How Do You Spell HANG?

Pronunciation: [hˈaŋ] (IPA)

The word "hang" has a tricky spelling that can be challenging for learners of the English language. Its phonetic transcription is /hæŋ/, which shows that the initial sound is a voiceless glottal fricative followed by the vowel sound /æ/ and ending with the nasal consonant /ŋ/. One reason for confusion in its spelling is that its past tense and past participle forms are "hung," which deviates from the expected pattern of adding "ed" to form the past tense. Nevertheless, with practice and exposure, learners can master the spelling of this versatile verb.

HANG Meaning and Definition

Hang (verb):

1. To suspend or fasten something from above, allowing it to dangle freely. It involves attaching an object by means of a hook, nail, or string to a higher point, enabling it to be supported in mid-air. For instance, you can hang a picture frame on the wall or hang clothes on a clothesline.

2. To cause the death of by suspending with a rope or other means around the neck. This definition pertains to the act of execution by hanging, often used as a method of capital punishment.

3. To be attached or supported in a certain position, typically by being suspended. This could refer to objects, such as curtains hanging by a rod, or people hanging from monkey bars.

4. To linger or remain in a specific place or position, often in a relaxed or casual manner. For example, you can hang out with friends at a café or hang around a park waiting for someone.

5. To hesitate or delay in doing something. It implies indecisiveness or reluctance in taking action.

6. To be dependent upon or influenced by something. This usage usually refers to emotions, opinions, or attitudes that are affected by external factors or circumstances.

Hang (noun):

1. A state of suspension or extension from a higher point, allowing an object to dangle freely. It could refer to the way something is attached or balanced.

2. The manner in which something is attached, supported, or fixed in a specific position, often with hooks or strings.

Top Common Misspellings for HANG *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for HANG

Etymology of HANG

The word "hang" ultimately derives from the Old English word "hōn", which meant "to suspend or fix in a high position". This Old English word is believed to have come from the Proto-Germanic word "*hangōną", which had a similar meaning of "to hang, be suspended". This Proto-Germanic word can be traced back to the Proto-Indo-European root "*keng-" or "*kank-" which has the notion of "to bend or hang". The word "hang" has retained its basic sense throughout its history, referring to the act of suspending or attaching something from above.

Idioms with the word HANG

  • hang/stay loose The idiom "hang/stay loose" means to remain relaxed, calm, and flexible in a given situation, without getting stressed, tense, or anxious. It implies being open to changes and spontaneous actions rather than being rigid or overly structured.
  • hang in there, at hang on in there The idiom "hang in there" or "hang on in there" is an expression used to encourage someone to continue persevering or enduring through difficult or challenging circumstances without giving up. It emphasizes the importance of staying strong, patient, and maintaining resilience in the face of adversity.
  • hang on in there The idiom "hang on in there" means to persevere or continue to strive in difficult or challenging circumstances. It is often used as an encouragement or motivational phrase to urge someone to keep going despite obstacles or hardships.
  • hang by a thread The idiom "hang by a thread" means to be in a precarious or unstable situation, where something is at risk of falling apart or coming to an end very soon. It implies a state of extreme vulnerability or fragility.
  • hang tough The idiom "hang tough" means to remain strong, determined, and resilient in the face of adversity or difficult situations. It implies not giving up or wavering under pressure and staying persistent until one achieves their goals or reaches a desired outcome.
  • blow/hang the expense The idiom "blow/hang the expense" means to spend money lavishly and without concern for cost or budget. It suggests that the person or group is willing to incur any amount of expense to achieve their desired outcome or indulge in luxury.
  • go hang (yourself) The idiom "go hang (yourself)" is an insulting or dismissive phrase used to express contempt, anger, or disregard for someone else. It implies that the speaker wishes the person to go away or to suffer misfortune, though it typically does not carry a literal meaning of self-harm. It is a harsh and offensive way of telling someone to leave or to deal with their own problems.
  • hang the cost/expense The idiom "hang the cost/expense" means to be unconcerned or disregard the financial consequences of something. It suggests not worrying about the price or expense and being willing to pay whatever it takes.
  • hang/hold on like grim death The idiom "hang/hold on like grim death" means to hold onto something tightly and desperately, often in a situation where one's life or survival is at stake. It implies a strong determination to not let go or give up, even in the face of extreme difficulty or danger.
  • let it all hang out The idiom "let it all hang out" means to completely express oneself freely and openly without holding back any emotions, thoughts, or behaviors. It suggests being authentic and uninhibited, revealing one's true self without any reservations or restrictions.
  • hang/hold fire The idiom "hang/hold fire" means to temporarily refrain from taking action or making a decision. It originates from the practice of soldiers suspending their firing of weapons, usually guns or cannons, in order to wait for further orders or instructions. In a broader context, it refers to pausing or delaying a process or course of action until more information or clarification is available.
  • hang a right The idiom "hang a right" means to turn right, typically while driving or following directions. It implies making a sharp or noticeable right turn.
  • hang a left The idiom "hang a left" means to turn left while navigating or driving, typically used informally or colloquially. It involves making a left-hand turn at an intersection or a road.
  • give sb enough rope (to hang themselves) The idiom "give someone enough rope (to hang themselves)" refers to allowing a person to have the freedom or opportunity to act or speak in a way that will eventually lead to their own downfall or expose their true intentions or character. It means to grant someone the necessary space or autonomy, often with the belief that their actions will ultimately lead to negative consequences for themselves.
  • Give sm enough rope and he'll hang himself The idiom "Give someone enough rope and he'll hang himself" means that by allowing someone to have absolute freedom or by providing them with the opportunity to make mistakes or reveal their true nature, they will ultimately bring about their own downfall or ruin.
  • hang up The idiom "hang up" can have two different meanings: 1. To end a phone call: This meaning refers to the action of physically placing the telephone receiver back on its hook to end a conversation. 2. To have an obsession or preoccupation: This meaning refers to being emotionally or mentally stuck on a particular idea, thought, or issue, often causing distress or hindering progress.
  • hang sth up The idiom "hang sth up" means to stop or retire from a particular activity or job. It is often used when someone decides to end their career or cease involvement in a specific occupation or pursuit.
  • so cold you could hang meat The idiom "so cold you could hang meat" is often used to describe extremely low temperatures. It suggests that the weather or environment is extremely cold to the point that it is literally possible to hang, or freeze, pieces of meat without them spoiling or thawing. The idiom serves as a hyperbolic expression to emphasize just how frigid the conditions are.
  • hang around The idiom "hang around" means to spend time in a particular place or with a certain group of people without any specific purpose or goal. It typically implies casual or aimless socializing or loitering.
  • hang sb out to dry The idiom "hang sb out to dry" refers to deliberately abandoning or leaving someone in a difficult or vulnerable position, often without providing support or assistance. It implies that the person is being left to face the consequences or deal with a problem alone, without any help or protection.
  • hang sm out to dry To "hang someone out to dry" means to abandon or betray someone, leaving them to face the consequences of their actions without any support or assistance. It implies leaving someone in a difficult or vulnerable situation without offering any help or protection.
  • hang out your shingle The idiom "hang out your shingle" refers to starting one's own business or practice. It originated from the practice of attorneys and doctors hanging a shingle or sign on their office door to indicate that they are open for clients or patients. Therefore, the idiom suggests someone setting up their own professional practice or business and making it known to the public.
  • hang in the balance The idiom "hang in the balance" means to be in a state of uncertainty or in a condition where the outcome is undetermined. It implies that a decision or a situation is at a critical stage and could go either way.
  • be/hang in the balance The idiom "be/hang in the balance" means that a situation is uncertain or undecided, with both possible outcomes having an equal chance of happening. It implies that the final result or decision will heavily impact the course or outcome of a situation.
  • hang behind The idiom "hang behind" typically means to linger or stay behind while others have already left or moved forward. It implies a reluctance or hesitation to join or follow the majority.
  • smw to hang (up) one's hat The idiom "to hang (up) one's hat" means to retire or settle down in a particular place. It implies finding a permanent or long-term home, often after a period of travel or temporary residence. It signifies the act of establishing oneself in a specific location and giving up a nomadic or transient lifestyle.
  • hang up your boots The idiom "hang up your boots" typically means to retire or quit a job or activity, especially one that involves physical exertion or athleticism. It specifically alludes to the act of taking off and hanging up one's boots, which in various sports or occupations symbolizes the end of an individual's active participation or career.
  • hang loose The idiom "hang loose" is an expression meaning to relax, chill out, or take it easy. It originated in Hawaiian culture, where it is often represented by the hand gesture of making a fist and extending the thumb and pinky fingers while keeping the other fingers folded. It conveys a laid-back and carefree attitude.
  • hang a few on The idiom "hang a few on" refers to having multiple alcoholic drinks in a short period of time or getting drunk.
  • hang five The idiom "hang five" is a surfing slang phrase that refers to placing one's toes on the front edge of a surfboard while maintaining balance. It stems from the surfer's hand gesture of using their thumb and little finger to mimic a "hang loose" sign, indicating relaxation and a carefree attitude while riding a wave.
  • hang by a hair The idiom "hang by a hair" means to be in a very precarious or dangerous situation, where a slight mistake or misfortune could result in a significant and negative consequence. It implies being in a state of extreme vulnerability or being on the brink of failure.
  • hang together The idiom "hang together" means to remain united and support each other in difficult or challenging situations. It often implies staying cohesive as a group or team, even when facing adversity or disagreements.
  • cling on/hang on by your fingertips The idiom "cling on/hang on by your fingertips" means to remain in a precarious or desperate situation, barely holding on or barely achieving success. It implies that one's grip or control over a situation is extremely tenuous and could easily slip away.
  • cling on/hang on by your fingernails The idiom "cling on/hang on by your fingernails" refers to a situation where someone is barely holding on or just managing to survive in a challenging or difficult situation. It implies that the person is desperately trying to maintain their position or avoid failure despite the odds being against them.
  • and hang the cost/expense The idiom "and hang the cost/expense" is typically used to express a careless or defiant attitude towards the financial consequences of an action. It conveys a willingness to overlook or disregard the costs involved in order to pursue something or fulfill a desire. The phrase implies a lack of concern for money or a willingness to take risks despite the potential financial burden.
  • hang head The idiom "hang head" means to express shame, guilt, or defeat by lowering one's head in a downward position.
  • hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life The idiom "hang/hold on (to sth/sb) for dear life" means to cling tightly or hold tightly to something or someone in a perilous or life-threatening situation. It implies extreme desperation and the strong desire to survive or protect someone/something.
  • hang on for dear life The idiom "hang on for dear life" means to hold on tightly and desperately, typically to a physical object or a situation, in order to prevent oneself from falling, losing control, or being separated from it. It conveys the idea of extreme and determined efforts to maintain balance, safety, or stability.
  • hang on like grim death The idiom "hang on like grim death" means to hold tightly and persistently to someone or something, as if one's life depended on it. It suggests a strong and desperate grip, often used to describe a situation where one refuses to let go, regardless of the circumstances. It conveys a sense of determination, tenacity, and the refusal to give up.
  • hang on every word The idiom "hang on every word" means to pay close attention and listen attentively to someone, often with great interest or fascination. It suggests being wholly engrossed in what someone is saying, eagerly waiting for every single word they utter.
  • Hang on to your hat! The idiom "Hang on to your hat!" means to hold on tight or be prepared for something exciting, unexpected, or fast-paced. It is often used as a warning or a way to encourage someone to be prepared for a situation that may be intense or thrilling.
  • hang on The idiom "hang on" typically means to hold on or wait for a moment, to persevere or stay determined despite difficulties, or to remain connected or interested in something.
  • hang fire The idiom "hang fire" means to delay or hesitate in taking action or making a decision, often due to uncertainty, caution, or a lack of readiness. It can also refer to a situation where a firearm fails to ignite or discharge immediately after the trigger is pulled, causing a delay.
  • hang sm in effigy The idiom "hang someone in effigy" means to publicly display or represent someone, typically in the form of a dummy or symbolically, as a means of expressing strong disapproval, hatred, or protest towards them. It doesn't involve physically harming or executing the person, but rather serves as a symbolic act of condemnation.
  • Give enough rope and he'll hang himself The idiom "Give enough rope and he'll hang himself" means that if someone is given sufficient freedom or latitude to act or make decisions, they will eventually reveal their true character or intentions, often leading to their own downfall or failure.
  • smw to hang hat The idiom "somewhere to hang (one's) hat" typically means to have a place where one can settle down, feel comfortable, or reside. It refers to finding a location for oneself where they can feel at home or have a sense of belonging.
  • hang up your hat The idiom "hang up your hat" means to retire or quit a job or occupation, usually suggesting that someone is permanently leaving that profession or role. It metaphorically refers to the act of removing one's hat and hanging it on a hook, symbolizing the act of giving up or relinquishing a position or responsibility.
  • hang hat on The idiom "hang hat on" means to base one's beliefs, opinions, or actions on a particular thing, often referring to relying or trusting solely on a specific source of authority, information, or evidence. It implies using something as a foundation or primary support for one's decisions or judgments.
  • hang hat The idiom "hang hat" typically refers to the action of settling down or staying in a place for a prolonged period. It is often used to signify finding a home or a permanent residence.
  • hang down (from sm or sth) The idiom "hang down (from sm or sth)" refers to something, usually an object or a body part, extending or protruding downwards from a particular place or object. It can also imply a sense of looseness, slackness, or lack of support.
  • hang a huey
  • You'll get the hang of it The idiom "You'll get the hang of it" means that a person will eventually understand or become familiar with something through practice, experience, or repeated attempts. It suggests that with time and effort, the person will master or become proficient in a particular skill, task, or activity.
  • the hang of The idiom "the hang of" refers to the act of understanding or becoming proficient at something, often through practice or experience. It implies gaining a grasp of the skills or knowledge required to do something successfully.
  • hang with The idiom "hang with" refers to spending time and being in the company of someone, usually in a casual or social setting. It implies being friends or acquaintances and engaging in activities together, such as chatting, going out, or simply enjoying each other's presence.
  • hang up on The idiom "hang up on" means to abruptly end a phone conversation, sometimes without saying goodbye or without giving the other person a chance to speak. It can also refer to becoming fixated or obsessively preoccupied with something or someone.
  • hang up boots The idiom "hang up boots" means to retire or give up on a particular job, career, or activity, particularly when someone reaches a certain age or decides it is time to end their involvement. It is often used in the context of sports, referring to professional athletes who no longer continue playing.
  • hang over The idiom "hang over" typically refers to the lingering effects or consequences of something that happened in the past, usually that are negative or burdensome. It can suggest a sense of impending doom, guilt, anxiety, or a feeling of heaviness.
  • hang out with The idiom "hang out with" refers to spending time or socializing with someone, often in a casual or relaxed setting. It indicates being in the company of someone and engaging in leisure activities or simply being in each other's presence without any specific purpose or agenda.
  • hang out to dry The idiom "hang out to dry" means to abandon someone during a difficult or challenging situation, leaving them to face the consequences or take responsibility alone, often without providing any assistance or support. It can also refer to exposing someone to public criticism, humiliation, or scrutiny without offering any protection or aid.
  • hang out shingle The idiom "hang out shingle" typically refers to the act of starting or establishing one's own professional or entrepreneurial practice, often by displaying a sign or plaque (shingle) to indicate their services. It implies the beginning of a new business or professional endeavor.
  • hang out The idiom "hang out" means to spend time or socialize informally with someone or a group of people in a casual, relaxed manner. It refers to simply being in the company of others, engaging in various activities or conversations without a specific purpose or agenda.
  • hang onto The idiom "hang onto" means to grip or hold tightly onto something or someone, often to maintain control or ensure its persistence. It can also represent the act of keeping a possession or not letting go of an idea or belief.
  • Hang on a mo The idiom "Hang on a mo" is a colloquial expression that means "wait a moment" or "hold on for a short period of time". It is usually used in informal conversations to ask someone to pause or delay briefly before continuing with a task or conversation.
  • hang off
  • hang it up The idiom "hang it up" means to cease or give up a particular activity or endeavor. It can also refer to retiring or quitting a job or profession.
  • Hang it all! The idiom "Hang it all!" is an expression of frustration or annoyance, often used when facing an irritating situation or when something has not gone as planned. It is usually used to express a mild form of anger or exasperation.
  • Hang in there The idiom "Hang in there" means to persevere, to stay determined and resilient in a difficult situation, and to not give up despite challenges or obstacles.
  • hang in effigy To "hang in effigy" means to publicly display or represent a person, usually by hanging a likeness or representation of them, as a form of protest or symbolic expression of anger or disapproval. It is often done to express strong disdain or condemnation towards someone, without physically harming them. The use of effigies in this manner is intended to symbolize the person being targeted and to send a message of social or political opposition.
  • hang from The idiom "hang from" typically means to depend on, rely on, or be contingent upon something or someone. It suggests that the success, outcome, or fate of a situation or individual is determined by a particular factor or circumstance.
  • hang for The idiom "hang for" typically means to suffer or face severe consequences for one's actions or wrongdoings. It often implies that the punishment or outcome will be significant, possibly leading to dire circumstances or even death.
  • hang down The idiom "hang down" typically means to dangle or be suspended in a downward position due to gravity or lack of support. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a state of dejection, sadness, or defeat.
  • hang by the neck The idiom "hang by the neck" is a figurative expression meaning to be put in a dangerous or critical situation that could result in severe consequences or punishment, often suggesting a threat to someone's life or livelihood. It references the act of execution by hanging, where the individual's fate hangs by a noose around their neck.
  • hang by The idiom "hang by" means to depend on or be contingent upon something or someone. It indicates a situation where the outcome or success of a certain event or action is uncertain and heavily reliant on external factors.
  • hang back The idiom "hang back" means to hesitate, delay taking action, remain at a distance, or refrain from participating actively in a situation or activity. It refers to the act of holding back, waiting, or staying behind rather than moving forward or fully engaging.
  • hang a ralph
  • hang a louie The idiom "hang a louie" is an informal expression that means to make a left turn while driving or walking. It humorously refers to making a left turn by replacing the word "left" with "Louie". It is commonly used in American English slang.
  • get the hang of The idiom "get the hang of" is used to express the process of becoming familiar, skilled, or proficient in something. It refers to understanding or mastering a particular task, concept, or skill through practice or experience.
  • and hang the cost The idiom "and hang the cost" is an expression used to indicate a willingness to spend a significant amount of money or bear the expenses associated with something, despite its high cost, because the person considers it essential, valuable, or deserving of the expense. It reflects a disregard for the financial implications and a strong conviction in the importance of the matter at hand.
  • hang a left/right The idiom "hang a left/right" means to make a sharp turn to the left or right while driving or navigating. It is often used to give directions or to describe turning actions while on the road.
  • hang around (with sm) The idiom "hang around (with sm)" typically means to spend time or socialize with someone in a casual or aimless manner. It implies being in someone's company without a specific purpose or objective.
  • hang sth on sm To "hang something on someone" means to blame, accuse, or attribute a particular responsibility or fault to that person. It suggests holding someone accountable for a certain action or outcome.
  • hang sth on sm or sth The idiom "hang something on someone or something" typically means to attribute blame, responsibility, or guilt to someone or something for a particular action or situation. It implies placing the burden or consequences of something on that person or thing.
  • hang (sth) out (of sth) The idiom "hang (sth) out (of sth)" usually refers to the action of extending or projecting something outside of an enclosed space or area. It can be used literally to describe the act of suspending or displaying an object outside a window, a building, or a container. Additionally, it can be used figuratively to imply revealing or exposing certain things, thoughts, or feelings that were previously hidden or kept private.
  • hang over sm('s head) The idiom "hang over someone's head" is used to describe a situation or burden that causes worry, guilt, or the feeling of impending consequences for someone. It implies that the issue is constantly present and affecting the person's thoughts or emotions, much like a dark cloud hanging over them.
  • hang over sm or sth The idiom "hang over someone or something" typically means to linger or be present as a persistent feeling, problem, or influence, often causing a sense of unease, worry, or reminder. It can refer to a literal hangover after excessive drinking, but it is more commonly used in a figurative sense to describe the lasting effect or uneasiness of a past event, concern, or issue that continues to affect someone or something.
  • hang sth over sm or sth The idiom "hang something over someone or something" has multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two common interpretations: 1. To have something impending or unresolved that is causing worry or anxiety for a person or situation. It suggests a sense of impending threat or consequence. Example: "The deadline for my project is hanging over me like a dark cloud." 2. To dangle or suspend something above or over someone or something. This implies a physical action of suspending an object or item above a person or object. Example: "The teacher hung a colorful poster over the blackboard." It is important to note that idioms can have various interpretations and meanings based on the context they are used in.
  • hang on someone's words The idiom "hang on someone's words" means to listen very carefully and attentively to everything that someone is saying, giving their words great importance or significance. It implies placing a lot of trust or reliance on someone's words and considering them as highly informative or valuable.
  • hang heavy The idiom "hang heavy" is commonly used to describe a situation or atmosphere that feels burdensome, oppressive, or filled with a sense of weightiness. It indicates a feeling of being weighed down or overwhelmed by something, whether it be a specific problem, responsibility, or general negativity.
  • hang one's head To "hang one's head" is an idiom that means to lower or drop one's head, typically due to feelings of shame, embarrassment, guilt, or defeat. It signifies a visual representation of someone feeling ashamed or remorseful for their actions or the situation they are in.
  • hang a left (or right) The idiom "hang a left" (or right) means to turn sharply or abruptly to the left (or right) while driving or navigating. It often implies making a quick and unexpected turn or changing direction suddenly.
  • hang around with The idiom "hang around with" means to spend time or socialize with a particular person or group of people, often implying a close or regular association.
  • hang five (or ten) The idiom "hang five (or ten)" refers to a surfing technique where a surfer keeps one foot on the board and extends the other foot out towards the nose or front of the board, typically while riding a wave. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a relaxed and leisurely state of mind or a moment of taking a break or enjoying oneself.
  • hang it! The idiom "hang it!" is an informal expression used to convey frustration, disappointment, or a sense of giving up on something. It can be seen as a replacement for stronger language expressing anger or irritation.
  • hang one on The idiom "hang one on" typically means to consume alcoholic beverages excessively or to get drunk.
  • hang up on someone The idiom "hang up on someone" means to abruptly end a phone conversation by disconnecting the call without saying goodbye or offering any explanation. It can also imply a psychological or emotional disconnection, where someone deliberately stops paying attention or stops engaging with another person.
  • not care a hang about The idiom "not care a hang about" means to have no interest or concern about something or someone, indicating a complete lack of regard or apathy towards them.
  • hang on the lips of The idiom "hang on the lips of" is used to describe someone who is eagerly and attentively listening to someone else. It means to be completely engrossed and captivated by someone's words or speech, usually due to the importance, significance, or interest of what is being said.
  • hang up one's spikes The idiom "hang up one's spikes" typically means to retire or quit from a sports or athletic career. It is often used to convey the idea of an athlete permanently ending their involvement in competitive sports or no longer participating in organized athletic events. The term "spikes" refers to the specialized shoes, commonly worn in sports like track and field, that have pointed metal or plastic projections on the sole to provide better traction on the ground. Thus, "hanging up one's spikes" symbolizes putting aside the footwear associated with athletic activities, marking the end of one's sporting career.
  • hang about The idiom "hang about" means to stay or wait somewhere without any specific purpose or reason. It implies lingering or loitering without a clear objective or sense of urgency.
  • not care a hang (about something) The idiom "not care a hang (about something)" means to have no interest or concern whatsoever about a particular thing or situation. It indicates a complete or total lack of regard or indifference.
  • not give a hang (about something) The idiom "not give a hang (about something)" means to not care at all about or have any interest or concern in something. It suggests a complete lack of interest or indifference towards a particular situation, event, or object.
  • give a dog a bad name and hang him The idiom "give a dog a bad name and hang him" means to unfairly blame or condemn someone based on their reputation or past actions, regardless of their actual guilt or innocence. It refers to the tendency to judge and punish individuals solely because of a negative perception that has been associated with them.
  • hang up (one's) boots The idiom "hang up (one's) boots" refers to the act of retiring or giving up a particular occupation or activity, especially in the context of sports or careers that involve physical labor. It suggests that the person has reached a point where they can no longer continue due to age, injury, or simply deciding to move on to something else.
  • hang by a thread/hair The idiom "hang by a thread/hair" means to be in a very precarious or uncertain situation with a small chance of survival or success. It implies that the situation could easily worsen or collapse completely.
  • hang on by (one's) fingernails The idiom "hang on by (one's) fingernails" means to barely hold on or survive in a challenging or difficult situation. It implies struggling or remaining in a precarious position, often with a sense of desperation or vulnerability.
  • hang on by (one's) fingertips The idiom "hang on by (one's) fingertips" means to barely manage to hold on or continue existing in a difficult or precarious situation. It implies a struggle to survive or maintain a grip on something, often used metaphorically to describe a person or situation on the verge of collapse or failure.
  • not care a hang The idiom "not care a hang" means to have no interest or concern about something, to not care at all. It implies a complete lack of importance or significance placed on the matter in question.
  • hang up your fiddle when you come home The idiom "hang up your fiddle when you come home" means to give up or cease engaging in a particular activity or hobby when returning to one's own environment or personal life. It implies that one should set aside their professional or extracurricular pursuits and focus on more personal matters or responsibilities. The phrase originates from the practice of hanging up a musical instrument, such as a fiddle (a type of violin), upon returning home, symbolizing a shift in attention or priorities.
  • hang on/hold on like grim death The idiom "hang on/hold on like grim death" means to cling desperately or persistently to something or someone, refusing to let go even in the face of extreme difficulty or danger. It implies an intense determination or will to survive at all costs.
  • hang (one) out to dry The idiom "hang (one) out to dry" means to abandon or betray someone, leaving them in a difficult or vulnerable situation without any support or assistance. It can also refer to exposing someone to public criticism, blame, or embarrassment without offering any help or protection.
  • hang somebody out to dry The idiom "hang somebody out to dry" means to abandon or betray someone, particularly in a difficult or challenging situation, leaving them alone or exposed to criticism, blame, or negative consequences without offering any support or assistance.
  • hang someone out to dry The idiom "hang someone out to dry" means to abandon or betray someone by leaving them in a difficult or vulnerable position without any support or protection. It suggests leaving someone exposed to criticism, blame, or punishment without any assistance or defense.
  • hang someone in effigy The idiom "hang someone in effigy" refers to the act of creating or displaying a lifelike representation of an individual (typically made of straw, clothes, or other materials) and publicly hanging or displaying it in a public place. This symbolic act is meant to express strong disapproval, condemnation, or protest towards that person. It is not a literal act of harm or violence towards the individual; rather, it represents a non-violent form of expressing anger, contempt, or dissatisfaction with their actions or character.
  • give a man enough rope and he will hang himself The idiom "give a man enough rope and he will hang himself" means that if someone is provided with sufficient opportunity or freedom to act, they will inevitably make a mistake, reveal their true nature, or bring about their own downfall.
  • give him enough rope and he'll hang himself The idiom "give him enough rope and he'll hang himself" means to provide someone with the freedom or opportunity to act or behave in a certain way, often with negative consequences, which will eventually lead to their downfall or expose their true character. It implies that by allowing someone to make their own choices or decisions without interference, they will inevitably bring about their own failure or ruin.
  • give someone enough rope to hang themselves The idiom "give someone enough rope to hang themselves" means to allow someone to proceed with their actions or behavior in a way that will eventually lead to their own downfall or consequences. It refers to giving someone the freedom or opportunity to make mistakes or display their true nature, which ultimately leads to their own downfall or negative outcome.
  • hang on (someone's) every word The idiom "hang on (someone's) every word" means to listen to someone with great attention, interest, and dependency, often regarding them as an authority figure or holding their words in high regard. It implies being completely engrossed and captivated by what someone is saying, giving their words utmost importance and significance.
  • hang on somebody's words/every word The idiom "hang on somebody's words/every word" means to be attentive and give complete focus to someone's speech or instructions. It implies that the person is eagerly listening and taking everything the speaker says seriously and with great importance.
  • hang something on someone The idiom "hang something on someone" refers to the act of blaming or accusing someone for something, especially when there is little or no evidence to support the accusation.
  • hang something on someone or something The idiom "hang something on someone or something" typically means to accuse or blame someone or something for a particular wrongdoing or misdeed, often without sufficient evidence or justification. It can also refer to placing responsibility or burden on someone or something, usually in a negative or unfavorable manner.
  • hang up (one's) fiddle The idiom "hang up (one's) fiddle" means to retire or give up a particular skill, talent, or activity, typically due to age or lack of interest. It implies putting an end to one's involvement or pursuit of something. The phrase derives from the act of literally hanging up a fiddle, which symbolizes the cessation of playing or performing music.
  • hang up your fiddle The idiom "hang up your fiddle" means to retire or give up a particular skill, talent, or profession. It suggests that someone is choosing to stop pursuing or practicing a particular activity or occupation.
  • get the hang of (something) The idiom "get the hang of (something)" refers to the process of becoming skilled or proficient in doing a particular task or activity after initial confusion or inexperience. It implies that a person has gained a good understanding of how to do something correctly or efficiently.
  • give him enough rope to hang himself The idiom "give him enough rope to hang himself" means to provide someone with enough freedom or opportunity to make a mistake or reveal their true nature, in order for them to face the consequences of their actions or sabotage their own efforts.
  • give someone just enough rope to hang themselves The idiom "give someone just enough rope to hang themselves" means to allow someone enough freedom or opportunity to make a serious mistake or reveal their true nature, leading to their own downfall or failure. It implies giving someone the chance to display their incompetence, deceit, or negative traits, which ultimately result in negative consequences for them.
  • hang on to (someone or something) like grim death The idiom "hang on to (someone or something) like grim death" means to grasp or hold onto someone or something tightly and desperately, as if one's life depended on it. It implies an intense or desperate clinging to someone or something, usually due to fear, danger, or the desire to maintain control or possession.
  • hang (one's) hat on (something) The idiom "hang (one's) hat on (something)" means to place great importance, reliance, or trust on a particular thing, idea, or belief. It signifies using or depending on something as a source of security, stability, or support.
  • hang (up) (one's) hat The idiom "hang (up) (one's) hat" means to settle down or make oneself comfortable in a place, often implying a feeling of permanence or making it one's home. It can also refer to a person's decision to stop doing a particular job or activity.
  • hang your hat The idiom "hang your hat" typically means to stay or settle in a particular place, often implying making oneself at home or finding a sense of belonging. It can also refer to finding comfort or a sense of familiarity in a situation or circumstance.
  • home is where you hang your hat The idiom "home is where you hang your hat" means that wherever you feel comfortable and at ease, or wherever you have settled and made your own, is considered home. It emphasizes that home is not necessarily a physical location, but rather a place where you feel a sense of belonging and familiarity.
  • somewhere to hang hat The idiom "somewhere to hang one's hat" typically refers to having a place to call home or to settle down comfortably. It signifies finding a residence or location where one feels at ease or belongs. It can also imply having a stable and secure place to store one's belongings.
  • hang up (one's) hatchet The idiom "hang up (one's) hatchet" means to stop being hostile or cease a conflict with someone. It refers to putting aside differences, grudges, or hostilities and choosing to have peace or reconciliation.
  • hang up (one's) fiddle when (one) comes home The idiom "hang up (one's) fiddle when (one) comes home" refers to someone retiring from a particular occupation or activity, typically one that involves traveling or being away from home. The phrase suggests that upon returning home, the person decides to leave behind their previous pursuits and settle into a more settled or less demanding lifestyle.
  • hang over (one's) head The idiom "hang over (one's) head" means to have a looming or persistent worry, obligation, or burden that causes anxiety or unease. It refers to a situation or problem that continues to affect a person, creating a feeling of weight or pressure.
  • hang over somebody's head The idiom "hang over somebody's head" means to have a pending obligation or threat that causes anxiety or worry for someone. It refers to a situation or consequence that remains looming or persistent and can impact or burden a person's thoughts or actions.
  • hang your head The idiom "hang your head" typically means to feel ashamed, remorseful, or defeated. It is often used to describe someone visibly displaying a sense of guilt or disappointment.
  • hang on (one's) sleeve The idiom "hang on (one's) sleeve" typically means to be overly dependent on someone, constantly seeking their attention or guidance, or constantly seeking their approval or validation. It implies a clingy or needy behavior towards someone.
  • hang onto (something) The idiom "hang onto (something)" means to hold onto or keep something tightly, both physically and metaphorically. It refers to not letting go of a person, an object, an idea, or a situation, often against challenges or difficulties. It implies persistence, determination, and refusal to give up.
  • hang up (one's) spurs The idiom "hang up (one's) spurs" refers to retiring or giving up a particular role, profession, or activity, especially when it comes to a career or pursuit that requires skill, dedication, or physical prowess. It often implies voluntarily or metaphorically removing oneself from a position of authority or ceasing to engage in a particular venture. The phrase derives from the act of a cowboy or knight hanging their spurs—symbols of their skill, courage, and occupation—on a hook or nail as a sign of retirement or no longer being actively engaged in their respective pursuits.
  • hang (something) The idiom "hang (something)" typically refers to the act of delaying or postponing a decision, action, or responsibility. It can also imply leaving a situation unresolved or in a state of uncertainty.
  • a peg on which to hang something The idiom "a peg on which to hang something" refers to a basis or foundation to build or support an argument, idea, or concept. It implies having a point of reference or evidence that can be used to strengthen or justify a particular viewpoint or belief.
  • a peg to hang a matter on The idiom "a peg to hang a matter on" refers to a necessary or significant point or factor that allows the resolution or progress of a particular issue or situation. Similar to the way a coat is hung on a peg for support and organization, this idiom suggests that the matter in question requires a firm and reliable basis or foundation to address it properly and come to a resolution.
  • a peg to hang something on The idiom "a peg to hang something on" refers to having a specific point or basis on which to build or support an argument, theory, or plan. It implies the need for a clear and solid foundation to provide credibility or evidence for a particular idea or concept.
  • hang a U-ie The idiom "hang a U-ie" (also written as "hang a U-turn") means to make a sudden and often illegal U-turn while driving, reversing direction abruptly by turning the vehicle around to face the opposite way. It is generally used to describe a quick change in direction or reversal of a decision or action, often indicating a reactionary or impulsive behavior.
  • hang in The idiom "hang in" generally means to persevere, remain determined, or stay emotionally strong in difficult or challenging circumstances. It implies not giving up or losing hope despite facing obstacles or setbacks.
  • hang of a
  • hang of a (someone or something)
  • hang on (someone's) lips The idiom "hang on (someone's) lips" means to listen to someone's words with great attention and interest, often because they are speaking in an informative or captivating manner. It suggests being fully engrossed or deeply fascinated by what someone is saying, as if hanging on every word that comes out of their mouth.
  • hang out (one's) shingle The idiom "hang out (one's) shingle" means to set up or establish one's own professional practice or business. It originated from the traditional practice of lawyers or doctors hanging a shingle, which is a sign bearing their name and profession, outside their office or place of work. Thus, when someone "hangs out their shingle," they are publicly announcing their availability and readiness to provide their services independently.
  • hang out with (one) The idiom "hang out with (one)" means to spend time with someone in a casual and relaxed manner, often in a social setting. It implies being together, engaging in activities or simply enjoying each other's company without any specific agenda or purpose.
  • hang out/up your shingle The idiom "hang out your shingle" or "hang up your shingle" is commonly used to refer to the act of starting one's own business or practicing a profession independently, especially when it comes to professions such as law, medicine, or other professional services. It originates from the practice of lawyers or doctors traditionally hanging a sign or shingle outside their office or place of practice to indicate that they are open for business. Thus, the idiom signifies the act of starting one's own practice or business and inviting potential clients or customers to seek their services.
  • hang over (one) The idiom "hang over (one)" typically means to weigh heavily on one's mind or to cause lingering worry, guilt, or anxiety. It can refer to the physical sense of feeling dizzy or having a headache after consuming excessive alcohol. However, figuratively, it is often used to describe a lingering sense of regret, remorse, or unease after a particular event or situation.
  • hang paper
  • hang ten The idiom "hang ten" refers to a surfing technique where a surfer positions both feet at the front of the surfboard, with all ten toes hanging off the edge of the board. It is also used figuratively to represent a relaxed and carefree attitude or lifestyle associated with surfing and beach culture.
  • hang tough on something To "hang tough on something" means to remain firm, resolute, and determined in one's stance or position, especially in the face of adversity, opposition, or challenges. It involves staying strongly committed and refusing to give up or back down despite difficult circumstances.
  • hang up (one's) shingle The idiom "hang up (one's) shingle" refers to starting one's own business or practice, especially as a professional such as a lawyer, doctor, or consultant. It suggests that the person is setting up their own office or establishment, symbolically represented by hanging a shingle outside to advertise their services.
  • hang with someone The idiom "hang with someone" means to spend time with someone socially, typically in a casual or relaxed manner. It implies being in the company of someone, engaging in conversation, activities, or simply enjoying each other's presence.
  • hang around (with someone) The idiom "hang around (with someone)" means spending time with someone casually and regularly, typically without any specific purpose or agenda. It implies being in the company of someone, sharing activities, conversations, or experiences without any specific goal or intention.
  • hang down (from someone or something) The idiom "hang down (from someone or something)" typically means to extend or dangle downwards from someone or something. It implies that a part of one's body or an object is in a lower position or is suspended in a downward manner.
  • hang one's hat (up) (somewhere) The idiom "hang one's hat (up) (somewhere)" means to establish a residence or settle down in a particular place, usually for an extended period of time. It implies finding a home or a comfortable place to live and often denotes a sense of permanence or stability.
  • hang (or stay) loose The idiom "hang (or stay) loose" means to remain relaxed, calm, and easygoing in any situation. It encourages someone to not become overly stressed or anxious and to maintain a laid-back attitude. It suggests being flexible and adaptable, going with the flow, and not letting external pressures affect one's composure.
  • hang (something) out (of something) The idiom "hang (something) out (of something)" typically refers to extending or displaying an object, usually partially or fully, from a specific location or opening. It can imply that something is protruding or being dangled in a casual or careless manner.
  • hang something over someone or something The idiom "hang something over someone or something" means to use or hold a threat or a negative action in order to manipulate or control someone or something. It refers to the act of leveraging a particular action or consequence as a means of exerting influence or power over another person or situation.
  • hang over someone or something The idiom "hang over someone or something" means to be a persistent source of worry, concern, or influence that lingers and affects someone or something even after an event or situation has passed. It implies a sense of heaviness or burden that one cannot easily escape or shake off.
  • hang over someone('s head) The idiom "hang over someone's head" means to cause someone to feel worried, anxious, or burdened by a past action, responsibility, or unresolved issue. It refers to a situation or problem that continues to trouble or affect someone.
  • hang something up The idiom "hang something up" typically refers to putting an object, especially clothes or a phone, in its designated place for storage or display.

Similar spelling words for HANG

Plural form of HANG is HANGS

Conjugate verb Hang

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have hanged; hung
you would have hanged; hung
he/she/it would have hanged; hung
we would have hanged; hung
they would have hanged; hung
I would have hang
you would have hang
he/she/it would have hang
we would have hang
they would have hang

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been hanging
you would have been hanging
he/she/it would have been hanging
we would have been hanging
they would have been hanging

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would hang
you would hang
he/she/it would hang
we would hang
they would hang

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be hanging
you would be hanging
he/she/it would be hanging
we would be hanging
they would be hanging

FUTURE

I will hang
you will hang
he/she/it will hang
we will hang
they will hang

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be hanging
you will be hanging
he/she/it will be hanging
we will be hanging
they will be hanging

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have hanged; hung
you will have hanged; hung
he/she/it will have hanged; hung
we will have hanged; hung
they will have hanged; hung
I will have hanged
you will have hanged
he/she/it will have hanged
we will have hanged
they will have hanged
I will have hung
we will have hung
you will have hung
he/she/it will have hung
they will have hung

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been hanging
you will have been hanging
he/she/it will have been hanging
we will have been hanging
they will have been hanging

IMPERATIVE

you hang
we let´s hang

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to hang

PAST

I hanged
you hanged
he/she/it hanged
we hanged
they hanged
I hung
we hung
you hung
he/she/it hung
they hung

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was hanging
you were hanging
he/she/it was hanging
we were hanging
they were hanging

PAST PARTICIPLE

hanged; hung
hanged

PAST PERFECT

I had hanged; hung
you had hanged; hung
he/she/it had hanged; hung
we had hanged; hung
they had hanged; hung
I had hanged
you had hanged
he/she/it had hanged
we had hanged
they had hanged
I had hung
we had hung
you had hung
he/she/it had hung
they had hung

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been hanging
you had been hanging
he/she/it had been hanging
we had been hanging
they had been hanging

PRESENT

I hang
you hang
he/she/it hangs
we hang
they hang

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am hanging
you are hanging
he/she/it is hanging
we are hanging
they are hanging

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

hanging

PRESENT PERFECT

I have hanged; hung
you have hanged; hung
he/she/it has hanged; hung
we have hanged; hung
they have hanged; hung
I have hanged
you have hanged
he/she/it has hanged
we have hanged
they have hanged
I have hung
we have hung
you have hung
he/she/it has hung
they have hung

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been hanging
you have been hanging
he/she/it has been hanging
we have been hanging
they have been hanging

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it hang

SIMPLE PAST

I hanged; hung
you hanged; hung
he/she/it hanged; hung
we hanged; hung
they hanged; hung
I would have hung
we would have hung
you would have hung
he/she/it would have hung
they would have hung

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