How Do You Spell HAD?

Pronunciation: [hˈad] (IPA)

Correct spelling for the English word "Had" is [hˈad], [hˈad], [h_ˈa_d] (IPA phonetic alphabet).

HAD Meaning and Definition

Had is the past tense and past participle of the verb "to have." It is used in the context of possession, indicating that someone possessed or owned something in the past. As a transitive verb, "had" expresses ownership or control over an object or an experience. For example, if you say, "I had a car," it means that you owned a car at some point in the past. Similarly, if someone says, "They had a great time at the party," it signifies that they experienced an enjoyable time during a specific past event.

Additionally, "had" is used to form the past perfect tense in English grammar. When employed in this way, it indicates an action that occurred earlier than another past action. For instance, if you say, "I had already finished eating when he arrived," it means that you completed your meal before his arrival.

Furthermore, "had" can also function as an auxiliary verb in forming various verb tenses, including the past perfect progressive tense. In this case, it highlights a continuous action that was ongoing in the past, leading up to another event. For instance, "They had been playing soccer for two hours when it started raining."

Overall, "had" is a versatile word that conveys ownership, past actions, and continuity, both independently and in combination with other verbs in different tenses.

Top Common Misspellings for HAD *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for HAD

Etymology of HAD

The word "had" can be traced back to the Old English word "hæfde", which was derived from the Proto-Germanic word "habaiđa". This Proto-Germanic term came from the Proto-Indo-European root word "kap-" or "kamb-", meaning "to take, seize, or hold". Over time, "hæfde" evolved into the Middle English word "hadde", and eventually became the modern English word "had".

Idioms with the word HAD

  • had best/better The idiom "had best/better" is used to suggest or advise that it would be wise or preferable to do something in a specific way. It implies that taking a certain action or following a particular course of action is the most suitable or beneficial option in a given situation.
  • had better/best do sth The idiom "had better/best do sth" is used to convey a strong recommendation or advice regarding a particular action. It implies that it would be wise or necessary to do something in order to avoid negative consequences or achieve a desired outcome. It often suggests a sense of urgency or a warning.
  • had it coming (to you) The idiom "had it coming (to you)" means that someone deserved the negative consequences or punishment they received due to their own actions or behavior. It implies that the person had been behaving in a way that invited or provoked the negative outcome.
  • have had it (up to here) with To have had it (up to here) with something means to have reached the point of extreme frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a particular situation, person, or thing. It implies that one's patience or tolerance has been completely exhausted.
  • wish you had never been born The idiom "wish you had never been born" is a strongly worded expression conveying extreme resentment, anger, or frustration towards someone, reflecting a deep desire that the person had never come into existence or had never been born.
  • a good time was had by all The idiom "a good time was had by all" is used to express that everyone present at an event or gathering thoroughly enjoyed themselves and had a pleasurable experience.
  • have had your chips The idiom "have had your chips" means to have reached the end or be out of options, generally referring to a situation where you have exhausted all possibilities and there is no chance of success or recovery. It can also imply that a person has experienced a failure or loss and there is no chance of making a comeback.
  • have had its/your day The idiom "have had its/your day" means that something or someone was once successful, influential, or important in the past but is no longer relevant or effective in the present. It suggests that its time of prominence or usefulness has passed and it is no longer able to have the same impact or significance.
  • have done etc. more than has had hot dinners The idiom "have done etc. more than has had hot dinners" is typically used to describe someone who has experienced a great number of things or has a great deal of expertise in a particular area. It suggests that the person has had a very eventful or productive life, compared to the number of meals they have eaten.
  • went/had gone out with the ark The idiom "went/had gone out with the ark" or sometimes referred to as "dated back to the ark" means something is very old or outdated. It is derived from the story of Noah's Ark in the Bible, symbolizing an event that happened a long time ago.
  • have done/seen/had etc. more sth than sb has had hot dinners The idiom "have done/seen/had etc. more something than somebody has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize that someone has a great deal of experience or knowledge in a particular area. It suggests that the person has done, seen, had, or witnessed something so frequently or extensively that it surpasses the number of meals the other person has eaten. It indicates a high level of familiarity or expertise in a particular subject or activity.
  • don't believe I've had the pleasure The idiom "don't believe I've had the pleasure" is typically used as a polite way to say that one does not remember or recognize a person or situation. It implies that the speaker has not had the opportunity to meet or experience whatever is being referred to.
  • have had more than your fair share of sth The idiom "have had more than your fair share of something" means that someone has gotten or experienced a larger amount of something, usually something negative, than what is considered fair or reasonable. It suggests that the person has had an excessive or disproportionate amount compared to others.
  • been had The idiom "been had" refers to a situation where someone has been deceived, tricked, or taken advantage of. It implies that a person has been fooled or duped into believing something false or has fallen victim to a scam or dishonesty.
  • had better The idiom "had better" is used to give advice or warnings about a course of action that is strongly recommended. It implies a sense of urgency or consequences if the advice is not followed.
  • had (just) as soon do sth The idiom "had (just) as soon do sth" means that someone would prefer to do something else rather than the suggested action. It expresses a strong preference or inclination towards an alternative option.
  • had rather do sth The idiom "had rather do something" is used to express a strong preference for doing something or a preference for one thing over another. It indicates that someone would prefer or choose to do a particular action or attend a particular event.
  • If frogs had wheels, they wouldn't bump their butts,
  • have had more than fair share of The idiom "have had more than fair share of" means that someone has experienced an excessive or unfair amount of something. It implies that a person has had more than what is considered reasonable or equitable.
  • have had its chips The idiom "have had its chips" typically means that something or someone has come to the end of its useful life or has suffered irreversible damage or deterioration. It suggests that the person or thing in question is no longer viable, effective, or valuable.
  • I've had a lovely time The idiom "I've had a lovely time" is typically used to express that someone has thoroughly enjoyed an event or experience. It implies that the person had a wonderful, delightful, or enjoyable time. It is a polite and positive way to express satisfaction and gratitude to the host or others involved.
  • I had a lovely time The idiom "I had a lovely time" means that someone thoroughly enjoyed a particular experience or event. It indicates that the person had a pleasant and enjoyable experience or that they found happiness and fulfillment during that time.
  • had a nice time The idiom "had a nice time" refers to having an enjoyable and pleasant experience or engagement with someone or during an event. It implies that the individual had a good, satisfying, or positive experience.
  • had it coming The idiom "had it coming" means that someone deserves the negative consequences or punishment they are experiencing because of their own actions or behavior. It suggests that the individual's actions have led to the current situation and that they should not be surprised or shocked by the outcome.
  • have had its/ day The idiom "have had its day" means that something or someone has reached the peak of their success, popularity, or usefulness and is now in decline or no longer relevant. It suggests that the time of being important or significant has passed.
  • I've had it up to here The idiom "I've had it up to here" is used to convey a strong sense of frustration, annoyance, or exasperation with a person, situation, or a particular behavior. It implies that one's patience or tolerance has reached its limit or its breaking point. The phrase "up to here" typically refers to a point near or at the top of one's head, indicating that one's frustration has become overwhelming.
  • have had your fill of sth To have had your fill of something means to have experienced or consumed enough of it, and no longer have any interest or desire to continue. It implies being completely satisfied or satiated with a particular thing or situation.
  • have had your fill The idiom "have had your fill" means to have had enough of something, typically referring to satisfying one's appetite or desire for a particular thing or experience. It implies that one is content or no longer in need.
  • I've had enough of this! The idiom "I've had enough of this!" means that the person speaking is at the point of experiencing frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a situation or person, and can no longer tolerate or handle it anymore. It often implies a desire to put an end to the situation or to distance oneself from it.
  • have had enough The idiom "have had enough" means to no longer tolerate or endure a situation, experience, or behavior. It implies reaching a threshold where one cannot handle or accept something any longer.
  • (I) don't believe I've had the pleasure. The idiom "(I) don't believe I've had the pleasure" is typically used as a polite response to indicate that you have not had the opportunity to meet or be introduced to someone before, even though they may be familiar with you or your reputation. It expresses a sense of courteousness and acknowledgment of the other person's presence.
  • You cannot lose what you never had The idiom "You cannot lose what you never had" means that you cannot be upset about or mourn the loss of something or someone that you never actually possessed or experienced. It conveys the idea that it is pointless and illogical to be distressed about not having something that was never yours to begin with.
  • never had it so good The idiom "never had it so good" means that someone is experiencing a level of success or prosperity that is greater than they have ever experienced before. It implies a sense of contentment and satisfaction with one's current situation, usually referring to an overall improvement in living conditions or circumstances.
  • have had a good innings The idiom "have had a good innings" is used to express that someone has had a successful or fulfilling life or career. It derives from the sport of cricket, where "innings" refers to a player's turn to bat and score runs. Therefore, when someone has had a good innings, it means they have achieved a lot or been successful in their endeavors.
  • have had it with The idiom "have had it with" means to no longer have any patience, tolerance, or willingness to deal with someone or something. It is often used to express frustration, annoyance, or exhaustion.
  • have had it The idiom "have had it" refers to being at the point of exhaustion, frustration, or being completely fed up with a situation or someone's behavior. It indicates that one cannot tolerate or continue with a particular circumstance any longer.
  • have had fill of The idiom "have had fill of" means to have had enough of someone or something, often because they have become tiresome or overwhelming. This phrase implies that one's patience or tolerance has been exhausted and further exposure or involvement is no longer desired or possible.
  • have had fill The idiom "have had fill" means to have had enough of something, to be completely satisfied or tired of a particular situation, person, or thing. It implies reaching a point where there is no desire or need for further involvement or consumption.
  • have had chips
  • have had a bellyful of The idiom "have had a bellyful of" essentially means to have endured or experienced enough of something unpleasant or undesirable, reaching a point of complete satisfaction or impatience.
  • had rather do The idiom "had rather do" is used to express a strong preference or inclination towards a particular action or choice. It is often used when someone would prefer or choose to do one thing instead of another.
  • had as soon do The idiom "had as soon do" means to prefer doing something else instead of a particular action or task. It implies a strong dislike or lack of desire towards the mentioned action.
  • (I) had a nice time. The idiom "(I) had a nice time" means that someone enjoyed an experience or event. It is commonly used to express satisfaction and contentment with a particular activity, outing, or social gathering.
  • have (just about) had it The idiom "have (just about) had it" means to be at the point of exhaustion, frustration, or being unable to tolerate something any longer. It implies that someone is reaching their limit or breaking point in a particular situation.
  • have had it (up to here) The idiom "have had it (up to here)" means to reach a point of complete frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a situation or someone's actions. It implies that one can no longer tolerate or endure the circumstances any further.
  • to be had The idiom "to be had" means to be tricked, deceived, or taken advantage of. It refers to being fooled or swindled by someone, usually resulting in a loss of money, trust, or other resources.
  • had best The idiom "had best" is typically used to suggest that it is advisable or most suitable for someone to do something. It is often used when giving advice or warning, indicating the recommended course of action in a particular situation.
  • had sooner The idiom "had sooner" is used to express a strong preference or desire for one thing to happen or be done before another. It indicates an urgency or preference for one option over another.
  • have never had it so good The idiom "have never had it so good" means that someone is currently experiencing an exceptionally favorable or prosperous situation compared to their previous circumstances. It suggests that their current state is the most favorable and comfortable they have ever experienced.
  • have had enough (of something/somebody) The idiom "have had enough (of something/somebody)" means to be tired, fed up, or no longer willing to tolerate or continue something or someone. It implies reaching a point of dissatisfaction or exhaustion with a particular situation, person, or behavior, and a strong desire for it to stop or change.
  • have had a few The idiom "have had a few" is used to describe someone who has consumed or is under the influence of alcoholic drinks, usually suggesting that they have had more than a moderate amount. It implies that the person may be slightly intoxicated or tipsy.
  • have had a bellyful of somebody/something The idiom "have had a bellyful of somebody/something" refers to reaching the point of being fed up or having experienced enough of someone or something. It implies that the person is no longer willing to tolerate or endure their presence, actions, or behavior.
  • had better/best (do something) The idiom "had better/best (do something)" is used to imply that it is strongly recommended or advised to take a certain action or course of action. It suggests that there are potential negative consequences or risks if the action is not taken.
  • have had your day The idiom "have had your day" typically refers to an individual or something that was once successful, influential, or relevant but is no longer in the same status or position. It means that they have reached their peak or had their time of success, which may have passed and they are no longer as significant or relevant as before.
  • be had up (for something) The idiom "be had up (for something)" typically means to be summoned or called to appear in court or before an authority to face charges or be questioned about a particular offense or wrongdoing. It implies being held accountable or responsible for one's actions or behavior.
  • be had The idiom "be had" typically means to be deceived, tricked, or fooled by someone or something. It implies that a person has been taken advantage of or made a fool of in a particular situation.
  • You had better believe it! The idiom "You had better believe it!" is a statement that emphatically emphasizes the truth or validity of something. It conveys a strong conviction and confidence in the statement being made, implying that there is no doubt or skepticism whatsoever.
  • have had a bellyful The idiom "have had a bellyful" means to feel that one has had enough of something, whether it is a particular experience, situation, or person. It implies a state of being completely fed up or saturated with a particular thing or situation.
  • had better (do something) The idiom "had better (do something)" is typically used to express a strong recommendation or warning about a specific action or behavior that should be taken in order to avoid negative consequences. It implies that not taking such action may result in undesirable outcomes or harm. It is a way of indicating that doing a particular thing is necessary or advisable.
  • have had the biscuit The idiom "have had the biscuit" typically means that someone or something is past their prime or is no longer effective or useful. It can also suggest that someone has reached the point of no return or has lost their chance or opportunity.
  • have had (one's) chips The idiom "have had (one's) chips" means to have reached a point of total defeat or failure, usually in the context of a competition or endeavor. It implies that there is no chance of recovery or redemption. The phrase originates from the game of poker, where "chips" represent a player's money or bets.
  • if pigs had wings, they would/could fly The idiom "if pigs had wings, they would/could fly" is used to express skepticism or to indicate that something is highly improbable or unrealistic. It emphasizes the unlikelihood of a particular situation or outcome, as pigs do not have the physical ability to fly. It is often used in a playful or humorous manner to convey the idea that certain circumstances are simply impossible or highly unlikely to occur.
  • had its day, has The idiom "had its day, has" means that something or someone was once popular, successful, or influential in the past but is no longer relevant, important, or effective in the present. It suggests that the person or thing has lost its value or importance over time.
  • have had its/(one's) day The idiom "have had its/(one's) day" refers to something or someone that was once popular, successful, or influential, but is no longer relevant or effective in the present time. It suggests that the peak period of its existence has already passed.
  • have had your/its day The idiom "have had your/its day" means that something or someone was once prominent, successful, or influential, but has now lost its significance or power. It suggests that the time of relevance or success has passed and will not return.
  • have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners The idiom "have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize that someone has a great amount of experience, skill, or knowledge in a particular field or activity. It implies that the person has done something extensively, surpassing the number of meals they have consumed. It emphasizes a high level of expertise or familiarity in a particular area.
  • more something than someone has had hot dinners The idiom "more something than someone has had hot dinners" is typically used to emphasize that someone has an exceptionally large or extensive amount of something. It suggests that the quantity or frequency of the said "something" is beyond the ordinary or to a remarkable degree.
  • more — than someone has had hot dinners The idiom "more — than someone has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize someone's extensive experience in a particular area or the vast quantity of something they possess. It implies that the person has had an abundance of a particular thing or has been involved in a particular activity for a significant length of time.
  • have had more than (one's) fair share of (something) The idiom "have had more than (one's) fair share of (something)" means to have experienced an excessive or disproportionately large amount of something, typically implying that it has been burdensome or overwhelming. It suggests that the person has received or endured more than what is considered reasonable or equitable.
  • had one's fill The idiom "had one's fill" means to have had enough of something, typically referring to having consumed a sufficient amount of food or drink, but can also be used metaphorically to imply being content, satisfied, or weary of an experience or situation.
  • have had your fill of The idiom "have had your fill of" means to have reached a point of satisfaction or contentment after experiencing or consuming something to the point of being satisfied or fed up with it. It implies that someone has had enough of a particular thing or situation and no longer desires further involvement or engagement with it.
  • have had your fill of somebody/something To have had your fill of somebody/something means to have experienced or consumed enough of someone or something, to the point of being satisfied or no longer interested. It often implies a sense of being tired, bored, or annoyed with someone or something and wanting to move on or have a break from it.
  • have had your fill of something The idiom "have had your fill of something" means to have had enough or to be completely satisfied or content with something, usually implying that any more of it would be excessive or undesirable.
  • never had it so good, one The idiom "never had it so good" means that someone is currently in a situation that is better or more favorable than any previous experience they have had. It signifies a state of comfort, prosperity, or success that surpasses any previous time in one's life.
  • had
  • had best (do something) The idiom "had best (do something)" means that it is advisable or most prudent for a person to do a particular action. It emphasizes that it is in the person's best interest or advantageous to follow the suggested course of action.
  • has had its chips The idiom "has had its chips" typically means that something or someone is past its prime or beyond the point of no return. It suggests that the person, thing, or situation has reached a state of irreparable damage or decline.
  • have had a basinful The idiom "have had a basinful" typically means that someone has reached their limit or tolerance of something, often referring to an unpleasant or overwhelming experience. It expresses the feeling of being fed up or having endured enough of a certain situation. The phrase implies that someone has had more than enough and cannot take any more.
  • have had a basinful (of something) The idiom "have had a basinful (of something)" means to have reached the limit of one's tolerance, patience, or endurance with a particular situation, person, or thing. It expresses a feeling of being completely fed up or overwhelmed.
  • have had it with (someone or something) The idiom "have had it with (someone or something)" means to reach a point of extreme frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with someone or something. It suggests that one can no longer tolerate or endure the situation and desires a change or resolution.
  • have had one too many The idiom "have had one too many" typically refers to being intoxicated or drunk, implying that someone has consumed more alcohol than they can handle or that it has negatively affected their behavior or judgement.
  • have had the pleasure The idiom "have had the pleasure" is generally used to indicate that someone has had the opportunity to experience something enjoyable or positive. It implies that the person expressing it had a positive or enjoyable encounter or experience with someone or something.
  • have had the radish There doesn't seem to be a widely recognized idiom or expression "have had the radish." It is possible that it is a less common or regional idiom, or it might be a variation or misinterpretation of a different idiom. It is always important to consider the context in which the phrase was used to understand its intended meaning.
  • have had the Richard
  • I wished I had bitten my tongue off The idiom "I wished I had bitten my tongue off" is an exaggeration used when someone deeply regrets or feels remorseful about something they have said. It suggests that they believe it would have been better to have remained silent instead of speaking and causing harm or trouble.
  • if pigs had wings The idiom "if pigs had wings" is used to describe a hypothetical situation that is highly unlikely or impossible. It implies that the event or scenario being discussed is so improbable or far-fetched that it would require pigs to develop the ability to fly in order to become a reality.
  • what you've never had you never miss The idiom "what you've never had you never miss" means that if a person has never experienced or possessed something, they are unlikely to feel its absence or understand its value. In other words, you cannot miss or long for something that you have never had or known.
  • you had me worried The idiom "you had me worried" is an expression used to convey that someone caused distress or concern to another person due to their actions, behavior, or statements. It implies that the person who said or did something caused anxiety, fear, or uncertainty in the speaker's mind.
  • You had to be there The phrase "You had to be there" is an idiom used to convey that the experience or situation being described was difficult to fully understand or appreciate without having personally witnessed or participated in it. It implies that the explanation or story being shared does not fully capture the essence or impact of the event, and thus, can only be truly understood by those who were present.

Similar spelling words for HAD

Conjugate verb Had

CONDITIONAL

I would had
you would had
he/she/it would had
we would had
they would had
I would have
we would have
you would have
he/she/it would have
they would have

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be having
you would be having
he/she/it would be having
we would be having
they would be having

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have had
you would have had
he/she/it would have had
we would have had
they would have had

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been having
you would have been having
he/she/it would have been having
we would have been having
they would have been having

FUTURE

I will have
you will have
he/she/it will have
we will have
they will have

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be having
you will be having
he/she/it will be having
we will be having
they will be having

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have had
you will have had
he/she/it will have had
we will have had
they will have had

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been having
you will have been having
he/she/it will have been having
we will have been having
they will have been having

IMPERATIVE

you have
we let´s have

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to have

PAST

I had
you had
he/she/it had
we had
they had

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was having
you were having
he/she/it was having
we were having
they were having

PAST PARTICIPLE

had

PAST PERFECT

I had had
you had had
he/she/it had had
we had had
they had had

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been having
you had been having
he/she/it had been having
we had been having
they had been having

PRESENT

I have
you have
he/she/it has
we have
they have

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am having
you are having
he/she/it is having
we are having
they are having

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

having

PRESENT PERFECT

I have had
you have had
he/she/it has had
we have had
they have had

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been having
you have been having
he/she/it has been having
we have been having
they have been having

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