How Do You Spell GOES?

Pronunciation: [ɡˈə͡ʊz] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "goes" may seem confusing, but it follows a simple pattern. The "o" in "goes" is pronounced as an "uh" sound, represented by the phonetic symbol [ə]. The letter "e" at the end of the word is silent, and is only used to indicate that the "o" is pronounced with a short "uh" sound instead of the long "oh" sound. This pattern is similar to other words with the same pronunciation, such as "does" and "toes."

GOES Meaning and Definition

Goes is the third person singular present tense of the verb "go," which can be defined as the act or process of moving from one place to another. More specifically, it refers to the act of traveling or proceeding towards a destination or objective. It can also mean the act of departing or leaving one place or situation for another.

The term "goes" is used to indicate the action being performed by a third person singular subject. It can refer to a single object or individual moving or travelling, or it can indicate recurring or habitual actions of a particular person or thing. For instance, one might say "He goes to work every morning" to describe a person's daily routine.

In addition to physical movement, "goes" can also denote the passage or duration of time. It can be used to indicate the duration of an event or activity, as in "The concert goes from 7 pm to 10 pm." Similarly, it can refer to the continuation or progress of something, such as "The investigation into the case goes on."

Furthermore, "goes" can be utilized to describe the changes or developments that occur in a particular situation or condition. It can indicate the process or result of progressing, developing, or unfolding, as in "The project is going well" or "The students' performance goes from strength to strength."

Overall, "goes" is a versatile verb that describes a range of actions, movements, durations, progressions, and developments, depending on the context in which it is used.

Top Common Misspellings for GOES *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for GOES

Etymology of GOES

The word "goes" is the third person singular present tense of the verb "go". The origin of "go" can be traced back to the Old English word "gan", which means "to go, depart, or spread". This term is derived from the Proto-Germanic word "gēaną". The word "go" has been in use in the English language since the 14th century and has remained largely unchanged in its basic form over the centuries.

Idioms with the word GOES

  • the same/that goes for sb/sth The idiom "the same/that goes for sb/sth" means that the same statement or rule applies to someone or something else. It suggests that whatever is stated or implied about a particular person or thing can be equally applied to another person or thing in a similar situation. It emphasizes the consistency or universality of a rule, characteristic, or circumstance.
  • it goes without saying The idiom "it goes without saying" means that something is very obvious or self-evident, and therefore does not need to be explicitly mentioned or stated.
  • what sb says, goes The idiom "what sb says, goes" means that a person has complete authority and their decisions or instructions are final and must be followed without questioning or argument. It implies that the person's opinion or statement holds the most weight and overrides any other conflicting opinions.
  • bang goes sth The idiom "bang goes something" is typically used to express the sudden and complete loss or destruction of something, often referring to a plan, hope, or opportunity. It suggests that the situation has abruptly and irrevocably ended or failed.
  • pride comes/goes before a fall The idiom "pride comes/goes before a fall" means that excessive arrogance or overconfidence often leads to a person's downfall or failure. It suggests that those who are too proud or complacent about their success are more vulnerable to experiencing a sudden loss, setback, or failure.
  • what/whatever sb says goes The idiom "what/whatever sb says goes" means that whatever someone says or decides is final or authoritative, and must be accepted or followed without question or objection. It implies that the person holds complete control or authority over a situation or decision.
  • your mind is a blank/goes blank The idiom "your mind is a blank/goes blank" is used to describe a state of mental blankness or lack of comprehension. It implies a temporary inability to think clearly or recall information, often occurring when asked a question or challenged with a problem. It suggests that one's mind is momentarily devoid of thoughts or ideas, leaving the person feeling mentally stumped or confused.
  • your heart goes out to sb The idiom "your heart goes out to someone" means that you feel a deep sense of sympathy, compassion, or empathy towards someone who is going through a difficult situation or experiencing pain or sorrow. It conveys a strong emotional connection and a sincere desire to support and comfort the person in need.
  • here goes! The idiom "here goes!" is used to express determination, anticipation, or courage before embarking on a new or daring action or venture. It signifies a moment of gathering one's resolve and taking a leap of faith.
  • here goes nothing!, at here goes! The idiom "here goes nothing!" or "here goes!" is an expression often used to describe a situation or action where one is about to attempt something risky, challenging, or uncertain. It conveys a sense of determination and willingness to take a leap of faith, even if there is doubt about the outcome or success of the endeavor.
  • as far as it goes The idiom "as far as it goes" means to the extent or limit of something, implying that although a statement or action may be true or valid, it has certain limitations or does not fully encompass the entirety of the subject matter. It suggests that there is more to be considered or additional factors that need to be taken into account beyond what has been previously stated or done.
  • the balloon goes up The idiom "the balloon goes up" refers to the occurrence of an anticipated or significant event, often associated with the beginning of an important or challenging situation. It suggests that something crucial, impactful, or potentially problematic is about to happen or has already commenced.
  • here goes again The idiom "here goes again" typically refers to a situation where someone is about to repeat or engage in something that they have done before, often anticipating a similar outcome or pattern. It may convey a sense of resignation, recognition of a repetitive cycle, or a willingness to try again despite previous failures or setbacks.
  • What says goes The idiom "What says goes" means that the person or thing who has the power or authority to make decisions or give orders has the final say, and their decision must be followed or obeyed without question.
  • (It) (just) goes without saying. The idiom "(It) (just) goes without saying" means that something is so obvious or well-known that it does not need to be explicitly stated or mentioned. It implies that the information or idea is universally understood or accepted without the need for further explanation.
  • What goes around, comes around The idiom "What goes around, comes around" means that the consequences of one's actions, whether good or bad, will eventually return to affect that person. It suggests that one's actions and behavior will eventually have repercussions, often emphasizing the notion of karma or the idea that one reaps what they sow.
  • just goes to show The idiom "just goes to show" is used to emphasize or highlight a particular point, often implying that a certain situation or example is a clear demonstration or evidence of a broader truth or principle. It is typically used when providing an example or evidence to support a general statement or idea.
  • goes to show The idiom "goes to show" is used to emphasize that a specific example or situation proves or demonstrates a general truth or principle. It suggests that the given evidence reinforces a commonly accepted notion or belief.
  • Bang goes! The idiom "bang goes!" is used to convey the sudden or unexpected loss or failure of something. It implies that a particular opportunity, plan, or outcome has been abruptly ruined or thwarted.
  • Pride goes before a fall The idiom "Pride goes before a fall" means being overly confident or arrogant often leads to a person's downfall or failure. It implies that excessive pride or hubris can blind someone to their weaknesses or make them underestimate the challenges they may face, resulting in a negative outcome or setback.
  • your mind goes blank The idiom "your mind goes blank" is used to describe a situation when someone temporarily loses the ability to think clearly or recall information, finding their mind devoid of any thoughts or ideas. It refers to a sudden mental lapse or a moment of being unable to think or remember anything.
  • March comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lamb,
  • What goes up must come down The idiom "What goes up must come down" means that anything that experiences a rise or elevation will eventually have to return to its previous state or level. It suggests that success, happiness, or fortune cannot last indefinitely and is often used to remind someone that a period of ups will inevitably be followed by a period of downs.
  • one's heart goes out to The idiom "one's heart goes out to" is used to express deep sympathy, compassion, or empathy towards someone who is going through a difficult or heartbreaking situation. It means that the person feels a strong emotional connection and cares deeply about the other person's well-being.
  • heart goes out to The idiom "heart goes out to" means that one feels empathy, sympathy, or compassion towards someone else's situation or suffering. It implies a deep emotional connection and a sincere sentiment of understanding and support.
  • That's the way it goes The idiom "That's the way it goes" means accepting a situation or outcome, often in a resigned or philosophical manner, acknowledging that things don't always turn out the way we want or expect them to. It signifies the understanding that life is full of unpredictable events and inevitable disappointments, and that these occurrences are simply a part of the natural course of life.
  • I hope all goes well The idiom "I hope all goes well" expresses a sincere wish or desire for a favorable outcome or successful result in a given situation.
  • Here goes nothing The idiom "Here goes nothing" is a phrase used to express an attempt at doing something with uncertain or little hope of success. It often signifies that the speaker is taking a risk or trying something new with low expectations or confidence in the outcome.
  • so it goes The idiom "so it goes" is a phrase used to express acceptance or resignation to a situation, often in the face of a tragedy or unfortunate event. It conveys the idea that events occur regardless of one's opinion or feelings, and that it is futile to resist or dwell upon them. It reflects a sense of inevitability and the recognition that life is filled with both positive and negative experiences.
  • off goes
  • mind goes blank The idiom "mind goes blank" refers to a state or moment when a person is unable to think clearly or recall information. It describes a situation where one's mind becomes empty or devoid of thoughts, rendering them unable to respond or think coherently.
  • How goes it? The idiom "How goes it?" is an informal and casual way to ask someone about their overall well-being, current situation, or progress in general. It is often used as a greeting or a simple inquiry into someone's state or progress.
  • goes without saying The idiom "goes without saying" means that something is self-evident, universally understood, or does not require verbal expression as it is already widely known or accepted.
  • goes for The idiom "goes for" means to apply or pertain to someone or something in a particular way. It can refer to a general characteristic, behavior, or attitude that consistently applies to someone or something.
  • as far as goes
  • what/whatever somebody says, goes The idiom "what/whatever somebody says, goes" means that whatever decision or opinion someone expresses will be accepted or followed without question or objection. It implies that the person has ultimate authority or control over the situation and their words are final.
  • it goes to show The idiom "it goes to show" is used to introduce or emphasize that something demonstrates or proves a particular point or aspect. It highlights the significance or validity of a statement or situation based on evidence or examples provided.
  • as/so far as somebody/something goes The idiom "as/so far as somebody/something goes" means to the extent or degree that someone or something is concerned or involved in a particular situation. It indicates limits or inclusion, emphasizing a specific aspect or perspective within a larger context.
  • as/so far as it goes The idiom "as/so far as it goes" means to acknowledge or accept something to a certain extent or within a limited scope. It implies that while a particular statement or action may be true or correct within its boundaries, there may be additional factors or considerations that need to be taken into account for a more comprehensive understanding.
  • when the balloon goes up "When the balloon goes up" is an idiom that refers to a significant or crucial event, often signaling the start of a difficult or dangerous situation. It suggests that when this event occurs, things will become intense, challenging, or chaotic. This expression can be used to express readiness or preparedness for a problem or conflict.
  • bang goes something The idiom "bang goes something" is used to express that something has failed or been ruined. It implies a sudden and abrupt end or a significant setback in a certain situation or plan.
  • here/there (one) goes again The idiom "here/there (one) goes again" refers to someone repeating their usual behavior or actions, often in a predictable or familiar pattern. It suggests that the person is engaging in a known habit or repeating a certain pattern, often with negative connotations.
  • anything goes The idiom "anything goes" refers to a situation or context where there are no rules, restrictions, or boundaries regarding what is acceptable or allowed. It implies that there are no limits or constraints, allowing for a wide range of possibilities or behaviors.
  • as far as (something) goes The idiom "as far as (something) goes" means to the extent or extent of progress that has been made or accomplished in a particular matter or topic. It implies discussing or considering only that specific aspect or component and not expanding beyond it.
  • as far as that goes The idiom "as far as that goes" is usually used to acknowledge or discuss a specific aspect or topic within a larger context. It implies that the mentioned aspect is significant in its own right, but its importance or relevance may be limited or inconsequential when compared to other factors.
  • the dogs bark, but the caravan goes on The idiom "the dogs bark, but the caravan goes on" means that no matter how much criticism, opposition, or obstacles one faces, they should continue with their plans or actions unaffected. It emphasizes the importance of perseverance and determination in the face of distractions or naysayers. The reference to barking dogs symbolizes noise or disturbances, while the caravan represents progress or the journey towards a goal.
  • make (something) up as (one) goes (along) The idiom "make (something) up as (one) goes (along)" means to improvise or create something spontaneously and without a preconceived plan or prior preparation. It refers to the act of figuring things out or deciding on a course of action while in the process of doing it. It implies a flexible and adaptable approach to handling a situation or problem.
  • balloon goes up, the The idiom "balloon goes up" typically refers to a situation where an unexpected or serious event occurs, often resulting in heightened tension, excitement, or an important development. It can also signify the initiation of a plan, action, or a critical moment that changes the course of events. The phrase is derived from the image of a balloon being released or inflated, marking the beginning of an event or an adventure.
  • when (or before) the balloon goes up The idiom "when (or before) the balloon goes up" means the moment when a situation becomes critical, chaotic, or an anticipated event occurs. It is often used to describe the onset of an important event or the beginning of a potentially dangerous or intense situation.
  • (one's) mind goes blank The idiom "(one's) mind goes blank" means to experience a sudden and temporary loss of thoughts or the inability to recall information, often resulting in a momentary confusion or temporary mental block. It refers to a situation where someone's mind becomes empty or devoid of thoughts, rendering them unable to think clearly or remember things momentarily.
  • No good deed goes unpunished. The idiom "No good deed goes unpunished" means that despite one's efforts to do something helpful or kind, they may end up facing negative consequences or ingratitude instead of appreciation. It suggests that sometimes, the outcome of a well-intentioned action may not align with the intentions, leading to an undeserved punishment or negative outcome.
  • no good deed ever goes unpunished The idiom "no good deed ever goes unpunished" means that even when someone does something kind, helpful, or well-intentioned, they may still face criticism, ingratitude, or negative consequences. It suggests that one should not expect gratitude or a positive outcome in return for their good actions.
  • a chill runs/goes down (one's) spine The idiom "a chill runs/goes down (one's) spine" refers to a feeling of fear, unease, or discomfort that suddenly overwhelms someone. It is often used to describe a strong, instinctive reaction or a sudden realization that something is deeply unsettling or alarming. The phrase implies a physical sensation akin to a cold shiver traveling along the back or spine.
  • a shiver runs/goes down (one's) spine The idiom "a shiver runs/goes down (one's) spine" refers to a sudden, uncontrollable shudder or shiver that runs down one's back, often as a reaction to fear, nervousness, or eerie sensations. It is an expression used to describe a strong and visceral response to something unsettling or spine-chilling.
  • a shiver runs/goes down somebody's spine The idiom "a shiver runs/goes down somebody's spine" means to experience a sudden feeling of fear, nervousness, or excitement, often accompanied by a physical sensation where one's back or spine feels a chill or tingling sensation. It typically occurs in response to something eerie, unsettling, or deeply emotional.
  • before the balloon goes up The idiom "before the balloon goes up" typically means before a stressful or dangerous situation begins, often referring to a moment of crisis, conflict, or chaos. It signifies the need to take action or make preparations in advance, as things are about to become challenging or unpredictable.
  • heart goes out to (someone) The idiom "heart goes out to (someone)" is used to express deep empathy, sympathy, or compassion towards someone who is going through a difficult situation or experiencing hardship. It signifies a strong emotional connection and a genuine concern for the well-being and feelings of the other person.
  • heart goes out to, one's The idiom "heart goes out to, one's" refers to feeling deep sympathy, compassion, or empathy for someone who is experiencing difficulty, pain, or sadness. It expresses a genuine emotional connection and the desire to support or comfort the person in distress.
  • so the story goes The idiom "so the story goes" is used to refer to a commonly accepted or widely circulated version of a story or event, often implying that it may not be entirely accurate or reliable. It suggests that the information being conveyed is based on hearsay, speculation, or popular belief rather than indisputable facts.
  • steady as she goes The idiom "steady as she goes" means to maintain a stable and consistent course of action or progress, often in a steady and cautious manner. It often implies a need to stay focused, avoid unnecessary risks, and continue with a steady pace in order to achieve a desired outcome.
  • the story goes (that) The idiom "the story goes (that)" refers to a common narrative or belief about an event or situation. It is often used when recounting hearsay, folklore, or popular accounts of a particular story or historical event. The phrase implies that what follows is based on what has been commonly recounted or passed down over time, without necessarily verifying its accuracy or authenticity.
  • what (one) says goes The idiom "what (one) says goes" means that the person in authority or power has the final say or decision, and others are expected to comply or conform to their instructions or wishes without question. It implies that the person's orders or statements are absolute and non-negotiable.
  • whatever (one) says goes The idiom "whatever (one) says goes" means that a person has complete authority or control over a situation, and their decisions or opinions are final and must be followed without question or opposition.
  • who goes there? The phrase "who goes there?" is an old-fashioned idiom or a challenge used to inquire about the identity or intentions of someone approaching or entering a particular place. It typically suggests suspicion or caution towards an unknown or unfamiliar person. The expression is commonly associated with guards, sentries, or individuals responsible for maintaining security.
  • your heart goes out to somebody The idiom "your heart goes out to somebody" means to have deep sympathy, compassion, or empathy for someone who is experiencing hardship, sadness, or difficulty. It implies a strong emotional connection and a desire to support or comfort the person in their time of need.
  • How goes it (with you)? The idiom "How goes it (with you)?" is a casual way of asking someone about their well-being or current situation. It can be used to inquire about someone's overall state or to ask about specific aspects of their life.

Similar spelling words for GOES

Conjugate verb Goes

CONDITIONAL

I would go
we would go
you would go
he/she/it would go
they would go

FUTURE

I will go
we will go
you will go
he/she/it will go
they will go

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have gone
we will have gone
you will have gone
he/she/it will have gone
they will have gone

PAST

I went
we went
you went
he/she/it went
they went

PAST PERFECT

I had gone
we had gone
you had gone
he/she/it had gone
they had gone

PRESENT

I go
we go
you go
he/she/it goes
they go

PRESENT PERFECT

I have gone
we have gone
you have gone
he/she/it has gone
they have gone
I am going
we are going
you are going
he/she/it is going
they are going
I was going
we were going
you were going
he/she/it was going
they were going
I will be going
we will be going
you will be going
he/she/it will be going
they will be going
I have been going
we have been going
you have been going
he/she/it has been going
they have been going
I had been going
we had been going
you had been going
he/she/it had been going
they had been going
I will have been going
we will have been going
you will have been going
he/she/it will have been going
they will have been going
I would have gone
we would have gone
you would have gone
he/she/it would have gone
they would have gone
I would be going
we would be going
you would be going
he/she/it would be going
they would be going
I would have been going
we would have been going
you would have been going
he/she/it would have been going
they would have been going

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