How Do You Spell HAS?

Pronunciation: [hˈaz] (IPA)

The word "has" is spelled with two phonemes, /hæz/. The first phoneme, /h/, is a voiceless glottal fricative, which is pronounced by exhaling air through the vocal cords without vibration. The second phoneme, /æz/, is a voiced alveolar fricative followed by a voiced alveolar nasal. It is pronounced by making a hissing sound with the tongue behind the upper teeth, and then ending the sound with the nose. "Has" is a present tense form of the verb "have", meaning possessing or owning something.

HAS Meaning and Definition

Has is the third person singular present tense of the verb "have." It is used to indicate ownership, possession, or the act of holding something. Has is commonly used when referring to a person or entity's possession of an object, state of being, or experience.

In terms of ownership, has indicates the presence of something that belongs to someone or something. For example, if a person possesses a car, it would be correct to say, "He has a car." Similarly, if a company owns several buildings, one could say, "The company has multiple properties."

Besides ownership, has can also express possession or control over an abstract concept or quality. For instance, if a person is experiencing a particular feeling or sensation, one might say, "She has a lot of patience." In this case, has implies the presence or possession of the mentioned trait.

Furthermore, has can also denote certain actions or events that have taken place in the past. For example, if someone has experienced something in their life, it means that they have lived through or encountered that specific event.

Overall, has is a versatile verb that helps to indicate possession, ownership, experience, control, or the existence of something or someone. Its usage is integral in communication and provides clarity regarding various aspects of possession and past experiences.

Top Common Misspellings for HAS *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for HAS

Etymology of HAS

The word "has" is a form of the verb "have", which comes from the Old English word "habban". "Habban" is believed to have originated from the Proto-Germanic word "habjanan", which means "to possess" or "to have". This Proto-Germanic word is derived from the Proto-Indo-European root "kap-" or "h₁ep-", with similar meanings. Eventually, "habban" was shortened and evolved into "have" in Middle English and further contracted to "has" in modern English.

Idioms with the word HAS

  • (one's) sun has set The idiom "(one's) sun has set" refers to the decline or diminishing of someone's career, power, or influence, often indicating that their prime or successful period in life is over. It implies that the person's achievements or abilities are no longer at their peak and that they may be past their prime.
  • the die has been cast The idiom "the die has been cast" means that a decisive action or event has taken place, and the outcome or course of events is now unalterable or inevitable. It is often used to convey the idea that a significant choice or decision has been made and there is no turning back. This idiom is derived from the practice of casting lots, in which the outcome is determined by the roll of dice or similar methods.
  • had its day, has The idiom "had its day, has" refers to something that was once popular, successful, or influential, but is no longer as important or relevant. It suggests that the thing in question had a time of prominence or success in the past, but its significance has diminished over time.
  • somebody has a face like thunder The idiom "somebody has a face like thunder" means that someone's facial expression or demeanor is extremely angry, fierce, or filled with intense displeasure. It implies that the person's face is dark, stormy, and ready to unleash their anger or irritation.
  • more — than someone has had hot dinners The idiom "more — than someone has had hot dinners" is a playful and exaggerated way of expressing that someone has a great deal of experience or expertise in a particular area. It implies that the person has been involved in or consumed something more times than they have eaten hot dinners, which is a common and frequent occurrence in daily life.
  • sb/sth has more bark than bite The idiom "sb/sth has more bark than bite" means that someone or something appears to be aggressive or threatening, but in reality, they are not harmful or do not possess the power or capability to follow through on their threats. Essentially, it suggests that their actions or words may seem intimidating, but they lack the ability or determination to back them up.
  • every dog has his day The idiom "every dog has his day" means that everyone will have their opportunity for success or good fortune at some point in their lives, regardless of their current circumstances or past failures. It suggests that even those who are overlooked or underestimated will eventually have their moment to shine or achieve their goals.
  • close the barn door after the horse has bolted The idiom "close the barn door after the horse has bolted" means to take action to prevent a problem or danger, but it is already too late to make a difference. It signifies reacting to a situation only after the damage has already been done or the opportunity has been missed.
  • close, etc. the barn door after the horse has escaped The idiom "close the barn door after the horse has escaped" means taking action or making an effort to prevent a problem or danger, but doing so with little effectiveness or too late to make a difference. It implies that the actions being taken are no longer helpful or relevant because the situation has already occurred or cannot be reversed. The phrase is often used to criticize someone for being reactive rather than proactive.
  • every silver lining has a cloud The idiom "every silver lining has a cloud" refers to the idea that even in the most positive or fortunate situations, there may still be some negative aspects or drawbacks. It suggests that no matter how optimistic or promising something may appear, there is always a potential downside to consider.
  • Elvis has left the building "Elvis has left the building" is an idiomatic expression that originally derived from announcements made at Elvis Presley concerts. It means that a notable or significant event has come to an end, and there is no reason for people to stay or wait any longer. It is often used humorously or figuratively to convey that a particular situation or person has come to an end or is no longer relevant.
  • look as though (one) has seen a ghost The idiom "look as though (one) has seen a ghost" means to have a scared or shocked expression on one's face, often due to a sudden and unexpected occurrence or news. It implies a state of extreme surprise or alarm.
  • shut/lock/close the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "shut/lock/close the stable door after the horse has bolted" means to take action or make an effort to prevent a problem or disaster but after it has already occurred, thus rendering the action pointless or ineffective. It implies that the preventive measures are implemented too late and no longer have any impact or benefit. It highlights the futility of trying to rectify a situation after the damage has already been done.
  • he, she, etc. has gone/been and done something The idiom "he, she, etc. has gone/been and done something" is used to express surprise or disbelief about someone's actions, often emphasizing the unexpected or unusual nature of their behavior. It implies that the person has taken some action that is considered remarkable, significant, or unprecedented.
  • your hour has come The idiom "your hour has come" means that the anticipated or inevitable time for someone to face the consequences of their actions, achieve success, or be recognized has arrived. It refers to a significant moment or opportunity that someone has been waiting for or dreading.
  • It is a long lane that has no turning. The idiom "It is a long lane that has no turning" means that even though a situation may seem difficult or monotonous, there will eventually be a positive change or resolution. It expresses the idea that perseverance and patience will lead to a different and more favorable outcome.
  • Every Jack has his Jill The idiom "Every Jack has his Jill" means that for every person, there is a suitable or compatible partner or counterpart. It implies that everyone can find their perfect match or soulmate.
  • closing/shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "closing/shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted" refers to taking action or making an effort to prevent or rectify a problem, but only after the damage has already been done or the opportunity has been missed. It implies that the action is ineffective or pointless because it is too late to make a meaningful difference.
  • have done etc. more than has had hot dinners The idiom "have done etc. more than has had hot dinners" is often used to describe someone who has experienced or accomplished a significant amount in their life. It conveys the idea that the person in question has a vast range of experiences or has been involved in various activities, usually more than the average person. It implies that the individual has had numerous adventures, achievements, or opportunities, emphasizing their extensive life experiences. The comparison to "hot dinners" serves as a way to suggest that the person's experiences greatly surpass the frequency of a common daily occurrence like eating meals.
  • a lie has no legs The idiom "a lie has no legs" means that falsehoods or lies cannot thrive or sustain themselves for long periods. It implies that lies will eventually be exposed or disproven, leading to the loss of credibility for the person who told the lie.
  • once the dust has settled The idiom "once the dust has settled" means waiting for a situation to calm down or become clearer before taking further action or making a judgment. It refers to a period of time when the chaos or confusion of a situation dissipates, allowing for a clearer assessment of the events and their consequences.
  • It has name on it The idiom "It has your name on it" means that something is specifically intended for you or perfectly suited to you. It suggests that the thing or opportunity is meant for you and waiting for you to claim or take advantage of it.
  • every cloud has a silver lining The idiom "every cloud has a silver lining" means that even in difficult or negative situations, there is always something positive or hopeful to be found.
  • everyone has their price The idiom "everyone has their price" means that every person can be persuaded or influenced to do something, as long as the motivation or reward offered is enticing enough. It implies that no one is completely immune to compromise or temptation, and that ultimately all individuals can be swayed by the promise of personal gain or benefit.
  • (one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it The idiom "(one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it" means that a person must accept the consequences or face the results of their own actions or decisions, whether they are good or bad. It implies that one is responsible for their choices and must face the outcomes, even if they are undesirable.
  • One has to draw the line smw The idiom "one has to draw the line somewhere" means that there comes a point where a limit must be set or a boundary must be established. It signifies that there are certain actions, behaviors, or situations that are deemed unacceptable or intolerable, and one must decide where to set that limit or boundary to maintain personal integrity, standards, or principles.
  • more sth than Carter has (liver) pills The idiom "more sth than Carter has (liver) pills" refers to having an excessive or abundant amount of something. It implies having more of a particular item, quantity, or quality than is necessary or expected. The phrase originated from the availability of Carter's Little Liver Pills, which were marketed as a remedy for various ailments in the early 20th century.
  • close, lock, etc. the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "close, lock, etc. the stable door after the horse has bolted" means to take action to prevent or rectify a problem, but only after it has already occurred and the damage is done. It implies that the effort is futile or pointless because it is too late to prevent the negative consequences. It highlights the importance of being proactive and acting in a timely manner to avoid problems instead of trying to fix them after they have already happened.
  • have done/seen/had etc. more sth than sb has had hot dinners The idiom "have done/seen/had etc. more something than somebody has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize that one person has a lot of experience or knowledge in a particular area compared to another person. It suggests that the person being referred to has encountered or done the mentioned thing countless times or to an impressive extent. The phrase "more than [someone] has had hot dinners" adds exaggeration and humor to the expression.
  • rumor has it that... The idiom "rumor has it that..." means that there is a circulating rumor or gossip suggesting or speculating about something. It indicates that the information being discussed is based on hearsay or informal sources, rather than confirmed facts.
  • have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners The idiom "have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners" is used to express that someone has a vast amount of experience or expertise in a particular activity or field. It implies that the individual has done or had more of that thing than they have had meals, indicating their extensive knowledge or involvement in that area.
  • boldly go where no one has gone before The idiom "boldly go where no one has gone before" is derived from the famous catchphrase from the intro of the Star Trek television series. It has since become a popular phrase symbolizing pioneering, adventurous, and innovative behavior. The idiom implies the courage to explore uncharted territory, embrace risks, and venture into new frontiers, both literally and metaphorically. It encourages individuals to push boundaries, challenge conventions, and strive for groundbreaking achievements.
  • closing the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "closing the stable door after the horse has bolted" means taking action or making an effort to prevent something bad from happening, but doing so too late as the damage has already been done and the situation cannot be reversed. It refers to the futility of trying to fix a problem or prevent a negative outcome after the initial opportunity to do so has passed.
  • lock the barn door after the horse has bolted The idiom "lock the barn door after the horse has bolted" means to take action or make an effort to prevent something from happening when it is already too late, as the damage or negative outcome has already occurred due to the lack of precaution or preventative measures.
  • what became, has become, will become of somebody/something? The idiom "what became, has become, will become of somebody/something?" refers to the questioning of the future prospects, fate, or outcome of a person or thing. It is often used to express uncertainty or concern about the future circumstances and potential consequences for someone or something.
  • One has to draw the line somewhere The idiom "One has to draw the line somewhere" means that there is a point where one sets a limit or boundary, beyond which they are unwilling to go or tolerate. It implies that everyone has their limits or standards, and it is essential to establish and enforce them to maintain their integrity or prevent further unacceptable actions or behaviors.
  • Happy is the country which has no history. The idiom "Happy is the country which has no history" suggests that a nation or society that lacks a significant or turbulent historical background is likely to be peaceful, content, and prosperous. The phrase implies that a nation untouched by the burdens of past conflicts, conquests, or hardships can enjoy stability and happiness. It highlights the idea that a lack of historical baggage allows a society to focus on progress, development, and harmony, ultimately leading to a contented and successful nation.
  • more than Carter has pills The idiom "more than Carter has pills" means having an excessive or abundant quantity of something. It is typically used to convey the idea of having more than necessary or beyond what is expected or reasonable. The origin of this idiom can be traced back to the expression referring to former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, who was known for taking many pills or medications during his lifetime.
  • bird has flown, the The idiom "the bird has flown" typically refers to a situation where someone or something has escaped or disappeared, often before being caught or discovered. It suggests that the opportunity has been missed or lost, and there is no way to retrieve or recapture what was lost.
  • (one) only has one pair of hands The idiom "(one) only has one pair of hands" means that a person can only do so much at a time or can only accomplish a limited amount of tasks due to physical limitations. It implies that there are limits to what one person can achieve or handle simultaneously.
  • has come and gone The idiom "has come and gone" typically means that a particular event or period of time has already ended or is in the past. It suggests that something has already occurred or taken place, often implying that it is no longer relevant or significant.
  • has more money than God The idiom "has more money than God" is used to describe an individual who possesses an exceedingly large amount of wealth or financial resources. It emphasizes the vastness and almost incomprehensible amount of money the person possesses, suggesting that they are extremely rich beyond measure.
  • price one has to pay The idiom "price one has to pay" typically refers to the consequences or negative effects that someone must endure as a result of a decision or action. It indicates that there is a cost or sacrifice involved in obtaining or achieving something.
  • has more bark than bite The idiom "has more bark than bite" means that a person or thing may seem aggressive or threatening, but they are actually not as powerful or dangerous as they appear. It implies that the person or thing lacks the ability or willingness to follow through with their threats or promises.
  • has had its chips The idiom "has had its chips" means that something or someone has reached the end or has been ruined. It implies that whatever it refers to has exhausted all its possibilities or potential and is now no longer useful or relevant.
  • The worm has turned The idiom "The worm has turned" typically means that someone who has been submissive, weak, or compliant eventually rebels, stands up for themselves, or takes a stand against an oppressor or a situation. The phrase implies a sudden change in behavior or attitude of someone who has been mistreated or taken advantage of for a long time.
  • the wheel has come/turned full circle The idiom "the wheel has come/turned full circle" means that a situation or event has returned to its starting point or initial condition, often indicating that history is repeating itself or that the outcome is the same as before. It emphasizes the cyclical nature of life or a specific situation.
  • has the world by the tail The idiom "has the world by the tail" means to be extremely successful, fortunate, or in control of one's own destiny. It implies that someone has achieved great prosperity or achievement and is enjoying a period of prosperity, often in various aspects of life such as career, personal relationships, or happiness.
  • the bird has flown The idiom "the bird has flown" is used to describe a situation where someone or something has escaped or disappeared. It often refers to a missed opportunity or the failure to capitalize on a chance or advantage. The phrase suggests that the opportunity or target is no longer available or within reach, similar to a bird that has flown away and cannot be caught.
  • now (someone) has gone and done it The idiom "now (someone) has gone and done it" is used to express frustration or disappointment towards someone for their actions which have caused a problem or made a situation worse. It implies that the person has done something that was both unexpected and undesirable, and their actions have had negative consequences.
  • the emperor has no clothes The idiom "the emperor has no clothes" refers to a situation in which people are afraid to acknowledge or point out the obvious truth or reality due to fear, social pressure, or a desire to conform. It originates from a popular children's story titled "The Emperor's New Clothes" by Hans Christian Andersen, in which an emperor is convinced by swindlers to believe that his new clothes are invisible to those who are stupid or inept. Despite the emperor being naked, those around him, including his advisors and subjects, pretend to see the non-existent garments in order to avoid appearing foolish or disobedient. Thus, the idiom is used to criticize situations where people blindly go along with something, ignoring the obvious truth or reality.
  • lock the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "lock the stable door after the horse has bolted" means taking action or making a response when it is already too late to prevent the negative consequences or damage that has already occurred. It refers to an effort that is futile or pointless because the opportunity to prevent the problem has already passed.
  • look as if (one) has seen a ghost The idiom "look as if (one) has seen a ghost" is used to describe someone's extreme shock, fear, or astonishment. It implies that the person's facial expression or reaction resembles that of encountering something terrifying or inexplicable.
  • Shut the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "shut the stable door after the horse has bolted" means that someone is taking action or precautionary measures to solve a problem or prevent something bad from happening, but it is too late, as the damage or loss has already occurred. It implies that the action being taken is futile or pointless since it comes after the critical moment has passed.
  • shut/close the stable/barn door after the horse has bolted The idiom "shut/close the stable/barn door after the horse has bolted" refers to taking action to prevent a problem only after the damage has already been done. It implies that the action taken is futile or pointless because it comes too late to have any significant impact. The idiom is often used to highlight situations where a person realizes the need for action or caution only after the negative consequences have already occurred.
  • a cat has nine lives The idiom "a cat has nine lives" means that someone or something has been fortunate enough to escape or survive numerous dangerous situations or accidents. It emphasizes the resilience and ability to endure adversity.
  • cat has nine lives The idiom "cat has nine lives" means that someone or something has had many narrow escapes from danger or death, suggesting that they have been unusually lucky or resilient. It is often used to describe someone who manages to survive or recover from seemingly impossible situations multiple times.
  • Them as has, gits The idiom "Them as has, gits" can be interpreted as a colloquial way of expressing the idea that those who already possess wealth, success, or opportunities are more likely to acquire more, while those who lack these resources are less likely to obtain them. It implies that advantages or blessings typically come to those who are already well off or privileged.
  • more something than someone has had hot dinners The idiom "more something than someone has had hot dinners" is an expression used to emphasize that someone has a significant amount or extensive experience with something. It suggests that the person has had more of that particular thing than they have had hot meals. This idiom is often used in a hyperbolic or humorous manner to convey the idea of abundance or extensive familiarity.
  • hell has no fury like a woman scorned The idiom "hell has no fury like a woman scorned" is a proverbial expression used to convey the idea that a woman who has been wronged or betrayed can be extremely angry, vengeful, or vindictive. It suggests that the anger and wrath of a woman faced with infidelity, deceit, or mistreatment can be incredibly intense and should not be underestimated.
  • every dog has his/its day The idiom "every dog has his/its day" means that everyone will eventually have their moment of success or glory, regardless of their current situation or circumstances.
  • much ink has been spilled The idiom "much ink has been spilled" means that a considerable amount of writing, analysis, or discussion has been dedicated to a particular topic or issue. It suggests that significant effort, time, and resources have been invested in producing written content related to the subject matter.
  • has the cat got your tongue? The idiom "has the cat got your tongue?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise, impatience, or frustration when someone is silent or refuses to speak. It suggests that the person is mysteriously quiet or unable to find their words, similar to if a cat had actually taken their tongue.
  • somebody has arrived The idiom "somebody has arrived" typically means that a notable or influential person has joined a particular group or achieved a level of success and recognition. It suggests that this individual has gained recognition or importance that earns them attention or respect.
  • every dark cloud has a silver lining The idiom "every dark cloud has a silver lining" means that even in the most difficult or challenging situations, there is always some positive aspect or outcome to be found. It suggests that even though something may seem negative or discouraging initially, there is usually a hidden advantage or opportunity within it.
  • what (one) has coming The idiom "what (one) has coming" refers to the consequences or results that someone deserves, typically due to their actions, behavior, or choices. It suggests that individuals will face the outcome or repercussion that is fitting or appropriate for their actions, whether positive or negative.
  • sb has bought it The idiom "sb has bought it" is an informal expression that means someone has suffered a negative outcome or experienced a significant setback, often referring to a physical injury, harm, or even death. It can also imply that someone has fallen victim to a situation or made a serious mistake resulting in adverse consequences.
  • not know what has hit you The idiom "not know what has hit you" means to be completely taken by surprise and unable to understand or comprehend the sudden impact or consequences of a situation or event. It implies being caught off guard or being unaware of the severity or significance of something that has just occurred.
  • when the dust has settled The idiom "when the dust has settled" means when a situation or event has calmed down, reached a state of stability, and its effects or repercussions are no longer immediate or intense. It refers to a time when emotions, turmoil, or chaos have subsided, allowing for a clearer perspective or evaluation of the situation.
  • the cat has got someone's tongue The idiom "the cat has got someone's tongue" means that someone is unusually silent or unable to speak, typically due to shyness, embarrassment, or being at a loss for words in a specific situation.
  • someone's time has come The idiom "someone's time has come" refers to the belief that a person's fate or the moment they have been waiting for or expecting has finally arrived. It suggests that they are now ready or destined to experience a certain event, opportunity, or outcome that they have been anticipating or working towards.
  • sm's time has come The idiom "sm's time has come" refers to the moment when someone or something has reached the ideal or opportune moment to achieve success, recognition, or influence. It suggests that the individual or subject in question has been patiently waiting for their moment and that it has finally arrived.
  • A growing youth has a wolf in his belly. The idiom "A growing youth has a wolf in his belly" means that adolescents have a strong appetite or hunger due to their rapid growth and high energy levels. It emphasizes the idea that young people often have a strong and persistent need for food.
  • What has (someone) done with (something)? The idiom "What has (someone) done with (something)?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise or disbelief over the absence, disappearance, or transformation of something that was expected or familiar. It suggests that the person being referred to has somehow altered or mishandled the situation or item in question.
  • close, etc. the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "close, etc. the stable door after the horse has bolted" means to take action to prevent a negative consequence or problem, but only after it has already happened and cannot be undone. It suggests that the reaction or solution is too late and futile, as the damage has already been done.
  • boldly go where no man has gone before The idiom "boldly go where no man has gone before" refers to a willingness to explore new territory, take risks, or venture into the unknown and uncharted areas that nobody has previously ventured into or explored. It expresses a sense of bravery, curiosity, and pioneering spirit. This idiom is often associated with the famous opening line from the television show Star Trek: "Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before."
  • the wheel has turned full circle The idiom "the wheel has turned full circle" means that a situation has returned to where it started after a series of events or changes, essentially coming full circle. It implies that history repeats itself or that a cycle has been completed.
  • Has the cat got tongue? The idiom "Has the cat got your tongue?" is a figurative expression that is used to inquire why someone is not speaking or being unusually quiet. It is often used in situations where someone is expected to speak or give a response, but they remain silent or hesitant.
  • a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client The idiom "a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client" is used to convey the idea that individuals who choose to represent themselves in legal matters often make unwise decisions or lack the knowledge and objectivity that a trained lawyer would possess. It emphasizes the importance of seeking professional legal counsel for better outcomes in legal proceedings.
  • worm (has) turned The idiom "worm (has) turned" means that someone who has been submissive or patient for a long time suddenly becomes defiant or rebellious. It refers to a situation where a meek or accommodating person reaches a breaking point, stands up for themselves, or rebels against mistreatment.
  • the black ox has trod upon (one's) toe The idiom "the black ox has trod upon (one's) toe" is an expressive way to describe someone's experience of misfortune, pain, or a period of hardship. It implies that an unexpected or unfortunate event has occurred, causing distress or trouble for the individual.
  • mouse that has but one hole is quickly taken The idiom "a mouse that has but one hole is quickly taken" means that if someone or something only has one option or solution, they are more vulnerable to danger or capture. It emphasizes the importance of having multiple options or alternatives to safeguard oneself or avoid risks.
  • time has come The idiom "time has come" refers to the moment when something is due or required to happen, indicating that the appropriate or opportune time for a particular event, action, or decision has arrived. It suggests that all circumstances and preparation are in place for a long-awaited occurrence.
  • success has many fathers, failure is an orphan The idiom "success has many fathers, failure is an orphan" means that when there is success or accomplishment, there are often many people or parties who claim to have contributed to it or take credit for it. On the other hand, when there is failure or something goes wrong, nobody wants to take responsibility or accept blame for it.
  • Every man has his price. The idiom "Every man has his price" means that every person can be bought or influenced if the right offer or incentive is presented to them. It suggests that there is a point at which anyone is willing to compromise their morals, principles, or convictions if the temptation is great enough.
  • what has been seen cannot be unseen The idiom "what has been seen cannot be unseen" means that once someone has witnessed something, especially something unpleasant or disturbing, they cannot forget about it or erase it from their memory. It suggests that certain images or experiences are so impactful that they have a lasting effect on a person's mind.
  • the wheel has come full circle The idiom "the wheel has come full circle" means that a situation has returned to its original state or circumstances. It suggests that events have unfolded in a way that brings things back to where they started, often with a sense of inevitability or irony.
  • after the dust has settled The idiom "after the dust has settled" refers to a situation or event that has calmed down or reached a state of stability after a tumultuous or chaotic period. It implies that there has been enough time for emotions to subside, for decisions to be made, or for the consequences of a particular event to be understood.
  • has got game The idiom "has got game" refers to someone who is skilled, talented, or highly proficient in a particular activity, especially in a competitive or challenging context. It is often used to describe someone who is exceptionally suave, confident, or successful in romantic pursuits or social interactions.
  • word has it The idiom "word has it" means that there is some information or rumor going around, and people are talking about it. It refers to a situation where there is a general perception or understanding among people regarding a specific matter.
  • (one) has made (one's) bed The idiom "(one) has made (one's) bed" means that a person has created or caused a difficult or unpleasant situation for themselves, usually as a result of their own actions or decisions. It implies that they are now compelled to face the consequences or deal with the negative outcome they brought upon themselves.
  • close the stable door after the horse has bolted The idiom "close the stable door after the horse has bolted" means taking actions too late to prevent or rectify a problem that has already occurred or cannot be reversed. It refers to the futility of trying to fix a situation that has already gone terribly wrong and emphasizes the importance of being proactive and taking preventative measures beforehand.
  • every dog has its day The idiom "every dog has its day" means that everyone will eventually have a moment of glory or success, regardless of their previous failures or lack of recognition. It implies that even those who are often overlooked or underestimated will eventually have an opportunity to shine or be victorious.
  • growing youth has a wolf in his belly
  • the black ox has trod upon (one's) foot
  • has

Similar spelling words for HAS

Conjugate verb Has

CONDITIONAL

I would has
you would has
he/she/it would has
we would has
they would has
I would have
we would have
you would have
he/she/it would have
they would have

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be having
you would be having
he/she/it would be having
we would be having
they would be having

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have has
you would have has
he/she/it would have has
we would have has
they would have has

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been having
you would have been having
he/she/it would have been having
we would have been having
they would have been having

FUTURE

I will have
you will have
he/she/it will have
we will have
they will have

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be having
you will be having
he/she/it will be having
we will be having
they will be having

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have had
you will have had
he/she/it will have had
we will have had
they will have had

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been having
you will have been having
he/she/it will have been having
we will have been having
they will have been having

IMPERATIVE

you have
we let´s have

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to have

PAST

I had
you had
he/she/it had
we had
they had

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was having
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he/she/it was having
we were having
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PAST PARTICIPLE

had

PAST PERFECT

I had had
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we had had
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PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been having
you had been having
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we had been having
they had been having

PRESENT

I have
you have
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we have
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PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am having
you are having
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we are having
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PRESENT PARTICIPLE

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PRESENT PERFECT

I have had
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PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been having
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I would have had
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