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How Do You Spell GAYAL?

Correct spelling for the English word "gayal" is [ɡˈe͡ɪə͡l], [ɡˈe‍ɪə‍l], [ɡ_ˈeɪ_əl]] (IPA phonetic alphabet).

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Common Misspellings for GAYAL

Below is the list of 98 misspellings for the word "gayal".

  • ga7al
  • gayalp
  • gaual
  • gaywl
  • bayal
  • ghayal
  • tayal
  • giyal
  • gwayal
  • gaywal
  • ga6yal
  • yayal
  • gsyal
  • agyal
  • gayao
  • fgayal
  • gaxal
  • ygayal
  • hayal
  • tgayal
  • gayap
  • gayyal
  • gayak
  • wayal
  • gzayal
  • gayaal
  • gzyal
  • gaayl
  • gayel
  • gayzal
  • gauyal
  • gagal
  • gayakl
  • ga9al
  • gaysal
  • gayasl
  • oayal
  • gsayal
  • gwyal
  • gayapl
  • gayual
  • geyal
  • ga yal
  • eayal
  • gaytal
  • gayqal
  • gaya l
  • ga6al
  • gayaol
  • gaycl
  • bgayal
  • gfayal
  • gayalk
  • gqyal
  • gazyal
  • gqayal
  • g ayal
  • hgayal
  • gayalo
  • gtayal
  • gayawl
  • gayzl
  • gayil
  • gaqyal
  • gayal
  • gayad
  • gcyal
  • vayal
  • gayaql
  • gahal
  • gahyal
  • gay al
  • gyayal
  • gayql
  • ga7yal
  • gayhal
  • gatyal
  • gayall
  • gagyal
  • gawyal
  • gaysl
  • gay7al
  • ggayal
  • gayah
  • gayam
  • gayazl
  • vgayal
  • gayan
  • gay6al
  • gyaal
  • gaygal
  • gbayal
  • gaqal
  • gvayal
  • cayal
  • gayla
  • gasyal
  • gaayal

Similar spelling words for GAYAL

Plural form of GAYAL is GAYAL OR GAYALS

Definition of GAYAL

  1. GYAL, g[=i]'al, n. a kind of East Indian ox, long domesticated, dark brown in colour, with short curved horns. [Hindi.]

Anagrams of GAYAL

4 letters

3 letters

Usage Examples for GAYAL

  1. Mr. G. P. Sanderson shot a fine old male of what he supposed to be the wild gayal, and he says: " I can state that there was not one single point of difference in appearance or size between it and the bison of Southern India, except that the horns were somewhat smaller than what would have been looked for in a bull of its age in Southern India;" and this point was doubtless an individual peculiarity, for Blyth, in his 'Catalogue of the Mammals of Burmah, ' says: " Nowhere does this grand species attain a finer development than in Burmah, and the horns are mostly short and thick, and very massive as compared with those of the Indian gaurs, though the distinction is not constant on either side of the Bay of Bengal." - "Natural History of the Mammalia of India and Ceylon" by Robert A. Sterndale
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