How Do You Spell HAT?

Pronunciation: [hˈat] (IPA)

The word "hat" is spelled with the letters h, a, and t. In IPA phonetic transcription, it is pronounced /hæt/. The first sound /h/ is an unvoiced glottal fricative, followed by the short vowel sound /æ/ which is pronounced with an open mouth and the tongue lowered. The final sound /t/ is an unvoiced dental or alveolar stop, pronounced by briefly stopping the airflow from the mouth. Overall, the spelling of "hat" accurately represents its phonetic pronunciation in English.

HAT Meaning and Definition

A hat is an article of clothing worn on the head, typically made of various materials such as fabric, straw, or felt, and designed to cover and protect the head from various elements. It is characterized by its crown, which is the part that fits snugly on the head, and a brim, which is the wide, rimmed edge that extends outward from the crown. Hats come in a wide variety of styles, shapes, and sizes, catering to different occasions, cultural traditions, fashion trends, or functional purposes.

Hats serve a multitude of purposes. They can provide shade from the sun, protecting the face and eyes from harmful UV rays. Some hats are designed to protect the head from cold, wind, or rain, providing warmth and insulation. In certain professions, hats also serve as a part of a uniform, representing a particular organization, occupation, or social status.

Beyond their practical functionality, hats are often worn as fashion accessories, allowing individuals to express their personal style and enhance their overall appearance. They can be embellished with various decorations like feathers, ribbons, or bows, and adorned with unique designs or patterns. Hats have been an integral part of human history and culture, symbolizing different meanings across various societies.

Top Common Misspellings for HAT *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for HAT

Etymology of HAT

The word hat originated from the Old English word hæt, which can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic word hattuz. The term further evolved from the Proto-Indo-European root kad- meaning cover or protect. It is related to other Germanic languages such as Old Norse hattur and Old High German hut.

Idioms with the word HAT

  • pass the hat The idiom "pass the hat" refers to the act of collecting money from a group of people, usually for a specific cause or individual. It involves each person contributing a certain amount of money by passing a hat or container around to collect the donations. This phrase is often used in informal settings or small-scale fundraising efforts.
  • old hat The idiom "old hat" refers to something that is outdated, no longer interesting, or widely known and familiar. It implies that the subject or concept has become worn out or unexciting due to its long-standing existence or lack of novelty.
  • under one's hat The idiom "under one's hat" refers to keeping a secret or concealing information. It implies that someone is keeping something private or not sharing their thoughts, plans, or knowledge with others.
  • if the hat fits(, wear it) The expression "if the hat fits, wear it" means that if you believe or perceive a statement or criticism to be true about yourself, then you should accept it and acknowledge that it applies to you. It implies that if someone is making a generalization or referring to a certain characteristic, and you believe it accurately describes you, then you should not deny it, but rather accept it.
  • keep (something) under (one's) hat The idiom "keep (something) under (one's) hat" means to keep something confidential or keep it secret. It refers to not sharing information or keeping it hidden from others.
  • lift (one's) hat The idiom "lift one's hat" typically refers to the act of taking off or tipping one's hat as a gesture of respect, acknowledgement, or greeting towards someone. It is a traditional and polite way to show courtesy and recognition towards others.
  • put (one's) name in the hat The idiom "put (one's) name in the hat" means to express interest or willingness to participate or be considered for something, usually a competition, appointment, or opportunity. It implies throwing one's name into a pool of potential candidates or participants, hoping to be chosen or selected.
  • tin hat The idiom "tin hat" refers to a colloquial term that describes a protective helmet, especially one made of metal or a similar material like tin. It is often used metaphorically to suggest preparing oneself for potential danger, criticism, or unpleasant situations.
  • tip (one's) hat The idiom "tip (one's) hat" means to make a respectful gesture by lifting or touching one's hat as a sign of greeting, acknowledgment, or farewell.
  • tip your hat The idiom "tip your hat" means to show respect or appreciation for someone or something, typically by making a gesture of removing or lifting one's hat as a sign of acknowledgment or admiration. It can also imply showing deference or giving praise to someone.
  • top hat The idiom "top hat" refers to a formal or high-ranking position or status. It can also represent an upper-class or affluent lifestyle. The term originates from the traditional formal hat, the top hat, which was commonly associated with aristocracy and elegance. Consequently, using the idiom "top hat" implies someone holding a position of authority, wealth, or privilege.
  • toss (one's) name in the hat The idiom "toss (one's) name in the hat" means to express one's interest or intention to participate or be considered for something. It is often used when referring to joining a competition, running for a position, or offering oneself as a candidate for a particular opportunity. It implies putting oneself forward as a potential contender or participant.
  • pass the hat around The idiom "pass the hat around" refers to collecting money from a group of people for a particular purpose or cause. It originated from the practice of physically passing a hat among a group of individuals to gather contributions or donations. Nowadays, the idiom is often used metaphorically, meaning to ask a group of people for financial support or contributions.
  • pull sth out of the bag/hat The idiom "pull something out of the bag/hat" means to suddenly produce or find a solution, idea, or achievement, especially when faced with a challenging or difficult situation. It implies being able to successfully deliver or perform unexpectedly, often surprising others.
  • home is where you hang your hat The idiom "home is where you hang your hat" means that one's home is wherever they feel comfortable and at ease, regardless of the physical location. It emphasizes the idea that home is not necessarily a specific place, but rather a state of personal belonging and comfort.
  • take hat off to "Take hat off to" is an idiomatic expression that is used to convey respect, admiration, or acknowledgement for someone's achievements, actions, or qualities. It suggests removing one's hat as a gesture of admiration or recognition, similar to a salute or applause. It is often used when someone wants to express their deep appreciation or admiration for someone else's accomplishments.
  • throw (one's) name in the hat To "throw (one's) name in the hat" means to express interest or candidacy for a particular opportunity or position. It refers to the act of adding oneself as a potential contender in a selection process or competition.
  • hang your hat The idiom "hang your hat" means to settle or establish oneself in a particular place, usually for a period of time. It typically refers to finding a temporary or permanent residence, a place to belong, or a sense of familiarity and comfort.
  • be picked out of a hat The idiom "be picked out of a hat" refers to a selection process where a choice is made randomly or arbitrarily, often without any specific qualifications or reasons. It suggests that the decision is made purely by chance or luck, similar to drawing a name or item from a hat.
  • throw hat in the ring The idiom "throw hat in the ring" means to announce or declare one's candidacy or intention to participate in a competition, contest, or endeavor. It originated from the practice of a person literally throwing their hat into a boxing or wrestling ring as a sign of their intention to fight. In a broader sense, it implies actively entering the race or joining the fray.
  • hat trick The idiom "hat trick" refers to a notable achievement, particularly in sports, when a player achieves three significant accomplishments in a single game or event. It originated from the tradition of awarding a hat to a player who scored three goals in a game of ice hockey. It can also be used more broadly to denote any remarkable accomplishment or series of three successful outcomes.
  • smw to hang hat The idiom "somewhere/someplace to hang (one's) hat" refers to a location where a person feels comfortable, at home, or can settle down. It implies finding a place to live or stay temporarily that provides a sense of belonging or security.
  • hard hat The idiom "hard hat" typically refers to someone who works in a job or industry that requires physical labor or manual work. It specifically embodies the image of wearing a protective hard hat as a symbol of working in construction or other similar trades. The term can also connote qualities such as resilience, perseverance, and a strong work ethic.
  • be all hat and no cattle The idiom "be all hat and no cattle" is typically used to describe someone who talks a lot or boasts about something, but lacks the necessary skills, abilities, or knowledge to back it up. It implies that the person is all show and no substance, akin to someone wearing a cowboy hat but lacking any actual experience or ownership of cattle.
  • raise your hat to someone The idiom "raise your hat to someone" is a figurative expression that means to show admiration, respect, or approval for someone. It originates from the act of lifting one's hat as a sign of respect or greeting. It can be used in contexts where one acknowledges another person's achievements, skills, or actions and offers them admiration or praise.
  • black hat (or white hat) The idiom "black hat (or white hat)" is derived from Western movies where the color of the cowboy's hat symbolized their moral alignment. In current usage, it refers to individuals or groups with malicious or benevolent intentions, respectively. The term is often associated with hackers and cybersecurity. Someone wearing a "black hat" engages in computer hacking for illegal or unethical purposes, while someone wearing a "white hat" uses hacking skills for ethical, defensive, or lawful purposes.
  • pull something/a rabbit out of the hat The idiom "pull something/a rabbit out of the hat" refers to the act of doing or producing something unexpectedly and successfully, often in a challenging or critical situation. It originates from the popular image of a magician pulling a rabbit out of a hat, which is an impressive and surprising trick. It is often used to describe someone's ability to come up with a clever or unexpected solution or accomplishment, especially when it was thought to be impossible or unlikely.
  • go hat in hand to (someone) The idiom "go hat in hand to (someone)" means to humble oneself or seek assistance from someone with a sense of humility or need. It refers to approaching someone in a subservient or supplicant manner, often for help, forgiveness, or a favor. It implies a willingness to put aside pride and ask for assistance or forgiveness sincerely.
  • pick something out of a hat The idiom "pick something out of a hat" means to choose or select something randomly and without any specific method or preference. It implies a decision made without much thought or consideration, often leaving the outcome to chance. The origin of the expression comes from the act of selecting a random item by reaching into a hat that conceals multiple options.
  • be wearing teacher's etc. hat The idiom "be wearing teacher's hat" is an expression that refers to someone taking on the role and responsibilities of a teacher or instructor. It indicates that a person is assuming a position of authority or expertise in a certain situation, often involving guiding or instructing others.
  • hang up your hat The idiom "hang up your hat" means to settle down or permanently stop doing something, usually referring to retiring or quitting a job or a certain lifestyle. It implies the act of putting an end to an activity or a particular phase in one's life.
  • all hat and no cattle The idiom "all hat and no cattle" refers to someone who talks or boasts a lot but lacks the skills, knowledge, or experience to back up their claims or show results. It implies that someone may appear impressive or influential in their outward demeanor or appearance (symbolized by the hat), but they lack substance or substance (symbolized by the cattle).
  • a hat trick A hat trick is an idiom used in sports, particularly in hockey, soccer, and cricket, to describe the achievement of scoring three goals or achieving three distinct successes in a single game or event.
  • at the drop of a hat The idiom "at the drop of a hat" means to do something immediately or without hesitation, often in response to a simple or spontaneous event. It implies being highly responsive and ready to act quickly.
  • keep under one's hat The idiom "keep under one's hat" means to keep something a secret and not share it with others. It implies discretion and not revealing private or confidential information.
  • hang hat on The idiom "hang hat on" means to rely or depend on something as a source of stability, comfort, or success. It is often used to express confidence or trust in a particular person, thing, or idea. It originates from the literal act of hanging a hat on a hook or rack, suggesting a sense of settling down or finding a secure place.
  • be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat To "be wearing your teacher's/lawyer's etc. hat" means to adopt the mindset or assume the role and responsibilities of a particular profession or role, even when one is not actually functioning in that capacity. It suggests that a person is behaving or thinking in a way that is associated with a specific profession or occupation, often showing traits such as authority, knowledge, or professionalism in their actions or decisions, comparable to those of a teacher, lawyer, etc.
  • doff your hat to sb/sth The idiom "doff your hat to sb/sth" means to show respect or admiration for someone or something. It is a figurative expression derived from the act of taking off one's hat as a sign of respect. It implies acknowledging someone's achievements, abilities, or qualities.
  • take off hat The idiom "take off hat" typically refers to showing respect, admiration, or appreciation for someone or something. It implies removing one's hat as a gesture of acknowledgment, recognition, or praise.
  • take off (one's) hat (to someone or something) The idiom "take off (one's) hat (to someone or something)" is an expression that conveys deep admiration, respect, or praise for someone or something. It implies recognizing someone's exceptional qualities, skills, achievements, or actions and acknowledging them. It often indicates the highest level of respect and could be seen as metaphorically removing one's hat as a gesture of admiration or deference.
  • pull one out of the hat "Pull one out of the hat" is an idiom that means to unexpectedly produce or achieve something impressive or successful. It refers to the act of performing a magic trick where a magician pulls a rabbit out of a hat, which is considered an astonishing feat. In a broader sense, the idiom suggests surprising or surpassing expectations by accomplishing something remarkable in a manner that was unexpected or seemingly impossible.
  • toss hat into the ring The idiom "toss hat into the ring" means to enter a competition or to show interest in participating in a contest or undertaking. It implies willingly putting oneself forward as a contender or candidate for something.
  • pull (someone or something) out of a hat The idiom "pull (someone or something) out of a hat" means to unexpectedly produce or find a solution or idea, often in a time of need or difficulty. It refers to the act of a magician pulling something out of a hat, which was not visible or anticipated before. It implies coming up with a surprising or clever solution or resource to address a problem or situation.
  • hold on to your hat The idiom "hold on to your hat" means to brace oneself or prepare for a potentially shocking or surprising event or situation. It is a way of expressing excitement or anticipation while highlighting the need for being mentally and emotionally prepared.
  • throw your hat in the ring The idiom "throw your hat in the ring" means to declare oneself as a candidate for a job, position, or opportunity. It indicates the action of putting oneself forward and actively participating in a competition or contest.
  • throw (one's) hat in(to) the ring The idiomatic expression "throw (one's) hat in(to) the ring" means to offer oneself or nominate oneself as a candidate for a competition, election, or any form of contest. It implies actively joining and showing one's intention to participate and compete with others.
  • I take my hat off to sb The idiom "I take my hat off to someone" means to show admiration, respect, or appreciation for someone. It is a way of acknowledging someone's achievements, skills, or qualities.
  • pull a rabbit out of (one's)/the hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of (one's)/the hat" is used to describe someone doing something surprising, unexpected, or impressive, often during a difficult or challenging situation, without any prior indication. It refers to the magician's trick of pulling a live rabbit out of an apparently empty hat, emphasizing the element of surprise and resourcefulness in overcoming obstacles. This idiom is commonly used to express the ability to find a creative or unconventional solution to a problem or to achieve a successful outcome through seemingly impossible means.
  • throw one's hat into the ring The idiom "throw one's hat into the ring" means to announce one's intention to compete or participate in a contest, election, or competition. It symbolizes the act of joining in and declaring oneself as a candidate or a competitor.
  • pick (someone or something) out of a hat The idiom "pick (someone or something) out of a hat" refers to a random or arbitrary selection process, often associated with contests, decisions, or choices. It means to choose without any particular reason or preference, as if selecting blindly from a hat.
  • take your hat off to somebody The idiom "take your hat off to somebody" means to show admiration, respect, or acknowledgement towards someone for their accomplishments, skills, or qualities.
  • pass the hat round/around The idiom "pass the hat round/around" refers to the action of collecting money or donations from a group of people, typically by passing around a hat or container, in order to raise funds for a particular cause or purpose. It implies a collective effort of pooling resources together for a shared goal or to help someone in need.
  • go hat in hand The idiom "go hat in hand" refers to a situation where someone approaches another person or organization humbly or submissively, usually to ask for a favor, assistance, or forgiveness. It implies a sense of humility, respect, and dependence on the other party's goodwill.
  • take (one's) hat off to (someone or something) The idiom "take (one's) hat off to (someone or something)" means to express admiration, respect, or recognition for someone or something. It implies acknowledging someone's achievements, skills, or actions, often in a figurative sense of removing one's hat as a sign of respect.
  • brass hat The idiom "brass hat" refers to a person of high rank or authority, typically in a military or bureaucratic organization. It is often used to describe those in positions of power who make important decisions or give orders. The term "brass hat" originates from the military tradition of high-ranking officers wearing brass insignia on their hats to distinguish themselves.
  • keep something under your hat The idiom "keep something under your hat" means to keep something secret or confidential, to not disclose or reveal information to others.
  • pull a rabbit out of a hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of a hat" means to accomplish something seemingly impossible or to produce an unexpected solution or result. It refers to the magic trick where a magician reveals a rabbit from an empty hat, implying the ability to create surprising outcomes or solutions.
  • He wears a ten-dollar hat on a five-cent head The phrase "He wears a ten-dollar hat on a five-cent head" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who may have expensive or extravagant outer qualities or appearances, such as a fancy hat, but lacks intelligence, wisdom, or common sense in their thoughts or actions. Essentially, it suggests that while the person may seem impressive on the outside, they lack substance or depth.
  • eat one’s hat The idiom "eat one's hat" means to express certainty about something that is highly unlikely or improbable. It implies a strong belief and a willingness to bet or take extreme action if proven wrong.
  • black hat The idiom "black hat" typically refers to someone who engages in malicious or illegal activities, specifically in the realm of computer hacking or unethical online behavior. This term originates from Western movies where villains often wore black hats to signify their malicious intentions as opposed to the heroes who wore white hats. In the context of cybersecurity and hacking, a "black hat" individual or group represents a hacker or cybercriminal who exploits vulnerabilities in computer systems for personal gain or to cause harm.
  • pass the hat round The idiom "pass the hat round" means to collect money or contributions from a group of people, typically by passing a hat or container for donations. It can also refer to a fundraising or charity effort where individuals contribute money towards a common cause.
  • (with) hat in hand The idiom "(with) hat in hand" is used to describe when someone is feeling humbled, submissive, or in a position of supplication, usually seeking forgiveness, help, or a favor from someone else. It originates from the act of removing one's hat as a sign of respect, especially when approaching someone of higher status or authority. Therefore, "with hat in hand" metaphorically suggests a person's willingness to be deferential or apologetic in a situation.
  • pull out of a hat The idiom "pull out of a hat" refers to the act of producing or coming up with something unexpectedly or seemingly miraculously, often in difficult or challenging situations. It suggests the ability to solve a problem, find a solution, or create something impressive or surprising with great skill or resourcefulness, as if performing a magic trick.
  • pull a rabbit out of the hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of the hat" refers to performing an unexpected or seemingly impossible feat, especially one that saves the day or solves a problem, often by producing a remarkable solution or result out of nowhere. This expression is derived from traditional magic shows, where a magician would typically surprise the audience by conjuring a rabbit seemingly from thin air, as if pulling it out of a hat.
  • wear another hat To "wear another hat" means to take on a different role or assume additional responsibilities, often outside of one's usual area of expertise or job description. It implies adapting to a new or different task or situation.
  • throw one's hat in the ring The idiom "throw one's hat in the ring" means to announce or declare one's candidacy or willingness to participate in a competition, contest, or challenging situation. It refers to the act of literally throwing one's hat into a ring or arena to show readiness to engage in a fight or battle. It is commonly used to describe someone's decision to enter a political race or join a competitive event.
  • talk through one's hat The idiom "talk through one's hat" means to speak about something without having sufficient knowledge or understanding of the subject matter, typically resulting in making unreliable or unfounded statements. It suggests that the person is speaking in a careless or insincere manner, often bluffing or pretending to have knowledge or authority they don't possess.
  • a tip of the hat The idiom "a tip of the hat" refers to a gesture or act of acknowledging, showing respect, or paying tribute to someone or something. It is often used to express appreciation, admiration, or familiarity towards a person or their achievements. The phrase originated from the physical action of briefly raising one's hat as a form of salutation or acknowledgment.
  • toss one's hat into the ring To "toss one's hat into the ring" means to announce or declare one's candidacy or willingness to participate in a competition, contest, or challenging situation. It signifies a readiness to actively engage and compete with others in order to achieve a desired goal or outcome.
  • throw one’s hat in the ring The idiom "throw one's hat in the ring" means to officially or enthusiastically enter a competition, contest, or challenge, often by expressing or demonstrating one's interest or willingness to participate.
  • pull it out of the hat The idiom "pull it out of the hat" refers to the act of producing a clever solution, idea, or result unexpectedly or with great skill, especially in a difficult or challenging situation. It conveys the idea of performing a magical or surprising feat as if by magic, similar to a magician pulling a rabbit out of a hat.
  • take your hat off to sb The idiom "take your hat off to someone" means to show respect, admiration, or appreciation for someone's achievement or actions.
  • toss (one's) hat in(to) the ring The idiom "toss (one's) hat in(to) the ring" means to officially announce one's candidacy for a position or to actively participate in a competition or contest. It implies showing willingness, determination, or ambition to be involved or compete. The phrase originates from the act of throwing one's hat into a prizefighting or boxing ring, symbolizing the person's readiness to face opponents. It has now been generalized to any context where a person declares their intentions to compete or seek a position.
  • throw (one's) hat over the windmill The idiom "throw (one's) hat over the windmill" refers to taking a risk or embarking on a daring adventure, without considering the potential consequences or obstacles. It stems from the story of Don Quixote, a literary character who famously jousts with windmills, mistaking them for giants. It suggests a whimsical or impulsive attitude towards achieving one's goals, often disregarding common sense or practicality.
  • talk through one’s hat The idiom "talk through one’s hat" means to speak or make statements that are exaggerated, false, or without any real knowledge or understanding of the topic being discussed. It implies that the person is talking nonsense or making things up as they go along.
  • somewhere to hang hat The idiom "somewhere to hang your hat" refers to a place where one can feel comfortable, settle down, or call home. It signifies finding a location, whether literal or figurative, where a person can relax, feel secure, and have a sense of belonging.
  • take your hat off to The idiom "take your hat off to" means to show admiration, respect, or acceptance of someone's achievements, abilities, or actions.
  • hang hat The idiom "hang hat" typically means to settle in a particular place or establish oneself in a specific location, often for an extended period. It implies finding a home or a sense of belonging in a certain area.
  • hang (one's) hat on (something) The idiom "hang (one's) hat on (something)" means to fully rely on or base one's confidence, belief, or success on a particular thing or idea. It implies that a person considers that thing or idea as reliable and dependable, and they trust it completely.
  • throw your hat into the ring The idiom "throw your hat into the ring" means to announce or declare one's candidacy or intention to compete in a contest or competition. It implies actively participating and entering into a challenge or opportunity. This expression originated from the practice of fighters or boxers throwing their hats into the boxing ring to signal their readiness to engage in a match.
  • wear more than one hat The idiom "wear more than one hat" means to have multiple responsibilities or roles in a particular situation or organization. It refers to an individual who performs different functions or takes on various tasks simultaneously.
  • i’ll eat my hat The idiom "I'll eat my hat" is an exaggerated statement expressing disbelief or doubt, often used when one is making a prediction or stating something unlikely to happen. It implies that the speaker is so certain of their statement being wrong that they are willing to do something highly improbable, like eating their own hat, if proven otherwise.
  • knock somebody/something into a cocked hat The idiom "knock somebody/something into a cocked hat" means to defeat or outperform someone or something to such an extent that it renders their efforts useless or irrelevant. It suggests a complete and overwhelming superiority or domination.
  • be talking through your hat The idiom "be talking through your hat" means to speak without knowledge or understanding about a certain topic. It implies that someone is either making things up or exaggerating what they are saying, often to deceive or impress others.
  • Hang on to your hat! "Hang on to your hat!" is an idiomatic expression often used as a warning or advice to someone to be prepared or brace themselves for a potentially surprising, exciting, or challenging situation that is about to happen. It implies holding on tightly to one's hat, which can be seen as a metaphorical representation of holding onto one's composure, stability, or control amid unexpected or turbulent circumstances.
  • pull a rabbit out of hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of a hat" refers to a sudden and impressive action that solves a problem or achieves success unexpectedly or magically. It is derived from magic tricks where a magician would seemingly produce a rabbit by reaching into an empty top hat.
  • (as) black as (one's) hat The idiom "(as) black as (one's) hat" is often used to describe something or someone that is totally evil, sinister, or morally corrupt. It refers to the color black, which is commonly associated with darkness, secrecy, and negativity.
  • eat (one's) hat The idiom "eat (one's) hat" is an expression used to convey a strong conviction or certainty that something will happen or turn out in a particular way, even though it may seem unlikely or improbable. It implies that the speaker is so confident in their prediction that they would metaphorically consume their own hat (or do something equally implausible) if proven wrong.
  • I'll eat my hat The idiom "I'll eat my hat" is a statement used to express extreme disbelief or certainty that something will not happen. It is usually said when someone considers the likelihood of a particular event occurring to be very low, and implies that if the event does happen, they are willing to do something as unlikely as eating their own hat.
  • be talking through hat The idiom "be talking through hat" means to speak or express oneself in a way that is nonsensical, untrue, or without having sufficient knowledge or understanding about the topic being discussed. It implies that the person is making things up or simply talking without any credibility.
  • hang (up) (one's) hat The idiom "hang (up) (one's) hat" means to settle down or make oneself at home in a particular place, typically for a long period of time. It implies finding a comfortable or permanent residence or job in a specific location. It can also indicate feeling secure, content, or belonging in a certain environment.
  • eat your hat The idiom "eat your hat" is a colloquial expression used to express extreme doubt or skepticism about something happening or being true. It implies that if the unlikely event or statement does occur, the speaker would be compelled to do something as unlikely as eating their own hat.
  • the perfect hat trick The idiom "the perfect hat trick" refers to a term used in sports, particularly in football (soccer), to describe a situation where a player scores three goals in a single game using their left foot, right foot, and their head. Thus, it refers to a striker's achievement of scoring a goal in each possible way, showcasing their exceptional versatility and skill.
  • stovepipe hat The idiom "stovepipe hat" refers to a tall, narrow, and cylindrical hat that was popular during the 19th century. It is typically made of felt or silk and has a straight brim. The term is used metaphorically to describe an old-fashioned or outdated style or manner of dress, behavior, or thinking.
  • hang one's hat (up) (somewhere) The idiom "hang one's hat (up) (somewhere)" is commonly used to refer to someone finding a place to live or settle down. It indicates that a person has chosen a specific location as their home or base of operations. The phrase can also represent feeling comfortable and at ease in a particular place.
  • hat in hand The idiom "hat in hand" refers to a person appearing humble, contrite, or in a subservient position, usually seeking forgiveness, assistance, or favor from someone who has authority or power over them. It typically implies a person approaching another with a sense of humility or deference, metaphorically suggesting that they would be willing to remove their hat and hold it respectfully as a sign of respect or supplication.
  • I take my hat off to The idiom "I take my hat off to" is a metaphorical phrase used to express admiration, respect, or praise for someone's achievements, qualities, or actions. It implies acknowledging and showing genuine appreciation for someone's accomplishment or behavior, often highlighting their exceptional skills, courage, or character.
  • talk through your hat The idiom "talk through your hat" means to speak about something without having proper knowledge or understanding, often resulting in making inaccurate or nonsensical statements. It refers to people who pretend to be knowledgeable or authoritative on a subject they actually know little about.
  • smw to hang (up) one's hat The idiom "to hang (up) one's hat" refers to retiring or settling down in a particular place. It implies finding a permanent home or a place where one feels comfortable and at ease. It stems from the literal act of hanging up one's hat when arriving at a place and taking off one's coat, indicating a sense of stopping or settling in.
  • He wears a tendollar hat on a fivecent head. The idiom "He wears a tendollar hat on a fivecent head" is used to describe someone who presents themselves as more important or intelligent than they actually are. It implies that the person's thoughts or ideas do not match the perceived value they place on themselves. In simpler terms, it suggests that someone is trying to appear more significant or knowledgeable than they truly are, highlighting a mismatch between their external appearance and inner abilities.
  • pass the hat around/round The idiom "pass the hat around/round" refers to a collective effort of raising money or gathering contributions from others, usually by physically passing a hat or container to collect funds. It signifies a communal act of pooling resources, usually for a specific cause or to help someone in need.
  • take one's hat off to The idiom "take one's hat off to" means to express admiration, respect, or praise for someone or something. It originates from the act of removing one's hat as a sign of respect or acknowledgment.
  • talk through hat The idiom "talk through hat" means to speak or provide information that is exaggeration, nonsense, or completely untrue. It refers to someone who is not knowledgeable on a topic but pretends to have authority or expertise by making false claims or offering unsupported opinions.
  • Here's your hat, what's your hurry? The idiom "Here's your hat, what's your hurry?" is a playful or sarcastic way of telling someone to leave quickly or hurry up. It is often used when you want to express impatience or show that you are ready for someone to leave.
  • talk out of (one's) hat The idiom "talk out of (one's) hat" means to speak without knowledge or authority, making false or baseless statements. It refers to someone who is making up information or pretending to know something they don't.
  • be talking through (one's) hat The idiom "be talking through (one's) hat" means to speak confidently or assertively about a subject that one has little to no knowledge or understanding of. It implies that the person is speaking without having any supporting facts or evidence to back up their statements, essentially making things up or talking nonsense.
  • knock something into a cocked hat "Knock something into a cocked hat" is an idiom that means to outdo or surpass something or someone significantly, making it or them appear insignificant or inferior. It implies the act of defeating or surpassing a previous standard or benchmark with ease and confidence.
  • put (one's) hat in(to) the ring The idiom "put (one's) hat in(to) the ring" means to officially enter or offer oneself as a candidate or participant in a contest, competition, or endeavor. It is often used in the context of politics, elections, or job applications, suggesting a willingness to compete or seek an opportunity.
  • take your hat off to someone The idiom "take your hat off to someone" means to publicly acknowledge and respect someone's achievements, skills, or qualities. It signifies a high level of admiration and recognition for someone's accomplishments.
  • throw/toss your hat in the ring The idiom "throw/toss your hat in the ring" means to declare one's interest or candidacy for a position, competition, or opportunity. It implies a willingness to participate and take a chance on something, often in a competitive or challenging context. The phrase originates from the tradition of boxing or wrestling matches where fighters would toss their hats into the ring to signify their readiness to compete.
  • pick, etc. something out of a hat The idiom "pick something out of a hat" means to make a random or arbitrary selection without any prior thought or consideration. It suggests choosing something purely by chance or luck, similar to pulling an object from a hat at random.
  • knock into a cocked hat The idiom "knock into a cocked hat" means to completely surpass or defeat something or someone with great ease and superiority. It implies making something else appear insignificant, ineffective, or obsolete in comparison.
  • pull a rabbit out of your hat The idiom "pull a rabbit out of your hat" means to suddenly and unexpectedly produce a solution or achieve something deemed difficult or impossible. It originates from the magician's trick of appearing to make a rabbit magically appear from an empty hat, which typically astonishes the audience. Therefore, it implies the ability to accomplish unexpected feats or find creative solutions in challenging situations.
  • white hat The idiom "white hat" refers to an ethical and lawful approach or behavior. It originated from Western movies where the hero or protagonist wore a white hat, symbolizing their virtuous and honorable character. In modern usage, it is often associated with computer hackers who use their skills and knowledge to identify and solve security vulnerabilities, often working in an authorized and legal capacity to protect systems and networks.
  • wear (one's particular profession's) hat The idiom "wear (one's particular profession's) hat" refers to the act of assuming or adopting the mindset, perspective, or role associated with a specific profession or occupation. It implies that a person is applying their professional expertise, knowledge, or skills to a situation, typically outside of their professional domain.
  • knock sth into a cocked hat To "knock something into a cocked hat" means to surpass or outperform something or someone to such an extent that it renders them irrelevant or insignificant. This idiom implies a complete and overwhelming victory or superiority.
  • keep under hat The idiom "keep under hat" means to keep something a secret or to keep something confidential.
  • eat hat
  • put the tin hat on (something)
  • under hat
  • fling (one's) hat over the windmill To take a risk or chance; to attempt something daring or adventurous.
  • have a brick in (one's) hat The idiom "have a brick in (one's) hat" is a colloquial expression that means to be angry or upset about something. It suggests that the person is carrying around a heavy burden or grudge, represented by the brick in their hat. It implies that the person is harboring negative feelings or emotions that are weighing them down.
  • big hat, no cattle The idiom "big hat, no cattle" refers to someone who appears or tries to act important or wealthy, but who lacks substance, experience, or credibility to back up their claims. Essentially, it means pretending to be something you are not.
  • brick in (one's) hat The idiom "brick in (one's) hat" refers to a secret plan, idea, or intention that one keeps hidden or concealed. It alludes to the idea of having something secretive or hidden under one's hat, like a brick.

Similar spelling words for HAT

Plural form of HAT is HATS

Conjugate verb Hat

CONDITIONAL

I would hat
you would hat
he/she/it would hat
we would hat
they would hat

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be hating
you would be hating
he/she/it would be hating
we would be hating
they would be hating

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have hat
you would have hat
he/she/it would have hat
we would have hat
they would have hat

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been hating
you would have been hating
he/she/it would have been hating
we would have been hating
they would have been hating

FUTURE

I will hat
you will hat
he/she/it will hat
we will hat
they will hat

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be hating
you will be hating
he/she/it will be hating
we will be hating
they will be hating

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have hated
you will have hated
he/she/it will have hated
we will have hated
they will have hated

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been hating
you will have been hating
he/she/it will have been hating
we will have been hating
they will have been hating

IMPERATIVE

you hat
we let´s hat

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to hat

PAST

I hated
you hated
he/she/it hated
we hated
they hated

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was hating
you were hating
he/she/it was hating
we were hating
they were hating

PAST PARTICIPLE

hated

PAST PERFECT

I had hated
you had hated
he/she/it had hated
we had hated
they had hated

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been hating
you had been hating
he/she/it had been hating
we had been hating
they had been hating

PRESENT

I hat
you hat
he/she/it hats
we hat
they hat

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am hating
you are hating
he/she/it is hating
we are hating
they are hating

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

hating

PRESENT PERFECT

I have hated
you have hated
he/she/it has hated
we have hated
they have hated

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been hating
you have been hating
he/she/it has been hating
we have been hating
they have been hating

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