreciate someone's act of kindness or favor. It indicates that the person has already performed a helpful or benevolent action, often implying that they have fulfilled their daily quota of doing something positive or selfless.
  • cry out for sm or sth The idiom "cry out for something" means that a situation or thing desperately needs or requires something specific. It implies that the absence or lack of that particular thing is causing a noticeable and urgent problem or deficiency.
  • legislate for sth The idiom "legislate for something" refers to the act of creating or enacting laws or regulations to address a particular issue, problem, or situation. It implies that a formal legal framework is being established to govern or regulate a specific aspect or concern.
  • can whistle for The idiom "can whistle for" means that someone will have to do without something they desire or expect, indicating that they will not receive it. It implies a sense of impossibility or unlikelihood of fulfillment.
  • only have eyes for sb The idiom "only have eyes for someone" means to be completely infatuated or solely focused on a particular person, typically in a romantic or affectionate manner. It indicates that the person is not interested in or attracted to anyone else and is solely devoted to one individual.
  • appear for The idiom "appear for" means to attend or represent oneself in court as a defendant or plaintiff in a legal case. It refers to the act of physically being present and participating in the proceedings of a court case either as the accused or a party seeking legal action.
  • fall for sb The idiom "fall for sb" refers to developing strong romantic or emotional feelings towards someone. It implies being attracted to someone and potentially developing a love interest in them.
  • wait for the other shoe to drop The idiom "wait for the other shoe to drop" is used to describe a situation where someone is anticipating or waiting for something negative or troublesome to happen, especially after an initial problem or event has already occurred. It implies a sense of impending doom or the expectation that the situation will worsen before it gets better. The phrase originates from the idea of waiting for the sound of the second shoe hitting the floor after hearing the first shoe drop.
  • recompense sm for sth The idiom "recompense someone for something" means to compensate or repay someone for a loss, injury, or wrongdoing. It implies providing proper restitution or making amends for a particular action or event.
  • save, keep, etc. it for a rainy day The idiom "save, keep, etc. it for a rainy day" means to save or reserve something, such as money, resources, or possessions, for a future time of need or emergency. It suggests the importance of being prepared for unexpected or challenging situations by maintaining a reserve or backup.
  • look out for sb/sth The idiom "look out for sb/sth" means to be watchful or vigilant for someone or something, often with the intention of protecting or assisting them. It implies being alert and attentive to potential dangers or opportunities in order to provide support, guidance, or care.
  • blame for (something) The idiom "blame for (something)" means to attribute responsibility or fault to someone for a specific action, event, or outcome, usually in a negative or critical sense. It suggests holding someone accountable for the consequences or results of a particular situation or mistake.
  • send away for The idiom "send away for" means to request or order something by mail or through a specified process, usually in order to receive a catalog, product, or information.
  • not for the life of me, etc. The idiom "not for the life of me" or "not for the life of (someone)" is an expression used to convey a strong feeling of certainty or assurance that one is unable to do or remember something, regardless of any effort put into it. It implies a level of impossibility or inability to accomplish a particular task or recall certain information, even if one's life depended on it.
  • knock sb for six To "knock sb for six" is an idiomatic expression that originates from the game of cricket. In cricket, "six" refers to the highest-scoring shot where the ball is hit beyond the boundary without touching the ground. Figuratively, the phrase means to greatly surprise or shock someone, leaving them feeling overwhelmed or disoriented. It implies a powerful or unexpected impact, similar to the forceful effect of a cricket ball being hit for a six.
  • beat the bushes for The idiom "beat the bushes for" means to make a thorough and exhaustive effort in searching for something or someone, often by vigorously and repeatedly exploring all possible avenues or sources. It implies putting in great effort, energy, and determination to find or discover something.
  • cover for (someone or something) The idiom "cover for (someone or something)" means to provide protection, assistance, or explain away the mistakes, inadequacies, or wrongdoings of someone or something else. It involves taking responsibility or stepping in to support or defend them in order to shield them from negative consequences or judgement.
  • be waiting for the other shoe to drop The idiom "be waiting for the other shoe to drop" means to anticipate or expect that something bad or unpleasant is going to happen, usually due to a chain of events or a pending consequence. It implies a sense of unease, anticipation, or impending doom while waiting for the inevitable conclusion or outcome. The phrase often suggests a state of heightened anxiety or suspense.
  • make a name for yourself The idiom "make a name for yourself" means to establish a reputation or become well-known for your achievements, skills, or accomplishments. It refers to the act of gaining recognition and making a lasting impression in a particular field or area of expertise.
  • agitate for The idiom "agitate for" means to actively and persistently promote, advocate, or strive for a specific cause or desired outcome. It involves stirring up public opinion, creating awareness, and pushing for change through various means such as protests, campaigns, or lobbying efforts. It implies a strong determination and active engagement in order to bring about a desired result or social change.
  • penalize sm for sth To "penalize someone for something" means to impose a punishment or impose a disadvantage on someone as a result of their actions or behavior. It involves treating someone negatively or obliging them to suffer consequences for a specific action or behavior.
  • there's one law for the rich and another for the poor The idiom "there's one law for the rich and another for the poor" means that wealthy people often receive different and more favorable treatment under the law compared to those who are less privileged or economically disadvantaged. This expression implies that the legal system can be biased or unfair, granting preferential treatment based on one's socioeconomic status.
  • be in for it The idiom "be in for it" means to be in trouble, to face negative consequences, or to be held accountable for one's actions or behavior. It often implies that something undesirable or unpleasant is likely to happen as a result of the person's actions.
  • beat the drum for someone or something The idiom "beat the drum for someone or something" means to actively and enthusiastically promote or advocate for someone or something, typically through publicity or advertising efforts. It implies spreading positive awareness or support in order to garner attention or support for the person or cause being promoted.
  • condemn someone for something To condemn someone for something means to express strong disapproval or criticism towards that person for a particular action or behavior. It implies blaming or reproaching someone for their actions and often involves negative judgment or censure.
  • cover (up) for someone The idiom "cover (up) for someone" means to protect or shield someone from the consequences of their actions or mistakes by providing a false or misleading explanation, or by taking the blame or responsibility for them. It involves taking actions to conceal the truth or make excuses on behalf of someone in order to help them avoid facing any negative outcomes or accountability.
  • in for something The idiom "in for something" typically means that someone is about to experience or endure something, usually referring to a difficult, unpleasant, or challenging situation. It implies that the person has committed to the situation and must face the consequences, whether they are positive or negative.
  • be for a good cause The idiom "be for a good cause" implies that an action, event, or effort is motivated by a worthy, noble, or morally upright objective. It suggests that the purpose behind something is beneficial or aimed at improving the well-being of others or the society as a whole.
  • No rest for the wicked The idiom "No rest for the wicked" is a phrase commonly used to suggest that someone who is guilty of wrongdoing or immoral behavior cannot expect to find peace or respite from their actions. It implies that those who engage in evil or sinful activities will face constant troubles, responsibilities, or challenges as a consequence of their actions and are unable to find any solace or relaxation.
  • go for the burn The idiom "go for the burn" is commonly used to describe pushing oneself to the limit or exerting maximum effort, usually during physical exercise or a challenging task. It suggests embracing discomfort or pain in order to achieve a desired result or goal.
  • die for (someone or something) To "die for (someone or something)" means to have an intense or extreme affection, devotion, or loyalty towards someone or something, to the point of being willing to sacrifice oneself or go to great lengths for their benefit or in support of their cause. It signifies a profound level of commitment or love.
  • a cry for help The idiom "a cry for help" refers to an expression or action that indicates a desperate plea or request for assistance or support, usually in a difficult or distressing situation. It can be both literal and metaphorical, indicating a person's need for aid or understanding.
  • for good measure The idiom "for good measure" means to include something in addition to what is necessary or expected, usually to ensure completeness, thoroughness, or as an extra precaution. It suggests going beyond what is required to provide an added advantage or benefit.
  • sth for nothing The idiom "something for nothing" is used to describe a situation where someone or something is obtained or acquired without any effort, work, or cost. It implies obtaining a valuable or desirable outcome without having to give anything in return.
  • arrange for (sm to do sth) The idiom "arrange for (someone to do something)" refers to the act of making plans or organizing things in order to ensure that someone performs a particular task or activity. It implies taking the necessary steps to schedule or coordinate an activity involving the person in question.
  • be sorry for (oneself) The idiom "be sorry for oneself" means to feel self-pity or sympathy for oneself, often in an exaggerated or excessive manner. It refers to a state of feeling sorry or sad about one's own circumstances, often accompanied by a belief that one's problems or hardships are worse than those of others.
  • arrange for something The idiom "arrange for something" means to make preparations or organize something in advance for a specific purpose or event. It implies taking necessary steps to ensure that something happens smoothly or as planned.
  • declare (oneself) for (someone or something) The idiom "declare (oneself) for (someone or something)" means to openly support or side with someone or something, often by making a public statement or expressing a strong opinion. It implies making one's position or preference known, often in a formal or official manner.
  • have an eye for sth The idiom "have an eye for sth" means to possess or demonstrate a natural ability to recognize, appreciate, or identify something, often referring to a particular skill or talent. It suggests having good taste, discernment, or an innate aptitude for perceiving or understanding something with precision and accuracy.
  • have an ear for The idiom "have an ear for" means to have a natural ability or talent for recognizing, understanding, or appreciating a particular aspect of sound, such as music, language, rhythm, or tone. It refers to someone who possesses a keen or intuitive sense for perceiving and interpreting auditory stimuli.
  • cite someone for something The idiom "cite someone for something" means to formally accuse or charge someone with a specific offense or wrongdoing, typically in a legal or official manner. It involves presenting evidence or documentation to support the accusation. It can also refer to formally summoning or notifying someone about a violation or infraction they have committed.
  • give your eyeteeth for sth The idiom "give your eyeteeth for something" means being willing to sacrifice or give up something extremely valuable or precious in order to obtain or possess something desired or coveted. The phrase "eyeteeth" refers to the canines or eye teeth, which are highly valued and important teeth in one's mouth. Thus, the idiom signifies a strong desire or willingness to make a significant sacrifice for something of great importance or desire.
  • he, she, etc. won't thank you for something The idiom "he, she, etc. won't thank you for something" means that someone will not appreciate or acknowledge the effort, favor, or action that you have done for them. It implies that despite doing something beneficial or helpful, the person will not show gratitude or express appreciation for it.
  • cut out for sm or sth The idiom "cut out for (someone or something)" means to be naturally suited or well-tailored for a particular task, occupation, or role. It implies that a person has the necessary qualities, abilities, or characteristics required for success in a particular area.
  • cut out for sth The idiom "cut out for something" means that a person possesses the necessary qualities, skills, or abilities to be successful or well-suited for a particular task, role, or pursuit. It implies that someone is naturally inclined or well-prepared for a specific job or activity.
  • be there for the taking The idiom "be there for the taking" means that something is easily accessible or available for anyone who wants to seize or obtain it. It implies that an opportunity or advantage is readily obtainable without much effort or competition.
  • take for dead The idiom "take for dead" means to mistakenly believe or assume that someone is dead or no longer alive, usually due to a significant or prolonged absence.
  • lay for sm or sth The idiom "lay for someone or something" typically means to wait or prepare for someone or something in order to catch or confront them. It often implies a plan to ambush or surprise the person or thing being laid for.
  • dollar for dollar The idiom "dollar for dollar" refers to an equal exchange or equivalent value in terms of money. It suggests that the given amount of money is matched in value, matching the amount spent or received.
  • an eye for an eye (and a tooth for a tooth) The idiom "an eye for an eye (and a tooth for a tooth)" is a phrase derived from the principle of retributive justice, indicating a punishment or equal retaliation that corresponds proportionally to the offense committed. It suggests that the punishment for a wrongdoing should be equivalent to the harm caused, advocating for fairness and balance in justice.
  • Hope for the best and prepare for the worst The idiom "Hope for the best and prepare for the worst" means that one should be optimistic and positive about a situation, while also taking precautions and being ready for any potential difficulties or negative outcomes that may arise. It emphasizes the importance of being both hopeful and realistic in one's approach to uncertain or challenging situations.
  • be fighting for your life The idiom "be fighting for your life" means to be engaged in a desperate struggle or exerting extreme effort to survive or overcome a significant and dangerous threat or situation. It implies an intense and often literal battle for survival.
  • fall for sb hook, line and sinker The idiom "fall for sb hook, line, and sinker" means to be completely and unquestionably deceived or tricked by someone. It implies that the person has believed something or someone completely, without any skepticism or doubt. The phrase originates from fishing, where "hook, line, and sinker" refers to the entire fishing tackle. Thus, falling for something "hook, line, and sinker" suggests falling for a deception without any resistance or second thoughts.
  • feel for sm The idiom "feel for someone" means to empathize or sympathize with someone, understanding and sharing in their emotions, especially their pain or suffering. It suggests that the person acknowledges and genuinely cares about the other person's situation or difficulties.
  • take an eye for an eye The idiom "take an eye for an eye" means to seek revenge or retaliate by inflicting the same harm or injury on someone who has harmed or injured you. It suggests the concept of seeking justice by punishing the offender with the same level of harm they have caused. It originates from the principle of retributive justice, often associated with concepts of fairness and reciprocity.
  • not able to get sth for love or money The idiom "not able to get something for love or money" means that no matter how much effort or resources one puts into acquiring or obtaining something, it is simply unattainable or unavailable.
  • anything/nothing/something in it for somebody The idiom "anything/nothing/something in it for somebody" refers to a situation or opportunity that offers potential benefits, rewards, advantages, or personal gains to a particular individual. It often implies that the person is looking for a reason or motivation to become involved or interested in something.
  • embark for (some place) The idiom "embark for (some place)" means to begin a journey or undertake a new venture, typically involving leaving one place and travelling to another. It implies the act of setting sail or commencing a voyage, often in a literal sense, but can also be used metaphorically to describe starting any endeavor or project.
  • be no match for The idiom "be no match for" means to be significantly weaker, less skilled, or less powerful than someone or something else. It implies a lack of ability to compete, overcome, or surpass the other person or entity.
  • for all that The idiom "for all that" means despite those facts or circumstances mentioned, nevertheless, regardless.
  • adore someone for having something The idiom "adore someone for having something" means that a person deeply admires and respects someone else specifically because they possess a certain quality, skill, possession, or attribute. It implies that the person's adoration is based on a specific aspect or characteristic of the individual.
  • (one) can whistle for it The idiom "(one) can whistle for it" means that someone will not receive the requested or expected thing, usually based on a refusal or reluctance of the other party. It implies that the person will have to wait indefinitely or have no chance of obtaining the desired outcome.
  • mistake (sm) for (sm else) The idiom "mistake (sm) for (sm else)" means to confuse or wrongly identify one person or thing as another. It implies making an error in perceiving or recognizing something, often due to similarities or misunderstandings.
  • sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander, what's The idiom "sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander" means that if a particular behavior or treatment is acceptable or applicable for one person, it should also be acceptable or applicable for another person in a similar situation. It emphasizes equality and fairness in the treatment of different individuals or groups. The phrase "what's" does not have a specific meaning in this idiom.
  • be grateful for small mercies The idiom "be grateful for small mercies" means to appreciate or find solace in the little or minor positive aspects or blessings when confronted with a difficult or challenging situation. It suggests being thankful for any small relief or advantages, even if they may not completely resolve the problem or make the situation ideal.
  • live for the moment The idiom "live for the moment" means to focus on and enjoy the present rather than worrying about the future or dwelling on the past. It suggests living in the present moment and making the most of it without being overly concerned about the consequences or long-term implications. It encourages spontaneity, seizing opportunities, and finding happiness in the present without excessive planning or worry about what lies ahead.
  • mistake (sth) for (sth else) The idiom "mistake (sth) for (sth else)" means to wrongly or incorrectly identify or perceive something as being something else. It implies confusing or misinterpreting one thing as another due to similarities or lack of attention to detail.
  • take word for The idiom "take (someone's) word for" means to believe or trust what someone says without questioning or doubting it. It implies accepting another person's statement or assurance as true or accurate without requiring further evidence or confirmation.
  • only have eyes for/have eyes only for somebody The idiom "only have eyes for/have eyes only for somebody" means to be extremely attracted or infatuated with someone, to the point of being oblivious to or uninterested in anyone else. It implies a strong focus and adoration towards a specific person, often disregarding the presence or advances of others.
  • criticize sm for sth The idiom "to criticize someone for something" means to express disapproval or negative judgment towards someone regarding a particular action, behavior, or quality that they possess or displayed. It implies providing feedback or pointing out flaws, mistakes, or shortcomings in relation to a specific matter.
  • purchase sth for sm The idiom "purchase something for someone" means to buy or acquire something specifically for someone else, typically as a gift or on their behalf. It implies that the object or item being purchased is intended for the benefit or use of the person mentioned.
  • destined for (something) The idiom "destined for (something)" refers to being unavoidably or inevitably bound for a particular outcome or future circumstance. It implies that the person, object, or event mentioned is fated or predetermined to experience a specific situation or achieve a certain goal.
  • clamor for The idiom "clamor for" means to demand something in a loud, persistent, or aggressive way. It implies a strong and vociferous protest or desire for something.
  • eye for an eye (and a tooth for a tooth). The idiom "eye for an eye (and a tooth for a tooth)" refers to the concept of retaliation or revenge, where the punishment inflicted upon someone is in proportion to the harm they have caused. It originated from a legal principle known as lex talionis in ancient societies, which aimed to maintain justice by ensuring that the punishment matched the severity of the crime committed.
  • make a play for sth The idiomatic phrase "make a play for something" commonly means to try to obtain or achieve something, usually with a sense of ambition or strategizing. It can often refer to pursuing and vying for a specific opportunity or outcome, often involving competition or a strategic move.
  • make arrangements for The idiom "make arrangements for" means to organize or plan something in advance, typically with the intention of ensuring that everything is prepared or ready for a particular event or situation. It implies taking necessary actions or setting up things in order to facilitate and coordinate the smooth execution of a plan or activity.
  • have a head for The idiom "have a head for" means to have a natural ability, aptitude, or talent for a particular thing or skill. It suggests possessing an innate capacity or intellect that makes it easier for someone to comprehend, excel, or succeed in a certain field or activity.
  • give (one) (the) what for The idiom "give (one) (the) what for" means to scold, criticize, or reprimand someone severely and forcefully. It implies a strong verbal or disciplinary response to someone's actions or behavior.
  • (one) might be forgiven for (doing something) The idiom "(one) might be forgiven for (doing something)" is used to suggest that it would be understandable or acceptable for someone to do something, considering the circumstances or the situation they are in. It implies that the action in question is justifiable and others would not hold it against them.
  • go out for (something) The idiom "go out for (something)" typically means to participate or compete in a particular activity or event, often with the intention of attaining or achieving a specific goal or desired outcome. It is commonly used when referring to auditions, tryouts, contests, sports teams, or applying for a particular position or role.
  • eat for breakfast The idiom "eat for breakfast" refers to someone or something being easily defeated, overwhelmed, or surpassed by someone or something else. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is no match for the opponent or situation at hand and is easily dealt with or conquered. It can also suggest that the person or thing is being challenged or confronted directly and directly dealt with decisively.
  • be a great one for something/for doing something To be a great one for something/for doing something means to have a tendency or a strong liking for a particular activity or behavior. It implies that someone enjoys or frequently engages in a specific action or shows a great interest in it.
  • keep (something) for a rainy day The idiom "keep (something) for a rainy day" means to save or set aside something (usually money or resources) for use in the future when it may be needed or when circumstances become difficult or uncertain. It implies the act of planning ahead and being prepared for unforeseen situations.
  • have (got) a knack for (something) The idiom "have (got) a knack for (something)" means to have a natural talent or skill for doing something effortlessly or with ease. It implies that the person possesses an unusual ability or aptitude for a particular activity or task.
  • cannot see the wood for the trees The idiom "cannot see the wood for the trees" means being unable to see or understand the overall or big picture because of being too focused on small details or specific aspects of a situation. It implies losing perspective or being overly preoccupied with minor or insignificant elements, causing one to miss the broader context or main point.
  • feel for sb The idiom "feel for someone" means to empathize with, understand, or sympathize with someone's emotions, hardships, or difficult situation. It implies that a person has a deep sense of empathy or compassion towards someone else.
  • be somebody's for the asking The idiom "be somebody's for the asking" means that someone is willing and available to provide assistance or fulfill a request without any hesitation or conditions. It implies that the person is eager and ready to help or comply with the other person's desires.
  • make allowances for sb/sth The idiom "make allowances for someone/something" means to take into consideration or make allowances for someone's or something's limitations, faults, or special circumstances, thereby being more understanding, forgiving, or tolerant towards them.
  • educate someone for something The idiom "educate someone for something" means to provide someone with the necessary knowledge, skills, or training in order to prepare them for a specific task, role, or profession. It implies guiding or instructing someone to acquire the required expertise and qualifications needed to excel in a particular field or undertake a specific responsibility.
  • can't (do something) for toffee The idiom "can't (do something) for toffee" is used to convey the inability or lack of skill in performing a certain task. It suggests that the person mentioned is completely inept or unsuccessful in performing the specified action. It is often used humorously or mockingly. The phrase "for toffee" is used as a substitute for "at all," implying that the person performing the task is so bad at it that they cannot even do it for a reward or incentive like toffee (a type of candy).
  • can't see the forest for the trees The idiom "can't see the forest for the trees" refers to a situation where someone is too focused on small, insignificant details and fails to see the larger picture or understand the overall situation or context. It emphasizes the idea that sometimes people get so caught up in minor aspects or individual components of a problem or situation that they lose sight of the main issue or fail to grasp the bigger perspective.
  • root for sb/sth The idiom "root for sb/sth" means to support or cheer for someone or something eagerly and enthusiastically. It often implies expressing encouragement and being in favor of their success or victory.
  • steel oneself for The idiom "steel oneself for" means to mentally prepare or make oneself strong and determined in the face of a difficult or challenging situation. It implies gathering courage, resilience, or determination to deal with something demanding or emotionally overwhelming.
  • make no apologies for (something) The idiom "make no apologies for (something)" means to not express regret, remorse, or justification for one's actions, beliefs, or decisions. It signifies being unapologetic, confident, and unashamed about something, often in the face of criticism or disapproval from others.
  • be not cut out for something The idiom "be not cut out for something" means that a person does not have the necessary abilities, skills, or qualities required for a particular task, role, or occupation. It implies that the person is not suited or suited well enough for that specific endeavor.
  • one law for the rich and another for the poor The idiom "one law for the rich and another for the poor" refers to the unfairness and inequality in the justice system or society where individuals from different socio-economic backgrounds are treated differently under the same law. It implies that the wealthy or privileged individuals often receive more lenient treatment or escape the consequences of their actions, while those who are less privileged or economically disadvantaged are subject to stricter enforcement and punishment.
  • cast around for sm or sth The idiom "cast around for someone or something" means to search or seek in various places or options for finding someone or something. It refers to the act of looking around or exploring different possibilities in order to locate a desired person or item.
  • for all (one) cares The idiom "for all (one) cares" is used to express a complete lack of concern or interest in a particular situation or outcome. It indicates that someone does not care at all about the matter being discussed.
  • have an ear for sth The idiom "have an ear for something" means to possess a natural ability or talent for perceiving, recognizing, or understanding specific sounds, music, tones, accents, or languages. It implies having a good sense of hearing or an intuitive understanding of sound.
  • get/have the hots for somebody The idiom "get/have the hots for somebody" refers to having a strong physical or romantic attraction towards someone. It implies a deep desire or a passionate interest in another person, often pertaining to feelings of infatuation or lust.
  • answer for sm or sth The idiom "answer for someone or something" means to take responsibility or be held accountable for someone or something.
  • solicit for sm or sth The idiom "solicit for sm or sth" means to actively seek, request, or ask for something or someone. It typically refers to initiatives or efforts to gain support, contributions, opinions, or participation from others in a persuasive or sincere manner.
  • feel sorry for yourself The idiom "feel sorry for yourself" means to have excessive self-pity or self-indulgence, usually in a situation where one believes they are treated unfairly or faced with adversity. It implies wallowing in negative emotions and focusing on one's own suffering rather than seeking solutions or taking action.
  • take sm or sth for granted The idiom "take someone or something for granted" means to not appreciate or value someone or something properly, often because they have become so familiar or reliable that their importance is overlooked. It suggests a sense of complacency, assuming that someone or something will always be there without recognizing their true worth.
  • for better or worse The idiom "for better or worse" is a phrase used to express unconditional commitment, stating that regardless of the circumstances or outcome, one is dedicated to staying loyal and supportive.
  • have the hots for The idiom "have the hots for" means to have a strong and often passionate romantic or physical attraction towards someone.
  • adore someone for doing something The idiom "adore someone for doing something" means to have a great affection, admiration, or appreciation for someone because of a specific action or behavior they have demonstrated. It implies that the person's actions have made them highly esteemed or cherished by the speaker.
  • how are you fixed for sth? The idiom "how are you fixed for something" is an informal way of asking someone if they have enough or if they are sufficiently prepared or supplied with something. It often refers to the availability or possession of a particular item, resource, or solution.
  • go to bat for someone The idiom "go to bat for someone" means to advocate or support someone in a situation or defend their interests. It originates from the game of baseball, where one player bats on behalf of their team. Similarly, when someone "goes to bat" for another person, they take action on their behalf or stand up for them.
  • be gagging for (something) The idiom "be gagging for (something)" is typically used in British slang and means to be extremely eager, desperate, or craving something, usually referring to a desire for a particular activity or for something specific. It can also connote a strong need or longing for something.
  • sit still for The idiom "sit still for" means to tolerate, endure, or accept something, often reluctantly, without taking any action or expressing disagreement.
  • be for the high jump The idiom "be for the high jump" means to be in trouble or facing punishment for a mistake or wrongdoing. It implies that someone is about to face consequences for their actions and may have to suffer the repercussions.
  • audition sm for sth The idiom "audition someone for something" means to assess or evaluate someone's suitability or ability for a particular role, task, or position. It is commonly used in the context of performing arts, where individuals are tested or tried out for a specific role in a play, movie, or musical. However, it can also apply to other situations outside of the entertainment industry, where a person's skills or qualifications are evaluated in order to determine their suitability for a certain job or assignment.
  • strapped for cash The idiom "strapped for cash" means to have a lack of money or be in a financially difficult situation, usually with limited funds available for immediate use or spending.
  • not for all the tea in China The idiom "not for all the tea in China" is used to express that someone is unwilling to do something, no matter how great the reward or offer. It implies that the person is steadfast in their refusal and considers the offer or task to be completely undesirable, comparing it to having all the tea in China, which is an enormous quantity.
  • pass for sb/sth The idiom "pass for sb/sth" means to be accepted or mistaken as someone or something else, usually due to a close resemblance or similarity. It implies that the person or thing in question is able to successfully masquerade or be regarded as someone or something desired or expected.
  • spend sth for sth The idiom "spend something for something" typically means to use or allocate a specific amount of money or resources for a particular purpose or item. It refers to the action of exchanging money or assets in order to obtain an item or achieve a desired outcome.
  • stick up for The definition of the idiom "stick up for" is to defend or support someone or something, especially in a situation where they are being treated unfairly or criticized.
  • for all the world The idiom "for all the world" means that something appears or seems to be a certain way, as if it were the case without any doubt or question. It emphasizes that the situation is very clear, evident, or undeniable.
  • curse someone for something The idiom "curse someone for something" means to express anger, disappointment, or frustration towards someone for their actions or behavior. It implies wishing ill fate or misfortune upon them as a consequence of what they have done.
  • do something for luck The idiom "do something for luck" refers to performing a particular action or ritual in the hope of attracting good fortune or success in a future endeavor. It suggests that by engaging in a certain behavior, one believes they can influence the outcome of a situation positively. This action may not have any logical or rational connection to the desired result but is believed to bring luck or increase the likelihood of a favorable outcome.
  • educate for (something) The idiom "educate for (something)" typically refers to the process of preparing or training someone specifically in a particular field, skill, or profession. It implies providing knowledge, instruction, and guidance to develop the necessary expertise or understanding required for a specific role or area of study.
  • for the time being The idiom "for the time being" means temporarily or for now. It refers to a specific period or situation that is subject to change in the future.
  • audition for sth The idiom "audition for sth" refers to the process of performing or demonstrating one's skills or abilities in order to be considered for a specific role, job, or opportunity. It typically involves a structured evaluation or test conducted by a person or group responsible for making the final decision.
  • make allowance(s) for (someone or something) The idiom "make allowance(s) for (someone or something)" means to consider or take into account someone or something's needs, limitations, or circumstances, and adjust one's expectations, plans, or actions accordingly. It involves being understanding, accommodating, or forgiving towards others or making necessary adjustments to accommodate specific factors or conditions.
  • fish for sth The idiom "fish for something" refers to an act of attempting to obtain or seek something, often by using various strategies or techniques, such as asking indirect or subtle questions, making suggestions, or dropping hints. It implies a desire to elicit a specific response, information, or outcome from someone or a situation, much like a fisherman uses bait to catch a fish.
  • fight for someone or something The idiom "fight for someone or something" means to strongly advocate or support someone or something, often in the face of opposition or challenges. It conveys a sense of determination, perseverance, and loyalty to protect or promote the well-being, rights, or interests of another person or cause. It can involve physical confrontation, but most commonly refers to fighting metaphorically, such as through verbal arguments, legal battles, or intense efforts to achieve a desired outcome.
  • inquire for someone The idiom "inquire for someone" means to ask or seek information specifically about a particular person.
  • arrange something for some time The idiom "arrange something for some time" typically means to plan or organize something to occur or happen at a specific time or in the near future. It refers to taking the necessary steps or making the necessary preparations to ensure that a particular event or activity happens as scheduled or according to a desired timeline.
  • blame someone for something The idiom "blame someone for something" means holding someone responsible or assigning fault or guilt to them for a particular action, situation, or outcome, often unfairly or undeservedly.
  • have sb's guts for garters The idiom "have somebody's guts for garters" is an expression used to convey extreme anger or hostility towards someone. It suggests a desire to punish or harm the person so severely that their intestines (guts) could be used to make garters, which are decorative bands worn around the leg. It is a vivid and figurative way of expressing strong animosity or a threat of severe consequences.
  • for the worse The idiom "for the worse" means that something has changed or taken a turn in a negative or unfavorable direction compared to how it was before. It typically refers to a situation or condition that has deteriorated or declined.
  • do something for all you are worth The idiom "do something for all you are worth" means to put in maximum effort, use all of one's abilities, or give one's best performance while doing something.
  • along for the ride The idiom "along for the ride" refers to someone who is passively participating or going along with something without contributing much or having much influence. It suggests that the person is merely observing or being included without actively engaging or making important decisions.
  • Pardon me for living! The idiom "Pardon me for living!" is an ironic or sarcastic phrase used to express frustration or annoyance with someone who has made a statement or done something that the speaker finds ridiculous, absurd, or offensive. It is a way of highlighting the speaker's disbelief or exasperation towards the other person's actions or behavior.
  • For want of a nail the shoe was lost for want of a shoe the horse was lost and for want of a horse the man was lost. The idiom "For want of a nail the shoe was lost, for want of a shoe the horse was lost, and for want of a horse the man was lost" is a proverb that emphasizes the importance of paying attention to small details and taking care of seemingly insignificant matters. It highlights the domino effect that can occur when a seemingly minor issue is left unaddressed, leading to progressively larger consequences. In a broader sense, it serves as a reminder that neglecting small tasks or failing to address minor problems can ultimately lead to significant and sometimes disastrous outcomes.
  • give your eye teeth for something/to do something The idiom "give your eye teeth for something/to do something" means to desire or be willing to sacrifice a great deal or give up something very valuable in order to obtain or achieve the desired thing or action.
  • spring for sth The idiom "spring for something" means to generously or willingly pay for something, typically treating someone else or covering the cost of a desired item or experience. It implies a sense of spending money that may be unexpected or beyond regular expenses.
  • swear for The idiom "swear for" refers to taking an oath or making a solemn pledge on behalf of someone else. It means assuming responsibility or vouching for someone's actions, beliefs, or character.
  • be well off for something The idiom "be well off for something" means to have an abundant or plentiful supply of something, often referring to a specific item or resource. It implies that one has an adequate or satisfactory amount of that thing, which may contribute to comfort, success, or contentment.
  • there's no accounting for taste The idiom "there's no accounting for taste" is used to express the idea that people's preferences and personal choices, especially in matters of aesthetics or culture, cannot be explained or justified logically or rationally. It implies that everyone has their own unique tastes and preferences, and there is no correct or universal standard by which to judge them.
  • make out a case for sth, at make a case for sth The idiom "make out a case for something" or "make a case for something" refers to presenting arguments or evidence to support or justify something. It means to provide reasons or explanations that support the validity or importance of a particular idea, action, or position. It implies the act of persuasively presenting a strong case or argument in favor of a particular point of view or course of action.
  • it's every man for himself The idiom "it's every man for himself" means that individuals are acting solely in their own self-interest and are not concerned about helping or supporting others. It emphasizes a competitive and selfish mindset where everyone is responsible for their own well-being and success.
  • answer for sm The idiom "answer for sm" means to take responsibility or face consequences for something that one has done. It implies being held accountable for one's actions or decisions.
  • flip someone for something The idiom "flip someone for something" refers to the act of convincing or persuading someone to trade or exchange something of value. It implies successfully swaying or influencing someone to give up their possession or stance in favor of the speaker's desired outcome or proposition.
  • be fighting for life The idiom "be fighting for life" typically means to be struggling to survive, often in a critical or desperate situation. It suggests that a person or thing is making a strenuous effort to stay alive or overcome severe challenges or danger.
  • fall for someone hook, line and sinker The idiom "fall for someone hook, line and sinker" means to completely and unquestioningly believe or be deceived by someone or something, often in a romantic or personal context. It refers to being completely captivated or infatuated, as if one is caught by a fishing hook (hook), the fishing line (line), and the fishing sinker (sinker) which make it difficult to escape.
  • time for a change The idiom "time for a change" means that it is necessary or advantageous to make a significant shift or alteration in one's life, situation, or approach. It suggests that the current circumstances or methods have become ineffective, stagnant, or unsatisfactory, and a new direction or strategy is needed.
  • cannot for the life of me/him/her/us/them The idiom "cannot for the life of me/him/her/us/them" is used to express extreme confusion, frustration, or inability to understand or accomplish something, despite making effort or trying one's best. It indicates a strong sense of helplessness or bewilderment.
  • apologize for The idiom "apologize for" means to express regret or remorse for one's actions, words, or behavior that has caused harm, offense, or inconvenience to someone else. It involves acknowledging one's mistake, accepting responsibility, and offering an apology as a form of reconciliation or making amends.
  • shoot for the moon The idiom "shoot for the moon" means to set ambitious goals or aim for something extremely high or difficult to achieve. It encourages aiming for the highest level of success or accomplishment, even if it seems unlikely or challenging.
  • cast about for (something) The idiom "cast about for (something)" means to search or look around for something, often in an aimless or uncertain manner. It refers to the action of seeking or trying to find something without a specific target or direction in mind.
  • fall for The idiom "fall for" means to be deceived, tricked, or easily manipulated by something or someone. It usually implies developing feelings or a strong attraction towards someone or something in a way that blinds a person to their true intentions or nature.
  • issue a call for something The idiom "issue a call for something" can be defined as the act of making a public request or appeal for a specific action, assistance, or support on a particular matter or cause. It typically involves reaching out to a larger audience or group of individuals in order to motivate or encourage them to respond or take action.
  • pave the way for sb/sth The idiom "pave the way for sb/sth" means to prepare or make things easier or more favorable for someone or something to succeed or progress. It involves removing obstacles, creating opportunities, or setting the groundwork that enables smooth progress or achievement in a particular situation or for a specific person.
  • in for the kill The idiom "in for the kill" refers to someone being determined to achieve complete success or victory in a situation, often with ruthless intentions or a strong desire to overcome their opponent completely. It is commonly used to describe someone who is on the verge of achieving their ultimate goal, and is focused on capitalizing on that opportunity to attain a definitive win.
  • keep something warm for someone The idiom "keep something warm for someone" means to hold onto or reserve something for someone until they can claim or use it. It can be used both literally and figuratively. Literally, it could refer to keeping a seat, food, or any other item warm until the person intended for it arrives. Figuratively, it can mean holding onto an opportunity, a position, or a role for someone until they are ready to take it.
  • hellbent for The idiom "hellbent for" means being extremely determined or relentless in pursuing a goal or destination, often disregarding potential obstacles or consequences. It suggests an intense and unwavering focus on achieving something, regardless of the challenges involved.
  • nothing is so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse The idiom "nothing is so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse" means that spending time outdoors, particularly in the presence of a horse, can be extremely beneficial for a person's well-being and character development. It suggests that engaging with the natural world and connecting with animals can have a positive impact on a person's inner self, promoting personal growth, resilience, and overall mental and emotional well-being.
  • He that would go to sea for pleasure, would go to hell for a pastime. The idiom "He that would go to sea for pleasure, would go to hell for a pastime" is a cautionary expression that highlights the dangers and hardships associated with certain activities. It implies that those who seek pleasure or enjoyment in undertakings that are inherently risky or challenging may end up experiencing great difficulties or negative consequences as a result. Essentially, it warns individuals to carefully consider the potential repercussions before engaging in seemingly enjoyable but potentially perilous endeavors.
  • sacrifice sm or sth for sm or sth The idiom "sacrifice someone or something for someone or something" refers to the act of giving up or letting go of a person or thing for the sake of someone or something else. It often implies making a difficult choice or decision that involves putting the needs or desires of someone or something else above your own.
  • get done for (something) The idiom "get done for (something)" typically means to be found guilty or held responsible for a particular action, usually referring to a crime or offense. It implies facing the consequences or being punished for one's actions.
  • have (got) it in for The idiom "have (got) it in for" means to have a strong and often unfounded animosity or dislike towards someone, to be intentionally seeking to harm or cause trouble for them.
  • like looking for a needle in a haystack The idiom "like looking for a needle in a haystack" means searching for something that is exceptionally difficult or nearly impossible to find, due to it being hidden or surrounded by a large amount of similar or irrelevant things. It highlights the idea of a task or quest that is extremely challenging and time-consuming.
  • sucker for sm or sth The idiom "sucker for sm or sth" refers to someone who is easily or irresistibly drawn to a particular thing or activity. They have a weakness for or are easily swayed by that specific thing or situation.
  • beat the drum for The idiom "beat the drum for" means to vigorously promote or advocate for something or someone, often by generating attention, support, or publicity. It implies actively championing a cause or individual, making a sustained effort to gain support or promote their merits.
  • What's on tap for today? The idiom "What's on tap for today?" refers to asking about or inquiring about the plans, agenda, or schedule for the current day. It is often used to inquire about someone's intended activities, tasks, or events they have planned to accomplish during the day.
  • jockey for position The idiom "jockey for position" means to actively and strategically compete or maneuver in order to gain an advantageous or superior position, whether it be in career advancement, social hierarchy, competition, or any other context that involves vying for an advantageous position or status.
  • issue a call for The idiom "issue a call for" means to make a formal request or appeal for something or to ask or demand that others take a particular action or provide a specific thing. It implies invoking others to respond or contribute to a cause, issue, or need.
  • Thank you for sharing. The phrase "Thank you for sharing" is an idiom used to express gratitude towards someone who has shared information or expressed their thoughts and feelings. It is often used to acknowledge and appreciate someone's willingness to open up, be transparent, or contribute to a conversation, whether it be in a personal or professional setting.
  • make a bolt for something The idiom "make a bolt for something" means to quickly and suddenly run towards or reach for something in a determined and often desperate manner. It implies a swift and decisive action or escape, typically in urgent situations or when feeling intense desire or need.
  • take up the cudgels for sb/sth To "take up the cudgels for someone/something" means to vigorously defend or support them in a dispute or argument. It implies actively and passionately championing a cause or standing up for someone, often in a public or confrontational manner. The phrase originates from the literal act of wielding cudgels (short thick sticks) as weapons in a physical fight or confrontation.
  • celebrate sm for an accomplishment The idiom "celebrate someone for an accomplishment" means to publicly acknowledge and applaud someone for their success or achievement. It involves expressing joy, admiration, and appreciation for the individual's hard work, talent, or effort in reaching a particular goal.
  • In for a penny The idiom "in for a penny" means that if one is going to commit to or undertake a particular action or situation, they might as well fully commit or take full responsibility for it, regardless of the potential consequences or costs involved. It implies a willingness to go all the way or give it one's all, no matter the initial investment or risk.
  • make a dash for someone or something The idiom "make a dash for someone or something" means to quickly move toward someone or something with urgency or determination, often in a hurried or impulsive manner. It implies a sense of haste or a strong desire to reach the person or thing being referred to.
  • set (oneself) up for a letdown The idiom "set (oneself) up for a letdown" means to make oneself vulnerable or susceptible to disappointment or failure by having unrealistic or excessively high expectations. It implies that the person is willingly or unknowingly preparing or positioning themselves for an eventual disappointment or letdown.
  • for the life of you The idiom "for the life of you" means that no matter how hard you try or think, you are unable to do or understand something. It implies a situation or task that is extremely challenging or perplexing.
  • punish sm for sth The idiom "punish someone for something" refers to holding someone accountable and imposing a penalty or consequence upon them for a particular action or behavior. It implies taking disciplinary action or administering retribution for the wrongdoing or offense committed by an individual.
  • have (got) the hots for sb The idiom "have (got) the hots for someone" means to have a strong, passionate desire or romantic attraction towards a specific person. It suggests being strongly infatuated with them or having intense feelings of desire or lust.
  • curtains for (someone or something) The idiom "curtains for (someone or something)" refers to the end or demise of someone or something, typically in a final and irreversible manner. It suggests that there is no hope or chance of survival, success, or continuation.
  • buzz for someone The idiom "buzz for someone" typically means to create excitement or intrigue about someone, often through word of mouth or publicity. It refers to generating a positive or enthusiastic buzz or attention around a person, often in the context of building their reputation or promoting their accomplishments.
  • give somebody a (good) run for their money The idiom "give somebody a (good) run for their money" means to provide strong competition or give someone a challenge, often in a