How Do You Spell HAVE?

Pronunciation: [hˈav] (IPA)

The English word "have" is spelled with the letters h-a-v-e. However, its pronunciation involves the use of two different sounds, /h/ and /əv/. The first is a voiceless glottal fricative, produced by pushing air through the space between the vocal cords. The second is a weak vowel sound, commonly known as schwa, represented by the symbol /ə/. When these two sounds are combined, they form the word "have". Despite the fact that the spelling of this word does not reflect its actual pronunciation accurately, native speakers are able to use context cues to identify it correctly.

HAVE Meaning and Definition

Have is a versatile verb with multiple meanings and uses. Primarily, it functions as an auxiliary and ordinary verb in different contexts. As an auxiliary verb, "have" is used in forming the perfect tenses, expressing past actions, states, or conditions. For example, "I have completed the task" or "She has been to Italy."

As an ordinary verb, "have" has a broad range of meanings. It can denote the possession or ownership of something, indicating that someone is in physical or mental control of an object or quality. For instance, "I have a car" or "He has a strong character."

Furthermore, "have" can imply experiencing or partaking in an action or event. It suggests the involvement or participation in an activity. For example, "We have lunch at 1 pm" or "She had a great time at the party."

Additionally, "have" can indicate the existence or presence of certain qualities or characteristics. It describes a state or condition in which someone possesses or displays a specific attribute. For instance, "He has a keen sense of humor" or "She has a warm personality."

Lastly, "have" can be used to express obligations, requirements, or necessities. It indicates that someone should or must do something. For example, "You have to finish your homework" or "We have to be there on time."

In summary, "have" serves as both an auxiliary and ordinary verb, encompassing meanings related to possession, experience, existence, and obligation. Its versatility allows for various applications in different contexts.

Top Common Misspellings for HAVE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for HAVE

Etymology of HAVE

The word "have" has its roots in the Old English language. It can be traced back to the Old English verb "habban", which meant "to own, possess; to hold, grasp". This Old English verb derived from the Proto-Germanic word "habjan", with a similar meaning. The Proto-Germanic term is further linked to the Proto-Indo-European root "*kap-", which signified "to grasp, seize". Over time, through various language changes and influences, the word "habban" evolved into "have" as we know it today in Modern English.

Idioms with the word HAVE

  • have sb/sth hanging round your neck The idiom "have sb/sth hanging round your neck" typically means to have someone or something as a burden or source of responsibility that one must deal with constantly or that is causing difficulties. It suggests a feeling of being weighed down or overwhelmed by the presence or influence of someone or something.
  • not have two pennies to rub together, at not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have two pennies to rub together" or "not have a penny to your name" refers to a state of extreme poverty, indicating that someone lacks even the most basic financial resources. It suggests that the person is so destitute that they don't even possess a small amount of money.
  • have a good run for your money The idiom "have a good run for your money" means to receive or experience a worthwhile, enjoyable, or satisfying experience or challenge in return for one's efforts, investment, or participation. It often refers to situations where one's expectations are met or exceeded, providing a sense of satisfaction or value for the time, money, or effort put in.
  • bury/have your head in the sand The idiom "bury/have your head in the sand" refers to someone who willfully chooses to ignore or avoid an unpleasant or problematic situation, often out of fear, denial, or a desire to avoid taking responsibility. It is based on the supposed behavior of an ostrich, which is often wrongly believed to bury its head in the sand when faced with danger.
  • have sb over a barrel The idiom "have sb over a barrel" means to have someone in a difficult or disadvantageous situation where they have no other option but to comply with one's demands or wishes. It implies that the person being "over a barrel" is trapped, powerless, and unable to negotiate or escape the situation.
  • have a lot to say for yourself The idiom "have a lot to say for yourself" is used to describe someone who is confident, assertive, and outspoken, often expressing their opinions or thoughts freely and without hesitation. It suggests that the person is not easily swayed or intimidated and is capable of effectively expressing themselves.
  • have nothing to say for yourself The idiom "have nothing to say for yourself" means to be unable or unwilling to provide a satisfactory explanation or justification for one's actions or behavior, often resulting in feelings of guilt, shame, or embarrassment. It implies that someone is unable to defend or explain their position or actions when faced with criticism or scrutiny.
  • what have you got to say for yourself? The idiom "what have you got to say for yourself?" is an expression used to demand an explanation, justification, or defense from someone for their actions, behavior, or the consequences of their actions. It typically conveys a sense of disappointment, disapproval, or anger towards the person being addressed, implying that they should provide reasons or apologies for their actions.
  • have a, sm, etc. say in sth The idiom "have a say in something" means to have the opportunity or right to express one's opinion or contribute to a decision-making process about a specific matter. It suggests being involved and having influence or control over the outcome or direction of something.
  • not have a civil word to say about sb The idiom "not have a civil word to say about someone" means that one cannot find anything good, positive, or polite to say about that person. It implies a complete lack of respect or appreciation for the individual mentioned.
  • have sb taped The idiom "have someone taped" typically means that someone understands or knows someone's true nature, character, habits, or abilities very well. It implies that the person has gained a deep understanding and knowledge of the individual's personality, behavior, or skills. It can also suggest that the person is experienced in predicting or understanding the actions and motives of the individual in different situations.
  • have a passing/slight/nodding acquaintance with sth The idiom "have a passing/slight/nodding acquaintance with something" refers to having a limited or superficial knowledge or familiarity with a particular subject, person, or thing. It implies that the knowledge or acquaintance is only superficial or cursory and not in-depth or extensive.
  • have a nodding acquaintance with sb/sth The idiom "have a nodding acquaintance with someone/something" means to have a very basic or superficial knowledge or familiarity with a person or a topic. It implies that the level of acquaintance is casual and limited, often only enough for a brief nod of recognition or acknowledgement.
  • have seen better days The idiom "have seen better days" refers to something or someone that was once in a better or more prosperous condition but is now worn out, tired, or past its prime. It suggests that the object or person has deteriorated in some way.
  • have to be seen to be believed The idiom "have to be seen to be believed" means that something is so extraordinary or incredible that it can only be fully understood or accepted by observing or witnessing it firsthand.
  • I/we'll (have to) see The idiom "I/we'll (have to) see" is used to express uncertainty or indecision about a matter. It implies that the person is not fully committed to an action or decision and needs more time or information before making a definite response.
  • you should have seen/heard sth/sb The idiom "you should have seen/heard sth/sb" means that something or someone was so remarkable, impressive, or surprising that the speaker wishes others had witnessed or experienced it. It indicates that the event, object, or person was truly exceptional and worth witnessing. It is commonly used to express regret that someone missed out on witnessing or experiencing something extraordinary.
  • have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects, plans, or opportunities that one is actively pursuing or involved in simultaneously. It implies that the person is engaged in various activities and keeping multiple options open in order to increase the chances of success or achieve desired outcomes.
  • have bats in the belfry The idiom "have bats in the belfry" means to be crazy or mentally unstable. It is often used humorously to describe someone who behaves eccentrically or irrationally. The term originates from the image of bats inhabiting the belfry of a church, a place associated with strange and erratic behavior by these nocturnal creatures.
  • have your (fair) share of sth The idiom "have your (fair) share of sth" means to have an adequate or appropriate portion or amount of something. It indicates that one has received or experienced an amount that is considered reasonable or equitable.
  • have a sharp tongue The idiom "have a sharp tongue" refers to someone who has a tendency to speak harshly, critically, or sarcastically. It describes an individual who frequently uses cutting or biting remarks in their speech, often without considering the impact or effect it may have on others.
  • be sharptongued, at have a sharp tongue The idiom "be sharp-tongued" or "have a sharp tongue" refers to someone who tends to speak in a direct and critical manner, frequently using sarcasm or delivering harsh comments. This person is known for their ability to speak candidly, often without considering the impact their words may have on others.
  • have shot your bolt The idiom "have shot your bolt" means to have exhausted all of your resources, efforts, or options in a particular situation and have no further possibility of success. It originates from archery, where "shot your bolt" refers to having released all your arrows or ammunition and being left with nothing else to use.
  • have (got) sb by the short and curlies The idiom "have (got) sb by the short and curlies" is an informal expression that means to have someone under complete control, often through manipulation or intimidation. It implies that one has a strong hold or influence over another person, leaving them in a vulnerable or powerless position. The phrase originated from the notion of having a grip on someone's pubic hair, namely the "short and curlies," which is an intimate and sensitive area. Therefore, it conveys a sense of control, dominance, or leverage over someone.
  • have a short memory The idiom "have a short memory" is used to describe someone who quickly forgets negative experiences or past mistakes. It refers to a person's ability to easily move on from disappointments, failures, or conflicts, without dwelling on them or holding grudges. They may also be resilient and able to maintain a positive outlook despite setbacks or challenges.
  • have a short fuse The idiom "have a short fuse" means to have a quick and easily aroused temper. It refers to someone who gets angry or explodes in anger rapidly and without warning.
  • have (got) sb by the short hairs, at have (got) sb by the short and curlies The idiom "have (got) sb by the short hairs" or "have (got) sb by the short and curlies" refers to having someone in a helpless or vulnerable position where they have no choice but to comply with your demands or follow your instructions. It implies having full control or power over someone, leaving them at your mercy or unable to escape from the situation.
  • have a chip on your shoulder To have a chip on your shoulder means to have a persistent attitude of resentment or readiness for confrontation. It refers to harboring a grudge or feeling unjustly treated, often leading to a confrontational or defensive demeanor.
  • have sth/nothing to show for sth The idiom "have something/nothing to show for something" means to have tangible or visible results or accomplishments because of a particular effort, experience, or period of time. It can also mean the lack of any tangible or significant outcomes despite one's efforts or investment.
  • have sth on your side The idiom "have something on your side" means to possess a particular advantage or favorable circumstance that supports or aids your cause or position. It implies having a factor or support working in your favor, which can contribute to success or achieving desired outcomes.
  • have time on your side, at time is on sb's side The idiom "have time on your side" or "time is on someone's side" means that someone has the advantage of having enough time to achieve their goals or objectives. It suggests that having ample time allows for patience, planning, and favorable outcomes. Time, in this context, is viewed as an ally rather than a constraint.
  • have sth up your sleeve The idiom "have something up your sleeve" refers to keeping a secret plan, idea, or strategy hidden and ready to be used at a later time, typically to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome. It implies that someone has an additional resource or tactic that others are unaware of.
  • have a card up your sleeve The idiom "have a card up your sleeve" means to have a secret plan or hidden advantage that can be used to gain an advantage over others, especially in a competitive or challenging situation. It suggests being prepared with a surprise or alternative strategy to outsmart or outmaneuver others when needed. The phrase is derived from the practice of cheating in card games, where players may hide a valuable card up their sleeves to use it to their advantage.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" means that someone or something has no possibility or chance of success or achieving a desired outcome. It emphasizes the extreme unlikelihood of a particular event or situation occurring, comparing it to the idea of a snowball surviving in the extremely hot conditions of Hell.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell, at not have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" (or "not have a cat in hell's chance") means that someone or something has no possibility or hope of success. It emphasizes the extreme unlikelihood or impossibility of a desired outcome or goal being achieved.
  • be/have sth to do with sth The idiom "be/have something to do with something" means to be related to or involved in something, or to have a connection or association with something. It can indicate a cause-and-effect relationship or signify being connected in some way, either directly or indirectly.
  • have got sth there The expression "have got something there" typically means that someone has made a valid or insightful point or argument. It acknowledges that the person has raised a good observation or offered a convincing opinion. It implies agreement or recognition of the accuracy or merit in what has been said.
  • have sth going with sb The idiom "have something going with somebody" generally refers to a romantic or sexual involvement between two people. It implies that they are in a relationship or have some sort of connection, usually on an intimate level.
  • have sth in mind The idiom "have something in mind" means to have a specific plan, intention, or idea about something. It can refer to having a concept or goal in one's thoughts or being prepared to make a decision or take action based on a particular notion.
  • have sth on good authority The idiom "have something on good authority" means to have information or knowledge that is obtained from a trustworthy or reliable source. It suggests that the information being shared is reliable and can be trusted.
  • have/make a stab at sth The idiom "have/make a stab at sth" means to attempt or try something, usually without a lot of confidence or certainty. It implies giving it a shot or making an effort, even if there is a chance of failure.
  • have the odds/cards stacked against you The idiom "have the odds/cards stacked against you" means to be in a situation where the likelihood of success or a positive outcome is significantly reduced due to various circumstances or factors working against you. It implies that the situation is unfavorable or disadvantageous, as if the cards in a card game are deliberately arranged against you to make winning difficult.
  • not have a leg to stand on The idiom "not have a leg to stand on" means to lack evidence, justification, or a valid argument to support one's position or claim. It signifies a situation where someone is unable to provide solid proof or credible reasoning to support their case.
  • have a bee in your bonnet The idiom "have a bee in your bonnet" means to have an obsessive or fixed idea that occupies one's thoughts and causes an individual to act irrationally or excessively focused on a particular subject or topic.
  • have sticky fingers The idiom "have sticky fingers" refers to someone who has a tendency to steal or take things that do not belong to them, often without permission or awareness. It implies a habit of being dishonest or lacking integrity when it comes to handling other people's property.
  • have a sting in the/its tail The idiom "have a sting in the/its tail" means that there is an unexpected or unpleasant surprise or consequence to something. It implies that even though something may initially seem positive or harmless, there is a hidden problem or disadvantage that will eventually reveal itself.
  • have a strong stomach The idiom "have a strong stomach" means to have the ability to withstand or tolerate things that are unpleasant, disturbing, or revolting, often referring to graphic or morbid situations. It indicates a person's resilience or lack of sensitivity towards such matters.
  • have a weak stomach The idiom "have a weak stomach" means to be easily nauseated or to have a low tolerance for unpleasant sights or smells, often causing one to feel sick or queasy. It is used to describe someone who is sensitive or unable to handle situations or substances that others find tolerable.
  • not have the stomach for sth The idiom "not have the stomach for something" means to lack the courage, determination, or emotional strength to do or face something difficult, unpleasant, or morally challenging. It implies being unable to handle or tolerate a particular situation or task.
  • have no stomach for sth, at not have the stomach for sth The idiom "have no stomach for something" or "not have the stomach for something" means to lack the courage, determination, or desire to face or deal with a particular situation or task. It refers to a feeling of being emotionally or mentally unable to handle or tolerate something difficult, unpleasant, or challenging.
  • have butterflies (in your stomach) The idiom "have butterflies (in your stomach)" means to have a feeling of nervousness, anxiety, or excitement, often felt in the area of the stomach, before facing a particular situation or event.
  • have a heart of stone The idiom "have a heart of stone" means to be cold, unsympathetic, or lacking in compassion or empathy. It suggests that a person is unfeeling and unaffected by emotional or sensitive matters.
  • stranger things have happened The idiom "stranger things have happened" is used to acknowledge that surprising or unusual events have occurred in the past, implying that the current situation is not entirely unexpected or out of the ordinary. It signifies that although something may seem peculiar or unlikely, it is not beyond the realm of possibility based on past experiences.
  • have another/more than one string to your bow The idiom "have another/more than one string to your bow" means to have multiple skills, abilities, or options available in order to increase one's chances of success or achieve a particular goal. It suggests being versatile, adaptable, and having alternative strategies or alternatives to rely on.
  • have your head (buried/stuck) in a book The idiom "have your head (buried/stuck) in a book" means that a person is deeply engrossed in reading and paying full attention to the content of a book, often to the exclusion of other activities or distractions. It implies being fully absorbed in the world created by the book, often leading to a lack of awareness of one's surroundings or social interactions.
  • have sth under your belt The idiom "have something under your belt" means to have completed or achieved something successfully or to have gained experience in a particular area. It implies that the accomplishment or experience is acquired and can be used as a personal advantage or asset.
  • have/take a dump The idiom "have/take a dump" is a colloquial expression that is used to describe the act of defecating or having a bowel movement. It is a more informal and crude way of referring to this bodily function.
  • take/have a knock The idiom "take/have a knock" typically means to experience a setback or difficulty in life, career, or personal endeavors. It implies facing a temporary setback that may affect one's confidence or progress toward a goal.
  • have/take pride of place The idiom "have/take pride of place" refers to something that is given the most prominent or honored position in a particular setting or context. It implies that the item or person is highly valued or regarded, often being displayed or recognized as the centerpiece or most important element of that setting.
  • have/take a notion to do sth The idiom "have/take a notion to do something" means to suddenly or unexpectedly have a desire or inclination to do something. It refers to a spontaneous or impulsive decision or urge to engage in a specific activity or action. It usually implies that the person's motivation or choice is driven by a passing whim or a change in mood.
  • have sb on tape, at have sb taped The idiom "have sb on tape" or "have sb taped" means to have recorded evidence of someone's actions or words, usually obtained in secret or without their knowledge. It implies having concrete proof or evidence of someone doing or saying something that may potentially incriminate or embarrass them.
  • have sb to thank (for sth) The idiom "have someone to thank (for something)" means to be grateful or indebted to someone for something good or positive that has happened. It implies that someone else has played a significant role in bringing about a particular outcome or providing assistance or support.
  • have a face like the back end of a bus The idiom "have a face like the back end of a bus" refers to someone who has an unattractive or unpleasant facial expression. It suggests that the person's face resembles the unattractive rear or back end of a bus.
  • have a thin time (of it) The idiom "have a thin time (of it)" means to experience a difficult or challenging period or situation. It implies that someone is facing hardships, struggles, or adversity in their life, often referring to a specific period of time. It can also suggest a lack of resources, opportunities, or support during that time.
  • have a thing about sth/sb The idiom "have a thing about sth/sb" means to have a particular obsession, preference, or fascination with something or someone. It refers to having a strong attraction, interest, or inclination towards a specific person or thing.
  • who would have thought it? The idiom "who would have thought it?" is typically used as an exclamation to express surprise or astonishment at an unexpected turn of events or outcome. It conveys a sense of disbelief or wonderment about a situation that was not anticipated or predicted.
  • have a frog in your throat The idiom "have a frog in your throat" means to have difficulty speaking or to have a temporary hoarseness or difficulty in producing sound when speaking, usually due to a sore throat or hoarseness.
  • have/throw a fit The idiom "have/throw a fit" means to express strong anger, frustration, or disappointment, often by shouting, screaming, or behaving irrationally. It implies an intense emotional reaction to a situation that is unexpected or undesirable.
  • have your tubes tied The idiom "have your tubes tied" refers to a surgical procedure called tubal ligation in which a woman's fallopian tubes are permanently blocked or sealed to prevent eggs from traveling from the ovaries to the uterus, thus rendering her unable to conceive children naturally. The idiom is often used figuratively to mean opting for permanent sterilization or contraception.
  • have your fingers in the till The idiom "have your fingers in the till" means to be embezzling money, specifically by stealing or misappropriating funds from a business, organization, or someone else's financial affairs. It implies a dishonest or unlawful act of profiting personally from otherwise entrusted funds.
  • have a lot of time for sb When someone says they "have a lot of time for someone," it means they hold that person in high regard, admire them, or respect them greatly. It implies a willingness to invest time and attention in their company or to support their endeavors.
  • have no time for sb The idiom "have no time for someone" means to have a lack of interest or patience for somebody or to not allocate any time or attention to them. It implies that one is not willing to engage or invest in a relationship or interaction with that person.
  • have time to kill The idiom "have time to kill" means to have a surplus or excess of time available, typically without any specific purpose or activity to occupy oneself with. It implies having idle or wasted time that can be used in a leisurely or unproductive manner.
  • have time on your hands The idiom "have time on your hands" commonly means having an excess amount of free time or having nothing important or urgent to do.
  • have a rare old time The idiom "have a rare old time" means to have a joyous or excellent experience, often used to describe a period of enjoyment or merriment. It implies that the individual is thoroughly enjoying themselves and having an extraordinary or memorable time.
  • have (got) to hand it to sb The idiom "have (got) to hand it to sb" means to acknowledge or give credit to someone for their skills, achievements, or success, often in a begrudging or admiring manner. It implies recognizing and appreciating someone's abilities, efforts, or accomplishments.
  • have had it (up to here) with To have had it (up to here) with something means to have reached the point of extreme frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a particular situation, person, or thing. It implies that one's patience or tolerance has been completely exhausted.
  • have occasion to do sth The idiom "have occasion to do sth" means to have a reason or opportunity to do something.
  • not have the heart to do sth The idiom "not have the heart to do something" means lacking the emotional strength or courage to perform a particular action because it feels morally or emotionally wrong, difficult, or painful. It indicates a sense of reluctance or sympathy that prevents someone from doing something they consider unfavorable or hurtful.
  • have half a mind/a good mind to do sth The idiom "have half a mind/a good mind to do something" means to be strongly inclined or tempted to do a particular action without actually intending to follow through with it. It implies a strong feeling or desire to do something, but often lacks the determination or commitment to actually carry out the action.
  • have/get your shit together The idiom "have/get your shit together" means to become organized, focused, and prepared in managing one's life or a specific situation. It implies taking control of one's actions, responsibilities, and emotions in a more efficient and responsible manner.
  • have a few (too many) The idiom "have a few (too many)" is typically used to refer to consuming more alcoholic beverages than one should, leading to a state of intoxication or drunkenness. It portrays the idea of surpassing the desired or acceptable limit of alcohol consumption.
  • have the inside track The idiom "have the inside track" means to have an advantage or access to privileged information or knowledge that gives someone a head start or an edge over others in a competition, a project, or a situation. It suggests being in a position of influence or having exclusive information, increasing the chances of success.
  • have big ideas The idiom "have big ideas" refers to having ambitious or grandiose plans, goals, or expectations. It indicates that someone has lofty aspirations or dreams and is not afraid to aim for significant accomplishments.
  • have bigger/other fish to fry The idiom "have bigger/other fish to fry" means to have more important or pressing matters to attend to; to have more significant concerns or responsibilities than the current topic or situation being discussed or focused on. It implies that the person has more important tasks or issues that demand their attention and hence cannot afford to be bothered by something trivial or less important.
  • have two left feet The idiom "have two left feet" means to be clumsy or awkward, particularly in terms of coordination and dancing skills. It refers to someone who lacks natural grace or ability to move smoothly.
  • have a leg up on sb The idiom "have a leg up on sb" means to have an advantage or head start over someone in a competitive situation. It implies having a higher position, more resources, or superior knowledge that gives you an edge over others.
  • have a grandstand view The idiom "have a grandstand view" means to have a prime or advantageous position to observe an event or situation. It refers to being in a prominent position, typically in a grandstand at a stadium or arena, where one can have an excellent view of the action or spectacle. It signifies being able to witness something from a privileged or prominent vantage point.
  • walls have ears The idiom "walls have ears" means that it is possible for someone nearby to overhear a private conversation, even if they are not directly involved. It suggests that caution should be exercised when discussing sensitive or confidential matters because it is wise to assume that others may be listening.
  • have your back to/against the wall The idiom "have your back to/against the wall" means to be in a difficult or desperate situation with limited options or resources. It refers to a feeling of being trapped or pressured, as if one's escape or freedom is restricted. It implies that one has to make a decision or take action even though they are in a vulnerable position with little room to maneuver.
  • have it both ways The idiom "have it both ways" means to try and benefit from two contradicting or mutually exclusive options or situations simultaneously, without facing any negative consequences. It implies attempting to enjoy the advantages or privileges of two conflicting choices without having to make a decision or commitment.
  • wouldn't have it any other way The idiom "wouldn't have it any other way" means that one is completely satisfied or content with the current situation or outcome and would not change it in any manner. It implies that the existing circumstances are exactly as desired or preferred.
  • have a whale of a time The idiom "have a whale of a time" means to have an exceptionally enjoyable and exciting experience or to have a lot of fun. It implies that someone is having a great time, often in a lively or exuberant manner.
  • have/hold the whip hand The idiom "have/hold the whip hand" means to have control or power over a situation, to be in a dominant or authoritative position, or to have the upper hand in a relationship or negotiation. It often implies having the ability to command or influence others.
  • have sth, will travel The idiom "have sth, will travel" is typically used to describe someone who is always prepared, adaptable, and willing to go anywhere or do anything in order to achieve their goals or fulfill their obligations. It implies that the person possesses the necessary skills or resources to succeed in various situations and is not bound by any limitations or constraints.
  • have/keep (all) your wits about you The idiom "have/keep (all) your wits about you" means to stay calm, alert, and think clearly in challenging or dangerous situations. It implies the ability to make quick and rational decisions in order to handle unexpected or difficult circumstances.
  • have a word in sb's ear The idiom "have a word in sb's ear" means to speak privately with someone in a confidential or secretive manner, usually to give them advice, information, or make a request. It implies a more intimate and personal conversation between two people.
  • have your work cut out (for you) The idiom "have your work cut out (for you)" means to have a daunting or difficult task ahead that requires a significant amount of effort, skill, or time to accomplish. It implies that the task is challenging and will demand one's full attention and dedication.
  • have the world at your feet The idiom "have the world at your feet" means to have great success, power, or influence in one's life, often with many opportunities and possibilities available at one's disposal. It suggests that someone has achieved a high level of accomplishment or is in a position of great advantage.
  • have all the cares of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have all the cares of the world on your shoulders" means to feel an overwhelming sense of responsibility, burdens, or worries. It implies that one is carrying the weight of numerous problems or concerns, as if they are responsible for solving all the troubles in the world. It conveys a feeling of being overwhelmed and weighed down by the challenges and difficulties faced.
  • get/have your money's worth The idiom "get/have your money's worth" means to receive the full value or benefit from something, usually in relation to a purchase or experience. It implies that one has obtained sufficient value or enjoyment in proportion to the amount of money spent.
  • as luck would have it The idiom "as luck would have it" means that something happened by chance or happened in an unexpected or fortunate way.
  • get/have your sums right/wrong The idiom "get/have your sums right/wrong" refers to the accuracy or correctness of calculations or mathematical equations. It means to have calculated or figured something out correctly (get your sums right) or to have made a mistake in calculations (have your sums wrong). It can be used metaphorically to imply being accurate or inaccurate in any situation that involves calculations, planning, or decision-making.
  • have/put your head on the block The idiom "have/put your head on the block" means to put yourself in a dangerous or risky situation where failure or negative consequences are likely. It often implies taking responsibility for a decision or action that may have serious consequences. The expression originates from the method of execution by beheading, where placing one's head on the block indicates being willing to face severe punishment or criticism.
  • have a blonde moment The idiom "have a blonde moment" is typically used to describe a temporary lapse in cognitive abilities or knowledge, often characterized as absent-mindedness or a silly mistake. It stems from a stereotypical portrayal of blonde-haired individuals as being less intelligent. However, it's important to note that this idiom perpetuates a harmful stereotype, and it's advised to avoid using such language.
  • blondes have more fun The idiom "blondes have more fun" generally refers to the belief or stereotype that people with blonde hair experience more enjoyment or excitement in their lives compared to others. It suggests that being blonde gives someone an advantage in terms of their level of fun, social interactions, or a generally positive perception of their experiences. However, it's important to note that this idiom is based on a cultural stereotype and should not be taken as a factual statement.
  • have (sb's) blood on your hands The idiom "have (sb's) blood on your hands" means to be responsible for causing someone's injury or death, either directly or indirectly, and implies feelings of guilt or remorse. It is often used metaphorically to describe involvement in a serious negative consequence or the consequences of one's actions.
  • have been around the ridges
  • nothing could have been further from my mind/thoughts The idiom "nothing could have been further from my mind/thoughts" means that something was the opposite of what was expected or anticipated. It is used to express that a particular idea, event, or situation was far from one's thoughts or intentions.
  • have a bone to pick with sb The idiom "have a bone to pick with someone" means to have a complaint, disagreement, or issue to discuss with someone. It implies that there is a problem or conflict that the person wants to address or resolve.
  • have had your chips The idiom "have had your chips" means to have reached the end or be out of options, generally referring to a situation where you have exhausted all possibilities and there is no chance of success or recovery. It can also imply that a person has experienced a failure or loss and there is no chance of making a comeback.
  • have your nose in a book The idiom "have your nose in a book" means that someone is deeply engrossed or absorbed in reading a book. It implies that the person is so captivated by the content of the book that they are completely focused on it, often to the extent of disregarding their surroundings or other activities.
  • have a foot in both camps The idiom "have a foot in both camps" means to be involved or associated with two conflicting or opposing parties, groups, or ideas. It implies the ability or status of someone to maintain connections or affiliations with different sides of an argument, situation, or issue without fully committing to either. They often maintain a neutral position, giving them a unique perspective or advantage.
  • have both feet on the ground, at have/keep your feet on the ground To have both feet on the ground or to have/keep your feet on the ground means to be realistic, practical, and sensible in one's thinking or approach to life. It refers to a person's ability to stay grounded, maintain a realistic perspective, and not get carried away by fantasies or impractical ideas. It emphasizes the importance of being down-to-earth and having a practical understanding of one's abilities, limitations, and the realities of the situation at hand.
  • have no business doing sth The idiom "have no business doing something" means that someone is not qualified, entitled, or suitable to be involved in a certain action or situation. It implies that their participation is improper or beyond their competence.
  • have sth on the brain The idiom "have something on the brain" means to constantly think or obsess about something. It refers to having a particular subject or thought dominating one's mind, occupying a significant amount of thought or attention.
  • have feet of clay The idiom "have feet of clay" means that someone who is admired or respected possesses a hidden fault or weakness. It suggests that someone, despite appearing strong or flawless, has a vulnerable or imperfect side to them.
  • have/keep your feet on the ground The idiom "have/keep your feet on the ground" means to remain practical, realistic, and level-headed in thinking and behavior, not allowing oneself to be overly influenced by emotions, fantasies, or unrealistic expectations. It suggests staying grounded and maintaining a sense of perspective and practicality in various aspects of life.
  • have got it bad The idiom "have got it bad" is used to describe a situation where someone is deeply infatuated, obsessed, or suffering emotionally because of a strong desire or attraction to something or someone. It often implies that their feelings are intense and overpowering, possibly to an unhealthy or excessive degree.
  • have (got) it made The idiom "have (got) it made" means to be in a highly favorable or successful position or situation. It implies that someone has achieved great success, wealth, or advantage and does not have to face difficulties or hardships. It can also suggest that the person in question has accomplished their goals or desires effortlessly.
  • have (got) sth licked The idiom "have (got) something licked" means to have successfully solved or mastered a problem or task. It is often used to indicate that someone has figured out the best way to do something or has obtained complete control or understanding over a situation.
  • have (got) the hots for sb The idiom "have (got) the hots for someone" means to have strong romantic or sexual feelings towards someone. It implies a strong attraction or infatuation towards that person.
  • what have you got to lose?, at you've got nothing to lose The idiom "What have you got to lose?" or "You've got nothing to lose" is a rhetorical question or statement used to encourage someone to take a risk or attempt something new. It suggests that since there is no negative consequence or significant loss involved, there is no reason not to try or take a chance. It highlights the absence of any downside and encourages seizing opportunities or exploring new possibilities.
  • have had its/your day The idiom "have had its/your day" means that something or someone was once successful, influential, or important in the past but is no longer relevant or effective in the present. It suggests that its time of prominence or usefulness has passed and it is no longer able to have the same impact or significance.
  • have your knife into sb The idiom "have your knife into someone" means to have a strong negative or hostile feeling towards a particular person. It suggests that the person is harboring bitterness, animosity, or a desire for revenge against the individual in question.
  • have it off The idiom "have it off" typically refers to engaging in sexual activity or having a sexual encounter with someone.
  • have a mind of its own The idiom "have a mind of its own" refers to an object, system, or situation that behaves or functions independently, contrary to what is expected or intended. It suggests that it possesses autonomy or unpredictability, exhibiting a will or character that goes beyond the control or influence of others.
  • have your/its moments The idiom "have your/its moments" means to experience periods or instances of greatness, excellence, or brilliance, despite also having flaws or being inconsistent. It implies that there are occasions when someone or something proves to be impressive or outstanding, even though they may not consistently maintain that level of excellence.
  • get/have your fingers burned The idiomatic expression "get/have your fingers burned" means to experience negative consequences or suffer a loss as a result of taking risks or engaging in a certain activity. It suggests that someone has learned a lesson the hard way after being involved in a harmful or dangerous situation.
  • burn your fingers, at get/have your fingers burned The idiom "burn your fingers" or "have/get your fingers burned" refers to an experience where someone suffers negative consequences or a setback as a result of their own actions or decisions. It signifies getting into trouble, facing a loss, or suffering from an unfortunate outcome due to ignorance, carelessness, or taking unnecessary risks.
  • have money to burn The idiom "have money to burn" means to have an excessive amount of money, often used to convey the idea of having more money than one needs or knows how to spend. It implies a state of wealth and financial abundance where one can afford luxuries or spend money in a carefree and extravagant manner without having to worry about the consequences.
  • have your business, sensible, etc. head on The idiom "have your business, sensible, etc. head on" means to approach a situation or task with a practical, rational, or level-headed mindset. It implies being focused, attentive, and prepared to make sound decisions or judgments. It suggests using logical thinking and common sense instead of relying purely on emotions or whims.
  • have sb by the balls The idiom "have someone by the balls" is a vulgar expression that means to have someone fully in your control or to have power over someone. It suggests that the person being controlled is in a helpless or disadvantageous position, similar to holding someone in a physically vulnerable position.
  • have your cake and eat it The idiom "have your cake and eat it too" means to enjoy two contradictory options or outcomes simultaneously, often implying a desire for conflicting or unrealistic outcomes. It reflects a situation where someone wants the benefits or advantages of two opposing choices without having to make a compromise or give up anything.
  • not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have a penny to your name" means to be completely broke or penniless, having no money at all.
  • have a care The idiom "have a care" means to be cautious, careful, or vigilant. It is often used as a way to remind someone to consider the possible consequences of their actions or decisions.
  • and what have you The idiom "and what have you" is used to suggest that there are other things that could be mentioned or included in a list, but they are not explicitly stated. It serves as a way to refer to additional items, ideas, or possibilities without fully specifying them.
  • have it in you The idiom "have it in you" means to possess the necessary abilities, skills, or qualities to accomplish something or exhibit a particular behavior. It suggests that someone has the capability or capacity to do or be something despite initial doubt, hesitation, or uncertainty.
  • you have no idea The idiom "you have no idea" is used to express that someone lacks knowledge or understanding about a particular situation, event, or experience. It suggests that the person's knowledge or awareness is limited or non-existent, often implying that they underestimate or fail to grasp the magnitude or significance of something.
  • you have to laugh, at you've got to laugh The idiom "you have to laugh" or "you've got to laugh" is a phrase used to emphasize that despite a frustrating, absurd, or difficult situation, it is better to find humor and laughter in it rather than dwell on the negativity. It implies that laughter can help alleviate the seriousness of a situation and provide some relief or perspective.
  • have fun and games The idiom "have fun and games" means to engage in a situation or activity that is enjoyable or entertaining, but often involves challenges, problems, or complications. It suggests that the experience is not entirely easy-going or without difficulties.
  • not have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "not have a cat in hell's chance" is used to mean that someone or something has no possibility or chance of success or achieving a desired outcome. It implies that the situation or odds are incredibly difficult or impossible to overcome, much like a cat surviving in the fiery depths of hell.
  • have legs The idiom "have legs" is used to describe something that has the potential to be successful or popular, typically over a longer period of time. It implies that the concept, idea, or project has the ability to progress, grow, and sustain itself.
  • have sth on your hands The idiom "have something on your hands" means to have a problem, responsibility, or task that requires one's attention or action. It implies that a person is dealing with a difficult or challenging situation that needs to be addressed or resolved.
  • and be done with it, at and have done with it The idiom "and be done with it" or "and have done with it" is typically used to express a desire to finish or conclude something quickly, or to make a final decision without further delay or discussion. It suggests a sense of impatience or an eagerness to move on from a particular situation or task.
  • have it out with sb The idiom "have it out with someone" means to confront or have a frank and honest conversation with someone about an issue or disagreement, typically in order to resolve it or get clarification. It implies expressing one's feelings or concerns directly and openly, often aiming to reach a resolution or understanding.
  • and have done with it The idiom "and have done with it" means to quickly and decisively finish or conclude a task or situation without any further delay or discussion. It implies a desire to put an end to something, often indicating impatience or frustration.
  • have a nice, good, etc. line in sth
  • not have a/the ghost of a chance The idiom "not have a/the ghost of a chance" means to have no possibility or extremely slim odds of succeeding or achieving something. It implies that one's chances are so negligible or nonexistent that they are comparable to the likelihood of encountering a ghost, which is believed to be highly unlikely to occur.
  • have an eye to/for the main chance The idiom "have an eye to/for the main chance" refers to being focused on or attentive to opportunities for personal gain or advancement. It suggests that someone is constantly aware of potential advantages and is willing to seize them when they arise.
  • have/keep your eye on the clock, at be watching the clock The idiom "have/keep your eye on the clock" or "be watching the clock" means to continuously or frequently check the time or the clock, typically due to being eagerly or anxiously waiting for a certain event or deadline. It implies that the person is aware of the passing time and is actively focused on when something is expected to happen or end.
  • have sth coming out of your ears The idiom "have something coming out of your ears" means to have an excessive or abundant amount of something. It implies that there is so much of a particular thing that it is overflowing or overwhelming.
  • have come a long way The idiom "have come a long way" means to have made significant progress or improvement in a particular area, situation, or personal journey. It often signifies a notable transformation or development from a previous state or condition.
  • have a corner on a market The idiom "have a corner on a market" refers to the situation when a person or business has exclusive control or monopoly over a particular product, service, or industry. It means they have secured a dominant position in the market, giving them significant influence or power over pricing, supply, and competition.
  • have shit for brains The idiom "have shit for brains" is a vulgar expression used to describe someone who is incredibly foolish, stupid, or lacking in intelligence. It implies that the person's mental capacity or ability to think is extremely low, similar to having feces instead of a brain.
  • could have died of sth, at almost/nearly die of sth The idiom "could have died of something" or "almost/nearly die of something" is often used to exaggerate a person's reaction to a situation. It implies that the person was extremely shocked, surprised, or frightened by something that happened or was said. While the person did not actually face a life-threatening situation, the idiom emphasizes the intensity of their emotional response.
  • you could have heard a pin drop The idiom "you could have heard a pin drop" refers to a moment of profound silence or quietness in a particular situation or environment. It suggests that the atmosphere is so silent that even the slightest noise, like the dropping of a pin, would be heard clearly. It emphasizes the absence of any sound or disturbance, often indicating surprise, suspense, or anticipation.
  • you could have knocked me down/over with a feather The idiom "you could have knocked me down/over with a feather" is used to express great surprise or astonishment at something unexpected or shocking that has just occurred. It conveys the idea that the speaker was so shocked that they felt like they could have been physically knocked down by something as light and insignificant as a feather.
  • have your day in court The idiom "have your day in court" means to have the opportunity to present one's case or argument before a judge or jury in a legal proceeding. It refers to the right to a fair trial or legal process, where one can defend themselves or seek justice for a grievance.
  • have a cow, at have kittens The idiom "have a cow" or "have kittens" is an informal expression used to describe someone's reaction of extreme anger, frustration, or distress over a particular situation or event. The phrase suggests that the person's emotional response has escalated to such a degree that it is likened to a cow giving birth or a cat having multiple kittens, emphasizing the intensity of their reaction.
  • have friends in high places The idiom "have friends in high places" means to have influential or powerful connections or contacts who can assist or support you in achieving goals or dealing with problems. It implies having connections to individuals in positions of authority, wealth, or influence, which can be advantageous in various aspects of life.
  • have a field day The idiom "have a field day" typically means to have a great time or enjoy oneself abundantly in a particular situation. It suggests that someone is taking advantage of an opportunity or indulging in something with great enthusiasm.
  • have a ball "Have a ball" is an idiom that means to have a great time or enjoy oneself immensely. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is experiencing a lot of fun and pleasure.
  • have inner resources The idiom "have inner resources" typically refers to possessing innate capabilities, skills, qualities, or personal strengths that allow a person to handle challenging situations, solve problems, or navigate through difficult circumstances independently and effectively. It suggests that an individual has a deep reservoir of resilience, mental strength, self-reliance, or adaptability to draw upon when needed.
  • have (all) the makings of sth The idiom "have (all) the makings of something" means to possess all the necessary qualities or components to potentially become or develop into a particular thing or outcome. It suggests that the potential for success or achievement is present based on the existing elements or attributes.
  • have/hold all the aces The idiom "have/hold all the aces" means to have a significant advantage over others in a particular situation. It refers to being in a position of power or control, often having the upper hand in negotiations, competitions, or any circumstances where one has the best resources or options available.
  • have your head in the clouds The idiom "have your head in the clouds" means to be daydreaming or not paying attention to reality. It refers to someone who is often lost in their own thoughts or lacks attention to practical matters.
  • nearly/almost have a heart attack The idiom "nearly/almost have a heart attack" is used to describe an extreme emotional or physical response to a surprising, shocking, or alarming event. It implies a sense of intense fear, astonishment, or distress, often causing an individual's heart to race or skip a beat, though it does not necessarily indicate a serious medical condition.
  • I might have known The idiom "I might have known" is typically used to express regret or a sense of predictable disappointment. It implies that the speaker should have anticipated or foreseen something, implying that the situation or outcome was obvious or expected.
  • have a butcher's The idiom "have a butcher's" is a British slang phrase that means to take a quick look or to examine something or someone with curiosity or interest. It is derived from the Cockney rhyming slang of "butcher's hook," where "hook" rhymes with "look." Thus, "having a butcher's" is equivalent to "having a look."
  • have nothing on sb or sth The idiom "have nothing on someone or something" means to have no evidence or information that incriminates or proves wrongdoing or guilt against a person or thing. It implies that there is no valid reason to accuse or criticize the subject.
  • have an ear for sth The idiom "have an ear for something" typically means to possess a natural ability to recognize and appreciate sounds or music, or to have a keen sense of understanding or recognizing something specific. It suggests that someone has a knack for perceiving and comprehending sounds or certain aspects of a particular subject.
  • have the ear of sb The idiom "have the ear of sb" means to have someone's attention and influence or be able to persuade them to listen to or consider one's ideas, opinions, or requests. It often portrays having a close relationship or connection with someone who is influential or in a position of power.
  • have/keep your ear to the ground The idiom "have/keep your ear to the ground" means to stay alert and aware of the current events, trends, or rumors by actively listening and seeking information from reliable sources. It implies being attentive to what is happening or being said in order to stay knowledgeable and make informed decisions.
  • have sb eating out of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually because they trust and follow your lead willingly or are easily manipulated by you. It implies that the person is highly obedient, submissive, or completely under your influence.
  • have sb eating out of the palm of your hand, at have sb in the palm of your hand To have someone eating out of the palm of your hand, or to have someone in the palm of your hand, is an idiomatic expression that means to have complete control, influence, or power over someone. It implies that the person is so easily manipulated or swayed by you that they would do anything you ask or follow your lead without question.
  • have a memory like an elephant To have a memory like an elephant means to have an exceptional or remarkable ability to remember things accurately and for a long period of time. This idiom is often used to describe individuals who have an extraordinary capacity to recall details, events, or information.
  • get/have your end away The idiom "get/have your end away" is a slang expression that originated in British English. It is a euphemism typically used to refer to engaging in sexual activity or having sexual intercourse.
  • have a finger in every pie The idiom "have a finger in every pie" means to be involved or have influence in many different activities or endeavors. It refers to someone who has a hand in multiple projects, businesses, or areas of interest. This person often seeks to exert control or maintain an active role in various aspects of their life or the lives of others.
  • have an eye for sth The idiom "have an eye for something" refers to someone's ability to recognize, appreciate, or understand certain qualities or aspects of something. It suggests that the person has a keen sense or intuition in perceiving and evaluating certain things, such as art, fashion, design, talent, business opportunities, or details others might overlook.
  • have your eye on sth To "have your eye on something" means to be interested in or focused on a particular thing or goal, often with the intention or desire of obtaining it or achieving it in the future. It suggests that you are actively paying attention to or watching something with a keen interest or desire.
  • have eyes in the back of your head The idiom "have eyes in the back of your head" means to be extremely vigilant or aware so that one is able to perceive or notice things that others might miss. It suggests that someone possesses an exceptional ability to be observant and alert in all situations, as if they have an extra set of eyes at the back of their head.
  • only have eyes for sb The idiom "only have eyes for someone" means to be completely focused or infatuated with one specific person, often in a romantic or affectionate manner. It implies that no other person or thing holds your attention or interest, as your complete attention is directed towards the individual mentioned.
  • have a roving eye The idiom "have a roving eye" means to have a tendency to look at or be attracted to other people romantically, even when already in a committed relationship. It suggests a lack of fidelity or a wandering interest in potential romantic partners.
  • be gimleteyed, at have gimlet eyes The idiom "be gimleteyed" or "have gimlet eyes" refers to someone who has a sharp, penetrating, and observant gaze or vision. It implies a keen ability to scrutinize or perceive details, often used to describe individuals who possess a perceptive and focused nature when observing their surroundings or evaluating situations.
  • have gimlet eyes The idiom "have gimlet eyes" refers to someone who has sharp, piercing, or penetrating eyes. It suggests that the person is observant, perceptive, and has a keen ability to notice and understand things quickly and accurately.
  • have faith! The idiom "have faith!" means to believe in something or someone, especially in times of uncertainty, doubt, or difficulty. It encourages maintaining confidence, trust, and hope in a particular situation or outcome.
  • have fears for sb/sth The idiom "have fears for someone or something" means to be concerned or worried about the well-being, safety, or future outcomes of a particular person or thing. It implies having apprehensions or anxieties about the potential risks, dangers, or negative consequences that might affect the person or thing in question.
  • have an accident The idiom "have an accident" refers to the occurrence of an unintended and often harmful event that causes damage, injury, or a mishap. It typically refers to an unintentional incident or occurrence, often in the context of vehicular accidents or personal injury incidents.
  • have an axe to grind The idiom "have an axe to grind" means to have a selfish or ulterior motive or a personal grievance against someone. It refers to an individual who has a hidden agenda or a particular bias, often seeking to further their own interests or settle a score.
  • have sth down to a fine art The idiom "have something down to a fine art" means to have perfected or mastered a skill, technique, or activity to a high level of expertise or efficiency. It implies that someone has practiced and refined their abilities to the point where they can accomplish the task effortlessly or flawlessly.
  • have sth off to a fine art, at have sth down to a fine art The idiom "have something off to a fine art" or "have something down to a fine art" means to have become extremely skilled at doing something through practice, experience, or repetition. It suggests that the person is proficient and efficient in the specific task or activity being referred to. They have mastered it to a high degree, often being able to accomplish it flawlessly or with great ease.
  • have a finger in the pie The idiom "have a finger in the pie" means to have involvement or influence in a particular matter or situation. It implies that the person has a share or part in something, often referring to having a role or control in a project, decision, or enterprise.
  • have your finger on the trigger The idiom "have your finger on the trigger" means to be ready to take immediate action or make a crucial decision when the time is right. It refers to being in a position of control or responsibility, particularly in situations that require quick and decisive action.
  • have/keep your finger on the pulse The idiom "have/keep your finger on the pulse" means to stay actively aware of the current situation or to remain well-informed about ongoing developments in a particular area, situation, or field. It implies being knowledgeable and up-to-date in order to make informed decisions or judgments.
  • be of/have no fixed abode/address The idiom "be of/have no fixed abode/address" refers to a person who does not have a permanent or stable place of residence. It often implies that the person is transient or homeless, lacking a specific physical location they can call home.
  • have a fling The idiom "have a fling" refers to engaging in a brief, casual, and often passionate romantic or sexual experience, typically with someone who is not a long-term partner. It implies indulging in a temporary affair or relationship for enjoyment or excitement without any serious commitment or long-lasting consequences.
  • have/know sth off pat To have or know something off pat means to have it memorized completely and thoroughly. It refers to having a piece of information, a skill, or a routine learned perfectly and being able to recall or perform it effortlessly.
  • have/know sth down pat, at have/know sth off pat The idiom "have/know something down pat" or "have/know something off pat" means to have learned or memorized something perfectly and thoroughly, so that it can be performed or recited flawlessly. It implies that one has a complete understanding and mastery of the subject or skill.
  • have one foot in the grave The idiom "have one foot in the grave" means to be very close to death, usually due to old age or serious illness. It implies that the person is extremely frail or in a weakened state physically and may not have much time left to live.
  • have a heavy foot The idiom "have a heavy foot" can be defined as a colloquial way of describing someone who drives aggressively, often pressing down on the accelerator forcefully, which can lead to speeding or reckless driving.
  • have a (good) nose for sth The idiom "have a (good) nose for something" means to have a natural talent or ability to sense or detect something. It refers to having an intuitive instinct or an uncanny knack for recognizing or finding something, often without any obvious or explicit evidence. It is often used to describe someone with an exceptional ability to perceive or understand things that others may miss.
  • have your hands full The idiom "have your hands full" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities.
  • have sth going for you The idiom "have something going for you" means to possess certain qualities, advantages, or positive attributes that enhance one's chances of success or favorable outcomes in a particular situation. It implies having an advantage or strength in a particular context that sets someone apart or contributes to their progress or achievements.
  • have/get your snout in the trough The idiom "have/get your snout in the trough" refers to someone who is excessively or greedily seeking personal gain, often at the expense of others. It is often used to criticize individuals who are taking advantage of a situation or abusing their authority for personal benefit. The imagery of a snout, like that of a pig, emphasizes the idea of indulgence and greed.
  • have a heart of gold The idiom "have a heart of gold" refers to someone who is kind, generous, and compassionate. It describes a person who is good-natured, caring, and always willing to help others.
  • have a good innings The idiom "have a good innings" is a cricket metaphor used to describe a long, successful, or satisfying period of one's life or career. It implies that a person has achieved a lot or made the most of their opportunities, much like a batsman scoring many runs in a cricket match before being dismissed.
  • have sb's guts for garters The idiom "have sb's guts for garters" is a colloquial expression used to convey a strong desire or intention to severely punish or harm someone, often due to anger, betrayal, or a sense of revenge. It suggests a violent and merciless response to someone's actions or behavior.
  • have not heard the half of it, at not know the half of it The idiom "have not heard the half of it" or "not know the half of it" is used to convey that someone is unaware of the full extent or magnitude of a situation, event, or story. It suggests that the information or knowledge they possess is limited or incomplete.
  • have sth in hand The idiom "have something in hand" means to have possession or control over something, or to have made preparations or arrangements for something. It implies having a situation under control or having a backup plan in place.
  • have sb in the palm of your hand The idiom "have someone in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually by being able to manipulate or persuade them easily. It implies that the person is submissive or highly compliant to the desires or whims of the other person.
  • have it in for sb The idiom "have it in for someone" means to harbor strong negative feelings or hostility toward a specific person, typically seeking to harm, criticize, or sabotage them in some way. It signifies having a grudge or vendetta against someone.
  • not have any of it The idiom "not have any of it" means refusing to accept or tolerate something. It implies a complete rejection or refusal to comply with a particular idea, suggestion, or behavior.
  • have kittens The idiom "have kittens" means to become extremely agitated, anxious, or angry about something. It typically implies experiencing intense distress or worry.
  • have money The idiom "have money" refers to someone being wealthy or having a significant amount of money. It implies that the person is financially well-off and has the means to afford things comfortably.
  • have it away, at have it off The idiom "have it away" or "have it off" is a colloquial expression that is used to refer to engaging in sexual activity or having sex with someone. It implies a casual or immediate sexual encounter.
  • have a heart! The idiom "have a heart!" is an expression used to implore someone to be kind, compassionate, or sympathetic towards a particular situation or person. It is often used when urging someone to show mercy or understanding.
  • have hysterics The idiom "have hysterics" refers to a situation where someone becomes extremely emotional or upset, usually exaggerating their feelings and showing uncontrollable or intense reactions, often including screaming, crying, or excessive laughter.
  • have the blues The idiom "have the blues" means to feel sad, depressed, or despondent. It typically refers to a state of melancholy or emotional discomfort.
  • to have arrived The idiom "to have arrived" means to have achieved success, prestige, or recognition, especially in one's career or social status. It implies that the person has reached a position of success and is considered accomplished or influential in their field.
  • have a bumpy ride The idiom "have a bumpy ride" refers to experiencing difficulty or facing obstacles during a journey or endeavor. It implies encountering challenges or setbacks along the way, making the experience less smooth or comfortable.
  • not have a clue The idiom "not have a clue" means to have no knowledge or understanding of something, to be completely unaware or uninformed about a particular subject or situation. It implies a lack of knowledge or comprehension.
  • not have a bean The idiom "not have a bean" means to have no money or possessions whatsoever. It conveys a state of extreme poverty or lacking any material resources.
  • not have a prayer The idiom "not have a prayer" means to have no chance or possibility of success or achieving a desired outcome. It conveys the idea that one's efforts or circumstances are so unfavorable or impossible that even prayer or divine intervention would not help.
  • have a strop on The idiom "have a strop on" is primarily used in British English and it refers to a state of anger, frustration, or annoyance. When someone "has a strop on", they are often displaying their frustration or annoyance through their behavior, which can include sulking, throwing a tantrum, or acting in an irritable manner. It is similar to having a short fuse or being in a bad mood.
  • let sb have it The idiom "let sb have it" means to harshly scold, criticize, or speak angrily to someone. It suggests expressing one's anger, frustration, or disapproval towards another person without reservation or holding back any strong emotions. It can also be used to describe physically attacking someone or giving them a beating.
  • have news for sb The idiom "have news for someone" means to inform or share information with someone, often with the intention of surprising or correcting their previous beliefs or expectations.
  • have none of sth The idiom "have none of something" means to refuse or reject something completely. It implies a strong opposition or disagreement toward a particular idea, suggestion, or action, showing no willingness to accept or tolerate it.
  • have sb's number The idiom "have someone's number" means to understand someone's true nature or intentions, particularly when they are trying to deceive or manipulate others. It implies that you can see through someone's false pretenses or tactics and are not easily fooled by them.
  • have sth on your plate The idiom "have something on your plate" means to have responsibilities, tasks, or problems that need your attention or need to be dealt with. It refers to having a busy or full schedule with various commitments or obligations.
  • have sth on your mind The idiom "have something on your mind" means to be preoccupied or deeply troubled by a particular thought or concern. It suggests that someone is constantly and persistently thinking about something, making it difficult for them to focus on other things or causing them emotional distress.
  • have it on the highest authority The idiom "have it on the highest authority" means to have information or knowledge that is considered to be extremely reliable, credible, or authoritative. It implies that the information has been confirmed or obtained from a trustworthy and influential source.
  • have your head screwed on (the right way) The idiom "have your head screwed on (the right way)" means to be practical, sensible, and rational in one's thinking or decision-making. It refers to someone who is level-headed, able to think clearly, and possesses good judgment.
  • not have the foggiest (idea) The idiom "not have the foggiest (idea)" is used to convey a complete lack of understanding or knowledge about something. It means to have no clue or to be completely unaware of a particular subject or issue.
  • not have a pot to piss in The idiom "not have a pot to piss in" is a slang expression that refers to someone being very poor or lacking any financial resources. It suggests a state of extreme poverty, indicating that an individual does not even have a basic essential item like a pot or container to engage in the most basic bodily functions, let alone any money or possessions.
  • not have the remotest idea The idiom "not have the remotest idea" means to have absolutely no knowledge or understanding about something. It implies a complete lack of information or clue about a particular topic or situation.
  • not have a hope in hell The idiom "not have a hope in hell" is used to describe a situation in which someone has very little or no chance of success or achieving their goal. It implies that the likelihood of a positive outcome is extremely low, similar to the chances of someone succeeding in a hopeless situation.
  • have a good/healthy pair of lungs The idiom "have a good/healthy pair of lungs" refers to someone having strong and healthy respiratory organs. It signifies that the person has the ability to speak loudly, project their voice, or make themselves heard easily.
  • have a horror of sth The idiom "have a horror of something" means to strongly fear or detest something. It refers to having an intense aversion or dread towards a particular thing or situation.
  • have/keep your options open The idiom "have/keep your options open" means to refrain from making a definite decision or commitment in order to leave numerous possibilities available. It refers to maintaining flexibility or alternative choices in a given situation, instead of committing to a specific course of action.
  • have the last laugh The idiom "have the last laugh" means to ultimately emerge as the victor or be successful after initially facing opposition, criticism, or doubt. It refers to the satisfaction derived from outdoing or surpassing others who doubted or underestimated one's abilities or prospects.
  • have/lead a sheltered life The idiom "have/lead a sheltered life" refers to someone who has been protected, guided, or kept isolated from the realities and challenges of everyday life, usually resulting in a lack of experience or understanding of the outside world. Such individuals may be overly innocent, naive, or lacking in street smarts due to their limited exposure to different situations or hardships.
  • take a leak/have a leak The idiom "take a leak/have a leak" is an informal expression that refers to the act of urinating or relieving oneself. It can be used to politely or humorously describe the need to use the bathroom or find a restroom.
  • have a screw loose The idiom "have a screw loose" means to be mentally or emotionally unstable, eccentric, or irrational. It suggests that someone's thinking or behavior is erratic or abnormal, as if there is a literal loose screw in their mind.
  • have method in your madness The idiom "have method in your madness" means to appear or behave in a peculiar or eccentric manner, but not without purpose or reason. It suggests that there is some underlying logic or strategy behind someone's seemingly irrational or chaotic actions.
  • have a method to your madness, at have method in your madness The idiom "have a method to your madness" (or "have method in your madness") is used to describe someone who may seem strange, unpredictable, or chaotic in their actions or behavior, but actually has a sensible or logical motive behind it. It implies that there is a purpose or strategy behind their seemingly unconventional or irrational behavior.
  • have sth to play with The idiom "have something to play with" refers to having something or someone to engage or occupy oneself with, typically for entertainment or amusement. It implies having a source of enjoyment or diversion.
  • have the measure of sb/sth The idiom "have the measure of someone/something" means to thoroughly understand or have a good understanding of someone or something. It implies having a clear understanding of someone's abilities, characteristics, or qualities, and being able to accurately assess or predict their actions, behavior, or outcomes.
  • have a senior moment The idiom "have a senior moment" refers to a temporary lapse or forgetfulness often associated with old age. It usually describes instances when older individuals experience a brief memory lapse or difficulty in recalling information that they would normally remember easily.
  • have nerves of steel The definition of the idiom "have nerves of steel" means to be exceptionally calm, untroubled, and unaffected by stressful or challenging situations. It refers to a person who remains composed and brave in difficult circumstances, showing no signs of being nervous or anxious.
  • have ants in your pants The idiom "have ants in your pants" means to be unable to sit still or remain calm due to excessive restlessness, fidgeting, or impatience.
  • have the patience of a saint The idiom "have the patience of a saint" means to have an extraordinary amount of patience, remaining calm and composed in difficult or trying situations, much like the patience displayed by saints or highly virtuous individuals.
  • have sth in your pocket The idiom "have something in your pocket" means to be prepared, knowledgeable, or well-prepared for a particular situation or task. It implies having access to valuable information, resources, or strategies that can be advantageous or helpful in accomplishing something successfully.
  • have a problem with sth/sb The idiom "have a problem with something/someone" means to experience difficulty or dissatisfaction with something or someone, to a point where it causes concern or conflict. It implies disagreeing, disapproving, being bothered, or finding fault with a particular thing or person.
  • reap what you have sown The idiom "reap what you have sown" means that one will experience the consequences or results of their actions, especially if those actions were negative or harmful. It suggests that individuals will eventually face the outcomes, good or bad, of their choices and behaviors, similar to how a farmer harvests the crops they have planted.
  • get head above water and have head above water The idiom "get head above water and have head above water" refers to a situation where someone is able to manage or handle their financial, personal, or professional circumstances successfully without feeling overwhelmed or overwhelmed. It means to be in a stable situation, usually after a period of struggle or difficulty, where one can keep up with their responsibilities and obligations.
  • have an ace up your sleeve The idiom "have an ace up your sleeve" means to have a secret or hidden advantage or resource that can be used to gain an advantage or achieve success. It is often used to describe someone who has a clever or unexpected solution to a problem or a surprise strategy that gives them an edge over others. The phrase originates from the practice of cheating in card games, where having an ace (the highest-ranking card) hidden up one's sleeve would give them an unfair advantage.
  • have sth up one's sleeve The idiom "have something up one's sleeve" means to have a secret plan, alternative option, or hidden advantage that one can use to their advantage when faced with a particular situation. It implies that the person is prepared or has a clever strategy in mind that is not yet known to others.
  • have a tiger by the tail The idiom "have a tiger by the tail" means to be in a situation where one has taken on a difficult or dangerous task or responsibility that is challenging to control or manage. It suggests that the situation is precarious and that any attempts to let go or back out would result in even more trouble.
  • have relations with sm The idiom "have relations with someone" is a euphemistic way of saying to engage in sexual activity or intimate relationships with someone. It implies engaging in romantic or physical interactions with another person.
  • have intimate relations with sm The idiom "have intimate relations with someone" refers to engaging in sexual activity or being in a romantic or sexual relationship with another person.
  • have sb on a string The idiom "have someone on a string" refers to having complete control or dominance over someone and being able to manipulate or influence their actions or decisions. It implies that the person being controlled is following the lead or direction of another person without questioning or asserting their own independence.
  • have more than one string to one's fiddle The idiom "have more than one string to one's fiddle" means to possess multiple skills, abilities, or options beyond what is commonly known or expected. It emphasizes versatility, adaptability, or the ability to handle various situations.
  • have sm on the string The idiom "have someone on the string" typically means to have control or influence over someone, often with manipulative intentions. It suggests that someone is in a position to easily manipulate or control another person's actions, decisions, or emotions.
  • Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies. The idiom "Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies" means that extreme or serious problems require drastic or unconventional solutions. It suggests that when faced with a dire situation, one should take bold or unconventional actions in order to find a solution.
  • have an affair (with sm) The idiom "have an affair" refers to being in a romantic or sexual relationship with someone who is not one's spouse or committed partner. It typically implies engaging in secrecy and deception.
  • Do we have to go through all that again? The idiom "Do we have to go through all that again?" means expressing reluctance or resistance to repeat or relive a past experience, often because it was unpleasant, tedious, or unnecessary. It implies a desire to avoid rehashing the same discussion, argument, or situation that has already been dealt with in the past.
  • have nose in the air To have one's nose in the air means to behave in a condescending or arrogant manner, typically by displaying a superior attitude or looking down upon others. It signifies a sense of superiority or haughtiness.
  • have sb rolling in the aisles The idiom "have someone rolling in the aisles" means to cause someone to laugh hysterically or uncontrollably. It implies that something is incredibly funny and entertaining, bringing immense joy and amusement to the person or a group of people.
  • Idle people have the least leisure. The idiom "Idle people have the least leisure" means that individuals who are habitually lazy or unproductive often find themselves with little free time or moments of leisure. It implies that those who waste their time unproductively suffer the consequences of having limited opportunities for rest or enjoyment.
  • busiest men have the most leisure The idiom "busiest men have the most leisure" means that those who are constantly occupied or have a lot of responsibilities often find ways to relax and enjoy their free time more efficiently than those with little to do. It suggests that people who manage their time well and are highly productive are able to make the most of their leisure time, while those who have an abundance of free time may not value it or know how to use it effectively.
  • have an alcohol problem The idiom "have an alcohol problem" refers to a person who struggles with an addiction or dependency on alcohol. It indicates that the individual is unable to control or limit their consumption of alcohol, leading to negative consequences in various aspects of their life, including physical health, relationships, work, and overall well-being.
  • have heart in the right place The idiom "have heart in the right place" is used to describe someone who has good intentions or good moral intentions despite perhaps not always making the best decisions or actions. It means that even if their methods or approach may be flawed, their intentions are sincere and well-meaning.
  • have head screwed on right The idiom "have their head screwed on right" means to be intelligent, rational, and sensible in one's thinking and decision-making. It implies that someone has good judgment and a clear understanding of things. It is often used to describe someone who is level-headed, practical, and capable of making smart choices.
  • have dead to rights The idiom "have dead to rights" means to catch someone in the act of doing something wrong or illegal, making it indisputably evident or undeniable.
  • Little pitchers have big ears The idiom "Little pitchers have big ears" means that young children are often unnoticed or underestimated, but they are still able to hear and understand more than what people may expect. It suggests that children are perceptive and can pick up on conversations or information that adults may not realize they are aware of.
  • have the ear of The idiom "have the ear of" means to have influence, the attention, or the trust of someone who is in a position of power or authority. It suggests that the person who "has the ear of" someone important can easily communicate their ideas, opinions, or concerns and is in a favorable position to have their voice heard and taken into consideration.
  • have nothing between the/ ears The idiom "have nothing between the ears" is used to describe someone who is unintelligent or lacks mental capacity. It implies that the person's mind is empty, lacking knowledge or intellectual abilities.
  • have half an ear on The idiom "have half an ear on" means to be partially paying attention or listening to something while also being engaged or occupied with another task or situation. It implies that the person is only giving partial attention to the conversation or activity at hand.
  • have ear to the ground The idiom "have an ear to the ground" means to stay informed and attentive to the latest news, developments, or rumors about a particular situation or topic. It implies that someone is actively listening and paying attention to the opinions and concerns of others in order to gain knowledge or awareness of what is happening in a specific context. It often suggests being well-informed and having a finger on the pulse of a situation.
  • have ear The idiom "have ear" typically means to be a good listener and have the ability to understand and empathize with others when they are sharing their thoughts, feelings, or problems. It implies having the capacity to provide support or advice to someone who needs to be heard.
  • have coming out of ears The idiom "have coming out of ears" means to have an excessive or abundant amount of something. It suggests being overwhelmed or being in possession of more than one can handle or use.
  • have coming out ears
  • have big ears The idiom "have big ears" typically refers to someone who is attentive and observant, often implying that they are skilled at picking up or eavesdropping on conversations or being aware of their surroundings. It suggests that the person is able to easily gather information or gain insights due to their heightened perception and attentiveness.
  • have an ear for The idiom "have an ear for" means to have a natural talent or ability to recognize and appreciate sounds, music, tones, or languages. It refers to the ability to discern or understand auditory stimuli more effectively than others.
  • have a word in ear The idiom "have a word in ear" means to privately speak to someone in order to share important or confidential information or to offer advice, instruction, or criticism. It implies a one-on-one conversation that is discreet and meant for the recipient's ears only.
  • Fields have eyes, and woods have ears The idiom "Fields have eyes, and woods have ears" means that one should be cautious of their surroundings as even in seemingly uninhabited or remote places, there may be unseen spectators or listeners. It emphasizes the idea that someone might be watching or listening to every action or conversation, even in seemingly private or secluded locations. In other words, one should always be mindful of potential surveillance or eavesdropping, regardless of the apparent privacy of a location.
  • have a ring to it The idiom "have a ring to it" means that something sounds pleasing or memorable when spoken or heard. It implies that there is a certain quality or rhythm in the way a phrase or name sounds, making it interesting or catchy.
  • have a familiar ring The idiom "have a familiar ring" means that something sounds or seems familiar, as if you have heard or experienced it before. It suggests a sense of recognition or resemblance to something known or previously encountered.
  • have to run along The idiom "have to run along" means that a person needs to leave quickly or abruptly, usually because they have other commitments or tasks to attend to.
  • have to be moving along The idiom "have to be moving along" means that someone needs or wants to leave or depart from a place or situation. It implies a sense of urgency or the acknowledgment that one cannot stay any longer.
  • have rocks in one's head The idiom "have rocks in one's head" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived as being stupid, foolish, or lacking intelligence. It implies that the person's head or mind is filled with rocks instead of a proper functioning brain.
  • 'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all The idiom "'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all" is a quote from Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "In Memoriam A.H.H." This phrase suggests that it is more preferable to experience love, even if it ultimately ends in loss or heartbreak, than to have never loved anyone at all. It conveys the idea that the joy and fulfillment that love brings outweigh the pain and sorrow that may come when it is lost.
  • have rolling in the aisles The idiom "have rolling in the aisles" means to cause people to laugh uncontrollably or to be highly amused, resulting in laughter or amusement that is hard to control.
  • have what it takes The idiom "have what it takes" means to possess the necessary qualities, skills, abilities, or attributes required to succeed or excel in a particular situation, task, or role. It typically refers to someone's ability to meet the challenges or demands of a specific endeavor or goal.
  • have to shove off The idiom "have to shove off" means to have to leave or depart from a place or situation. It implies the need to go or move on to other things.
  • have mind in the gutter The idiom "have one's mind in the gutter" refers to someone who has vulgar, lewd, or inappropriate thoughts, usually in a sexual context. It suggests that the person's mind tends to focus on or interpret things in a crude or impure manner.
  • have it made in the shade The idiom "have it made in the shade" means to have achieved great success or to be in a comfortable and advantageous position. It implies being well-off, having everything in your favor, or having a simple and worry-free life.
  • have it made The idiom "have it made" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position in life, particularly in terms of having achieved success, wealth, or comfort. It implies that a person has reached a point where they have accomplished their goals or desires, and their future seems secure and easy.
  • have it all together The idiom "have it all together" refers to a person who is well-organized, capable, and in control of every aspect of their life. It implies that this individual manages their personal and professional responsibilities effectively, appears composed and confident, and handles difficult situations with ease.
  • Have I got for you!
  • have got to be kidding The idiom "have got to be kidding" is an expression used to convey astonishment or disbelief in response to something that seems outrageous, absurd, or impossible. It usually suggests that the speaker finds the situation or statement completely unbelievable or ridiculous.
  • have ass in a sling The idiom "have ass in a sling" is an informal expression that means to be in a troublesome or difficult situation, often as a result of one's own actions or choices. It implies being in a predicament with little or no means of escape or relief. The phrase can also convey a sense of being vulnerable, helpless, or having consequences to face.
  • have a load on The idiom "have a load on" refers to someone being intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It implies that the person has consumed a significant amount of substances and is generally used to describe someone who is visibly impaired or behaving differently due to their intoxicated state.
  • have a fine/good etc. pair of lungs The idiom "have a fine/good etc. pair of lungs" refers to someone who has a strong, powerful, or impressive voice or singing ability. It typically implies that the person can produce loud or melodious sounds, often referring to their ability to sing, shout, or speak with great volume and clarity. This phrase is commonly used to compliment someone's vocal skills or to highlight their ability to project their voice effectively.
  • to have the hots for The idiom "to have the hots for" means to have a strong romantic or sexual attraction towards someone. It implies a passionate or intense desire for another person.
  • have the hots for The idiom "have the hots for" is typically used to describe a strong physical or romantic attraction towards someone. It implies intense desire or infatuation for that person.
  • have done etc. more than has had hot dinners The idiom "have done etc. more than has had hot dinners" is typically used to describe someone who has experienced a great number of things or has a great deal of expertise in a particular area. It suggests that the person has had a very eventful or productive life, compared to the number of meals they have eaten.
  • have a rough time The idiom "have a rough time" means to experience difficulty, hardship, or a period of troubles and challenges in one's life or a specific situation. It refers to facing tough circumstances or going through a challenging phase.
  • have your ducks in a row The idiom "have your ducks in a row" means to be well organized, prepared, or coordinated. It refers to having everything in order or arranged systematically, much like a row of ducks following one another.
  • have two pennies to rub together The idiom "have two pennies to rub together" is used to describe someone who is very poor or has no money at all. It implies that the person lacks even the most basic financial resources and is struggling financially.
  • have a bun in the oven The idiom "have a bun in the oven" means that someone is pregnant. It is a lighthearted and often informal way of referring to someone's pregnancy.
  • Have a good time. The idiom "Have a good time" is an expression used to wish someone enjoyment, pleasure, or happiness during a specific event or activity. It is often said as a farewell or a parting phrase, encouraging the person to make the most of their experience and to create fond memories.
  • have the run of The idiom "have the run of" means to have unrestricted access and freedom to explore or use a particular place or thing. It implies being able to move about or utilize something without limitations or restrictions.
  • have on the run The idiom "have on the run" typically means to be in a state of constantly moving or evading capture, either due to being pursued by someone or facing multiple challenges or issues that require constant attention and action. It implies a sense of being constantly on the move or actively dealing with difficulties.
  • have luck run out The idiom "have luck run out" means to experience a decline or a sudden end of good fortune or favorable circumstances. It implies that a person's or an organization's streak of good luck or success has come to an end, and they may face challenges or less fortunate outcomes in the future.
  • have a runin The idiom "have a run-in" means to have a confrontation or conflict with someone, often resulting in an argument or disagreement. It can refer to a brief and unpleasant encounter with another person that leads to tension or a clash of opinions.
  • have a run of The idiom "have a run of" means to experience a consecutive or sustained period of success, luck, or good fortune in a particular endeavor or situation. It implies that the person or entity is on a winning streak or fortunate streak for a specific period of time.
  • have a good run for money The expression "have a good run for money" typically means to have a successful or enjoyable period of time in which one's efforts or investments yield good results or returns. It originated from the world of horse racing, where a horse that puts up a strong performance is said to have had a good run for its owner's money. In a broader context, the idiom is often used to describe any situation where someone experiences prosperous or satisfying outcomes in relation to their investments, endeavors, or endeavors.
  • have a good run The idiom "have a good run" can have multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are two possible definitions: 1. To enjoy a period of success or prosperity: When someone has a good run, it means they have experienced a favorable sequence of events or achieved a string of positive outcomes in a particular endeavor. This can be related to business, sports, or any other pursuit where favorable circumstances lead to successful outcomes. 2. To engage in an enjoyable or satisfying period of activity: This definition is more casual and can refer to any activity or experience that is enjoyable and fulfilling. It could be going on a vacation, participating in a hobby, or even simply having a good time with friends or family. It's important to note that the meaning
  • have a fit The idiom "have a fit" generally means to become extremely angry, upset, or emotional over something. It can also refer to having an intense physical or emotional reaction to a situation.
  • have it coming The idiom "have it coming" means to deserve the consequences or punishment for one's actions. It suggests that someone's behavior or actions have rightfully resulted in negative consequences or retribution.
  • have sb in your corner The idiom "have someone in your corner" means having someone who supports, advocates, or allies with you. It refers to having someone on your team, someone who is loyal and helps you in difficult situations, gives advice, and stands up for you. Having someone in your corner ensures that you have a dedicated and reliable supporter.
  • have sm in one's corner The idiom "have someone in one's corner" means to have someone supporting or advocating for you, especially during challenging or difficult situations. It suggests that the person being referred to is on your side, providing assistance, guidance, or protection.
  • have sm or sth cornered The idiom "have someone or something cornered" refers to a situation where someone or something is trapped or caught in a certain place with no possible escape. It can also be used metaphorically to indicate that someone has gained an advantage or control over a situation, leaving no room for options or escape for others involved.
  • have sth burning a hole in your pocket The idiom "have something burning a hole in your pocket" means to have a strong desire to spend or use money quickly. It describes a person who cannot resist the urge to spend money as soon as they have it, often to the point that it feels like their money is literally burning a hole in their pocket. This idiom is typically used to convey impulsive or extravagant spending habits.
  • Shrouds have no pockets. The idiom "Shrouds have no pockets" means that when a person dies, they cannot take their wealth or possessions with them. It serves as a reminder that material possessions are meaningless in the face of death and that one should focus on experiences and relationships instead of accumulating wealth.
  • have sm in one's pocket The idiom "have someone or something in one's pocket" means to have complete control, influence, or domination over someone or something. It implies that the person or thing is under the speaker's power and can be manipulated or managed as desired.
  • have a burr under one's saddle The idiom "have a burr under one's saddle" refers to a person feeling irritation, agitation, or restlessness. It is often used to describe someone who is persistently bothered or annoyed by something or someone. The phrase originates from the discomfort a rider experiences when there is a burr or sharp object stuck beneath their saddle, causing continuous aggravation during a horseback ride.
  • Have a safe trip. The idiom "Have a safe trip" is a warm farewell phrase used to wish someone a journey that is free from harm and danger. It is often said to loved ones or friends who are departing on a voyage, indicating that the speaker hopes they reach their destination safely and without any mishaps or difficulties.
  • have a soft spot for or an animal The idiom "have a soft spot for an animal" means to have deep affection, fondness, or empathy for an animal. It implies having a particular inclination or tenderness towards animals, often leading to a strong emotional connection or willingness to care for them.
  • have another think coming The idiom "have another think coming" means that someone is mistaken or incorrect in their belief or assumption, and they should reconsider their viewpoint or opinion. It implies that if they continue to hold their current perspective, they will face consequences or be proven wrong.
  • have another think The idiom "have another think" means to reconsider or think again about something, typically in response to a suggestion or proposal that one initially rejected or disagreed with. It implies the need for further reflection and openness to changing one's initial opinion.
  • have all the answers The idiom "have all the answers" means to possess all the necessary solutions or knowledge to every problem or question. It implies being knowledgeable, wise, or confident in one's ability to provide the correct response or solution.
  • have a lot to answer for The idiom "have a lot to answer for" means to be responsible for or accountable for a wrongdoing or negative consequence. It implies that someone's actions or decisions have caused harm, and they will face scrutiny or criticism as a result.
  • have sth hung up and salted
  • I'll have the same The idiom "I'll have the same" refers to expressing a desire for the exact same thing that someone else has chosen or requested. It is often used when ordering food, drinks, or any other item, to indicate that one wants the identical option as the person they are referring to.
  • have an appetite for sth The idiom "have an appetite for something" means to have a strong desire or keen interest in something. It implies a figurative hunger or craving for a particular thing or activity.
  • have the final say The idiom "have the final say" means to have the ultimate authority or decisive power in making a decision or determining the outcome of a situation. It refers to the ability to make the final and binding decision, often overruling others' opinions or actions.
  • can't say that I have The idiom "can't say that I have" is used to indicate that one does not have any personal experience or knowledge about a specific situation or occurrence. It suggests that the speaker has never encountered or experienced what is being referred to.
  • hardly have time to breathe The idiom "hardly have time to breathe" means being extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities, to the point where one feels like they have no time for rest or relaxation.
  • have sth down to a science The idiom "have something down to a science" means to have mastered or perfected a process, skill, or activity to such an extent that it is executed with great precision, efficiency, and predictability. It suggests that someone has thoroughly studied and understood the subject matter, resulting in the ability to consistently achieve desired outcomes.
  • have an argument (with sm) The idiom "have an argument (with someone)" refers to engaging in a verbal disagreement or dispute with another person, expressing opposing viewpoints and engaging in a heated or passionate discussion. It often involves a back-and-forth exchange of differing opinions or ideas, sometimes resulting in an emotional conflict.
  • have a score to settle (with sm) The idiom "have a score to settle (with someone)" means to have a past issue or dispute with someone that needs to be resolved or avenged. It implies a desire for retribution or getting even with someone who has wronged you in the past.
  • have a mind as sharp as a steel trap The idiom "have a mind as sharp as a steel trap" refers to someone who possesses incredibly quick and accurate thinking abilities. It suggests that the person has a highly alert and agile mind, able to grasp information or solve problems swiftly and effectively. Similar to a steel trap that snaps shut with agility and precision, this idiom implies mental sharpness, intelligence, and keenness of perception.
  • he/she doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his/her body The idiom "he/she doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind, etc. bone in his/her body" is used to describe a person who is inherently good-natured and lacking negative qualities such as envy, cruelty, or unkindness. It implies that the person has a consistently kind and generous disposition, with no trace of negative emotions or behaviors.
  • Kings have long arms The idiom "Kings have long arms" means that those in power or positions of authority have the ability to reach far and wide, exerting influence or control over a wide range of situations or people. It suggests that individuals in high positions can extend their power and influence to various aspects of life or different parts of society.
  • have calluses from patting own back The idiom "have calluses from patting own back" is an expression used to describe someone who excessively praises or congratulates themselves for their own achievements or actions. It implies that the individual constantly seeks validation and recognition for their accomplishments, often disregarding the contributions of others. The idiom conveys a sense of arrogance and self-importance.
  • have a good arm The idiom "have a good arm" typically refers to someone's ability to throw or toss something with accuracy, strength, or skill. It suggests that the person is capable of making long or accurate throws, often in reference to sports or activities involving throwing objects.
  • have a scrape (with sm or sth) The idiom "have a scrape (with someone or something)" means to have a minor or shallow injury or damage caused by a collision, accident, or contact with someone or something. It can also refer to a minor conflict, disagreement, or altercation with someone.
  • have your head screwed on right The idiom "have your head screwed on right" means to be intelligent, rational, or sensible in one's thinking and decision-making. It suggests that someone has a well-functioning mind and uses logic and reason to approach situations effectively.
  • have been around the block The idiom "have been around the block" refers to someone who has gained a lot of experience or knowledge in a particular area or field. It suggests that the person is not naive and has been through various experiences, giving them insight and wisdom.
  • have been around The idiom "have been around" is used to describe a person who is experienced or knowledgeable in a certain area due to having been involved or present in that particular context for a long time. It suggests that the individual has encountered various situations or people, gaining valuable insight and wisdom as a result.
  • have around The idiom "have around" refers to having someone or something present or nearby. It typically implies keeping someone in one's company or having something accessible for use or reference.
  • have about
  • have arrived The idiom "have arrived" refers to achieving a level of success, recognition, or accomplishment. It suggests that someone has reached a point in their life or career where they are considered to be successful or established in their field or industry.
  • have a seat The idiom "have a seat" is an informal way of inviting someone to sit down. It is often used to offer someone a place to rest or as a polite gesture to make them feel comfortable in a particular setting.
  • have second thoughts The idiom "have second thoughts" means to hesitate or reconsider a decision or opinion that was previously made. It refers to the process of thinking again, often due to doubts or changing circumstances, before finalizing a choice or position.
  • couldn't have asked for more The idiom "couldn't have asked for more" means to be completely satisfied or pleased with a situation or outcome because it has surpassed one's expectations or desires. It indicates that one feels no additional or further improvements could have been made.
  • have name in lights The idiom "have name in lights" means to achieve fame or recognition, typically in a theatrical or entertainment context, where one's name is prominently displayed in a lit-up sign or marquee. It signifies being celebrated or acknowledged prominently.
  • have heard/seen the last of sb/sth The idiom "have heard/seen the last of someone/something" means that someone or something is no longer going to be seen or heard from again. It implies that the person or thing in question will not return or be encountered in the future.
  • have done/seen/had etc. more sth than sb has had hot dinners The idiom "have done/seen/had etc. more something than somebody has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize that someone has a great deal of experience or knowledge in a particular area. It suggests that the person has done, seen, had, or witnessed something so frequently or extensively that it surpasses the number of meals the other person has eaten. It indicates a high level of familiarity or expertise in a particular subject or activity.
  • They must have seen you coming. The idiom "They must have seen you coming" is often used to convey the idea that someone has easily taken advantage of another person's naivety, gullibility, or lack of knowledge. It implies that the individual was not perceptive enough to recognize or anticipate a potential deception or manipulation, resulting in them being exploited or cheated.
  • I don't have time to catch my breath The idiom "I don't have time to catch my breath" means that someone is extremely busy or overwhelmed and does not have even a moment to rest, pause, or recover before dealing with the next task or situation. It implies a continuous and non-stop pace of activities, leaving no time for respite or taking a break.
  • don't have a pot to piss in The idiom "don't have a pot to piss in" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely poor or lacking in financial resources. It conveys the idea of not having even the most basic or essential possessions, symbolized by not owning a pot to urinate in.
  • Don't have a cow! The idiom "Don't have a cow!" is an expression used to tell someone not to overreact, get upset, or become overly angry about something that is relatively minor or unimportant. It is often used to calm someone down and reassure them that there is no need to become upset or lose their composure.
  • The gods send nuts to those who have no teeth The idiom "The gods send nuts to those who have no teeth" means that life often brings opportunities or blessings to those who are unable to take advantage of them or are unprepared to benefit from them. It suggests that sometimes fortune or good luck may come to those who lack the capacity or means to make the most of it.
  • have a senior/blond etc. moment The idiom "have a senior/blond etc. moment" is used to describe a temporary lapse in memory or a momentary lapse in intelligence or understanding. It is usually used humorously to refer to a situation where someone, regardless of age or hair color, experiences a brief moment of forgetfulness, confusion, or absentmindedness. The idiom implies that the person's behavior or forgetfulness is reminiscent of a stereotype associated with seniors, blondes, or any other group commonly associated with forgetfulness or absentmindedness.
  • have taken leave of your senses The idiom "have taken leave of your senses" means that someone is acting or speaking in an irrational or illogical manner. It implies that the person's behavior is not based on sound judgment or reasoning.
  • have more luck than sense The idiom "have more luck than sense" refers to someone who consistently experiences favorable outcomes or successes purely due to their luck or fortune, rather than their intelligence, knowledge, or good judgment. It implies that the person's actions or decisions may lack logical reasoning or coherent thinking, yet they still manage to come out ahead.
  • have a bad attitude To "have a bad attitude" means to have a negative or unpleasant outlook, behavior, or demeanor. It refers to someone who displays hostility, rudeness, pessimism, or an uncooperative nature in their interactions with others. It suggests a generally negative mindset or disposition that impacts how one perceives, reacts, or interacts with the world around them.
  • have heart set on The idiom "have heart set on" means to have a strong desire or fixed intention to obtain or achieve something specific. It denotes a strong determination or ambition towards a particular goal or outcome.
  • have heart set against The idiom "have heart set against" means to be strongly determined or resolved to oppose or dislike something or someone. It implies having a fixed or unwavering attitude of resistance or refusal.
  • have a setto The idiom "have a set-to" means to have an argument, dispute, or altercation with someone. It implies engaging in a heated exchange where both parties express their opposing views or engage in a conflict.
  • have it on good authority The idiom "have it on good authority" means to believe or trust something because it is coming from a reliable or trustworthy source. It implies that the information or news being received is credible and can be trusted without any doubt.
  • have pins and needles The idiom "have pins and needles" refers to the tingling or prickling sensation often felt in a limb when it has been numb or sleeping for an extended period of time. It can also represent a state of extreme nervousness or anticipation.
  • have your share of sth The idiom "have your share of something" refers to receiving or experiencing a fair or significant portion of a particular thing, often something negative or undesirable. It implies that one has not been exempted or spared from facing the same difficulties, challenges, or problems that others may encounter.
  • have had more than your fair share of sth The idiom "have had more than your fair share of something" means that someone has gotten or experienced a larger amount of something, usually something negative, than what is considered fair or reasonable. It suggests that the person has had an excessive or disproportionate amount compared to others.
  • have it away The idiom "have it away" is British slang that can have multiple meanings depending on the context. It generally refers to someone successfully achieving or obtaining something they desire, often in a clever or cunning manner. It can also be used to describe someone having a romantic or sexual encounter, typically in a secretive or illicit way.
  • have a close shave The idiom "have a close shave" means to have a narrow escape from a dangerous or risky situation. It implies that someone barely avoided a potentially harmful or disastrous outcome.
  • have an ax to grind The idiom "have an ax to grind" means to have a personal motive or ulterior purpose behind one's actions, often driven by a desire for revenge or self-interest. It suggests that someone is pursuing an agenda or holding a grudge that they are attempting to fulfill or achieve.
  • have an ax(e) to grind The idiom "have an ax(e) to grind" refers to having a hidden personal motive or an ulterior motive for doing or saying something. It suggests that the person has a specific agenda or personal interest in a situation, often seeking revenge, self-promotion, or to further their own goals.
  • have/take the shirt off sb's back The idiom "have/take the shirt off someone's back" means to take advantage of someone to the point of extreme exploitation, leaving them with nothing or in a very difficult situation. It signifies an act of extreme selfishness or greed, where the person in question is willing to go to any extent to fulfill their own desires, even if it means causing great harm or hardship to others.
  • have the shoe on the other foot The idiom "have the shoe on the other foot" means to be in a situation where one is experiencing the same treatment or circumstances that they previously inflicted upon others. It implies that someone who was once in a dominant position or the one meting out consequences is now in a vulnerable or subordinate position themselves. It suggests a reversal of roles or a shift in power dynamics.
  • Nothing so bad but might have been worse The idiom "Nothing so bad but might have been worse" implies that even in a difficult or unfavorable situation, there could have been an even more disastrous or unfortunate outcome. It suggests that no matter how bad something may seem, one should take solace in the fact that it could have been worse.
  • have a bad hair day The idiom "have a bad hair day" refers to feeling or appearing not one's best, often due to a series of minor mishaps, annoyances, or unfortunate circumstances throughout the day. It symbolizes a day when everything seems to go wrong or when a person is in a negative mood.
  • have a bad effect The idiom "have a bad effect" means to cause negative consequences, outcomes, or repercussions. It refers to a situation or an action that produces unfavorable or harmful results.
  • have a bad case of the simples The idiom "have a bad case of the simples" refers to a state of being overly simplistic or lacking in intelligence, understanding, or sophistication. It implies that someone is lacking in complexity, depth, or critical thinking skills.
  • have bags under eyes The idiom "have bags under eyes" refers to the visible swelling or puffiness under someone's eyes, usually caused by lack of sleep, fatigue, or aging. It implies that the person looks tired or exhausted.
  • have on a short leash The idiom "have on a short leash" means to have strict control or tight supervision over someone or something, typically to limit their freedom of action or choices. It implies keeping someone or something under close scrutiny and not allowing much independence or autonomy.
  • have by the short and curlies The idiom "have by the short and curlies" is a colloquial expression that means to have someone firmly under one's control or influence, leaving them with no choice or power to resist or escape. It implies having a person at a distinct disadvantage and being able to manipulate or exert authority over them. The imagery of "short and curlies" refers to hair, particularly pubic hair, and implies having a strong grip or hold on someone.
  • have a shot at The idiom "have a shot at" means to attempt or try one's luck at something, usually implying a challenge or opportunity. It suggests taking a chance or making an effort to achieve a specific goal or desired outcome.
  • should have stood in bed The idiom "should have stood in bed" is a humorous expression used to convey the feeling that anything one does or attempts to do turns out badly or is met with a series of misfortunes. It implies that the person would have been better off remaining in bed rather than facing the unfortunate events that have occurred.
  • He who sups with the devil should have a long spoon. The idiom "He who sups with the devil should have a long spoon" essentially means that if someone associates or has dealings with a dangerous or immoral person or group, they should take precautions and be extremely cautious. It suggests that engaging with negative influences can have harmful consequences, so it's important to protect oneself from the potential harm.
  • have the cares of the world on shoulders The idiom "have the cares of the world on shoulders" means to feel burdened or overwhelmed by various worries, responsibilities, or problems. It suggests carrying a heavy load of concerns, often implying a feeling of stress or pressure caused by a multitude of issues.
  • have shoulder to the wheel The idiom "have shoulder to the wheel" means to work diligently and tirelessly towards a goal or objective. It implies putting in a great amount of effort, often with the involvement of others, in order to achieve success or make progress. The phrase draws on the imagery of pushing or exerting force against a wheel, suggesting the idea of hard work and determination.
  • have broad shoulders The idiom "have broad shoulders" generally means to be strong and capable of handling criticism, blame, or responsibility without being easily affected or burdened by it. It refers to someone who is resilient, composed, and capable of shouldering or carrying the weight of difficult situations or challenges.
  • have a good head on shoulders The idiom "have a good head on your shoulders" means to be intelligent, level-headed, and wise in making decisions or solving problems. It refers to someone who is rational and possesses good judgment.
  • have a chip on shoulder The idiomatic expression "have a chip on one's shoulder" means to harbor a grudge or a feeling of resentment, usually due to a perceived unfair treatment or past grievances. It refers to someone who is easily provoked, always ready for an argument or confrontation, and constantly looking for opportunities to express their anger or discontent. Such individuals may feel a sense of victimization, which often leads to an aggressive or confrontational attitude.
  • (I) have to shove off. The definition of the idiom "(I) have to shove off" is to leave or depart from a place, often abruptly or quickly.
  • have to show for The idiom "have to show for" implies having tangible or concrete results or achievements as a result of one's efforts or actions. It refers to the visible or measurable outcomes that can be presented or demonstrated in support of something.
  • have the ball in court The idiom "have the ball in court" means to have the authority or power to make a decision or take action in a particular situation. It refers to being in a position where one has control or influence over the outcome or proceedings.
  • have on the ball The idiom "have on the ball" means to be alert, intelligent, knowledgeable, or highly competent in a specific task or situation. It refers to someone who is capable, resourceful, and able to think quickly and make good decisions.
  • have by the balls The idiom "have someone by the balls" means to have complete control or power over someone, usually by having leverage or causing them to be in a vulnerable or disadvantageous position. It implies having a strong influence or hold over another person.
  • have a shufti The idiom "have a shufti" is a British slang phrase that means to take a look or have a glance at something. It is often used when someone wants to examine or inspect something quickly or casually. It can also imply a sense of curiosity or interest in seeing what someone is doing or observing something.
  • have time on side The idiom "have time on side" means that someone has an advantage because they have plenty of time to accomplish something or make a decision, and therefore they can proceed calmly and without feeling rushed.
  • have a memory/mind like a sieve The idiom "have a memory/mind like a sieve" refers to a person who has a poor or unreliable memory. It suggests that information or experiences easily slip out of their mind, similar to how objects easily pass through the holes of a sieve.
  • have in sights The idiom "have in sights" refers to being aware of or having a specific target or goal in mind, often with a determined or focused intention to achieve it. It can also imply keeping a person or thing under close observation or scrutiny.
  • have nose in a book The idiom "have one's nose in a book" refers to someone who is deeply engrossed in reading or utterly absorbed in a book, often implying that the person is focused on reading to the exclusion of their surroundings or other activities. It highlights a person's intense interest in reading and their tendency to be absorbed in their literary world.
  • have a nose for The idiom "have a nose for" is used to describe someone's ability to instinctively detect or recognize something, often referring to their knack for finding or identifying something. It suggests that the person possesses a keen sense or intuition about a particular matter or situation.
  • have a nose The idiom "have a nose" typically means to have a keen sense of smell or the ability to detect and recognize scents easily. It can also refer to being good at finding or recognizing something, similar to having an intuition or a knack for it.
  • get nose out of joint and have nose out of joint put nose out of ... The idiom "get nose out of joint" or "have nose out of joint" refers to someone feeling offended, upset, or aggrieved because they believe they have been slighted or overlooked in some way. The phrase often implies that the person is feeling indignant or resentful due to a perceived slight or neglect.
  • have a bash The idiom "have a bash" means to try or attempt something, usually in an enthusiastic or energetic manner, without worrying too much about the outcome. It implies a willingness to give it a go and see what happens, regardless of the possibility of success or failure.
  • have bats in one's belfry The idiom "have bats in one's belfry" is used to describe someone who is perceived as being eccentric, crazy, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person's mind or thoughts are illogical or confused, similar to the way bats flying around in a belfry (the bell tower of a church) would create disorder and chaos.
  • have sth to spare The idiom "have something to spare" means to have an excess or surplus of something beyond what is necessary or expected. It suggests having more than enough of a particular resource, such as time, money, or energy. It implies having an ample amount that can be used or shared without any impact or loss to oneself.
  • have your beady eye on sth/sb The idiom "have your beady eye on something/somebody" means to watch or observe something or someone closely, often with suspicion or scrutiny. It implies being vigilant or keeping a careful eye on a particular situation or person. The phrase "beady eye" refers to someone's gaze being sharp and focused, like the eyes of a bird of prey, such as a bird with small shiny beads for eyes.
  • have (sm) bearing on sth The idiom "have (sm) bearing on sth" means to have relevance or significance in relation to a particular matter. It suggests that something is connected or has an impact on a specific situation or outcome.
  • have a beef with sb/sth The idiom "have a beef with sb/sth" means to have a complaint, grudge, or grievance against someone or something. It implies a feeling of dissatisfaction or annoyance towards a particular person or situation.
  • You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die The idiom "You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die" means that everyone will inevitably face difficulties, setbacks, or endure unpleasant experiences throughout their life. It suggests that life is not always easy, and one must go through hardships before reaching the end. Essentially, it emphasizes the notion that challenges and adversity are an inseparable part of the human experience.
  • I'll have to beg off. The idiom "I'll have to beg off" means to politely decline an invitation or opportunity due to a prior commitment, unavailability, or inability to attend or participate.
  • have one's ass in a sling The idiom "have one's ass in a sling" is a colloquial and vulgar expression that refers to a situation where someone is in trouble, facing difficulties, or feeling extremely anxious or worried about something. It implies a state of vulnerability, predicament, or potential negative consequences.
  • have a yellow belly The idiom "have a yellow belly" refers to someone who is considered cowardly, lacking courage or bravery in the face of danger or adversity.
  • have the best of The idiom "have the best of" means to gain advantages or come out ahead in a situation, often in a competitive or confrontational context. It implies having an upper hand or superior position compared to others involved.
  • have best interest at heart The idiom "have best interest at heart" means to genuinely care about someone's well-being and act in a way that benefits them. It implies that the person is looking out for the best outcome, making decisions or taking actions that are in the individual's best interest.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell and not a hope in hell The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" and "not a hope in hell" both have similar meanings and are used interchangeably to describe situations where someone or something has no chance of succeeding or being successful. It emphasizes the impossibility or extreme unlikelihood of a given outcome, often in a figurative or hyperbolic sense. It suggests that the chances of success are as unlikely as a snowball's ability to survive in hell, or that there is no hope whatsoever.
  • have bigger fish to fry The idiom "have bigger fish to fry" means to have more important or pressing matters to attend to instead of wasting time on something trivial or less significant. It highlights the existence of more crucial concerns that demand one's attention or priority.
  • have a big mouth The idiom "have a big mouth" refers to someone who talks too much or has a tendency to reveal confidential information or secrets.
  • have a soft spot for sb/sth The idiom "have a soft spot for sb/sth" means to feel a special fondness or affection towards someone or something. It suggests having a weak spot or vulnerability when it comes to that person or thing, often resulting in a willingness to excuse their faults or to go out of one's way to support or please them.
  • have a soft spot (in one's heart) for sm or an animal The idiom "have a soft spot (in one's heart) for someone or an animal" means to have a strong affection, fondness, or a special liking for a person or an animal. It implies feeling a deep emotional connection or empathy towards them, often resulting in a lenient or forgiving attitude towards their flaws or actions.
  • have to go sm
  • We('ll) have to do lunch smtime,
  • have a blast The idiom "have a blast" means to have a lot of fun or to thoroughly enjoy oneself in a particular situation or event.
  • Have a blimp!
  • have blinders on The definition of the idiom "have blinders on" refers to someone who is excessively focused on their own perspective or goals and is unwilling or unable to consider alternative views, opinions, or information. This idiom often implies a narrow-minded or close-minded approach to a particular situation or issue.
  • have blood on hands The idiom "have blood on hands" typically means to be responsible for someone's injury, suffering, or death. It is often used to suggest guilt or moral culpability for a harmful or tragic event, either directly or indirectly.
  • Blood will have blood The idiom "Blood will have blood" is a phrase derived from William Shakespeare's play Macbeth. It implies that violent actions or acts of revenge will inevitably lead to further violence or revenge. In essence, it suggests that the cycle of bloodshed cannot be stopped once it has started, as it perpetuates itself.
  • have a blowout The idiom "have a blowout" typically refers to a sudden and dramatic burst of energy, excitement, or enthusiasm, often in a social or celebratory context. It can also describe an unexpected and complete failure or breakdown, especially when referring to tires or mechanical parts of a vehicle.
  • have sm in one's spell To "have someone in one's spell" means to have control or influence over them in a way that they are completely captivated, enchanted, or utterly under their power or charm. It implies that the person is under the spellcaster's control, often to the point of being willing to do whatever they want or being unable to resist their influence.
  • Do I have to spell it out (for you)? The idiom "Do I have to spell it out (for you)?" is used to express frustration or annoyance with someone who fails to understand or comprehend something that is seemingly obvious. It implies that the information or idea being conveyed is extremely clear or self-explanatory and does not require further explanation or elaboration.
  • not have a type of bone in your body The idiom "not have a type of bone in your body" means to completely lack a particular quality or attribute. It suggests that someone lacks a specific characteristic so profoundly that it is as if they do not possess that trait within their physical being.
  • have a low boiling point The idiom "have a low boiling point" refers to someone who has a tendency to become angry, agitated, or easily provoked in a short amount of time. It indicates that the person is quick to lose their temper or become upset by even minor issues or disagreements.
  • not have a bone in body The idiom "not have a bone in the body" means that someone is very flexible, open-minded, and willing to change their opinions or beliefs. It suggests that the person is not rigid or stubborn and is adaptable to new ideas or circumstances.
  • he doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his body The idiom "he doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind, etc. bone in his body" is used to describe someone who is exceptionally kind, generous, and lacking in negative qualities or emotions. It emphasizes that the person is genuinely good-natured and lacks any hint of negative traits.
  • have a bone to pick with The idiom "have a bone to pick with" means to have a complaint or grievance with someone, usually about something they have said or done. It implies that there is an issue or disagreement that needs to be addressed and resolved.
  • have a bone to pick The idiom "have a bone to pick" means to have a complaint or grievance with someone or about something. It refers to a desire to discuss or resolve a specific issue or dispute.
  • have name inscribed in the book of life The idiom "have name inscribed in the book of life" typically refers to being recognized or recorded as a righteous or virtuous individual. It originates from religious traditions where it symbolizes being chosen for eternal salvation or being granted a place in heaven. It is often used metaphorically to imply being highly regarded or remembered for one's good deeds, actions, or character.
  • have a weak spot for sb/sth The idiom "have a weak spot for sb/sth" means to have a particular liking or affection for someone or something, often even when they have flaws or shortcomings. It implies an emotional vulnerability or susceptibility towards that person or thing, which may lead to being easily influenced or being forgiving of their faults.
  • have/keep a foot in both camps The idiom "have/keep a foot in both camps" means to maintain a connection or allegiance with two contrasting or opposing groups, organizations, or viewpoints simultaneously. It suggests being able to navigate and have influence in both situations, often by staying neutral or benefiting from the advantages of both sides.
  • have/make a stab at sth/doing sth The idiom "have/make a stab at sth/doing sth" means to attempt or try something, often with a sense of uncertainty or without a high level of skill or expertise. It implies making an effort or giving something a try, even if it might not be successful or well-executed.
  • have the cards stacked against (one) The idiom "have the cards stacked against (one)" means to face or confront multiple challenges or obstacles that make success or victory difficult or unlikely. It suggests that the circumstances or conditions are arranged in a way that is disadvantageous or unfavorable for someone. This idiom is often used when one is at a significant disadvantage compared to others involved in a particular situation or endeavor.
  • have a stake in sth The idiom "have a stake in something" means to have a personal interest, involvement, or investment in a particular situation or outcome. It implies having a tangible or emotional connection to the subject matter and typically implies a potential gain or loss based on the outcome.
  • have one's brain on a leash
  • have heart stand still
  • have a leg to stand on The idiom "have a leg to stand on" means to have valid or convincing evidence, arguments, or basis for one's beliefs, claims, or actions. It refers to having a strong enough position or justification to support one's stance or viewpoint.
  • have the brass (neck) to do sth The idiom "have the brass (neck) to do sth" means to have the audacity or boldness to do something, especially when it is considered inappropriate, surprising, or goes against social norms. It implies a sense of confidence, often in a cheeky or impertinent manner, demonstrating no fear of consequences or the opinions of others.
  • have a head start The idiom "have a head start" means to possess an advantage or lead over others in a particular situation or activity, usually by starting earlier or having prior knowledge or preparation.
  • have sm for breakfast The idiom "have someone/something for breakfast" is often used figuratively and means to deal with or defeat someone or something easily or without difficulty. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is no match or is easily overcome by the speaker.
  • have no staying power The idiom "have no staying power" means to lack the ability to sustain or maintain interest, attention, or commitment over a prolonged period of time. It suggests a lack of persistence, durability, or endurance in staying focused or motivated. It can refer to a person, an idea, a relationship, or any other situation that does not have the ability to endure and remain consistent or lasting.
  • have a mind like a steel trap The idiom "have a mind like a steel trap" refers to someone who has an exceptionally sharp, quick, and retentive mind. It implies that the person possesses excellent memory, intelligence, and the ability to grasp, analyze, and remember information swiftly and accurately.
  • have a broad back The idiom "have a broad back" essentially means to be resilient, able to handle criticism, or not easily affected by negative opinions or comments about oneself. It suggests that a person has a strong ability to deal with different challenges or setbacks without being emotionally affected or deterred.
  • have words stick in throat The idiom "have words stick in throat" means to struggle or find it difficult to express oneself verbally, usually due to extreme emotions such as anger, frustration, or fear. It implies a temporary inability to vocalize thoughts or feelings.
  • have stick in craw The idiom "have a stick in one's craw" means to feel deeply resentful or indignant about something, especially when unable to express or resolve the negative feelings. It suggests a persistent, gnawing feeling of dissatisfaction or annoyance.
  • have one's heart stand still The idiom "have one's heart stand still" means to be momentarily shocked or scared, causing a sudden cessation of the normal beating or functioning of one's heart. It refers to a moment of intense fear or surprise that briefly stops someone's heart, figuratively speaking.
  • have sb in stitches The idiom "have sb in stitches" means to cause someone to laugh uncontrollably or be in fits of laughter.
  • not have a stitch of clothes (on) The idiom "not have a stitch of clothes (on)" means that someone is completely naked or not wearing a single garment. It implies that the person is exposed and vulnerable in their state of undress.
  • have a brush with sth The idiom "have a brush with sth" typically refers to briefly experiencing or encountering something, often a risky or dangerous situation. It suggests a near-miss or a close encounter without serious or lasting consequences. It can also suggest a confrontation or brief involvement with a particular circumstance or problem.
  • have (sth) in stock The idiom "have (sth) in stock" means to have a supply or inventory of something available for purchase or use. It implies that the item in question is readily available and ready to be sold or utilized.
  • have the stomach for sth The idiom "have the stomach for something" means to have the courage, strength, or emotional fortitude to handle or endure a particular situation or task. It implies being able to handle something difficult or unpleasant and not being easily discouraged or discouraged.
  • have sth in store (for sm) The idiom "have something in store (for someone)" means to have something planned or prepared to happen to someone in the future, usually something unexpected or significant. It conveys the idea that there are potential surprises or outcomes that someone will experience or encounter.
  • have to burn The idiom "have to burn" typically means to have a strong desire or need to accomplish something or to achieve a particular goal. It implies a high level of determination and motivation to go after what one wants, often suggesting that the individual is willing to put in great effort and endure challenges or setbacks to attain their objective.
  • (Have you) been keeping busy? The idiom "(Have you) been keeping busy?" is a conversational phrase commonly used to ask someone if they have been occupied or engaged in various activities, tasks, or work. It implies the inquiry about how much the person has been occupying their time or if they have been productive in their pursuits.
  • have no business doing The idiom "have no business doing" refers to engaging in an activity or taking on a role that one is not qualified or entitled to do. It implies that the person does not have the necessary skills, knowledge, or authority to be involved in a particular task or responsibility.
  • have a/your finger on the button The idiom "have a/your finger on the button" means to be in a position of control or authority, ready to take action or make a decision at any moment. It typically refers to someone who is in charge and capable of initiating important actions or changes.
  • have a buzz on The idiom "have a buzz on" refers to being under the influence of alcohol or drugs, typically experiencing a feeling of intoxication or mild euphoria. It suggests that someone has been drinking or using substances to the point of achieving a noticeable level of intoxication.
  • He that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens. The idiom "He that would have eggs must endure the cackling of hens" means that if someone wants or desires something, they must be willing to accept or tolerate the accompanying inconveniences, criticisms, or unwanted attention that often come with it. It implies that one cannot expect to achieve their goals without facing some unpleasant aspects or dealing with the opinions and actions of others.
  • have your cake and eat it too The idiom "have your cake and eat it too" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two conflicting or mutually exclusive things or situations at the same time. It refers to the desire to have it all, even when those desires contradict each other or are impossible to achieve simultaneously.
  • You cannot have your cake and eat it (too). The idiom "You cannot have your cake and eat it (too)" means that you cannot have or enjoy the benefits of two conflicting options or choices simultaneously. It implies that one must make a decision between two mutually exclusive things and cannot possess or experience both at the same time.
  • have one's cake and eat it too The idiom "have one's cake and eat it too" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two contradictory things or situations simultaneously, without realizing that they conflict with each other or are mutually exclusive. It suggests a desire for impossible outcomes or unrealistic expectations where one tries to have the best of both worlds.
  • have first call on The idiom "have first call on" means to have the privilege or priority to be chosen or selected before others. It refers to being the first choice or having the first opportunity to do or receive something.
  • have a minute to call own The idiom "have a minute to call one's own" means to have a moment of personal time or solitude, free from interruptions or obligations. It implies having some time to relax, reflect, or pursue one's own interests without any external demands or distractions.
  • Could I have call you?
  • have calluses from patting one's own back
  • You could have knocked me over with a feather The idiom "You could have knocked me over with a feather" means to be extremely surprised or taken aback by something unexpected or astonishing. It implies that the speaker is so shocked or astonished that a simple touch or light breeze would be enough to knock them off balance, as if they were as light as a feather.
  • You could have knocked me down with a feather! The idiom "You could have knocked me down with a feather!" is used to express extreme surprise or shock upon hearing or discovering something unexpected or astonishing. It suggests a sense of being completely taken aback, as if one's astonishment is so intense that even the slightest touch could knock them over.
  • Who would have thought? The idiom "Who would have thought?" is used to express surprise or astonishment at something unexpected or unforeseen happening. It implies that the outcome or occurrence being referred to was highly improbable or unimaginable.
  • I'd like a word with you. and Could I have a word with you? The idiom "I'd like a word with you" or "Could I have a word with you?" is a polite way of asking someone for a private conversation or to discuss a specific matter. It implies that the speaker has something important or serious to discuss and wishes to have the listener's undivided attention.
  • Could I have a lift? The idiom "Could I have a lift?" is used to politely ask someone for a ride or transportation, typically in a car.
  • could have fooled me The idiom "could have fooled me" is used to express disbelief or skepticism towards someone's statement or action. It suggests that the speaker is not convinced or fooled by what is being claimed or presented. It implies that the speaker sees through the deception or is not easily persuaded by appearances.
  • have had more than fair share of The idiom "have had more than fair share of" means that someone has experienced an excessive or unfair amount of something. It implies that a person has had more than what is considered reasonable or equitable.
  • have a sweet tooth The idiom "have a sweet tooth" means to have a strong liking or preference for sweet foods or desserts. It implies that a person often craves or enjoys consuming sugary treats.
  • have the cards stacked against The idiom "have the cards stacked against" means to be in a situation where circumstances or factors make success or achieving a desired outcome extremely difficult or unlikely. It implies that the odds or conditions are heavily unfavorable, similar to playing a card game where the cards are arranged in a way that hinders winning.
  • have all the cards The idiom "have all the cards" means to have complete control or power over a situation or to possess all the advantageous or influential factors necessary for achieving a desired outcome. It suggests being in a dominant position where one holds all the necessary resources or information to manipulate or control the outcome to their advantage.
  • have a card up sleeve The idiom "have a card up one's sleeve" means to have a secret plan or advantage that can be used to surprise or outwit others, often in a competitive or strategic situation. It implies that someone is holding back information or a resource that can be revealed at a crucial moment when it will be most advantageous.
  • not have a care in the world The idiom "not have a care in the world" means to be completely carefree or unconcerned about anything. It describes a state of mind where someone does not have any worries, anxieties, or responsibilities weighing on them.
  • have a care in the world The idiom "have a care in the world" means to feel carefree or not to have any worries or concerns. It implies being completely relaxed or lacking any burden.
  • have your finger on the pulse The idiom "have your finger on the pulse" means to be well-informed and aware of the current trends, developments, or opinions in a particular situation or field. It suggests being in touch with the latest information and having a good understanding of the prevailing dynamics or changes.
  • have carnal knowledge of sm The idiom "have carnal knowledge of sm" is a phrase that refers to having sexual intercourse with someone. It typically implies a deeper level of intimacy and a physical relationship with the individual.
  • have hands tied The idiom "have hands tied" means to be unable to take action or make decisions due to a limitation or restriction. It implies being in a situation where one's options or control are restricted or limited, often against one's desire.
  • have a case The idiom "have a case" means to have a valid argument or a strong evidence to support a claim or accusation. It is often used when someone is confident about their position in a dispute or legal matter.
  • have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "have a cat in hell's chance" is used to describe a situation where someone has very little or no chance of succeeding or achieving something. It implies that the chances are extremely slim or close to impossible, just like a cat surviving in the fiery environment of hell.
  • have a few/a lot etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few/a lot etc. irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects, plans, or opportunities underway or in progress simultaneously. It implies that a person is actively involved in several things at once, increasing their chances of success or achievement.
  • I have to wash a few things out. The idiom "I have to wash a few things out" usually means that one needs to address or resolve some issues or problems, often related to personal matters or actions. It metaphorically implies the act of cleansing or purifying to remove negative aspects or consequences.
  • have one too many The idiom "have one too many" means to consume more alcoholic beverages than one can handle, leading to intoxication or drunkenness.
  • have (got) what it takes The idiom "have (got) what it takes" means to possess the necessary qualities, skills, determination, or potential to succeed in a particular situation, task, or role. It implies someone has the required abilities, mindset, or attributes to achieve success or handle a challenging situation.
  • have a hidden talent The idiom "have a hidden talent" means to possess a skill, ability, or expertise that is not immediately apparent or known to others. It refers to an individual's knack for something that they have not yet showcased or revealed to people around them.
  • have cause to do sth The idiom "have cause to do something" means to have a valid reason or justification to do a particular action or engage in a certain behavior. It implies that there is a specific justification or motive behind the action being performed.
  • things have come to a pretty pass The idiom "things have come to a pretty pass" means that the situation or circumstances have become quite bad, undesirable, or extreme. It implies a sense of disappointment, deterioration, or distress.
  • have a good command of sth The idiom "have a good command of something" means possessing a high level of proficiency or skill in a particular subject, language, or field. It refers to having a thorough understanding or mastery over something, enabling one to control or handle it effectively.
  • (I) can't complain. and (I have) nothing to complain about. The idiom "(I) can't complain" or "(I have) nothing to complain about" is a casual way of expressing contentment or satisfaction with one's current situation or circumstances. It means that there are no major problems or grievances to report or discuss.
  • have first crack at The idiom "have first crack at" means to have the initial opportunity or advantage to attempt or try something before anyone else. It implies being the first in line or having the first chance to do or achieve something.
  • have teeth The idiom "have teeth" typically means that something or someone has influence, power, or the ability to be effective or impactful. It implies a strong and substantial force or capability.
  • have a clear conscience (about sm or sth) The idiom "have a clear conscience (about something)" means to possess a sense of inner satisfaction and moral certainty in knowing that one has acted ethically and honestly regarding a particular situation or action. It implies being free from guilt or remorse because the person believes they have done nothing wrong.
  • How many times do I have to tell you? The idiom "How many times do I have to tell you?" is used to express frustration or exasperation when someone repeatedly fails to understand or remember something that has been said or instructed numerous times before. It implies that the speaker has already conveyed the information multiple times and questions why it still hasn't been comprehended or remembered.
  • not have a chance in hell The idiom "not have a chance in hell" means that something or someone has no possibility or likelihood of succeeding or achieving a desired outcome. It emphasizes a very remote or unrealistic chance of success.
  • have an eye for the main chance The idiom "have an eye for the main chance" means to have a keen ability to recognize and pursue opportunities for personal gain or advancement. It refers to a person's tendency to notice and seize advantageous prospects, often focusing on the most significant or lucrative ones. Essentially, it implies a shrewdness or astuteness in identifying and capitalizing on favorable situations to achieve one's goals.
  • have a snowball's chance in hell The idiom "have a snowball's chance in hell" is used to describe a situation or possibility that is highly unlikely or improbable. It implies that the chances of success or favorable outcome are close to impossible, similar to a snowball surviving in the extreme heat of Hell.
  • have a fighting chance The idiom "have a fighting chance" means to have a reasonable or realistic opportunity to succeed or overcome a challenge, even though the odds may be against you. It implies that there is a possibility of winning or achieving something, but it will require effort, determination, or skill.
  • have a dog's chance The idiom "have a dog's chance" means to have a very small or unlikely chance of success or survival. It implies that the odds are against someone, just like a dog facing difficult or unfavorable circumstances.
  • have a chance in hell The idiom "have a chance in hell" is used to express extreme improbability or the lack of any realistic possibility for something to occur. It suggests that the likelihood of success or achievement is almost non-existent, comparing it to the slim chances one might have in the fiery and inhospitable realm of hell.
  • times have changed The idiom "times have changed" means that the circumstances, attitudes, or societal expectations have evolved significantly from the past. It acknowledges that things are different from how they used to be, often implying that the current situation or mindset differs greatly from a previous era.
  • have a change of heart The idiom "have a change of heart" means to change one's opinion, attitude, or feelings about something, usually in a significant or unexpected way. It implies a shift in perspective or a reversal of a previous decision or stance.
  • have/lead/live a charmed life The idiom "have/lead/live a charmed life" means to have an exceptionally lucky or fortunate existence, seemingly protected from harm or misfortune. It refers to someone who consistently experiences positive outcomes, often defying the odds or avoiding any major difficulties in life.
  • need (to have) your head examined The idiom "need (to have) your head examined" implies that someone's behavior or way of thinking is irrational, crazy, or illogical. It suggests that the person's actions or beliefs are so absurd that they should be evaluated or checked for mental instability.
  • (Have you) been keeping cool? The idiom "Have you been keeping cool?" is typically used as a friendly greeting or inquiry about how someone has been managing the heat or staying calm during a particularly hot or stressful time. It can also be seen as a way to show concern for someone's well-being in challenging or difficult circumstances.
  • have the devil to pay The idiom "have the devil to pay" typically means to face severe or grave consequences for one's actions or decisions. It refers to being in a difficult or compromising situation that is hard to resolve or escape from. The phrase originated from nautical jargon, where "devil" referred to the seam between the hull planking and the deck, which was particularly challenging to seal or repair. Thus, having "the devil to pay" became synonymous with dealing with a troublesome or troublesome problem.
  • have been to hell and back The idiom "have been to hell and back" means to have experienced extreme suffering, difficulty, or a harrowing ordeal and ultimately survived it or overcome it. It implies enduring tremendous hardships and challenges and emerging stronger as a result.
  • (have) a thick skin The idiom "(have) a thick skin" means to be emotionally resilient or able to handle criticism, insults, or negative remarks without becoming upset or affected. It implies having the ability to remain composed and unaffected by others' opinions or comments.
  • have had its chips The idiom "have had its chips" typically means that something or someone has come to the end of its useful life or has suffered irreversible damage or deterioration. It suggests that the person or thing in question is no longer viable, effective, or valuable.
  • have a thin time The idiom "have a thin time" generally means to go through a difficult or challenging period in one's life. It can refer to experiencing a lack of success, opportunities, or resources, making it challenging to meet one's goals or live up to expectations.
  • have too much of a good thing The idiom "have too much of a good thing" means to have an excessive or surplus amount of something that is usually enjoyable or advantageous. It suggests that an excess of something positive can actually become negative or undesirable.
  • have sth going with The idiom "have something going with" refers to a romantic or sexual involvement or relationship with someone. It suggests a level of attraction or connection between two people, often implying that they are involved in a secret or casual relationship without any serious commitment.
  • have a thing going The idiom "have a thing going" typically means to have a romantic or interpersonal relationship, often one that is not officially confirmed or labeled. It suggests that two people have a mutual interest, attraction, or connection.
  • have a thing about The idiom "have a thing about" is used to indicate someone's strong preference, obsession, or fixation on a particular person, activity, object, or topic. It implies that the person has a peculiar or unique interest in something and may exhibit a strong emotional or irrational attachment to it.
  • have a good thing going The idiom "have a good thing going" typically means to be in a positive, successful, or advantageous situation. It refers to having a favorable circumstance, relationship, or opportunity that is working out well.
  • hardly have time to think The idiom "hardly have time to think" means being extremely busy or occupied, to the extent that there is very little time for reflection, relaxation, or contemplation. It implies a constant state of busyness or being overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities, leaving no room for a moment of calm or mental space.
  • get/have your day in court The idiom "get/have your day in court" refers to the opportunity for an individual to present their case, arguments, or evidence before a court of law. It implies that someone will have a fair and formal chance to argue their side of a legal matter and seek justice in the legal system.
  • have the ball in one's court To have the ball in one's court means to have the responsibility or the power to take the next action or make a decision in a particular situation.
  • have a thirst for sth The idiom "have a thirst for something" means to have a strong desire or craving for something, usually in a metaphorical sense. It describes an intense longing or eagerness to pursue or obtain a particular thing, whether it be knowledge, success, adventure, or any other aspect of life. It reflects a deep hunger or passion for achieving or experiencing that particular thing.
  • have a cow The idiom "have a cow" means to become extremely angry, upset, or agitated about something. It typically implies an overreaction to a minor issue or situation.
  • have one's words stick in one's throat The idiom "have one's words stick in one's throat" means to be unable to speak or articulate something because of extreme shock, embarrassment, or disbelief. It implies a feeling of being overwhelmed or rendered speechless due to a situation or revelation.
  • have green fingers The idiom "have green fingers" means to have a natural talent or skill for gardening or the ability to make plants thrive and grow well.
  • have a green thumb The idiom "have a green thumb" is used to describe a person who has a natural talent or ability for gardening or growing plants. It suggests that this person has a special skill or knack for taking care of plants and making them thrive.
  • have a face like thunder The idiom "have a face like thunder" refers to someone's facial expression portraying intense anger, displeasure, or annoyance. It implies that the person's face is dark, stern, and full of aggression, resembling the appearance of an approaching storm.
  • have sth cinched The idiom "have something cinched" means to have something firmly secured, guaranteed, or under control. It suggests that a person has successfully completed a task, achieved a goal, or is in a position of advantage.
  • have/keep sb on a short/tight leash The idiom "have/keep somebody on a short/tight leash" means to exert strict control or supervision over someone, often limiting their freedom or autonomy. It implies that the person is closely monitored and kept under strict authority or supervision, similar to how a dog would be kept on a short leash to restrict its movements.
  • have your fingers/hand in the till The idiom "have your fingers/hand in the till" means to embezzle or steal money, especially by someone who has unauthorized access to the funds. It refers to a person secretly using their position or authority to improperly take money for personal gain.
  • have one's hand in the till The idiom "have one's hand in the till" means to be stealing or embezzling money, especially from the funds of an organization or company that one is responsible for. It refers to the act of illicitly taking money from the cash register or other sources of income.
  • have time on hands The idiom "have time on hands" means to have an excess amount of free time or to have nothing important or urgent to occupy one's time. It implies having extra time available due to lack of commitments or responsibilities.
  • have time The idiom "have time" typically means to possess or allocate free time available for an activity, task, or event. It indicates having the opportunity or capacity to engage in a specific action without being too busy or occupied with other responsibilities.
  • have the time of life The idiom "have the time of life" means to have an incredibly enjoyable or memorable experience.
  • have an easy time of it The idiom "have an easy time of it" means to experience something without difficulties or challenges. It refers to a situation where someone is not required to put in much effort, encounter obstacles, or face any significant problems in achieving their goal or completing a task.
  • have a lot of time for The idiom "have a lot of time for" means to greatly respect, admire, or hold someone or something in high regard. It implies that one values and appreciates the person or thing in question, and is willing to invest time and attention towards it.
  • have a hard time The idiom "have a hard time" means to experience difficulty or struggle with something or in a particular situation. It implies that someone is finding a task or situation challenging and is not able to easily accomplish or deal with it.
  • do you have the time The idiom "do you have the time?" is often used as a polite way of asking someone for the current time or to check if they are available to talk or assist.
  • have clean hands The idiom "have clean hands" means to be innocent or free from guilt or responsibility in a situation. It refers to someone who has not participated in any wrongdoing or unethical behavior.
  • have a clear conscience The idiom "have a clear conscience" means to have no feelings of guilt or remorse regarding one's actions or behavior. It refers to being morally or ethically upright, having done nothing wrong, and having peace of mind knowing that one has acted in a morally correct manner.
  • Have I made myself clear? The idiom "Have I made myself clear?" is a rhetorical question used to emphasize that the speaker believes they have expressed their message or instructions clearly and expects the listener to fully understand and comply. It often implies that the speaker is seeking confirmation or assurance that their message has been comprehended.
  • don't have a pot to piss in (or a window to throw it out of) The idiom "don't have a pot to piss in (or a window to throw it out of)" is a colloquial expression used to describe extreme poverty or financial destitution. It implies that someone lacks basic resources or possessions, to the point where they don't even have a basic pot for personal needs or a window to dispose of waste. This idiom highlights a state of absolute lack and suggests the person's desperate circumstances.
  • have one's head in the clouds The idiom "have one's head in the clouds" means to be unaware of or not interested in the practical realities of life, often dreaming or fantasizing instead of being realistically focused. It refers to a person who is perceived as being detached or preoccupied with their own thoughts, ideas, or daydreams.
  • have the Midas touch The idiom "have the Midas touch" refers to someone who possesses exceptional skill or luck in making everything they touch turn into great success, wealth, or prosperity. It suggests that their actions or decisions consistently lead to favorable outcomes or financial gains. It derives from the Greek myth of King Midas, who had the ability to turn everything he touched into gold.
  • have a clue (about sth) The idiom "have a clue (about sth)" means to possess knowledge, information, or understanding about a particular subject or situation. It implies that the person is aware and informed about the topic being discussed.
  • have sm or sth in tow The idiom "have someone or something in tow" means to have someone or something accompanying or following you, as if being pulled along by a rope or chain. It suggests having control or responsibility over the person or thing in question, often involving them being under your influence or supervision.
  • have a onetrack mind The idiom "have a one-track mind" refers to someone who consistently thinks or is obsessed with only one particular thing and is unable to divert their attention or think about other topics. This person's thoughts, conversations, or actions are limited to a single subject, and they are often oblivious to other aspects of life or uninterested in other conversations or activities.
  • have coming The idiom "have coming" means to deserve or merit something, typically referring to an action or consequence that is considered justifiable or appropriate based on one's behavior or actions. It implies that the person will receive or experience something due to their own actions or choices.
  • have sth to prove The idiom "have something to prove" refers to a situation where someone feels the need to demonstrate their abilities, worth, or superiority in order to gain recognition, respect, or acceptance from others, especially when there may be doubts or skepticism about their capabilities. It typically suggests a strong motivation to succeed and overcome challenges to validate oneself.
  • Have a good trip,
  • have sth in common (with sb/sth) The idiom "have something in common (with someone/something)" means to share similar interests, characteristics, or experiences with someone or something else. It indicates that there are shared qualities or commonalities between two or more people or things.
  • have sth in common (with sm or sth) The idiom "have something in common (with someone or something)" means to share similar interests, characteristics, or traits with another person or thing. It implies a sense of similarity or connection between two or more entities.
  • have no truck with sb/sth The idiom "have no truck with sb/sth" means to refuse to be involved or associated with someone or something, often due to a disapproval or rejection of their actions, beliefs, or practices.
  • have no truck with sth/sb The idiom "have no truck with something/somebody" means to refuse to have any association or involvement with something or someone, usually due to disapproval or moral objection. It implies a deliberate avoidance or rejection of a certain person, group, belief, or activity.
  • have no truck with sth The idiom "have no truck with sth" means to refuse to be associated with or have any involvement in a particular thing or situation. It implies a strong disapproval or a decision to distance oneself from something.
  • have a stroke The idiom "have a stroke" typically refers to experiencing an acute medical condition known as a stroke, which occurs when the blood supply to the brain is interrupted or reduced, causing damage to brain cells. However, "have a stroke" can also be used figuratively to describe a sudden and strong emotional or physical reaction to a shocking or stressful event.
  • have confidence in sm The idiom "have confidence in someone" is used to describe the act of trusting and believing in someone's abilities, judgment, or character. It implies having faith and reliance on someone's capabilities and expecting them to perform well or make the right decisions.
  • have a conniption fit The idiom "have a conniption fit" refers to experiencing a sudden outburst of extreme anger, frustration, or hysteria, often characterized by losing control of one's emotions or exhibiting exaggerated reactions.
  • have the courage of your/its convictions The idiom "have the courage of your/its convictions" means to have the confidence and determination to act based on one's beliefs or principles, even when faced with opposition or challenges. It suggests being steadfast and resolute in standing up for what one genuinely believes in.
  • have the courage of your convictions The idiom "have the courage of your convictions" means to have confidence and steadfastness in your beliefs, principles, or opinions, and to act in accordance with them, even in the face of opposition or difficulty. It implies being brave enough to stand up for what you believe is right, without wavering or being swayed by others.
  • have the courage of one's convictions The idiom "have the courage of one's convictions" means to have the bravery and confidence to act in accordance with one's beliefs, even when facing opposition or challenges. It refers to standing firm and steadfast in one's beliefs and principles, regardless of the external pressures or criticism.
  • have a corncob up one's ass The idiom "have a corncob up one's ass" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is perceived as being excessively stern, uptight, or overly strict. It implies that the person in question is rigid, inflexible, or lacking a sense of humor. The idiom is often used humorously to tease or criticize someone who is seen as being unnecessarily serious or unrelenting. However, it is crucial to note that the idiom may contain explicit language and is considered vulgar.
  • have (sth) stick in one's craw The idiom "have (sth) stick in one's craw" means to be unable to accept or tolerate something, typically because it is unfair, offensive, or objectionable. It refers to a feeling of resentment or annoyance due to a particular situation or circumstance.
  • not have the heart to do The idiom "not have the heart to do" means lacking the emotional strength or courage to do something. It refers to a situation where someone feels reluctant or unable to carry out an action due to personal or moral reasons.
  • not have the heart The idiom "not have the heart" means to lack the emotional strength, courage, or willingness to do something due to feeling guilty, sympathetic, or compassionate towards someone or something.
  • have heart in mouth The idiom "have heart in mouth" means to feel extreme anxiety or fear, usually due to a dangerous or stressful situation.
  • have heart go out to The idiom "have heart go out to" means to feel deep sympathy, compassion, or empathy for someone who is experiencing a difficult or challenging situation. It signifies a genuine concern and emotional support for the person in distress.
  • have a hearttoheart The definition of the idiom "have a heart-to-heart" is to have a sincere and honest conversation with someone, usually about deep feelings, emotions, or important matters. It involves open communication and sharing personal thoughts and experiences.
  • have one's wires crossed The idiom "have one's wires crossed" means to have a misunderstanding or confusion, often resulting from a miscommunication or misinterpretation of information or signals. It is commonly used to describe a situation where two or more people have conflicting or contradictory understandings of a particular matter.
  • You have to be cruel to be kind. The idiom "You have to be cruel to be kind" means that sometimes, in order to help someone or achieve a positive outcome, it may be necessary to do something that appears harsh or unkind initially. The intention behind the action is ultimately to bring about a beneficial result, even if it involves temporary pain or discomfort.
  • have the upper hand The idiom "have the upper hand" means to have an advantage or be in a superior position compared to others involved in a particular situation, conflict, or competition. It suggests having more control, power, or influence in order to dictate or determine the outcome.
  • have use for The idiom "have use for" means to find something or someone beneficial, necessary, or relevant in a particular situation or context. It indicates a practical purpose or value for someone or something.
  • have no use for The idiom "have no use for" means to have no need, interest, or use for something or someone. It implies a lack of appreciation, relevance, or value towards a particular thing or individual.
  • (I) have to be moving along. The idiom "(I) have to be moving along" means that someone needs to leave or depart from a place or situation. It implies that the person speaking has other commitments or responsibilities that require their attention elsewhere.
  • have sb by the short and curlies The idiom "have sb by the short and curlies" is a colloquial phrase used to describe a situation in which someone has complete control or power over another person. It implies that the person being controlled is in a vulnerable and helpless position, as if someone has a firm grip on their physical or metaphorical "short and curlies"- referring to the sensitive area of the body, typically hair.
  • have work cut out for The idiom "have work cut out for (someone)" means that someone has a difficult or challenging task ahead of them. It implies that the work requires a lot of effort, skill, or time to complete successfully.
  • have work cut out The idiom "have work cut out" means to have a difficult task or challenge ahead that requires a lot of effort, skill, or determination to complete successfully. It implies that the task is not easy and will require full concentration to accomplish.
  • have rocks in head
  • have head up arse The idiom "have head up arse" is a crude expression that refers to someone being oblivious, ignorant, or out of touch with reality. It depicts a situation or behavior where a person is so self-absorbed or lacking in awareness that they are detached from the world or situation around them. It suggests that the person is focused solely on themselves and their own interests, disregarding the needs or perspectives of others.
  • have head screwed on The idiom "have head screwed on" is used to describe someone who is intelligent, sensible, and rational in their thinking and decision-making. It refers to an individual who has a good understanding of reality, is level-headed, and makes well-informed choices.
  • have head in the clouds The idiom "have head in the clouds" means to be daydreaming or lost in one's own thoughts, often resulting in being unaware of or disconnected from one's surroundings or responsibilities. It refers to someone who is not focused or practical, but rather has a tendency to be absent-minded or impractical.
  • have hanging over head The idiom "have hanging over head" means to be burdened or oppressed by something, usually a looming problem or responsibility that causes stress or worry. It suggests a feeling of constantly being reminded of an impending issue that needs to be addressed.
  • have eyes in the back of head The idiom "have eyes in the back of your head" means to be very aware of or perceptive about one's surroundings, often implying the ability to notice or anticipate things that are not easily seen or expected. It suggests being exceptionally vigilant, observant, or attentive.
  • have a head for The idiom "have a head for" refers to someone's ability or talent in a particular area or activity. It suggests that the person possesses a natural aptitude or knack for comprehending, understanding, or excelling in a specific field or skill.
  • have had its/ day The idiom "have had its day" means that something or someone has reached the peak of their success, popularity, or usefulness and is now in decline or no longer relevant. It suggests that the time of being important or significant has passed.
  • have day in court The idiom "have a day in court" typically means to have the opportunity to present one's case or arguments before a judge or jury, usually in a legal proceeding. It refers to the right to be heard and have one's position considered by the court to reach a fair decision or resolution. It can also be used more broadly to signify having an opportunity to explain or defend oneself in any situation.
  • Have a nice day The idiom "Have a nice day" is an informal expression commonly used as a pleasantry or farewell to wish someone well or encourage them to enjoy their day in a positive and pleasant manner.
  • have a death wish The idiom "have a death wish" is used to describe someone who engages in extremely risky or dangerous behavior, often with little regard for the potential consequences or harm that may result. It implies that the person seems to have a desire or inclination towards seeking situations that may lead to their own demise.
  • (I'm) delighted to have you (here). The idiom "(I'm) delighted to have you (here)" is an expression used to convey extreme pleasure or satisfaction in welcoming someone to a particular place or event. It expresses a strong and genuine sense of happiness and enthusiasm towards the presence of the person being addressed.
  • have back to the wall The idiom "have back to the wall" is used to describe a situation where someone is facing numerous difficulties or challenges, with very limited options or resources available to them. It implies being in a vulnerable or desperate position, where there is no room for error or escape. It conveys a sense of being cornered or trapped, without any means of retreat or support.
  • have back against the wall To have your back against the wall means to be in a difficult or desperate situation with no options or resources available. It refers to feeling trapped or threatened, as if there is no escape or room for maneuver.
  • have been in the wars The idiom "have been in the wars" refers to someone who looks battered, bruised, or physically injured, usually as a result of an accident, altercation, or rough experience. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who appears exhausted or emotionally drained due to a challenging or difficult period in their life.
  • have just one oar in the water The idiom "have just one oar in the water" means to have a limited understanding or involvement in a situation, or to be oblivious to what is happening around you. It suggests a lack of focus, coordination, or awareness, as if someone is only using one paddle instead of both while rowing a boat.
  • have designs on sth The idiom "have designs on something" refers to having a plan or intention to obtain or achieve something, usually with a sense of ambition or purpose. It implies that someone has a specific goal or desire they are actively working towards.
  • have designs on sb The idiom "have designs on someone" means to have romantic or amorous intentions toward a specific person. It implies harboring an attraction or desire for establishing a romantic relationship with someone.
  • have designs on sm or sth The idiom "have designs on someone or something" means to have ambitious or ulterior motives or intentions towards someone or something. It implies having a specific plan or goal in mind, often with the intention of gaining some advantage or benefit from the person or thing in question.
  • have wicked way with The idiom "have wicked way with" refers to a person's ability or skill in getting what they want or manipulating a situation to their advantage, often by using cunning or devious means. It implies that the person is highly skilled at achieving their goals or desires, even if it means disregarding moral or ethical standards.
  • have way with The idiom "have a way with" typically means to possess a natural skill or talent for influencing or captivating others. It refers to a person's ability to charm, persuade, or succeed in a particular situation or with certain people.
  • Have it your way The definition of the idiom "Have it your way" is to allow someone to do something or to have things done according to their preference or choice. It implies giving someone full control or authority over a situation or decision.
  • have a way with words The idiom "have a way with words" refers to someone's ability to communicate or express themselves effectively and skillfully, often with charisma and persuasion. It suggests that the person has a talent for using language and rhetoric to captivate, influence, or engage others in conversation or writing.
  • have a way with The idiom "have a way with" means to possess a natural talent or skill in dealing with someone or something, typically in a charismatic or persuasive manner. It refers to the ability to communicate, influence, or understand someone or something exceptionally well, often resulting in a positive outcome or a strong connection.
  • have a weakness for sm or sth The idiom "have a weakness for someone or something" means to have an indulgent or strong liking or fondness for someone or something, even if it may not be considered reasonable or responsible. It implies that the person is often unable to resist or control their attraction or desire towards that person or thing.
  • have a face like a wet weekend The idiom "have a face like a wet weekend" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone's facial expression or demeanor as appearing gloomy, saddened, or displeased. It implies that the person's appearance resembles the dreary and unappealing atmosphere of a wet and rainy weekend.
  • have the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders The idiom "have the cares/weight of the world on your shoulders" means to feel burdened and overwhelmed by numerous worries, responsibilities, or problems. It implies carrying an immense amount of stress and pressure, as if one is personally responsible for solving all the problems in the world.
  • have a weight problem The idiom "have a weight problem" refers to someone who is experiencing difficulties in managing their weight or is struggling with obesity. It implies that the person is facing challenges related to their body weight and may be overweight or excessively obese.
  • Nice place you have here The idiom "Nice place you have here" is a sarcastic or ironic remark used when someone visits a location that is actually unpleasant, poorly maintained, or undesirable. It is often said to express the opposite of what is expected, highlighting the irony or disapproval of the situation.
  • good to have you here The expression "good to have you here" is an idiomatic way of expressing pleasure or gratitude for someone's presence or attendance. It signifies that the speaker is glad that the person is present in a particular place or situation.
  • have your wicked way with sb The idiom "have your wicked way with someone" refers to taking advantage of someone, usually in a sexual or manipulative context, to satisfy one's own desires or needs with little regard for the other person's feelings or consent. It implies a selfish or exploitative behavior towards another individual.
  • Where (have) you been keeping yourself? The idiom "Where (have) you been keeping yourself?" is a figurative way of asking someone where they have been or what they have been doing, typically when their absence or lack of presence has been noticed.
  • have sm's hide The idiom "have someone's hide" means to have control or power over someone, usually with the intention of punishing or holding them accountable for something. It can also imply having authority or influence over someone to the point of being able to harm or manipulate them in some way.
  • have your wits about you "Have your wits about you" means to be alert, attentive, and mentally sharp. It refers to being fully aware of one's surroundings, making quick and rational decisions, and being prepared to act appropriately in any situation.
  • have/keep your wits about you The idiom "have/keep your wits about you" means to be alert, calm, and mentally sharp, especially in challenging or dangerous situations. It suggests remaining composed and using one's intelligence and awareness to navigate and deal with circumstances effectively.
  • have doing
  • have a penchant for doing The idiom "have a penchant for doing" means to have a strong liking or natural inclination towards doing something. It implies that the person frequently engages in or enjoys a particular activity.
  • have words with The idiom "have words with" means to confront someone or have a serious conversation with them, typically to express anger, displeasure, or disagreement about a certain matter. It implies a potentially heated or intense exchange of words.
  • have words The idiom "have words" means to engage in a conversation or argument with someone, usually in a serious or confrontational manner.
  • have to eat words The idiom "have to eat words" means to retract or apologize for something previously said due to being proven wrong or facing a different outcome than expected. It implies admitting one's mistake or backtracking on a statement.
  • have the final word The idiom "have the final word" means to have the ultimate authority or decision-making power in a given situation, ensuring that one's opinion or judgment will be the last and determining one.
  • have a word The idiom "have a word" means to speak or have a conversation with someone in order to discuss something or address a particular issue. It implies a need for communication or discussion regarding a specific matter.
  • have the world at feet The idiom "have the world at your feet" means to have great power, influence, or opportunities available to oneself. It suggests that someone is in a position of extreme success or is capable of achieving almost anything they desire. It signifies having complete control or mastery over one's circumstances and being capable of fulfilling all ambitions and aspirations.
  • Nothing so bad but (it) might have been worse. The idiom "Nothing so bad but (it) might have been worse" means that regardless of how terrible or unfavorable a situation may seem, there is always the possibility that it could have been even more negative or disastrous. It emphasizes the idea that one should consider themselves fortunate or find some comfort in the awareness that things could have turned out even more poorly.
  • have doubts about sm or sth The idiom "have doubts about someone or something" means to be uncertain or skeptical about someone's abilities, actions, or the truthfulness of something. It implies a lack of confidence or trust in the person or thing being discussed.
  • have a downer on sb The idiom "have a downer on sb" means to have a strong dislike, negative attitude, or prejudice towards someone. It implies having a consistently critical or unfavorable opinion of the person in question.
  • have sb's name written all over it The idiom "have sb's name written all over it" means that something is so perfectly suited to or characteristic of a particular person that it is as if their name is literally written on it. It suggests that the person's influence, preferences, or style are so evident in the situation or object that it couldn't belong to anyone else.
  • have down to a fine art The idiom "have down to a fine art" means to have mastered or perfected a particular skill or activity to the point of great expertise and efficiency. It implies that someone has become highly proficient in performing a task, often through extensive practice or experience.
  • have a fine etc. pair of lungs The idiom "have a fine etc. pair of lungs" is used to describe someone who has a very loud and powerful voice, often specifically referring to their singing ability. It suggests that the person is able to produce strong and resonant vocal sounds.
  • have one's rathers The idiom "have one's rathers" means to have a preference or personal choice in a situation. It refers to having a particular liking or inclination towards something over another option.
  • have (sm) time to kill The idiom "have time to kill" means having an abundance of free time or having extra time available with nothing specific to do. It suggests that one has plenty of time to spare and is not rushed or occupied by important tasks or commitments.
  • have the luck of the devil The idiom "have the luck of the devil" means to consistently have exceptionally good luck or fortune that seems almost supernatural or extraordinary. It suggests that despite unfavorable circumstances or odds, an individual continues to experience positive outcomes beyond what is typically expected.
  • have the devil's own luck The idiom "have the devil's own luck" means to consistently have exceptionally good luck or fortune, often in situations that are difficult or seemingly impossible. It implies that the person has a streak of remarkable luck that is almost supernatural, like being favored by the devil himself.
  • have the devil's own job "Have the devil's own job" is an idiom that means to have an extremely difficult or challenging task. It implies that the task is so challenging that it feels like one is facing a powerful and relentless adversary, similar to dealing with the devil himself.
  • devil's children have the devil's luck The idiom "devil's children have the devil's luck" means that people who are mischievous, wicked, or engage in negative behavior often seem to have good luck or appear to be successful in their endeavors despite their questionable actions. It implies that fortune can favor those who engage in immoral or harmful activities.
  • have heard the last of The idiom "have heard the last of" means that something or someone will not be seen, heard, or experienced again in the future. It suggests that the issue or person has reached a final conclusion or has permanently disappeared from one's life or the public's attention.
  • have a corncob up ass
  • have a crack at The idiom "have a crack at" means to attempt or try something, especially when one is uncertain about the outcome or not experienced in it.
  • have burning a hole in pocket The idiom "have burning a hole in pocket" refers to someone who has an intense or compulsive desire to spend money, usually because they cannot resist the urge to buy something. It implies that the person feels a strong urge or temptation to spend the money they have, as if it were "burning a hole" in their pocket.
  • get one's nose out of joint and have one's nose out of joint put one's nose out of joint The idiom "get one's nose out of joint" or "have one's nose out of joint" refers to a person feeling annoyed, offended, or upset due to a slight or perceived insult. It typically signifies that someone is feeling hurt or insulted by something someone else has said or done, causing them to be in a state of resentment or indignation.
  • have a hitch in one's gitalong
  • have one's shoulder to the wheel The idiom "have one's shoulder to the wheel" means to apply oneself diligently and make a dedicated effort to accomplish a task or goal. It implies being fully committed and working hard, often against difficulties or obstacles, in order to achieve success. The idiom originated from the literal action of pushing or turning a wheel, indicating the physical exertion and involvement required to get a task done.
  • You cannot have your cake and eat it The idiom "You cannot have your cake and eat it too" means that one cannot simultaneously enjoy two conflicting things or options. It implies that there are often choices or trade-offs to be made, and one cannot have both options fully available. In other words, it emphasizes the concept of making a decision and accepting the consequences that come with it, as it is not always possible to have everything desired.
  • have cake and eat it too The phrase "have your cake and eat it too" means wanting the benefits or advantages of two conflicting options or outcomes without having to choose one over the other or experiencing any negative consequences. It refers to the desire to enjoy two things simultaneously that are mutually exclusive or contradictory.
  • have cake and eat it The idiom "have cake and eat it" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two conflicting or mutually exclusive things simultaneously, without sacrificing or compromising either. It implies a desire for contradictory outcomes that are impossible to achieve together.
  • have the whip hand The idiom "have the whip hand" means to have control or dominance over a situation, often through possessing the power to impose one's will or authority over others. It refers to being in a position of advantage or superiority, where one can direct or influence the actions or decisions of others.
  • have all the aces The idiom "have all the aces" means to have a strong advantage, superior position, or complete control over a situation. It originates from card games, where having all the aces is a very powerful position, as the ace is usually the highest-ranking card. Therefore, to "have all the aces" suggests having an unbeatable hand or a significant advantage. This idiom is often used metaphorically to describe individuals who have all the necessary resources, knowledge, or power to succeed or exert control in a specific situation.
  • We have to do lunch smtime The idiom "We have to do lunch sometime" is a casual way of expressing the desire to meet up or spend time together over a shared meal, typically during lunchtime. It is often used to convey the idea of wanting to catch up, have a discussion, or simply enjoy each other's company.
  • Let me have it! The idiom "Let me have it!" typically means to give or unleash one's full force or passionate expression of something, often including criticism, anger, or an attack. It can also be used as a request to receive all the available information or details about something.
  • let have it The idiom "let have it" means to attack or criticize someone verbally or physically, confront them openly, or express one's anger or frustration towards someone or something.
  • have a near miss The idiom "have a near miss" is used to describe a situation where a potentially dangerous or harmful event was narrowly avoided. It refers to a close call or a situation where someone came very close to experiencing an accident or a negative outcome, but managed to escape or avoid it at the last moment.
  • have the edge on To have the edge on someone or something means to have a slight advantage, superiority, or upper hand over them. It implies being in a favorable position or having a competitive advantage.
  • have had your fill of sth To have had your fill of something means to have experienced or consumed enough of it, and no longer have any interest or desire to continue. It implies being completely satisfied or satiated with a particular thing or situation.
  • have had your fill The idiom "have had your fill" means to have had enough of something, typically referring to satisfying one's appetite or desire for a particular thing or experience. It implies that one is content or no longer in need.
  • to have a hollow leg The idiom "to have a hollow leg" means to have an unusually large capacity or appetite for eating and drinking. It implies that the person can consume a large amount of food and drink without getting full or intoxicated.
  • have a leg up on The idiom "have a leg up on" means to have an advantage or head start in a particular situation or competition. It implies being in a superior position compared to others, often due to having more knowledge, experience, skills, or resources.
  • have an effect on sm or sth The idiom "have an effect on someone or something" means to impact or influence someone or something in some way, causing a change or outcome.
  • have a bad effect (on sm or sth) The idiom "have a bad effect (on someone or something)" is used to describe a situation or action that has a negative impact or consequence on a person or a thing. It refers to something that harms or causes unfavorable outcomes to someone or something involved.
  • not have a minute to call your own The idiom "not have a minute to call your own" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or obligations, leaving no time for personal activities or relaxation. It signifies a lack of free time or autonomy over one's schedule.
  • never would have guessed The idiom "never would have guessed" means being completely surprised or taken aback by something unexpected or not easily predictable. It implies that the speaker or an observer could not have predicted or anticipated the outcome or situation.
  • have egg on your face The idiom "have egg on your face" means to be embarrassed or humiliated, usually as a result of making a mistake or experiencing a failure in front of other people. It suggests the feeling one might have if they had a messy egg accident and ended up with egg on their face, which would attract attention and cause embarrassment.
  • have egg on one's face The idiom "have egg on one's face" means to be embarrassed or humiliated due to a mistake, failure, or misjudgment in a public or noticeable way.
  • have nothing to do with sb/sth The idiom "have nothing to do with someone/something" means to be completely unrelated or uninvolved with someone or something, or to deliberately avoid any association or interaction with them. It signifies a deliberate choice to maintain distance or stay away from a person, group, or situation.
  • have nothing to do with sm or sth The idiom "have nothing to do with someone or something" means to be completely unrelated to or uninvolved with someone or something. It suggests a lack of connection, association, or interest in a particular person or thing.
  • have sth on file The idiom "have something on file" means to have a record or documentation of something stored or kept for future reference. It suggests that the information or document is readily available and can be easily accessed when needed.
  • have pride of place The idiom "have pride of place" refers to something being given the most prominent or conspicuous position, highlighting its special or important status. It often implies that the item in question holds great significance, deserving of being displayed or positioned prominently.
  • have a place in The idiom "have a place in" means to be suitable, deserving, or fitting to be included or considered as a part of something. It implies that someone or something has a rightful or appropriate position, role, or significance within a particular context or group.
  • have growing pains The idiom "have growing pains" typically refers to experiencing difficulties or challenges while undergoing a process of growth or development, whether it be personal, professional, or organizational. It implies that the struggles are temporary and necessary for progress and improvement.
  • have against The idiom "have against" is used to express a feeling of dislike, opposition, or resentment towards someone or something. It implies that there is a specific reason or cause for this negative sentiment, often referring to a particular characteristic, action, or event that has led to the unfavorable feelings.
  • have a familiar ring (to it) The idiom "have a familiar ring (to it)" means that something sounds or seems familiar, similar to something previously heard or experienced. It suggests a sense of recognition or resonance with a particular idea, phrase, or situation.
  • have too many irons in the fire The idiom "have too many irons in the fire" means to have too many tasks or projects to handle simultaneously, which can potentially lead to being overwhelmed or having a lack of focus on any one particular task. It suggests being involved in too many commitments or responsibilities, making it difficult to manage them effectively.
  • have a few lot etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few (lot, etc.) irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects, plans, or activities in progress simultaneously. It implies being involved in various endeavors or maintaining multiple options or opportunities open for future success.
  • have a keen interest in sth The idiom "have a keen interest in something" means to have a strong or intense interest in a particular subject or activity. It suggests that the person is highly enthusiastic, curious, and passionate about acquiring knowledge or engaging in that particular area of interest.
  • have sm's best interest(s) at heart The idiom "have someone's best interest(s) at heart" means to sincerely and genuinely care about someone's well-being and to act in a way that promotes their happiness, success, or benefit. It suggests that the person's intentions and actions are guided by a genuine concern for the other person's welfare and not driven by self-interest or ulterior motives.
  • have a grip on sth The idiom "have a grip on something" means to have a strong understanding, control, or mastery over a specific situation, concept, or task. It implies having a firm hold on the subject matter and being confident and knowledgeable about it.
  • have a charmed life The idiom "have a charmed life" means to consistently and inexplicably experience good fortune or luck. It refers to someone who seems to navigate through life effortlessly, encountering little or no difficulties, and frequently achieving success or positive outcomes.
  • have pick of The idiom "have pick of" means to have the opportunity to choose freely from a selection of options or opportunities. It implies having the advantage of being able to select the best or most desirable option from a range of choices.
  • have the gift of gab The idiom "have the gift of gab" means to possess or have a natural ability to speak or express oneself fluently and persuasively. It refers to someone who is exceptionally skilled at engaging in conversation, storytelling, or public speaking. This person is typically charismatic and adept at capturing the attention and interest of others through their words.
  • have a gift for (doing) sth The idiom "have a gift for (doing) something" refers to possessing a natural ability or talent for a particular skill or activity. It implies that the person has an innate capacity for excelling in that area without much effort.
  • have had enough The idiom "have had enough" means to no longer tolerate or endure a situation, experience, or behavior. It implies reaching a threshold where one cannot handle or accept something any longer.
  • have a lot on plate The idiomatic expression "have a lot on one's plate" means that someone has many tasks, responsibilities, or concerns to deal with simultaneously. It signifies being overwhelmed with a heavy workload or having a lot of things to handle or address.
  • have a penchant for doing sth The idiom "have a penchant for doing something" means to have a strong inclination or preference for doing a particular thing. It implies having a natural talent, inclination, or liking for a specific activity or behavior.
  • have the presence of mind to do The idiom "have the presence of mind to do something" means to be alert, composed, and mentally focused enough to perform a particular action or make a decision in a critical or unexpected situation. It refers to the ability to remain calm and think clearly during moments of urgency or pressure.
  • have on mind
  • have mind on The idiom "have mind on" means to be focused or preoccupied with something. It refers to the state of being mentally engrossed or having one's thoughts fixed on a particular subject or concern. It implies that the person's attention and concentration are directed towards that specific matter.
  • have in mind The idiom "have in mind" means to have a specific idea, plan, or intention about something or someone. It implies that a person is considering or thinking about a particular thought or purpose.
  • have half a notion to do The idiom "have half a notion to do" means having a vague inclination or a partial desire to do something. It suggests considering or contemplating an action, but not being fully committed or determined to proceed with it.
  • have half a mind to The idiom "have half a mind to" means having a strong inclination or intention to do something, often suggesting that the person is considering or contemplating it seriously. It implies a desire or temptation to take action, even if not fully committed to it.
  • have half a mind The idiom "have half a mind" typically means to be strongly considering or contemplating doing something, often implying a slight intention or inclination to take a particular action. It suggests that the person is somewhat inclined or leaning towards a decision or course of action but hasn't fully committed to it yet.
  • have an open mind The idiom "have an open mind" means to be receptive to new ideas, perspectives, or opinions without being biased or judgmental. It emphasizes the willingness to consider different viewpoints and not clinging strictly to one's own beliefs or preconceived notions.
  • have a mind to do The idiom "have a mind to do" means to have the intention or inclination to do something. It implies that someone is considering or contemplating taking a specific action.
  • have a mind to The idiom "have a mind to" means to have a strong inclination or intention to do something. It implies a certain level of determination or resolve in carrying out a particular action.
  • have a mind of own The idiom "have a mind of its own" means that something or someone behaves or acts independently, without being influenced or controlled by others. It implies having strong individuality or personal opinions that may not align with the majority or follow established standards.
  • have a memory like a sieve "Have a memory like a sieve" is an idiom used to describe someone who has a very poor or unreliable memory. It means that the person easily forgets things or has difficulty retaining information, similar to how a sieve or a strainer allows things to pass through without retaining them.
  • have a lot on mind The idiom "have a lot on one's mind" means to be preoccupied or burdened with many thoughts, worries, or responsibilities.
  • have a good mind The idiom "have a good mind" means to strongly consider or be on the verge of doing something, typically when it involves taking action or making a decision that may not be expected or desirable by others. It implies having a strong inclination or intention to proceed with a particular course of action.
  • have to do with sb/sth The idiom "have to do with sb/sth" means to be related, connected, or associated with someone or something. It indicates a connection or involvement in a specific matter, topic, or relationship.
  • you couldn't have asked for (anything) more The idiom "you couldn't have asked for (anything) more" means that the situation or outcome is extremely positive and exceeds all expectations. It implies that everything desired or expected has been achieved or surpassed, leaving nothing more to be desired.
  • have to do with sth The idiom "have to do with something" refers to the connection, relevance, or involvement of something in a particular situation or topic. It implies that the mentioned thing is related or relevant to another thing.
  • have sth to do with sth The idiom "have something to do with something" means to be related, connected, or involved in a particular matter or situation. It implies a connection or association between two or more things.
  • have the final/last word The idiom "have the final/last word" means to have the ultimate say or make the final decision in a dispute or discussion, thereby asserting control or dominance over others involved in the conversation. It implies having the concluding opinion that cannot be challenged or overridden.
  • have pull with The idiom "have pull with" means having influence or the ability to wield power or leverage over someone or a situation. It suggests having connections or a strong network that enables a person to gain favors, privileges, or advantageous outcomes.
  • have no use for sb/sth The idiom "have no use for someone/something" means to have a dislike, indifference, or lack of appreciation for someone or something. It suggests that the person or thing in question is deemed worthless, unnecessary, or not beneficial to one's needs or preferences.
  • you have got to be kidding The idiom "you have got to be kidding" is an exclamation used to express disbelief or incredulity towards something that is hard to believe or is deemed as absurd or untrue. It signifies astonishment or doubt regarding the sincerity or plausibility of a statement or situation.
  • have the edge on/over sb/sth To "have the edge on/over someone or something" means to have a slight advantage or superiority over them. It implies being a step ahead, having a better chance of success, or possessing a favorable position compared to the others involved.
  • have a flair for sth The idiom "have a flair for something" means to have a natural talent or ability for a particular activity or skill. It suggests that a person has an innate aptitude or a special gift that enables them to excel in a certain area.
  • have an eye for sm or sth The idiom "have an eye for something" is used to describe someone who possesses a natural talent or ability to recognize or appreciate a particular quality, skill, or beauty in something or someone. It suggests a keen sense of observation and discernment.
  • have hopes of The idiom "have hopes of" means to have expectations or aspirations for something. It implies having a belief or desire that something will happen or be achieved in the future.
  • have one's mind in the gutter The idiom "have one's mind in the gutter" means to have thoughts or conversations that are focused on inappropriate or vulgar topics, often of a sexual nature. It implies that someone's mind is occupied by low, crude, or offensive ideas.
  • only have eyes for The idiom "only have eyes for" means to be romantically or exclusively interested in someone, showing no interest in anyone else. It implies being completely captivated or infatuated with a particular person.
  • have one eye on The idiom "have one eye on" means to pay partial attention to something while also being aware of or monitoring another thing simultaneously. It implies that a person is not fully focused or committed to one task or situation because their attention is divided.
  • have half an eye on The phrase "have half an eye on" means to be partially attentive to something, to keep an intermediate level of attention or surveillance towards a particular situation or person.
  • have eyes like a hawk The idiom "have eyes like a hawk" means to have exceptionally sharp or keen eyesight, often characterized by the ability to notice even the smallest details or to be extremely vigilant and observant.
  • have eye on The idiom "have an eye on" means to closely monitor or watch someone or something, usually implying a sense of suspicion or interest.
  • have eye The idiom "have an eye" typically refers to having good observation skills or a keen sense of perception. It means to be able to notice or identify things that others might easily miss. It can also imply having an aesthetic appreciation or recognizing quality in various aspects of life, such as art, music, or fashion.
  • have beady eye on The idiom "have a beady eye on" means to watch someone closely or suspiciously, keeping a sharp and unwavering focus on their actions or behavior. It implies being observant with a critical or skeptical intent, as if one has narrowed and keen eyes like those of a bird of prey.
  • have an eye for The idiom "have an eye for" means to possess a natural ability or talent to judge, appreciate, or notice specific qualities, usually visual or aesthetic in nature. It suggests that someone has a keen perception or discernment for observing and recognizing particular details or characteristics.
  • have egg on face The idiom "have egg on face" means to be in a situation where one feels embarrassed, humiliated, or foolish due to a mistake, failure, or misunderstanding. It often implies that the person's error or misjudgment is evident to others, causing them to have a sense of shame or humiliation, comparable to having literal eggs smeared on their face.
  • (I have) no problem with that. The idiom "(I have) no problem with that" means that one fully accepts or agrees with a proposition or suggestion without any difficulty or objection. It indicates a lack of opposition or opposition.
  • have a lot/enough on your plate The idiom "have a lot/enough on your plate" means to have many tasks, responsibilities, or problems to handle or deal with at a given time. It implies being busy or burdened with a significant workload or numerous commitments, often indicating a lack of time or capacity to take on additional tasks.
  • have too much on one's plate The idiom "have too much on one's plate" means to have more tasks, responsibilities, or obligations than one is able to handle effectively or comfortably. It implies being overwhelmed or having a heavy workload.
  • not have the faintest idea The idiom "not have the faintest idea" means to have absolutely no understanding or knowledge about something. It expresses a complete lack of awareness or comprehension of a particular subject or situation.
  • have sth down pat To have something down pat means to have mastered it or have it completely memorized and understood. It implies having a thorough knowledge or expertise in a particular subject or skill.
  • have faith in sm The idiom "have faith in someone" means to trust and believe in someone's abilities, intentions, or character, especially during challenging times or when faced with uncertainties. It implies having confidence in the person's judgment, reliability, and capability to handle a situation successfully.
  • Where have you been all my life? The idiom "Where have you been all my life?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise and enthusiasm upon meeting someone who is perceived as ideal or perfect. It implies that the speaker wishes they had encountered or known the person much earlier, emphasizing their admiration or attraction towards them. The phrase is often used humorously or playfully in romantic or infatuation contexts.
  • What have you been up to? The idiom "What have you been up to?" is an informal way of asking someone what activities or events they have been involved in recently or what they have been doing with their time. It is often used to express interest in catching up with someone and knowing about their recent experiences or adventures.
  • How the mighty have fallen. The idiom "How the mighty have fallen" is typically used to express surprise or disappointment at someone's downfall or loss of power, success, or reputation. It portrays the contrast between someone's previous high status and their current downfall or misfortune.
  • Have you heard? The idiom "Have you heard?" is typically used as a rhetorical question to inquire whether someone is aware of a particular piece of information or gossip. It implies a sense of intrigue or excitement regarding that information.
  • have a hunch (that sth is the case) The idiom "have a hunch (that something is the case)" means to have a strong intuition or a feeling about something without having any concrete evidence or proof to support it. It implies having a sense or belief that something is true or will happen, often based on instincts or a gut feeling rather than logical reasoning.
  • have an impact on sm or sth The idiom "have an impact on someone or something" means to create a noticeable and often significant effect or influence on a person, situation, or thing. It implies that an action, event, or decision causes a change or outcome that can be observed or felt.
  • have hand in the till The idiom "have a hand in the till" typically means to be involved in stealing or embezzling money, especially from an organization or business where one holds a position of trust or authority.
  • have fingers in the till The idiom "have fingers in the till" means to be involved in or engaging in stealing or embezzling money, especially from an organization or business where one holds a position of trust or authority. It implies dishonesty and refers to someone misusing their access to financial resources for personal gain.
  • have finger on the pulse The idiom "have a finger on the pulse" means to be well-informed, aware, and understanding of the current situation or trends in a particular area or field. It implies having a keen sense of awareness and being able to accurately monitor and gauge the ongoing changes or developments in a given context. This phrase is often used to describe someone who is knowledgeable, insightful, and stays updated about important information or shifts within a specific industry, community, or society.
  • have finger in too many pies The idiom "have a finger in too many pies" means to be involved in or have influence over too many different activities or projects simultaneously. It refers to someone who is spread too thin or overly involved in various things, often to the detriment of their effectiveness or focus.
  • have a/ finger on the button The idiom "have a finger on the button" refers to having control or power over an important or decisive situation. It suggests that someone is in a position to make critical decisions or take action when necessary.
  • have your moments The idiom "have your moments" means that someone or something occasionally displays positive or impressive qualities, abilities, or actions, even though they may not consistently exhibit those qualities. It suggests that there are intermittent instances of excellence or brilliance, but not all the time.
  • have (got) a glow on The idiom "have (got) a glow on" typically refers to being in a state of intoxication or being drunk.
  • have the presence of mind to do sth The idiom "have the presence of mind to do something" means to remain calm, focused, and able to think clearly in a situation that may be confusing, stressful, or unexpected, allowing one to make quick, appropriate decisions or take effective action. It refers to being mentally alert and maintaining composure in crucial moments.
  • have fun The idiom "have fun" typically means to enjoy oneself, engage in pleasurable or entertaining activities, or to experience happiness and amusement in a particular situation or event.
  • have mixed feelings about sth The idiom "have mixed feelings about something" refers to having both positive and negative emotions or opinions about a particular situation, person, or thing. It implies being uncertain, conflicted, or torn between conflicting emotions or thoughts.
  • I just have this feeling. The idiom "I just have this feeling" refers to a strong intuition or premonition about something, usually without any specific evidence or logical explanation. It implies a sense of certainty or belief in a particular outcome or situation, even though it may be difficult to articulate the exact reasons behind it.
  • have feelings about sm or sth The idiom "have feelings about something or someone" refers to having a personal emotional response or reaction towards a particular thing or person. It implies having an opinion, sentiment, or emotional connection towards someone or something.
  • have one in the oven The idiom "have one in the oven" is an informal expression that is used to indicate that a woman is pregnant. It is often used conversationally to refer to someone who is expecting a baby.
  • not have the foggiest notion The idiom "not have the foggiest notion" is used to express a complete lack of knowledge or understanding about something. It suggests that the person has no clue or idea about a particular subject or topic.
  • have half a notion to do sth The idiom "have half a notion to do something" means to have a slight inclination or intention to do something, but it is not yet a fully formed or decided plan. It implies a sense of considering or contemplating an action, but without complete commitment or certainty.
  • have a case (against sm) The idiom "have a case (against someone)" means to have sufficient evidence, arguments, or reasons to support a legal or moral claim against someone or to have a strong argument to prove someone's guilt or liability.
  • have sth at one's fingertips The idiom "have something at one's fingertips" means to have easy and immediate access to something or to possess complete knowledge or understanding of something. It suggests that one is familiar with, skilled in, or able to quickly retrieve or utilize something whenever needed.
  • have recourse to sth The idiom "have recourse to sth" means to turn to or seek help, assistance, or support from something or someone in times of difficulty, trouble, or need. It implies relying on a particular resource, option, or course of action as a means of finding a solution or alleviating a problem.
  • Have a nice flight.
  • have one's name inscribed in the book of life The idiom "have one's name inscribed in the book of life" refers to the concept found in various religious and spiritual traditions where a person's name is recorded or written in a divine record, often symbolizing their salvation, righteousness, or eternal existence. It represents being granted a place or recognition in a higher power's eternal register, which signifies a person's spirituality or goodness.
  • not have the foggiest (idea/notion) The idiom "not have the foggiest (idea/notion)" means to have no understanding or knowledge of something. It implies a complete lack of comprehension or awareness about a particular subject or situation.
  • have sm or sth (well) in hand The idiom "have something (well) in hand" means to have control or management over a situation or task. It implies that one is capable of handling or taking care of something effectively and confidently. It can also refer to having a plan, solution, or resources ready to address a particular issue or problem.
  • have hands full The idiom "have hands full" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with tasks or responsibilities. It implies that someone already has a large amount of work or obligations to deal with, leaving little time for anything else.
  • have a hand in doing sth The idiom "have a hand in doing something" means to be involved in or responsible for a particular task or activity. It implies having a part in the process or playing a role in its completion.
  • have a hand in sth The idiom "have a hand in sth" means to be involved or to play a role in something. It can refer to having influence, participation, or responsibility for a particular situation, decision, or outcome.
  • things have come to/reached a pretty pass The idiom "things have come to/reached a pretty pass" means that a situation has become quite serious, difficult, or unfortunate. It suggests that things have reached a point where there is cause for concern or disappointment.
  • have the gall to do sth To have the gall to do something means to have the audacity, nerve, or boldness to do something, especially when it is considered impolite, disrespectful, or inappropriate. It implies that the person is acting in a way that is brazen or offensive, often in disregard for social norms or expectations.
  • have your guts for garters The idiom "have your guts for garters" is an expression used to convey extreme anger or threat towards someone. It suggests that the speaker would metaphorically rip out the person's intestines and use them to make garters, emphasizing a desire to harm or punish them severely. It is often used as a hyperbolic expression of anger or frustration.
  • have a kick to it The idiom "have a kick to it" typically means that something has a strong or surprising impact or effect. It suggests that there is an element of excitement, energy, or intensity present in the situation or experience being described.
  • (Have you) been okay?
  • have dibs on sth The idiom "have dibs on sth" means to claim ownership, possession, or rights to something before others do, especially by speaking up or declaring it first. It implies that one has reserved or secured the right to have or use something before anyone else.
  • Have you met (sm?) The idiom "Have you met (someone?)" is a playful way to introduce someone to another person. It implies that you believe the two individuals have not yet met and encourages them to get acquainted.
  • have sth hanging over your head The idiom "have something hanging over your head" means to have a problem, responsibility, or burden looming or bothering you. It implies feeling anxious or weighed down by an unresolved issue that needs to be dealt with or resolved.
  • have sth hanging over one's head The idiom "have something hanging over one's head" refers to a situation or task that causes anxiety, uncertainty, or a sense of impending doom. It implies that there is something unresolved, unfinished, or pending that constantly preoccupies one's thoughts. It can also suggest the burden of having a negative consequence or punishment anticipated.
  • have a glass jaw The idiom "have a glass jaw" is often used in boxing or combat contexts and it means to have a weak or vulnerable chin. In a figurative sense, it refers to someone who is easily hurt, offended, or knocked down by criticism, insults, or challenges.
  • I have to hand it to The idiom "I have to hand it to" is typically used to acknowledge or recognize someone's achievements, efforts, or skills. It signifies giving someone credit or acknowledging their capabilities in a particular situation.
  • have to hand it to The idiom "have to hand it to" means acknowledging or giving credit or praise to someone for their accomplishments, skills, or achievements. It implies appreciating their abilities or recognizing their effort in a particular situation.
  • have on hands The idiom "have on hands" refers to having something readily available or easily accessible. It typically denotes possessing or having something physically present or nearby.
  • have in the palm of hand The idiom "have in the palm of hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone or something. It suggests having power or command over a situation or individual. This phrase often conveys a sense of dominance or manipulation.
  • have in hands The idiom "have in hands" means to have physical possession or control over something. It implies that someone has direct access to the item or is responsible for its management and decision-making.
  • have in hand The idiom "have in hand" means to have control or possession of something. It refers to having something physically or figuratively within one's reach or under one's control.
  • have hand in The idiom "have a hand in" means to be involved or participate in something, usually in a significant or influential way. It implies having a role or responsibility in the outcome or decision-making process of a particular situation.
  • have at fingertips The idiom "have at fingertips" means to have immediate access to information or resources, where one can readily and easily retrieve or recall them. It suggests that the required knowledge or tools are readily available and easily attainable.
  • have a hand in The idiom "have a hand in" means to be involved in or contribute to something. It signifies having influence or participating actively in a particular situation or outcome.
  • have nothing going for The idiom "have nothing going for" is used to describe someone or something that lacks positive attributes, advantages, or prospects for success or improvement. It conveys the notion of having no beneficial qualities or opportunities.
  • have going for The idiom "have going for" typically means to possess certain factors or advantages that contribute to success or positive outcomes in a particular situation.
  • have a lot going for The idiom "have a lot going for" means to possess many positive or advantageous qualities or circumstances that contribute to one's success or desirability. It suggests that an individual or something has various strengths, assets, or opportunities that work in their favor or increase their chances of achieving their goals.
  • have a lot going The idiom "have a lot going" typically means to be busy or have many commitments and responsibilities. It can also imply that one's life or current situation is filled with various activities, opportunities, or positive aspects. Overall, it suggests being engaged in numerous endeavors or having a successful and fulfilling life.
  • have a lot of time for sb/sth The idiom "have a lot of time for sb/sth" means to hold someone or something in high regard, to have a great deal of admiration, respect, or affection for them. It implies being willing to dedicate time and attention to someone or something, showing interest and consideration.
  • have the goods The idiom "have the goods" means to possess accurate and incriminating information, evidence, or proof about something or someone, often used to expose or reveal wrongdoing, deceit, or a hidden truth. It suggests having the necessary evidence or knowledge to back up a claim or accusation.
  • have had a good innings The idiom "have had a good innings" is used to express that someone has had a successful or fulfilling life or career. It derives from the sport of cricket, where "innings" refers to a player's turn to bat and score runs. Therefore, when someone has had a good innings, it means they have achieved a lot or been successful in their endeavors.
  • have a good command of The idiom "have a good command of" means to have a high level of knowledge, understanding, or proficiency in a particular subject, skill, or language. It suggests that the person is skilled, competent, or capable in effectively using or controlling something.
  • have sb pegged "Have sb pegged" is an idiom that means to have a clear understanding or accurate perception of someone's true nature, personality, abilities, or intentions. It implies that the person is familiar with the individual to the point of being able to accurately predict their behavior or assess their capabilities.
  • have first call on sth The idiom "have first call on something" means to have the right or priority to obtain or use something before others. It implies being given the first opportunity or choice for a particular resource or privilege.
  • have itchy feet The idiom "have itchy feet" means to have a strong desire or urge to travel or explore new places. It suggests feeling restless or unsatisfied in one's current location and having a longing for new experiences and adventures elsewhere.
  • have the best of sm or sth The idiom "have the best of someone or something" means to gain an advantage or to surpass someone or something in a particular situation. It implies being in a position of superiority or superiority in performance, quality, or overall outcome compared to others involved.
  • have in mind sb/sth The idiom "have in mind sb/sth" means to have a specific person or thing in one's thoughts or plans, often implying that one is considering or thinking about someone or something for a particular purpose. It suggests that the person is aware of and has a particular idea or intention regarding the mentioned person or thing.
  • have sm or sth in mind The idiom "have someone or something in mind" means to have a specific person or thing in one's thoughts or plans and to consider them as a potential option or solution for a particular purpose or situation. It implies that the person speaking has a particular idea or choice in their thoughts that they are contemplating or intend to suggest.
  • have sth doing
  • have words (with sb) The idiom "have words (with someone)" means to argue or have a heated discussion with someone. It implies a confrontation or dispute where strong words are exchanged.
  • have number The idiom "have someone's/your number" means to understand or have a good knowledge of someone's true intentions, character, skills, or abilities, usually with the implication of being able to see through any pretense or deception. It is often used when someone believes they are not being honest or genuine.
  • have had it with The idiom "have had it with" means to no longer have any patience, tolerance, or willingness to deal with someone or something. It is often used to express frustration, annoyance, or exhaustion.
  • have had it The idiom "have had it" refers to being at the point of exhaustion, frustration, or being completely fed up with a situation or someone's behavior. It indicates that one cannot tolerate or continue with a particular circumstance any longer.
  • have had fill of The idiom "have had fill of" means to have had enough of someone or something, often because they have become tiresome or overwhelming. This phrase implies that one's patience or tolerance has been exhausted and further exposure or involvement is no longer desired or possible.
  • have had fill The idiom "have had fill" means to have had enough of something, to be completely satisfied or tired of a particular situation, person, or thing. It implies reaching a point where there is no desire or need for further involvement or consumption.
  • have had chips
  • have had a bellyful of The idiom "have had a bellyful of" essentially means to have endured or experienced enough of something unpleasant or undesirable, reaching a point of complete satisfaction or impatience.
  • (It's) good to have you here. The idiom "(It's) good to have you here" is a phrase used to express warm welcome and gratitude for someone's presence or arrival. It indicates that the speaker is pleased and appreciative of the person being present in a particular place or situation.
  • not have two pennies to rub together The idiom "not have two pennies to rub together" is used to describe someone who is extremely poor or lacking in money. It indicates that the person doesn't have any money at all, not even a small amount.
  • have (just about) had it The idiom "have (just about) had it" means to be at the point of exhaustion, frustration, or being unable to tolerate something any longer. It implies that someone is reaching their limit or breaking point in a particular situation.
  • have had it (up to here) The idiom "have had it (up to here)" means to reach a point of complete frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a situation or someone's actions. It implies that one can no longer tolerate or endure the circumstances any further.
  • have a spaz The idiom "have a spaz" is considered offensive and derogatory. It derives from the term "spastic," which is an offensive term to describe someone with spastic cerebral palsy or a neurodevelopmental disorder. Therefore, it is essential to avoid using this idiom as it perpetuates negative stereotypes and promotes ableism.
  • (Have you) been keeping out of trouble? The idiom "(Have you) been keeping out of trouble?" is a question used to ask someone if they have been avoiding or staying away from any problems or mischievous activities. It typically implies concern for the person's well-being and hints at the speaker's hope that the person has been behaving and staying out of any potentially problematic situations.
  • have/see your name in lights The idiom "have/see your name in lights" means to achieve widespread recognition and fame, typically in show business or a similar field. It implies that a person's name is prominently displayed, often in bright lights, on a marquee or billboard, signaling their success and popularity.
  • have to live with The idiom "have to live with" means accepting and adapting to a particular situation or circumstance, despite it being undesirable or challenging. It implies a sense of enduring or coping with something that may be outside of one's control.
  • have too much on plate The idiom "have too much on one's plate" refers to being overloaded or overwhelmed by tasks, responsibilities, or problems. It indicates that a person has a lot to deal with or manage, often to the point where it becomes difficult or impossible to handle everything effectively.
  • have an eye for/on the main chance The idiom "have an eye for/on the main chance" means to be constantly on the lookout for opportunities to further one's own interests or gain an advantage. It refers to someone who is skillful at identifying and seizing advantageous situations for personal gain.
  • not have all one's marbles The idiom "not have all one's marbles" means that someone is mentally unstable, irrational, or lacks common sense. It suggests that the person is not thinking clearly or has lost their ability to make sound judgments.
  • have all one's marbles The idiom "have all one's marbles" means to have full mental capacity or to be mentally sound and rational. It implies that someone is not suffering from any mental or cognitive impairment.
  • have taken leave of senses The idiom "have taken leave of senses" means that someone has become irrational, mad, or unreasonable. It suggests that they are no longer thinking clearly or using sound judgment.
  • not have a monopoly on sth The idiom "not have a monopoly on sth" means that someone or something does not have exclusive control or ownership over a particular thing or activity. It emphasizes that others also have the right or ability to perform the same action or possess the same thing. It suggests that one should not assume they are the sole authority or possess all the knowledge or power in a specific area.
  • have name written all over it The idiom "have name written all over it" means that something is clearly or obviously intended for a particular person or purpose. It suggests that the characteristics, qualities, or features of the thing are a perfect match or fit for a specific individual or situation.
  • have name on it The idiom "have name on it" means that something is specifically intended for or designed for a particular person or purpose. It suggests that there is a clear connection or relevance to that person or purpose. It implies that whatever is being referred to is meant for someone or something in particular and may not suit others.
  • Do I have to spell it out? The idiom "Do I have to spell it out?" means expressing frustration or exasperation at someone's failure to understand or comprehend something that should be obvious or straightforward.
  • have made
  • (I) have to go now. The idiom "(I) have to go now" means that the speaker needs to leave or end the conversation or situation they are currently in. It implies a sense of urgency or obligation, indicating that the person has other commitments or necessities that require their immediate departure.
  • have the makings of sth The idiom "have the makings of something" means to possess the necessary qualities or potential to become or achieve a particular thing. It suggests that someone or something has the inherent abilities, characteristics, or potential that are required to develop into or be successful in a specific role, situation, or endeavor.
  • have oneself The idiom "have oneself" means to control or conduct oneself in a particular manner or to enjoy or experience a specific situation or event. It implies taking charge of one's actions, behavior, or circumstances to achieve a particular outcome or gain a desired experience.
  • have to get married The idiom "have to get married" refers to the societal or familial pressure or expectation to enter into marriage, often implying that the decision is influenced by external factors rather than personal choice or readiness. It can suggest an obligation or necessity to marry, often disregarding personal desires or preferences.
  • have ants in pants The idiom "have ants in pants" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is restless, constantly moving or fidgeting, and unable to stay still or calm. It implies a feeling of extreme agitation, impatience, or hyperactivity.
  • have one's finger in too many pies The idiom "have one's finger in too many pies" refers to a situation where a person is involved in or trying to involve themselves in too many different activities or projects at the same time, often to the detriment of their ability to effectively manage or focus on any of them. It suggests spreading oneself too thin and not being able to give proper attention or dedication to any specific endeavor.
  • have pity on sb The idiom "have pity on someone" means to feel compassion or sympathy towards someone who is in a difficult or unfortunate situation, and to show kindness or mercy towards them.
  • have pity on sm (or an animal) The idiom "have pity on someone (or an animal)" means to feel sympathy or compassion towards that person or animal, usually in a situation where they are suffering or in need. It implies a desire to help or alleviate the distress of the individual.
  • No more than I have to The idiom "No more than I have to" means doing only the bare minimum or fulfilling the necessary obligations, without putting in any extra effort or going beyond what is required. It implies a reluctance to go above and beyond the basic expectations or responsibilities.
  • have more than one string to fiddle The idiom "have more than one string to fiddle" means to have multiple options, alternative plans, or skills to rely on in a particular situation. It suggests that a person has a versatile or backup approach to handle or achieve something.
  • have nothing to do with The idiom "have nothing to do with" means to be completely unrelated or unconnected to someone or something. It implies a strong desire to remain distant or dissociated from a person or situation.
  • have nothing on The idiom "have nothing on" means to not have any evidence or information that implicates someone in a wrongdoing or does not surpass someone's abilities, qualities, or achievements.
  • have a passion for sm or sth The idiom "have a passion for something" means to have a strong and intense enthusiasm or love for that particular thing or activity. It suggests a deep interest and commitment towards pursuing or engaging with it regularly and with great zeal.
  • have yet to (do something) The idiom "have yet to (do something)" means that someone has not done something yet, indicating that it still needs to be done or accomplished in the future. It emphasizes that the action or task has not been experienced, finished, or achieved at the present moment but remains pending or outstanding.
  • have (something) coming to one The idiom "have (something) coming to one" refers to deserving or being worthy of a particular consequence or punishment for one's actions or behavior. It implies that the individual will receive what they deserve as a result of their actions, whether it is positive or negative.
  • have (or get) cold feet The idiom "have (or get) cold feet" means to suddenly feel apprehensive or anxious about something one was previously committed or enthusiastic about. It is often used to describe someone who becomes unsure or hesitant about going through with a plan or decision, especially when they start to consider the potential risks or consequences.
  • have a word with The idiom "have a word with" means to speak to someone privately or to have a brief conversation with them, typically to discuss a specific topic or address an issue.
  • have no words for The idiom "have no words for" means being unable to articulate or express one's thoughts and emotions due to shock, surprise, or disbelief over something unexpected, extraordinary, or beyond comprehension. It implies a profound lack of appropriate words to describe or convey one's feelings accurately.
  • have an itching palm "Have an itching palm" is an idiom that refers to the desire for dishonest gain or bribery. It implies that someone is seeking to receive money or favors illegally or unethically, often by taking bribes or engaging in corrupt activities. This idiom suggests greed, dishonesty, and a willingness to exploit others for personal gain.
  • have (down) pat The idiom "have (down) pat" means to have something mastered or perfected. It refers to having a deep understanding or knowledge of a particular skill, task, or topic, usually through practice or repetition.
  • have it in for The idiom "have it in for" means to have a strong and often unfair dislike or grudge against someone. It implies harboring ill feelings, animosity, or a desire to harm or undermine another person.
  • have a whack at The idiom "have a whack at" means to attempt or try something. It suggests making an effort to accomplish or achieve a task by giving it a try, even if success is uncertain. It typically implies a willingness to take a chance or take on a challenge.
  • have a problem with The idiom "have a problem with" means to experience difficulty, disagreement, or strong dislike towards someone or something. It implies having an issue or objection towards a particular situation or individual.
  • have one's way with The idiom "have one's way with" is typically used to describe a situation where someone exerts complete control or dominance over someone or something, often in a negative or exploitative manner. It can imply using one's power, influence, or authority to manipulate or exploit a situation for personal gain or pleasure.
  • have carnal knowledge of The idiom "have carnal knowledge of" refers to having sexual intercourse with someone. It implies a physical or sexual relationship with another person.
  • have pity on The idiom "have pity on" means to show compassion, empathy, or mercy towards someone who is suffering, in need, or experiencing a difficult situation. It involves feeling sorry for someone and being willing to offer help or support.
  • have something on The idiom "have something on" typically means to be wearing or carrying a piece of clothing, an accessory, or an item. It can also refer to having an obligation, duty, or responsibility to do something.
  • have on the brain The idiom "have on the brain" refers to continuously thinking or being preoccupied with a particular topic, idea, or concern. It suggests that the person's mind is solely focused on the subject, often to the point of obsession or distraction from other thoughts or responsibilities.
  • have one's heart in one's mouth The idiom "have one's heart in one's mouth" means to feel extreme anxiety, fear, or anticipation, typically due to a suspenseful or intense situation. It refers to the sensation of one's heart beating so fast and forcefully that it feels as if it has moved up into their mouth.
  • have one's heart in the right place The idiom "have one's heart in the right place" means that someone has good intentions and a kind or benevolent nature, even if they may make mistakes or have flaws in their actions or decisions. It highlights the belief that a person's intentions and innate goodness are more important than their outward mistakes or shortcomings.
  • have (someone's) blood on one's hands The idiom "have (someone's) blood on one's hands" means to be responsible for someone's death or harm, either directly or indirectly. It implies that the person has caused or contributed to a tragic or fatal outcome.
  • have at The idiom "have at" means to eagerly and aggressively engage in or take action against something or someone. It implies a desire to attack, confront, or tackle a challenging task or situation with determination and gusto.
  • have done The idiom "have done" typically means to be tired, exhausted, or fed up with a particular situation or someone's behavior. It can also imply being completely finished or done with a task or activity.
  • have it good The idiom "have it good" means to be in a fortunate or advantageous situation, often implying that someone has a comfortable or easy life compared to others. It suggests that the person being described is content and satisfied with their circumstances.
  • have it out The idiom "have it out" means to confront or resolve a problem or issue directly, usually through a frank and intense discussion or argument. It implies a desire to settle matters or make things clear between two or more parties by openly discussing their disagreements or conflicting views.
  • have on The idiom "have on" typically means to wear or have clothing or an accessory on one's body.
  • have to be The idiom "have to be" means something that must or should exist or occur. It refers to a necessity or requirement for a certain situation or condition to be true.
  • have to do with The idiom "have to do with" means to be related, connected, or involved in a particular situation, topic, or matter. It signifies the association or relevance of something to another thing or situation.
  • to have and to hold The idiom "to have and to hold" originates from the traditional wedding vows used in many Western cultures. It signifies the commitment and determination to possess and cherish someone or something for as long as possible, often in the context of a romantic relationship or marriage.
  • have (or get) by the short hairs The idiom "have (or get) by the short hairs" is an expression that means to have complete control or power over someone, usually in a difficult or disadvantageous position. It implies having a strong advantage over someone and being able to manipulate or dictate their actions.
  • have one's hands full The idiom "have one's hands full" means to be very busy or occupied with a particular task or situation, often implying that one is dealing with a lot of challenges or responsibilities simultaneously.
  • have a lock on The idiom "have a lock on" means to have complete control or a firm grasp on something. It suggests having a secure and unbeatable position or advantage in a particular situation.
  • have one's (or get someone's) dander up The idiom "have one's (or get someone's) dander up" means to become angry, agitated, or irritated. It refers to the state of being provoked and incensed, often resulting in a strong emotional reaction.
  • let someone have it The idiom "let someone have it" means to vigorously confront, criticize, or attack someone, usually verbally or through harsh words or actions. It also implies expressing one's feelings, opinions, or objections strongly and without reservation.
  • have a mad on The idiom "have a mad on" is an informal expression that means to be extremely angry or upset about something. It implies that the person is experiencing intense emotions of anger, frustration, or resentment.
  • have an ear to the ground The idiom "have an ear to the ground" means to be attentive and aware of the latest information or developments in a particular situation or field. It implies staying informed and having a keen sense of observation to accurately sense or anticipate what is happening or about to happen.
  • have something down The idiom "have something down" means to have something fully understood, mastered, or memorized. It implies that someone has a particular skill, knowledge, or task well-practiced and can perform it confidently and without difficulty.
  • have a good mind to The idiom "have a good mind to" means to strongly consider or have a strong inclination to do something, often implying that one is contemplating taking action or expressing their desire to do so. It indicates a firm intention or determination to carry out a particular course of action.
  • have (or get) one's ducks in a row The idiom "have (or get) one's ducks in a row" means to be well-prepared, organized, and ready for a task or event. It refers to having all necessary details, plans, or resources in order before proceeding with something.
  • have got it easy The idiom "have got it easy" is used to describe someone who has a relatively effortless or comfortable situation, without facing many challenges or difficulties. It implies that the person has an advantageous or privileged position compared to others.
  • have a thick (or thin) skin The idiom "have a thick (or thin) skin" means to either have a resilient and unaffected attitude towards criticism, insults, or negative comments (thick skin) or to be easily hurt, offended, or sensitive to such remarks (thin skin). It refers to a person's ability to handle and withstand criticism or negative feedback without feeling deeply affected or hurt by it.
  • what have you The idiom "what have you" is used to refer to an indefinite or unspecified set of additional things of the same kind or category. It is often used to imply that there are other similar things or examples that could also be mentioned, without specifically listing all of them.
  • have an eye to The idiom "have an eye to" means to be attentive, observant, or vigilant about something. It suggests being aware of or considering a particular matter or situation. It can also imply having a purpose or intention towards achieving a specific goal or outcome.
  • have eyes for The idiom "have eyes for" means to be romantically or emotionally attracted to someone. It often implies that one has deep feelings or affection for a particular person and is not easily swayed or interested in others.
  • have feelings for The idiom "have feelings for" means to have romantic or emotional attraction towards someone. It implies having an interest or affectionate feelings beyond friendship.
  • have two strikes against one The idiom "have two strikes against one" typically means to have encountered or experienced two disadvantages or setbacks, which put one at a greater disadvantage in a particular situation. It suggests that the person is already facing difficulties or obstacles, making success or progress more challenging.
  • have one's fingers crossed The idiom "to have one's fingers crossed" means to hope for luck or success in a particular situation. It is often used when someone is wishing or wishing someone luck in a specific endeavor or outcome. The phrase is derived from the superstitious belief that crossing one's fingers brings good luck or brings protection against bad luck.
  • have at one's fingertips To have something at one's fingertips means to have immediate access to or knowledge of something, to be easily reachable or readily available. It implies having something within easy reach or being able to recall or retrieve information quickly and effortlessly.
  • have something on the ball "Have something on the ball" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who is competent, skilled, intelligent, or capable in a particular area or task. It implies that the person possesses the necessary qualities or abilities to succeed or perform well.
  • have a bash at The definition of the idiom "have a bash at" is to attempt or try something, often for the first time. It implies engaging in an activity or task without extensive preparation or prior experience, simply taking a shot at it to see how it goes.
  • have the advantage of The idiom "have the advantage of" means to possess a favorable circumstance, position, or quality that provides a superiority or benefit over others in a specific situation or competition. It implies having an upper hand or being in a more advantageous position.
  • have a frog in one's throat The idiom "have a frog in one's throat" means to have difficulty speaking or to have a hoarse voice, typically due to irritation or temporary obstruction of the vocal cords.
  • have one's feet on the ground The idiom "have one's feet on the ground" means to be practical, realistic, and well balanced in one's thinking and behavior. It refers to a person who is grounded, level-headed, and aware of reality, as opposed to being excessively idealistic or prone to flights of fancy.
  • have a talk with The idiom "have a talk with" means to have a conversation or discussion with someone, typically for a specific purpose or to address a particular issue or concern. It implies a serious or important nature of the discussion, often highlighting the need for communication and problem-solving.
  • have a go at The idiom "have a go at" means to attempt or make an effort to do something. It commonly implies just giving it a try, even if unsure about the outcome or without much experience.
  • have need to The idiom "have need to" means to require or be in need of something. It implies that there is a necessity or a lack that needs to be fulfilled or satisfied.
  • have something going for one The idiom "have something going for one" means to possess qualities, advantages, or favorable circumstances that contribute to one's success, competence, or appeal in a particular situation or endeavor. It implies having positive attributes or factors working in one's favor.
  • have one's nose out of joint The idiom "have one's nose out of joint" means to be offended, upset, or irritated because one feels slighted, disregarded, or treated unfairly. It refers to feeling a sense of personal affront or indignation, as if someone has "displaced" or "dislocated" one's nose from its usual position.
  • have someone's back The idiom "have someone's back" means to support, defend, or protect someone in a situation, especially in times of difficulty or challenge. It implies being loyal, trustworthy, and standing up for someone when they need assistance or advocacy.
  • have the grace The idiom "have the grace" can mean to possess a polite or charming demeanor, displaying elegance, poise, or tact when dealing with others or handling challenging situations. It implies the ability to maintain composure, dignity, and kindness, even in challenging or difficult circumstances.
  • have someone over a barrel The idiom "have someone over a barrel" means to have control or power over someone, leaving them in a vulnerable or disadvantageous position where they have no choice but to comply with the demands or requests of the other person. It implies that the person has little to no alternative options and must submit to the situation.
  • have a bee in one's bonnet The idiom "have a bee in one's bonnet" means to be obsessed or preoccupied with an idea or topic that one constantly talks about or acts upon.
  • have eyes only for The idiom "have eyes only for" means to be completely infatuated or interested in only one person or thing, ignoring or not noticing anyone or anything else around. It implies a strong and exclusive focus on that particular person or thing.
  • have a soft spot The idiom "have a soft spot" refers to having a special affection or increased fondness for someone or something. It suggests feeling a particular tenderness or emotional attachment towards a person, group, or thing, often beyond one's usual sentiments.
  • have never had it so good The idiom "have never had it so good" means that someone is currently experiencing an exceptionally favorable or prosperous situation compared to their previous circumstances. It suggests that their current state is the most favorable and comfortable they have ever experienced.
  • have no truck with To have no truck with someone or something means to refuse to be associated or involved with them. It implies a strong disapproval or desire to avoid them completely.
  • have designs on The idiom "have designs on" typically refers to someone having ambitions or intentions towards attaining something, often with strategic planning involved. It is commonly used to describe someone who is harboring secret or ulterior motives, especially in the context of pursuing a particular goal or target.
  • have butterflies in stomach The idiom "have butterflies in the stomach" means to experience nervousness, anxiety, or excitement, typically before a significant event or situation. It refers to the fluttering sensation in the stomach that some people feel when they are nervous.
  • must have The idiom "must have" typically means something that is highly likely or almost certainly true or accurate. It is often used to express a strong belief or assumption about something.
  • have (got) somebody’s number The idiom "have (got) somebody's number" means to understand someone's true intentions, motives, or character. It suggests that you have figured out someone's secrets or seen through their facade, and you have a clear understanding of their true nature or motives.
  • have somebody in your corner The idiom "have somebody in your corner" means to have someone who is supporting or defending you, usually in a difficult situation. It refers to having someone who is on your side or willing to stand up for you.
  • have a (good) laugh (about something) The idiom "have a (good) laugh (about something)" means to find something funny or amusing and to experience or enjoy a lighthearted moment or laughter together. It implies finding humor in a situation and being able to laugh about it.
  • have regard to something To "have regard to something" means to consider, pay attention to, or take into account a particular thing or factor when making a decision, taking an action, or forming an opinion. It suggests a level of awareness, attentiveness, and consideration towards a specific matter or aspect.
  • have the courtesy to do something The idiom "have the courtesy to do something" refers to the act of showing politeness, manners, or respect by doing a particular action that is considered appropriate or expected in a given situation. It implies that it is the right thing to do or the minimum expected behavior out of consideration for others.
  • have something to your credit The idiom "have something to your credit" means to have achieved or accomplished something noteworthy or prestigious that can be considered as an asset or a positive attribute in one's personal or professional life. It often refers to accomplishments or experiences that demonstrate skill, integrity, or expertise and can be valuable in enhancing one's reputation or resume.
  • let somebody have it The idiom "let somebody have it" means to strongly or forcefully criticize, scold, or reprimand someone, typically in a direct and confrontational manner. It can also refer to physically attacking or assaulting someone.
  • have a (heavy) cross to bear The idiom "have a (heavy) cross to bear" means to have a difficult or burdensome responsibility or problem to deal with in life, often likened to the biblical notion of carrying a cross, symbolizing the suffering endured by Jesus Christ. It suggests having to endure or carry a challenging situation, duty, or hardship that may feel overwhelming or demanding.
  • have a long way to go The idiom "have a long way to go" means that someone or something has a lot of progress or improvement to make in order to reach a desired goal or level of achievement. It implies that there is still a significant amount of effort, time, or development required to accomplish something.
  • how long have you got? The idiom "how long have you got?" is often used sarcastically or humorously to ask someone how much time they have remaining before a specific event or deadline, implying that their time is limited or running out. It can also be used to express impatience or the speaker's perception that the person they are addressing is taking too much time.
  • have a rough/an easy ride The idiom "have a rough/an easy ride" typically refers to the level of difficulty or ease experienced when facing a particular situation or task. It suggests that someone may encounter significant challenges and obstacles (rough ride) or face little difficulty and encounter few obstacles (easy ride) in achieving their goals or completing a task.
  • have the right idea The idiom "have the right idea" means to have a correct understanding or approach to a situation or problem. It implies that someone has a good or sensible plan or solution.
  • have a loose tongue The idiom "have a loose tongue" means to speak indiscreetly or without caution, often revealing secrets, spreading rumors, or making unintended offensive remarks. It refers to someone who talks too much or says things they shouldn't, either unintentionally or deliberately.
  • have designs on somebody The idiom "have designs on somebody" means to have romantic or ulterior motives towards someone, typically with the intention of pursuing a romantic or sexual relationship or having some kind of advantage over them.
  • have designs on something To have designs on something means to have a strong desire or intention to obtain or achieve something, often with a strategic plan or motive in mind. It suggests having a specific goal or ambition towards a particular object, person, position, or outcome.
  • have a roof over your head The idiom "have a roof over your head" means to have a place to live or a shelter. It implies possessing a safe and secure home or accommodation.
  • not have two beans, brain cells, etc. to rub together The idiom "not have two beans, brain cells, etc. to rub together" is used to describe someone who is extremely unintelligent or lacking in basic common sense. It suggests that the person does not possess even the minimum level of intellect needed for basic understanding or reasoning.
  • have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself The idiom "have something, nothing, etc. to say for yourself" means to have a valid or plausible explanation, justification, or defense for one's actions, behavior, or decisions. It indicates the ability to provide a compelling argument or contribute meaningful input when questioned or criticized.
  • not have a good word to say for somebody/something The idiom "not have a good word to say for somebody/something" means to be unable to say anything positive or complimentary about a particular person or thing. It implies a complete lack of praise or favorable comments.
  • have your say To "have your say" means to express your opinion, viewpoint, or thoughts on a particular matter or issue. It refers to the act of sharing your perspective or contributing to a discussion or debate so that your voice is heard and your views are taken into consideration.
  • not have a dog’s chance The idiom "not have a dog's chance" means to have no possibility or chance of succeeding or achieving something. It implies that the odds or circumstances are strongly against the person, similar to a dog's chance of succeeding against much larger and more powerful animals.
  • have done with it The idiom "have done with it" means to finally complete or finish something, especially after a long or tedious process or discussion, in order to move on or avoid further delay or trouble. It suggests a desire to end a situation or task decisively and without hesitation.
  • have a good mind to do something The idiom "have a good mind to do something" means to strongly consider or contemplate doing something, often implying a sense of determination or resolve. It suggests that the speaker is seriously contemplating taking action, though it does not necessarily imply that they will follow through with it.
  • have half a mind to do something The idiom "have half a mind to do something" means to strongly consider or contemplate doing something, often implying that one is inclined or tempted to take the action. It suggests that the person is somewhat undecided, but there is a strong inclination towards carrying out the mentioned action.
  • have somebody/something in mind (for something) The idiom "have somebody/something in mind (for something)" means to have a specific person or thing already chosen or considered for a particular purpose or task. It implies that the person has a clear idea or preference in their thoughts about who or what would be suitable for the given situation.
  • have it in mind to do something The idiom "have it in mind to do something" means to have a plan or intention to do something in the future. It suggests that someone is considering or contemplating performing a specific action or undertaking a certain task.
  • have a mind of your own The idiom "have a mind of your own" means to be independent and strong-willed, to think and act independently, rather than being easily influenced or controlled by others. It refers to someone who isn't swayed by external opinions or trends and who confidently follows their own beliefs and desires.
  • have your doubts (about something) The idiom "have your doubts (about something)" means to be uncertain or skeptical about something, to have reservations or lack confidence in it. It implies a hesitation or lack of belief in the truth, effectiveness, or success of a particular idea, statement, or situation.
  • have a down on somebody/something The idiom "have a down on somebody/something" means to have a strong dislike or bias against someone or something. It often implies having a negative opinion or being critical without any specific reason or evidence.
  • have a chip on your shoulder (about something) The idiom "have a chip on your shoulder (about something)" means to harbor a persistent feeling of resentment, anger, or defensiveness towards a particular topic, typically due to a perceived injustice or unfair treatment. It refers to a metaphorical chip placed on someone's shoulder, symbolizing their readiness to engage in a confrontation or argument.
  • have a good head on your shoulders The idiom "have a good head on your shoulders" means to be intelligent, wise, and thoughtful in decision-making and problem-solving. It refers to someone who possesses sound judgment and a sensible approach to life's challenges.
  • have something on your side The definition for the idiom "have something on your side" is to have a certain advantage or support that is beneficial to you in a particular situation. It typically implies possessing a favorable condition, circumstance, or resource that can aid in achieving success or overcoming challenges.
  • have an early/a late night The idiom "have an early/a late night" refers to the time a person goes to bed or stays awake until during the night. "Having an early night" means going to bed relatively early, while "having a late night" implies staying awake or going to bed late.
  • have got somebody under your skin The idiom "have got somebody under your skin" means to be deeply affected or emotionally influenced by someone. It suggests that someone has a significant impact on your thoughts, emotions, or behavior, often resulting in intense feelings or preoccupation with that person.
  • have a (good) sniff around The idiom "have a (good) sniff around" means to explore or investigate a place or situation thoroughly, often with the intention of finding something interesting or discovering information. It entails taking a close look at or examining something in detail. The phrase typically implies curiosity, active exploration, or scrutiny.
  • not have a snowball’s chance in hell The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" typically means that something or someone has no chance or very little possibility of succeeding or being accepted in a particular situation. It implies that the odds are overwhelmingly against the outcome being positive, just as a snowball would not survive in the extreme heat of hell.
  • have had enough (of something/somebody) The idiom "have had enough (of something/somebody)" means to be tired, fed up, or no longer willing to tolerate or continue something or someone. It implies reaching a point of dissatisfaction or exhaustion with a particular situation, person, or behavior, and a strong desire for it to stop or change.
  • have no equal The idiom "have no equal" means to be unparalleled or incomparable in a particular aspect or quality, surpassing all others in excellence or ability. It suggests that there is nothing or no one that can match or rival the specified person or thing.
  • have an even chance (of doing something) The idiom "have an even chance (of doing something)" means to have an equal or balanced opportunity or likelihood of achieving or accomplishing something. It suggests that there is an equal probability of success or failure, with no significant advantage or disadvantage.
  • have a soft spot for somebody/something The idiom "have a soft spot for somebody/something" means to feel a deep affection or sentimental fondness for someone or something. It suggests that despite any flaws or imperfections, there is a special place in one's heart for that person or thing.
  • have a soft corner for somebody/something The idiom "have a soft corner for somebody/something" is an expression used to describe a fondness or affection that someone has towards a specific person or thing. It means having a special liking or feeling of sympathy towards someone or something, often deriving from a personal connection or emotional attachment.
  • have an eye for something The idiom "have an eye for something" means to have a natural or innate ability to recognize, appreciate, or perceive something specific, often in terms of aesthetics or quality. It implies having good taste, discernment, or an exceptional skill in recognizing or selecting something with high value or quality.
  • have your eye on somebody The idiom "have your eye on somebody" means to be interested in someone, often romantically, and to pay special attention to them.
  • have your eye on something The idiom "have your eye on something" means to be interested in or strongly desiring a particular thing, typically with the intention of acquiring it. It suggests that the person is closely observing or monitoring the desired item, possibly with the intention of obtaining or possessing it in the future.
  • have (got) eyes like a hawk The idiom "have (got) eyes like a hawk" means to have exceptionally sharp, keen, or observant eyesight. It implies the ability to notice even the smallest or most hidden details, similar to the way a hawk is known for its exceptional visual acuity and keenness.
  • have one eye/half an eye on something The idiom "have one eye/half an eye on something" means to be partially attentive or aware of something while simultaneously focusing on something else. It implies keeping a minimal level of attention or vigilance towards a particular matter.
  • only have eyes for/have eyes only for somebody The idiom "only have eyes for/have eyes only for somebody" means to be completely infatuated or deeply in love with someone, so much so that they are the sole object of one's romantic or affectionate interest. It implies that one is completely focused on that person and oblivious to or uninterested in others.
  • have the face to do something The idiom "have the face to do something" refers to having the audacity or courage to do something, often implying that it is unwarranted or inappropriate. It suggests that the person has no shame or self-awareness in carrying out the action despite potential social disapproval or consequences.
  • have come to stay The idiom "have come to stay" means that something has become established or permanent and is not likely to change or go away. It implies that the particular situation, condition, or phenomenon is enduring and will exist for a long time.
  • have a feel for something The phrase "have a feel for something" means to have a natural understanding, intuition, or knack for something. It implies possessing a strong sense of familiarity or skill in a particular area, allowing one to comprehend and handle it effectively without much effort.
  • not have a stitch on The idiom "not have a stitch on" means to be completely naked or without any clothes on at all.
  • have no stomach for something The idiom "have no stomach for something" means to have no desire, interest, or tolerance for a particular activity, situation, or task. It is often used to describe a lack of enthusiasm or determination to deal with something unpleasant or difficult.
  • have had a few The idiom "have had a few" is used to describe someone who has consumed or is under the influence of alcoholic drinks, usually suggesting that they have had more than a moderate amount. It implies that the person may be slightly intoxicated or tipsy.
  • have another string/more strings to your bow The idiom "have another string/more strings to your bow" means to have additional skills, abilities, or options to fall back on or to use in a given situation. It originated from archery, where having multiple strings attached to a bow allows for greater flexibility and the ability to shoot multiple arrows. In a figurative sense, it refers to being versatile or having alternative options beyond one's primary skill or expertise.
  • have several, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have several irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects or tasks underway simultaneously. It implies that someone is actively engaging in various activities or pursuing numerous opportunities at the same time. This idiom suggests a sense of productivity and proactiveness, as well as a diversification of efforts.
  • you could have fooled me The idiom "you could have fooled me" is an expression used to convey skepticism or disbelief in response to something that seems unlikely or contrary to one's expectations. It implies that the speaker has been unconvinced or not easily deceived by someone or something.
  • have a nodding acquaintance with somebody/something The idiom "have a nodding acquaintance with somebody/something" means to have a very superficial or slight familiarity with someone or something. It suggests that the level of knowledge or interaction is not deep, and typically limited to surface details or brief encounters. The acquaintance may not be strong enough to establish a close relationship or deep understanding.
  • have something/a lot on the ball The idiom "have something/a lot on the ball" refers to someone who is intelligent, capable, and competent. It implies that the person possesses the necessary skills or knowledge to handle a particular task or situation effectively.
  • not have a bar of something The idiom "not have a bar of something" means to strongly object to, reject, or have no interest in something. It implies a complete refusal to be involved or associated with a particular thing or situation.
  • have a bash (at something) The idiom "have a bash (at something)" means to make an attempt or try something, usually in a determined or enthusiastic manner, even if one is unsure of success. It implies taking a shot at something, giving it a try, and putting in effort and commitment despite potential obstacles or uncertainties.
  • have a bee in your bonnet (about something) The idiom "have a bee in your bonnet (about something)" means to be obsessed or preoccupied with a particular idea, notion, or concern. It implies that someone cannot stop thinking or talking about something, often to the point of annoyance or irritation to others. Just like a bee buzzing inside a bonnet, the idiom suggests a persistent and distracting preoccupation with a specific topic or issue.
  • have had a bellyful of somebody/something The idiom "have had a bellyful of somebody/something" refers to reaching the point of being fed up or having experienced enough of someone or something. It implies that the person is no longer willing to tolerate or endure their presence, actions, or behavior.
  • have something under your belt The idiom "have something under your belt" means to have achieved or accomplished something successfully, typically referring to gaining experience, knowledge, or skills in a particular area. It implies that the person has added the mentioned accomplishment to their list of achievements or expertise.
  • only have yourself to blame The idiom "only have yourself to blame" means that if you experience negative consequences or undesirable outcomes, it is solely your own fault or responsibility. It implies that you are solely accountable for your actions or decisions that led to the undesirable situation, and therefore, you should not blame others or external factors.
  • have been around the block (a few times) The idiom "have been around the block (a few times)" means that a person has gained extensive experience or knowledge in a particular area or field. It implies that the person has been through various situations or challenges, and as a result, has become seasoned, wise, and knowledgeable.
  • have somebody’s blood on your hands The idiomatic expression "have somebody's blood on your hands" means to be responsible or blamed for someone's injury, harm, or death. It implies that the person has caused or contributed to a tragic outcome, often resulting from their actions or decisions.
  • not have a… bone in your body The idiom "not have a... bone in your body" is used to describe someone who completely lacks a certain characteristic or trait. It implies that the person is entirely devoid of a specific quality, such as compassion, courage, or a sense of humor.
  • have a bone to pick with somebody The idiom "have a bone to pick with somebody" means to have a complaint or grievance to discuss with someone. It indicates that there is an issue or disagreement that needs to be addressed or resolved.
  • have something on the brain The idiom "have something on the brain" means to be preoccupied or constantly thinking about something, often to the point of it being the main focus of one's thoughts or attention. It suggests an obsessive or persistent fixation on a particular topic or issue.
  • as chance would have it The idiom "as chance would have it" is used to describe a situation that occurs unexpectedly or by coincidence. It suggests that the outcome is due to luck or the workings of fate rather than deliberate planning or intention.
  • have something on good authority The idiom "have something on good authority" means to have reliable or trustworthy information or knowledge about something. It implies that the information has been obtained from a credible and knowledgeable source.
  • have (got) somebody’s back The idiom "have (got) somebody's back" means to be supportive, loyal, and protective towards someone, especially in times of need or difficulty. It implies that one is willing to defend and assist another person.
  • have your back to the wall The idiom "have your back to the wall" means being in a difficult or challenging situation where you have very limited options, resources, or support. It implies feeling trapped or cornered by circumstances and facing imminent danger or threat. It conveys a sense of vulnerability or being at a disadvantage, often requiring one to fight back or find a solution despite the unfavorable circumstances.
  • have no business doing something The idiom "have no business doing something" means that someone does not have the ability, qualification, or right to engage in a particular activity or task. It suggests that the person should not be involved or is interfering with something that does not concern them.
  • have no business to do something The idiom "have no business to do something" means that someone is not justified or does not have the right or authority to do a particular action. It implies that the person is acting inappropriately or beyond their scope of responsibilities.
  • have first call (on somebody/something) The idiom "have first call (on somebody/something)" means to have the right or priority to use or access someone or something before others. It implies that the person or entity possessing first call has the advantage or privilege of being the first choice or option.
  • have a claim on somebody The idiom "have a claim on somebody" means to have a legitimate or justifiable right or demand over someone, often due to a previous agreement, responsibility, or shared connection. It indicates that a person or entity can assert their entitlement or expectation from someone else.
  • have something in common (with somebody) The idiom "have something in common (with somebody)" refers to the shared qualities, interests, or experiences between two or more people. It suggests that there are similarities or connections that exist between individuals, resulting in a sense of understanding or shared understanding.
  • have something in common (with something) The idiom "have something in common (with something)" means that two or more things share a similarity or have similar qualities or characteristics. It implies that there is a connection or mutual understanding between the mentioned subjects.
  • have had your day The idiom "have had your day" typically refers to an individual or something that was once successful, influential, or relevant but is no longer in the same status or position. It means that they have reached their peak or had their time of success, which may have passed and they are no longer as significant or relevant as before.
  • have seen/known better days The idiom "have seen/known better days" refers to something or someone that is in a state of decline or deterioration compared to how it used to be in the past. It suggests that the object or person has experienced a better condition or time in the past but is currently in a less favorable state.
  • not have all day The idiom "not have all day" means to be in a hurry or not have a lot of time. It implies that someone cannot or does not want to spend excessive time on a particular task or activity.
  • have a dekko (at something) The idiom "have a dekko (at something)" means to take a quick or casual look at something. It is commonly used in British English.
  • have (one's) wits about (one) The idiom "have one's wits about one" means to be alert, attentive, and thinking clearly, especially in a challenging or dangerous situation. It implies being mindful and prepared, able to make quick decisions and respond effectively to whatever may come one's way.
  • have (some/any) qualms about (something or someone) The idiom "have (some/any) qualms about (something or someone)" means to have doubts, reservations, or concerns about something or someone. It implies a feeling of unease or hesitation regarding a decision, action, or situation.
  • have a hunch The idiom "have a hunch" means to have a strong intuition or a feeling about something, often without any concrete evidence or logical reasoning. It is a gut feeling or an instinctive belief about a certain situation or outcome.
  • have a thing about (someone or something) The idiom "have a thing about (someone or something)" means to have a strong personal preference, liking, or dislike towards a particular person or thing. It implies having a specific fascination, obsession, or fixation that affects one's thoughts, behavior, or reactions about that person or thing. It may indicate either positive or negative emotions and can vary from a mild preference to an intense preoccupation.
  • have a thing about somebody/something The idiom "have a thing about somebody/something" means to have a particular characteristic or trait that one is highly attracted to, obsessed with, or strongly interested in. It implies an intense liking, fascination, or fixation towards someone or something.
  • have doubts about The idiom "have doubts about" means to be uncertain or skeptical about something, questioning its truth, validity, or reliability.
  • have feelings about The idiom "have feelings about" refers to having strong emotions or opinions regarding a particular subject or situation. It implies that the individual has a personal and often deep connection or attachment to what is being discussed or experienced, leading to a strong emotional reaction or viewpoint.
  • have mixed feelings about (something) The idiom "have mixed feelings about (something)" means to feel both positive and negative emotions or have conflicting opinions or thoughts about a specific situation, person, or thing. It often implies uncertainty or being torn between different perspectives or outcomes.
  • not/never have a good word to say for/about somebody/something The idiom "not/never have a good word to say for/about somebody/something" means to consistently criticize or speak negatively about someone or something, without giving any positive remarks or praises. It implies that the person is always finding fault or expressing dissatisfaction, and is unable or unwilling to acknowledge any positive aspects or qualities.
  • have ace up (one's) sleeve The idiom "have an ace up (one's) sleeve" means to have a hidden advantage, secret plan, or special resource that one can rely on in a situation, usually to gain an advantage over others or to achieve success. It suggests that someone has a surprise or unexpected strategy that can be used when needed. The phrase originates from card games, specifically poker, where players may hide their best card, the ace, up their sleeve, and reveal it at a crucial moment to improve their chances of winning.
  • have an ace in the hole The idiom "have an ace in the hole" means to have a secret or backup plan that can be used to gain an advantage or secure success, especially in a challenging or competitive situation. It refers to the hidden advantage of holding the best playing card, the ace, which can guarantee a favorable outcome when revealed at the opportune moment.
  • have an ace up one’s sleeve The idiom "have an ace up one’s sleeve" means to have a secret plan or strategy that can be used to gain an advantage or achieve success. It originates from the game of poker, where a player may hide an ace card up their sleeve to use it later as a surprise move. Thus, having an ace up one’s sleeve refers to having a hidden advantage or resource that can be revealed at the right moment to outsmart others.
  • have an ace/a trick up your sleeve The idiom "have an ace up your sleeve" or "have a trick up your sleeve" means to have a secret or hidden advantage or plan that can be used to gain an advantage over others or to achieve success in a situation. It refers to a situation where someone has a surprise strategy or information that can be used to turn the tables in their favor unexpectedly.
  • have up sleeve The idiom "have up one's sleeve" means to have a secret plan, idea, or resource that is not currently known or revealed to others, but can be used to gain an advantage or solve a problem when the time comes. It implies that someone is holding something in reserve, ready to present or use it at a later point, typically when it is most advantageous.
  • have a nodding acquaintance (with someone or something) The idiom "have a nodding acquaintance (with someone or something)" means to be somewhat familiar with someone or something, but not very well. It implies knowing or recognizing someone or something on a superficial level, usually without having a close relationship or deep understanding.
  • have (one's) act together The idiom "have (one's) act together" means to be organized, prepared, and in control of one's life or situation. It refers to someone who has their affairs in order, makes informed decisions, and manages things efficiently.
  • have an affair (with someone) The idiom "have an affair (with someone)" refers to engaging in a romantic or sexual relationship with someone other than one's spouse or partner, typically in a secretive or illicit manner.
  • have letters after (one's) name The idiom "have letters after (one's) name" refers to having one or more academic degrees or professional qualifications that are indicated by abbreviations placed after one's name. It suggests that someone is highly educated or accomplished in a specific field.
  • have another guess coming The idiom "have another guess coming" is a sarcastic or humorous expression used to suggest that someone's assumption or guess is incorrect and they need to try again. It implies that the person's initial guess was utterly wrong or far off the mark, and they are unlikely to make an accurate estimation with their next attempt.
  • have (one's) back against the wall The idiom "have one's back against the wall" means to be in a difficult or desperate situation with limited options or resources, leaving one with no room to escape or maneuver.
  • have something against The idiom "have something against" means to hold a negative opinion or attitude towards someone or something, usually without a specific reason or explanation. It implies harboring a sense of animosity, dislike, or prejudice towards the person or thing in question.
  • have the deck stacked against The idiom "have the deck stacked against" means to face circumstances or conditions that are unfairly biased or unfavorable, making success or achievement difficult. It suggests facing significant challenges or obstacles that make achieving a desired outcome highly unlikely.
  • nose in the air, have one's The idiom "nose in the air, have one's" refers to someone who carries themselves with an arrogant or snobbish attitude, often looking down upon others and considering themselves superior. They exhibit a haughty demeanor, displaying their pride and self-importance.
  • have (someone) laughing in the aisles The idiom "have (someone) laughing in the aisles" means to make someone laugh uncontrollably or uproariously. It implies that the person or comedic performance is so funny that the audience cannot help but laugh out loud, often straining their sides with laughter.
  • have (one) rolling in the aisles The idiom "have (one) rolling in the aisles" means to make someone laugh uncontrollably or be overcome with amusement. It suggests that something is extremely funny or entertaining, resulting in a person laughing so hard that they are physically rolling on the floor with laughter.
  • have people rolling in the aisles The idiom "have people rolling in the aisles" means to be extremely funny or entertaining, causing uncontrollable laughter or amusement among a group of people. It describes a situation where the audience or observers are so amused that they are unable to control their laughter and are literally rolling or bending over with laughter, often in a public setting like a theater or comedy show.
  • eye to the main chance, have an To "have an eye to the main chance" means to be primarily focused on one's own interests and advantages, especially in a competitive or opportunistic manner. It suggests that someone is constantly seeking out and seizing advantageous opportunities for personal gain while being attentive to their own objectives and ambitions. This idiom relates to being ambitious, calculating, and strategic in pursuing success or advantage.
  • have (got) an/(one's) eye on (something) The idiom "have (got) an/(one's) eye on (something)" means to be observing or closely monitoring something, often with the intention of acquiring or obtaining it. It refers to having a strong interest or desire for a particular object, achievement, or opportunity and keeping it in one's focus as a goal or target.
  • have a soft spot for (someone or something) The idiom "have a soft spot for (someone or something)" means to have a particular, often sentimental, affection or fondness for someone or something. It implies having a weakness or being easily swayed by their charm or appeal.
  • have an affair The idiom "have an affair" refers to engaging in a romantic or sexual relationship, usually secret or outside of one's committed relationship or marriage.
  • have an appetite for The idiom "have an appetite for" means to have a strong desire or liking for something, usually used metaphorically to describe an intense interest or enjoyment in specific activities, experiences, or subjects. It implies a figurative hunger or craving for a particular thing.
  • have an argument The idiom "have an argument" refers to engaging in a verbal or sometimes a heated disagreement or debate with someone, usually with differing opinions or viewpoints. It implies expressing conflicting ideas, perspectives, or feelings in a confrontational or argumentative manner.
  • have an ear for (something) The idiom "have an ear for (something)" means to have a natural talent or ability to recognize, understand, or appreciate a particular aspect or quality of something, especially in relation to music, sound, language, or art. It implies possessing a keen sense of perception and discernment in that specific area.
  • have an edge on The idiom "have an edge on" means to have a slight advantage or superiority over someone or something. It suggests possessing a strategic or competitive advantage that increases the chances of success or favorable outcome in a particular situation. It implies being ahead or in a better position compared to others involved in a specific task or competition.
  • have an effect on The idiom "have an effect on" means to influence or cause a change in a particular situation, person, or thing. It refers to the impact or outcome resulting from someone or something's actions or presence.
  • have an even chance The idiom "have an even chance" means having an equal probability or likelihood of success or failure in a particular situation. It implies that there is a fair and balanced opportunity for both positive and negative outcomes.
  • have an eye on/for/to the main chance The idiom "have an eye on/for/to the main chance" means to be opportunistic or constantly seeking the best opportunity for personal gain or success. It implies being vigilant and focused on seizing advantageous situations or taking advantage of circumstances to further one's own interests.
  • have an impact on The idiom "have an impact on" means to have a significant effect or influence on someone or something. It suggests that something or someone has the power to make a lasting impression or create a noticeable change.
  • have an itch for something The idiom "have an itch for something" means to have a strong or persistent desire or craving for something. It suggests an intense longing or eagerness to obtain or experience a specific thing or activity.
  • have an out The idiom "have an out" typically means having a ready excuse or a way to avoid a difficult situation or commitment. It implies possessing an escape plan or a justification to exit a problematic scenario without facing negative consequences.
  • have an/(one's) ear to the ground The idiom "have an/(one's) ear to the ground" means to be attentive and aware of the current trends, opinions, or attitudes of a particular group or situation. It suggests that someone is paying close attention and staying well-informed about the happenings around them.
  • have half an ear on (someone or something) The idiom "have half an ear on (someone or something)" means to give partial attention or to be somewhat attentive to someone or something while also focusing on or being occupied with other matters or distractions. It implies not fully engaging or fully listening to the person or subject but being minimally aware or giving a fraction of attention.
  • have half an eye on (someone or something) The idiom "have half an eye on (someone or something)" means to be keeping a casual or partial watch or attention on someone or something, often with some suspicion or caution. It implies that the person is not fully focused or completely attentive but still has some awareness or observation.
  • have one's eye on The idiom "have one's eye on" usually means to be paying attention to or keeping a close watch on something or someone. It can also imply an interest or desire in acquiring or achieving that particular thing or person.
  • have the constitution of an ox The idiom "have the constitution of an ox" means to have exceptional physical strength, endurance, and resilience. It refers to someone who is incredibly robust and possesses great or even extraordinary vitality and stamina. It implies that the individual is not easily affected by illness or fatigue, and is able to endure extreme conditions or hardships without significant setbacks.
  • itch for, have an The idiom "itch for, have an" means to feel a strong desire or urge to do something. It implies a persistent longing or craving for a particular activity or experience.
  • not have an earthly chance The idiom "not have an earthly chance" means having no possibility or chance of success or achievement. It emphasizes the lack of any conceivable opportunity or hope in a given situation.
  • (one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it The idiom "(one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it" means that one has taken actions or made choices that have led to unfavorable consequences, and now one must accept the resulting outcomes or face the corresponding responsibilities. It suggests that individuals are solely accountable for dealing with the repercussions of their own decisions or actions.
  • and there you have it The idiom "and there you have it" is used to indicate that something has been fully explained or presented, often concluding a statement or explanation. It conveys the idea that all the necessary information or elements have been provided, suggesting that no further elaboration is required.
  • have another thing coming The idiom "have another thing coming" means that someone's expectation or assumption is incorrect, and they will be surprised or proven wrong.
  • have ants in the/(one's) pants The idiom "have ants in the/(one's) pants" is commonly used to describe someone who is restless, fidgety, or unable to sit still. It implies a sense of agitation or impatience, often due to excitement, nervousness, or anticipation.
  • ants in one's pants, have The idiom "ants in one's pants" refers to a state of restlessness, impatience, or agitation. When someone says they "have ants in their pants," it means they are unable to sit still, constantly moving or fidgeting due to nervousness, excitement, or eagerness.
  • have ants in one’s pants The idiom "have ants in one’s pants" refers to someone who is restless, agitated, or unable to sit still. It indicates a state of restlessness or impatience.
  • not have it The idiom "not have it" refers to someone refusing to accept or tolerate a particular situation, opinion, behavior, or outcome. It implies a strong disagreement or objection towards something or someone and expressing a lack of willingness to comply or go along with it.
  • have a lot, anything, etc. on The idiom "have a lot, anything, etc. on" typically means that someone is very busy or preoccupied with various tasks, responsibilities, or commitments. It suggests that they have a significant amount of work, events, or obligations to handle, leaving them with little free time or mental space.
  • not have anything on The idiom "not have anything on" typically means to not have any incriminating or damaging evidence against someone, or to lack superiority or advantage in a particular situation. It implies that there is nothing that can be used as leverage or proof against someone.
  • not have anything on (someone or something) The idiom "not have anything on (someone or something)" means to lack evidence, proof, or grounds to incriminate or criticize someone or something. It typically suggests that the accused person or thing is innocent, superior, or unbeatable in comparison to their counterparts.
  • have an appetite for something The idiom "have an appetite for something" means to have a strong desire or liking for something, often referring to a particular activity, experience, or indulgence. It implies having a keen interest or craving for something.
  • have an argument (with someone) The idiom "have an argument (with someone)" means to engage in a verbal disagreement, exchange differing viewpoints, or express conflicting opinions, typically resulting in a dispute or conflict between two or more individuals.
  • have (someone) turned around (one's) (little) finger The idiom "have (someone) turned around (one's) (little) finger" refers to having complete control or influence over someone, typically to the extent that they are willing to do anything one asks. It implies that the person is easily manipulated or influenced, and will readily comply with the demands or desires of another individual.
  • have (someone) twisted around (one's) (little) finger The idiom "have (someone) twisted around (one's) (little) finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, manipulating them easily to do whatever one wants. It implies that the person being manipulated is easily swayed and does not have the power to resist or make independent decisions.
  • have (someone) wound around (one's) (little) finger The idiom "have (someone) wound around (one's) (little) finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often by using charm or manipulation. It suggests that the person is easily manipulated or swayed by the speaker's actions or words, obeying their every command or request.
  • have (someone) wrapped around (one's) (little) finger To "have (someone) wrapped around (one's) (little) finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often through charm, persuasion, or manipulation. It implies that the person being controlled is easily manipulated and obedient, fulfilling the desires or requests of the person in control without question.
  • have a poke around The idiom "have a poke around" means to explore or investigate something in a casual and curious manner, often by physically examining or searching through items or places, usually in order to discover or understand more about them.
  • have a sniff around The idiomatic expression "have a sniff around" means to explore, investigate, or look around a place or situation, often with curiosity or a desire to gather information or find something specific. It can imply a thorough examination or investigation of an area to discover or learn more about it.
  • have (one's) head (stuck) up (one's) arse The idiom "have (one's) head (stuck) up (one's) arse" is an informal expression used to describe someone who is being ignorant, oblivious, or not paying attention to what is happening around them. It suggests that the person is self-absorbed, disconnected from reality, or lacking awareness of their surroundings.
  • have your head up your arse The idiom "have your head up your arse" is an informal and rude phrase that is used to convey that someone is oblivious, ignorant, or not thinking clearly about a situation. It implies that the person is not paying attention or is disconnected from reality.
  • have (something) down to a fine art The idiom "have (something) down to a fine art" means to have mastered a particular skill or activity to the point of expertise or near-perfection. It suggests that someone has reached a level of proficiency where they can perform the task effortlessly and flawlessly.
  • have (something) off to a fine art The idiom "have (something) off to a fine art" means to be extremely skilled or proficient in doing something. It implies that someone has perfected a particular skill or action and is able to perform it effortlessly or with great expertise.
  • have got something down to a fine art The idiom "have got something down to a fine art" means to have perfected or mastered a particular skill or activity to an exceptionally high level of competence, often by repeated practice or experience. It suggests that the person is highly skilled, efficient, or knowledgeable in performing a specific task or activity.
  • have (or get) something down to a fine art The idiom "have (or get) something down to a fine art" means to have perfected a particular skill or activity to a very high level of proficiency. It suggests that someone has practiced and refined something so thoroughly that they have become highly skilled and efficient in executing it.
  • as chance/luck would have it The idiom "as chance/luck would have it" is used to indicate that something happens by coincidence or by luck. It suggests that the outcome or occurrence was unexpected or unplanned.
  • as luck may have it The idiom "as luck may have it" means that something occurred purely due to chance or coincidence. It implies that the outcome was not planned or expected but rather happened by luck or happenstance.
  • ass in a sling, have one's To have one's ass in a sling is an idiomatic expression used to describe a situation where someone is in serious trouble, facing a difficult or precarious situation, or experiencing severe consequences for their actions. It suggests that someone is caught in a predicament or facing a potentially negative outcome.
  • have a wild hair up one’s ass The idiom "have a wild hair up one's ass" typically refers to someone behaving in a spontaneous, impulsive, or unpredictable manner. It suggests that the person has a sudden desire, urge, or compulsion to do something unconventional or out of character. It implies a restless or restless state of mind, often driven by an inexplicable motivation or inspiration, similar to the idea of having an imaginary itch that needs to be scratched.
  • have head up ass The idiom "have head up ass" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is ignorant, unaware, or oblivious to their own mistakes, faults, or problems. It suggests that the person is extremely self-absorbed or lacking in self-awareness, leading them to make foolish or uninformed decisions.
  • have one’s ass in a crack The idiom "have one's ass in a crack" is an informal and somewhat vulgar expression. It means to be in a difficult or precarious situation, often due to being in trouble, facing a deadline, or having a problem with no easy solution. It conveys a sense of feeling trapped or cornered, similar to being stuck in a tight spot.
  • have one’s ass in a sling The idiom "have one’s ass in a sling" is considered an informal and vulgar expression. It means to be in a difficult or disadvantageous situation, often due to one's own mistakes or poor choices. It implies that someone is facing a problem or predicament with no easy solution, and may also suggest a sense of vulnerability or loss of control.
  • have someone's ass in a sling The idiom "have someone's ass in a sling" typically means to have someone in a difficult or precarious situation, often as a result of their own actions or consequences. It implies that the person is facing trouble, being held accountable, or undergoing severe consequences for their behavior or decisions.
  • the lunatics have taken over the asylum The idiom "the lunatics have taken over the asylum" is used to describe a situation where individuals who are mentally unstable, irrational, or incompetent gain control or influence over a particular situation, organization, or system. It implies a sense of chaos, absurdity, or incompetence resulting from such a takeover.
  • the inmates have taken over the asylum The idiom "the inmates have taken over the asylum" refers to a situation where the people who were originally subordinate or considered mentally unstable are now in control or have gained power, leading to chaos or irrational decision-making. It implies a lack of control or order in a particular situation or organization.
  • have no strings attached The idiom "have no strings attached" is defined as a situation or agreement in which there are no additional conditions, obligations, or expectations attached. It implies that someone or something is being offered or provided without any hidden agendas or requirements.
  • have strings attached The idiom "have strings attached" refers to a situation or agreement where specific conditions, obligations, or limitations are associated with it. It implies that there are underlying expectations or provisions that must be adhered to.
  • have toys in the attic The idiom "have toys in the attic" typically means to be mentally unstable or eccentric. It suggests that someone's mind might be filled with strange or irrational ideas, similar to having playful or nonsensical toys stored in the attic.
  • have (one's) end away The idiom "have (one's) end away" is a British slang term that denotes engaging in sexual intercourse.
  • have it away with The idiom "have it away with" means to have a clandestine affair or engage in a secret romantic relationship, typically involving deception or infidelity. It can also refer to stealing or misappropriating something, especially in a secretive or sly manner.
  • have it off/away with somebody The idiom "have it off/away with somebody" is a colloquial expression, typically of British English, that means to engage in a secretive, usually sexual, relationship with someone. It implies a sense of surreptitiousness or illicitness.
  • the ayes have it The idiom "the ayes have it" is used to indicate that the majority of people in a vote or assembly have voted in favor of a particular proposal or motion. It suggests that the supporters or "ayes" of the proposal have a greater number than the opponents or "noes."
  • eyes in the back of one's head, have The idiom "having eyes in the back of one's head" refers to someone being exceptionally observant and perceptive, as if they possess an extra sense that allows them to notice things that are not directly in front of them. It suggests that the person is aware of their surroundings at all times and can anticipate events or detect things that others might miss.
  • have (got) (someone's) back The idiom "have (got) (someone's) back" refers to the act of supporting, protecting, or advocating for someone. It signifies being there for someone when they need assistance or standing up for them in difficult situations. It implies loyalty, trust, and solidarity in looking out for someone's well-being.
  • have a monkey on one’s back The idiom "have a monkey on one's back" refers to a situation where someone is burdened or troubled by a persistent and difficult problem or addiction. It implies that the person feels trapped or unable to free themselves from this issue, much like having a monkey clinging onto their back and weighing them down.
  • have a monkey on your back The idiom "have a monkey on your back" means to have a persistent problem or burden that weighs you down or causes continual distress. It refers to a situation or addiction that is difficult to escape from, often creating stress, anxiety, or a sense of being trapped.
  • have a yellow streak down one’s back Having a yellow streak down one’s back is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who is cowardly, lacking in courage or bravery. It implies that the person is easily intimidated, afraid of taking risks or standing up for themselves when faced with challenging or threatening situations.
  • have back up The idiom "have back up" means to have a contingency plan or alternative option in case something goes wrong or the primary plan fails. It refers to being prepared with additional resources, support, or assistance to ensure that there are alternatives available to address any unexpected issues or challenges.
  • have eyes in the back of (one's) head The idiom "have eyes in the back of (one's) head" means to be constantly aware of what is happening around oneself, even when it is not directly visible or known. It implies being extremely observant and perceptive, as if one has an additional pair of eyes at the back of their head.
  • have never looked back The idiom "have never looked back" means to have experienced significant progress or success after making a positive decision or taking a certain action, and to have no regrets or desire to return to a previous situation or state. It implies that the decision or action led to such favorable outcomes that there is no reason to contemplate or consider reversing it.
  • have the shirt off (one's) back The idiom "have the shirt off (one's) back" means to be extremely generous or selfless, willing to give away everything one owns or has without hesitation or reservation. It refers to someone who is so kind-hearted that they would even give away the clothes they are wearing if someone else needed them.
  • have a bad time The idiom "have a bad time" refers to experiencing a difficult, unpleasant, or challenging situation or circumstance. It implies facing various troubles, problems, or negative outcomes that can make one's experience or mood unpleasant or unhappy.
  • have a good, bad, high, low, etc. opinion of somebody/something The idiom "have a good, bad, high, low, etc. opinion of somebody/something" means to hold a favorable or unfavorable judgment or viewpoint about a person or thing. It implies one's subjective assessment or evaluation based on personal experiences, knowledge, or observations. The idiom can be used to express positive or negative sentiments towards an individual, object, idea, or situation.
  • have a good/bad night The idiom "have a good/bad night" is an expression used to wish someone well or reflect on the quality of their evening or nighttime experience. The phrase "have a good night" is commonly used as a farewell, expressing the desire for the person to have an enjoyable or restful evening. On the other hand, "have a bad night" can be used to convey negative feelings, suggesting that the person may experience a difficult or unpleasant evening.
  • have bags under (one's) eyes The idiom "have bags under (one's) eyes" refers to the physical appearance of puffiness or swelling beneath the eyes, usually caused by lack of sleep, fatigue, stress, or aging. It is used metaphorically to convey a tired or exhausted state of being.
  • have (one) over a barrel To have someone over a barrel means to have complete control or advantage over them, leaving them with no choice or negotiating power. It implies that the person is in a vulnerable position and is forced to comply with someone's demands or requests.
  • have a bash at (doing) something The idiom "have a bash at (doing) something" means to make an attempt or try something, often with enthusiasm and energy, even if one is not confident of success. It implies a willingness to give something a go or take a shot at it, regardless of the outcome.
  • bats in one's belfry, have The idiom "bats in one's belfry" is used to describe someone as being crazy, eccentric, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person has strange or irrational thoughts, similar to the way bats flying around a belfry would seem chaotic and unusual.
  • have bats in your belfry The idiom "have bats in your belfry" means to be eccentric, crazy, or mentally unstable.
  • have bats in the (or your) belfry The idiom "have bats in the (or your) belfry" means to be crazy, eccentric, or to have strange or irrational thoughts or behaviors. It is often used to describe someone who seems mentally unstable or has unusual ideas. The phrase is derived from the image of bats flying around the belfry, which is the tower or room in a church where the bells are hung. Bats are associated with darkness and can symbolize irrationality or madness, hence the idiom.
  • have bats in one’s belfry The idiom "have bats in one’s belfry" means to be eccentric, crazy, or mentally unstable. It refers to a person who has peculiar or irrational ideas or behavior. The phrase originated from the image of bats flying around a bell tower, suggesting the unpredictable and chaotic nature associated with someone who is not mentally sound.
  • have (one's) name written all over it The idiom "have (one's) name written all over it" is used to express that something is perfectly suited or tailored to a specific person. It suggests that the thing in question seems like it was specifically made or designed for that person.
  • have all marbles The idiom "have all marbles" typically means that someone is mentally sound, rational, and mentally fit. It implies that a person possesses all their mental faculties and is not insane or crazy. The phrase refers to the game of marbles, where losing or missing marbles may symbolize a loss of sanity or mental capacity.
  • have all one’s marbles The idiom "have all one’s marbles" means to have full mental capacity, to be sane, or to be mentally sharp and sound. It suggests that a person possesses their mental faculties and is not experiencing any cognitive impairment or insanity.
  • have all one's buttons The idiom "have all one's buttons" means to be in full possession of one's mental faculties or to be mentally sound and rational. It suggests that a person is mentally stable and functioning properly.
  • have all the hallmarks of somebody/something The idiom "have all the hallmarks of somebody/something" means to have all the characteristic features or qualities that are typically associated with a particular person or thing. It suggests that the person or thing in question possesses distinctive or unique attributes, making them easily recognizable or identifiable.
  • have it The idiom "have it" means to possess or own something, or to gain control or authority over a situation. It can also refer to experiencing or enjoying something.
  • have somebody/something written all over it The idiom "have somebody/something written all over it" means that a person, thing, or situation clearly bears the distinct characteristics or qualities of someone or something in a highly recognizable manner. It suggests that the person or thing is a perfect match for a particular purpose or role, leaving no doubt or ambiguity about their suitability or involvement.
  • If I knew you were coming, I'd have baked a cake The idiom "If I knew you were coming, I'd have baked a cake" is used to express surprise or regret at not being adequately prepared or informed about an upcoming event or visit. It implies that if the person had known about the arrival of someone, they would have made appropriate arrangements or done something special to welcome them.
  • have (someone) by the balls The idiom "have (someone) by the balls" is an informal expression that means to have complete control or power over someone, usually in a situation where the person has no other choice or options. It implies a sense of domination, manipulation, or disadvantage for the person being controlled.
  • have a lot on the ball The idiom "have a lot on the ball" means to be intelligent, competent, and skillful in a particular area or overall. It implies that someone has a strong ability to understand, learn quickly, and perform tasks effectively.
  • have a man by the balls The idiom "have a man by the balls" is an informal expression used to describe having complete control or power over someone, usually in a situation where they cannot escape or resist. It figuratively portrays dominance, manipulation, or leverage over another person.
  • have the ball at (one's) feet The idiom "have the ball at (one's) feet" means to have complete control or power over a situation. It refers to having a favorable position or advantage that allows someone to make decisions or take actions without any hindrances or opposition. It often implies that the person is in a position to accomplish something easily or is in a commanding position.
  • have the ball at your feet The idiom "have the ball at your feet" means to be in complete control of a situation or to have opportunities or advantages readily available. It refers to being in a position of power or influence, where one has the ability to make important decisions or take action.
  • have (one) bang to rights The idiom "have (one) bang to rights" means to have clear and concrete evidence or proof of one's guilt or wrongdoing. It implies catching someone in the act or possessing undisputable evidence of their culpability.
  • have someone bang to rights To have someone "bang to rights" is an idiomatic expression that means to catch someone red-handed or in the act of doing something wrong or illegal, leaving them with no plausible defense or explanation. It suggests that the evidence against them is irrefutable and conclusive.
  • have (one's) beady eye on (someone or something) The idiom "have (one's) beady eye on (someone or something)" means to watch someone or something closely and attentively, often with suspicion or mistrust. It implies being vigilant and observant, looking out for any clues or actions that may be of interest or concern. The phrase "beady eye" suggests a sharp and piercing gaze, likening it to the eyes of a bird or small animal that can closely focus on details.
  • have a cross to bear The idiom "have a cross to bear" refers to a burden or hardship that one has to endure or carry throughout their life. It is often used to describe a challenging or difficult situation or responsibility that someone cannot avoid or escape. The expression originates from the Christian symbolism of Jesus Christ carrying a cross, symbolizing the difficulties he faced.
  • have your cross to bear The idiom "have your cross to bear" refers to the notion of having a burdensome or challenging responsibility, problem, or personal struggle that one must endure or face throughout their life or a certain period of time. It often implies that the individual must carry and accept this difficulty as their personal burden, similar to the biblical allusion of Jesus carrying the cross before his crucifixion.
  • have (some) bearing on something The idiom "have (some) bearing on something" means to be relevant or applicable to a particular situation or context. It suggests that the subject in question has a connection or influence that can impact or contribute to the understanding or outcome of a specific matter or issue.
  • have made your bed and have to lie on it The idiom "have made your bed and have to lie on it" is used to convey the idea that if one has created a difficult or unfavorable situation for oneself, they must accept the consequences or face the difficulties resulting from their actions. It implies taking responsibility for one's choices, even if they have led to undesirable outcomes.
  • should have stood in bed, I The idiom "should have stood in bed" is an expression used when referring to a day that seemed to be consistently unlucky or when everything seems to go wrong. It implies that instead of attempting any action, it would have been better to stay in bed to avoid the unfortunate events that occur throughout the day. "I" in this context simply refers to the person who is lamenting their bad luck or regretting their decisions.
  • you have made your bed and must lie in it The idiom "you have made your bed and must lie in it" means that you must accept the consequences of your actions, even if they are unpleasant or undesirable. It implies that you are responsible for the decisions you have made, and you must endure the results or outcomes, whether they are favorable or not. It emphasizes the notion of taking ownership and facing the circumstances arising from your choices.
  • have a beef with (someone or something) The idiom "have a beef with (someone or something)" means to have a complaint or grievance against someone or something, typically pertaining to a particular issue or situation. It suggests having a disagreement or conflict with someone or being dissatisfied with a certain aspect or behavior.
  • have been there The idiom "have been there" generally means that someone has experienced a particular situation or predicament before. It implies that the person understands and empathizes with others who are going through a similar situation because they themselves have faced a similar challenge in the past.
  • have been there before The idiom "have been there before" refers to having previous experience or knowledge of a particular situation or problem. It implies that the person has encountered something similar in the past and can draw upon that experience to navigate or handle the current situation more effectively.
  • have been to the wars The idiom "have been to the wars" refers to someone who has experienced or endured significant difficulties, challenges, or traumatic events. It often implies that the person has overcome adversity or has been through many hardships.
  • have a bellyful (of something) The idiom "have a bellyful (of something)" means to have experienced or consumed enough of something, often to the point of feeling overwhelmed or fed up. It implies a sense of being completely satisfied or when one's tolerance or patience has reached its limit regarding a specific situation or person.
  • have eyes bigger than (one's) belly The idiom "have eyes bigger than (one's) belly" refers to a situation when someone takes or orders more food than they are actually able to eat. It implies that a person's desire or appetite exceeds their capacity or ability to handle it.
  • have a bellyful The idiom "have a bellyful" means to have had enough of something or to be completely satisfied or overwhelmed by a particular experience, often in a negative or unpleasant sense. It suggests that one's satisfaction or exhaustion reached a point where they can no longer tolerate or handle the situation.
  • have had a bellyful The idiom "have had a bellyful" means to feel that one has had enough of something, whether it is a particular experience, situation, or person. It implies a state of being completely fed up or saturated with a particular thing or situation.
  • have a bellyful of The idiom "have a bellyful of" means to have had enough of something, particularly when referring to experiencing a negative or undesirable situation. It suggests being fed up or overwhelmed and implies a sense of being completely full or having reached a limit regarding a specific matter.
  • have (something) under (one's) belt The idiom "have (something) under (one's) belt" means to have acquired knowledge, experience, or an accomplishment that can be used for future endeavors. This expression suggests that the person has successfully gained a certain level of expertise or skill in a particular area.
  • last laugh, have the The idiom "have the last laugh" means to ultimately succeed or be triumphant in a situation, especially after facing initial challenges or setbacks. It refers to the satisfaction of ultimately proving others wrong or overcoming difficulties to achieve success.
  • have the better of (someone or something) The idiom "have the better of (someone or something)" means to gain an advantage or to prevail over someone or something in a particular situation or conflict. It implies that one party is able to outperform, outwit, or surpass the other.
  • seen better days, have The idiom "seen better days" is used to describe something or someone that was in a better or more prosperous condition at some point in the past, but is currently in a worn-out, deteriorated, or less impressive state.
  • have nothing between the/(one's) ears The idiom "have nothing between the/(one's) ears" is used to describe someone who is considered to be unintelligent or lacking in intelligence. It suggests that there is a void or emptiness where their mental capabilities should be.
  • not have much between the ears The idiom "not have much between the ears" is used to describe someone who is perceived as lacking intelligence or having a low level of intellect. It suggests that the person does not have much knowledge, understanding, or critical thinking abilities.
  • big head, have a The idiom "big head, have a" typically refers to someone who is arrogant or has an inflated view of themselves and their abilities. It implies that the person holds an exaggerated opinion of their own importance, accomplishments, or skills, often to the point of being conceited or boastful.
  • big mouth, have a The idiom "big mouth, have a" is used to describe someone who often speaks impulsively or indiscreetly, revealing information that should have been kept secret or private. It refers to someone who has difficulty keeping things confidential and tends to share information without thinking of the consequences.
  • have a big head The idiom "have a big head" typically means to have an inflated ego or an excessive sense of self-importance.
  • have a pair The idiom "have a pair" typically means to have courage, bravery, or confidence in a challenging or risky situation. It often implies that someone is willing to take action or confront difficult circumstances.
  • have eyes bigger than (one's) stomach The idiom "have eyes bigger than (one's) stomach" means to take or desire more food than one can actually eat. It speaks to the tendency of someone to be overly ambitious or greedy in their appetites, leading to choosing or serving more food than they can consume.
  • have eyes bigger than your stomach The idiom "have eyes bigger than your stomach" means to take more food or things than one can actually consume or handle. It refers to a situation where someone's desire or ambition exceeds their actual capacity or capability to fulfill it.
  • have other fish to fry The idiom "have other fish to fry" means to have more important or pressing matters to attend to; to be preoccupied with other tasks or responsibilities. It implies that one has different, often more significant, concerns or tasks that require immediate attention, instead of focusing on a particular situation or issue.
  • have other/bigger fish to fry The idiom "have other/bigger fish to fry" means to have more important or pressing matters to attend to instead of giving attention or time to something that is less significant or trivial. It implies that there are more significant issues or tasks that deserve focus or priority.
  • doesn't have a (certain kind of) bone in (one's) body The idiom "doesn't have a (certain kind of) bone in (one's) body" is used to describe someone who completely lacks a particular quality or characteristic. It implies that the person lacks even a small trace of that specific trait throughout their entire being. It emphasizes the absence of that quality in their nature.
  • not have a (some kind of) bone in (one's) body The idiom "not have a (some kind of) bone in (one's) body" is used to describe a person who completely lacks a particular trait or characteristic. It emphasizes that the person is completely devoid of that specific quality or attribute. It suggests that the individual is incapable of displaying or having any degree of the mentioned characteristic.
  • bone to pick, have a The idiom "have a bone to pick" refers to a desire or need to have a discussion or argument with someone about an issue or grievance. It implies that there is an unresolved matter or disagreement that the speaker wants to address and resolve through conversation or debate.
  • have a bone to pick with (one) The idiom "have a bone to pick with (one)" means to have a complaint or grievance with someone about something they have said or done. It typically implies a desire to confront or have a discussion with the person in order to address the issue or express dissatisfaction.
  • have a bone to pick with someone The idiom "have a bone to pick with someone" means that someone has a complaint or grievance that they want to discuss or confront with another person. It implies a desire to have a conversation or argument about an issue or disagreement.
  • have (one's) nose in a book The idiom "have (one's) nose in a book" refers to someone who is deeply engrossed in reading a book and ignoring or unaware of their surroundings or other activities. It implies that the person is so absorbed in the book that they pay little attention to anything else happening around them.
  • have more chins than a Chinese phone book The phrase "have more chins than a Chinese phone book" is often used as a humorous way to describe someone who is overweight or has a notable amount of excess fat around their chin and neck area. It playfully compares the number of chins someone has to the many pages found in a traditional Chinese phone book, implying an exaggerated abundance of chins in a light-hearted manner.
  • have your nose in a book, magazine, etc. The idiom "have your nose in a book, magazine, etc." means to be completely engrossed in reading something, often for an extended period of time and with great focus. It implies that the person is deeply absorbed in their reading material, paying little attention to their surroundings or other activities.
  • nose in a book, have one's To have one's nose in a book is an idiom that means someone is deeply engrossed in reading or devoting a lot of time and attention to reading. It implies that the person is fully absorbed in a book, often to the point of being unaware of their surroundings.
  • can't have it both ways The idiom "can't have it both ways" means that a person cannot have or enjoy two contradictory things or positions at the same time. It implies that one has to make a choice or decision, as it is impossible to simultaneously have conflicting options.
  • foot in both camps, have a To have a foot in both camps means to have connections or involvement in two conflicting or opposing groups, factions, or ideologies. It refers to someone who has managed to maintain favorable relationships or affiliations with two or more parties that are at odds with each other. This idiom often suggests that the person may be trying to appease or benefit from both sides, although it can also imply a sense of divided loyalty or uncertainty.
  • have your bread buttered on both sides The idiom "have your bread buttered on both sides" means to have the best of both worlds or to enjoy advantages or benefits from multiple sources without experiencing any drawbacks or compromises. It implies being in a favorable position or having multiple advantageous options simultaneously.
  • you, etc. can't have it both ways The idiom "you can't have it both ways" means that a person cannot expect or demand two contradictory things simultaneously. It implies that one must choose between two conflicting options or positions, and it is not possible or fair to enjoy the benefits of both.
  • have a spot of bother The idiom "have a spot of bother" means to experience a small or insignificant problem or difficulty. It suggests that the trouble is not major but still may require attention or resolution.
  • have a second string to your bow The idiom "have a second string to your bow" means to have an alternative option or skill that can be used if the first one does not work out or fails. It suggests being prepared or having a backup plan in order to be more versatile and increase one's chances of success.
  • have many strings to (one's) bow The idiom "have many strings to (one's) bow" means to have various skills, talents, or options available to someone. It suggests that a person has numerous abilities or alternatives that they can utilize in different situations or pursue for different goals. This idiom emphasizes versatility and the ability to adapt or excel in multiple areas.
  • have more than one string to (one's) bow The idiom "have more than one string to (one's) bow" means to have multiple skills, abilities, or options available to oneself. It implies being versatile and having alternative avenues or resources to rely on.
  • have two strings to (one's) bow The idiom "have two strings to one's bow" means to have two different options or alternatives available as a means of achieving or obtaining something. It implies that someone is prepared, versatile, or resourceful enough to have more than one possible approach or strategy to achieve their goals.
  • have one’s brain on a leash The idiom "have one's brain on a leash" means to have control over one's thoughts and ideas, restraining oneself from expressing or acting on them. It implies that the person is being cautious or restraining their natural impulses in favor of being more measured or responsible.
  • have somebody/something on the brain The idiom "have somebody/something on the brain" means to have someone or something occupying a person's thoughts or attention to a great extent. It indicates that the person is constantly thinking about or preoccupied with someone or something.
  • not have two brain cells, pennies, etc. to rub together The idiom "not have two brain cells, pennies, etc. to rub together" is used to describe someone who is perceived as being very unintelligent, poor, or lacking basic common sense. It suggests that the person does not possess even a small amount of the given item, symbolizing their lack of mental or financial capacity.
  • have the brass (neck) to (do something) The idiom "have the brass (neck) to (do something)" is used to describe someone who has the audacity or boldness to do something, especially when it involves behaving in an inappropriate or impertinent manner. It suggests that the person possesses a level of self-confidence or nerve that surpasses what is considered acceptable or polite.
  • have someone for breakfast The idiom "have someone for breakfast" is an expression used to convey the idea of completely overpowering, defeating, or dominating someone in a competition, debate, or confrontation. It suggests that one person will metaphorically consume or defeat the other person so easily as if having them as a meal.
  • broad shoulders, have The idiom "broad shoulders, have" refers to someone who is able to handle or endure difficult situations or responsibilities without showing signs of weakness or being overwhelmed. It implies that the person possesses strength, resilience, and the ability to handle challenges with ease.
  • have a brush with To have a brush with something or someone means to have a brief or close encounter or experience with them, often involving a potentially dangerous or difficult situation. It implies a close call or near miss with a certain event or person.
  • have a lick of the tar brush The idiom "have a lick of the tar brush" is an offensive racial slur that dates back to the 19th century. It refers to someone of mixed race, particularly a person who has both Black and White ancestry. The phrase is derogatory and should be avoided due to its racist nature.
  • have a touch of the tar brush The idiom "have a touch of the tar brush" is an offensive and racially insensitive term used to imply someone has a mixed racial background, particularly with a Black or African heritage. It reflects a derogatory way of referring to individuals who possess physical characteristics associated with Black or African ancestry. However, it is important to note that this idiom perpetuates racism and should not be used or encouraged.
  • have (or be bitten by) the bug The idiom "have (or be bitten by) the bug" typically means to have a strong enthusiasm, interest, or passion for something. It refers to being deeply engaged or obsessed with a particular activity, hobby, or pursuit. The phrase suggests that one has been "bitten" by a figurative bug, compellin+g them to explore or indulge in that specific interest.
  • have (or get) the bulge on The idiom "have (or get) the bulge on" refers to gaining an advantage or having control over someone else in a particular situation. It portrays a sense of superiority or leverage, often implying that one is in a better position or has greater power or influence over someone else.
  • have (one's) fingers burned The idiom "have (one's) fingers burned" means to experience negative consequences or setbacks as a result of a previous action or decision. It implies that someone has made a mistake or encountered difficulties in a certain situation, and as a result, they become cautious or hesitant to repeat the same mistake or take similar risks in the future.
  • have money burning a hole in (one's) pocket The idiom "have money burning a hole in (one's) pocket" means to have an impulsive desire to spend money or a strong urge to use money immediately after acquiring it. It implies that the person is unable to resist the temptation of spending the money quickly.
  • have no business doing something/to do something The idiom "have no business doing something/to do something" means that someone is not entitled or suitable to be involved in a particular activity or action. It implies that the person lacks the necessary skill, qualification, or authority to engage in such a task.
  • the busiest men have the most leisure The idiom "the busiest men have the most leisure" means that those individuals who are highly productive and organized with their time tend to have more free time or leisurely activities compared to those who appear to have a lot of spare time but lack efficiency and productivity. It suggests that being busy and managing time well leads to greater efficiency and ultimately more time for relaxation or leisure activities.
  • I could tell you but then I’d have to kill you The idiom "I could tell you but then I'd have to kill you" is a humorous and sarcastic expression used when someone is unwilling or unable to disclose confidential or classified information. It implies that the information is so sensitive or secretive that the speaker jokingly claims they would resort to extreme measures, such as killing the person, to ensure its confidentiality. This expression is commonly used in a lighthearted manner to exaggerate the seriousness of the undisclosed information.
  • have butterfingers The idiom "have butterfingers" means to be clumsy or to have a tendency to drop or fumble things.
  • have (or be a) butterfingers The idiom "have (or be a) butterfingers" is used to describe someone who frequently drops or fumbles things, often due to a lack of coordination or clumsiness. It implies that they have difficulty maintaining a secure grip on objects, as if their hands were coated in butter.
  • have butterflies in (one's) stomach The idiom "have butterflies in (one's) stomach" means to feel nervous, anxious, or excited, often before a specific event or in anticipation of something. It refers to the fluttery sensation or feeling of unease one might experience in their stomach when feeling nervous.
  • have a/(one's) finger on the button The idiom "have a/(one's) finger on the button" means to have control or be in a position of authority or power to initiate or make a decisive action. It refers to the act of being ready or prepared to take swift action when necessary, often in a critical or crucial situation.
  • not have all (one's) buttons The idiom "not have all (one's) buttons" means someone is considered mentally unstable or lacking common sense. It suggests that the person is confused, irrational, or behaves in a peculiar manner.
  • have (one) by the short and curlies The idiom "have (one) by the short and curlies" refers to having complete control or power over someone, leaving them unable to escape or resist. It conveys a sense of being in a vulnerable position where one is at the mercy of someone else's authority or dominance.
  • have (someone or something) by the tail The idiom "have (someone or something) by the tail" means to have control or power over someone or something. It suggests that the person or thing is under one's complete command or influence, making it easy to direct or manage.
  • have (someone) by the short hairs The idiom "have (someone) by the short hairs" refers to the act of having complete control or power over someone, often in a situation where they are powerless to resist or escape. It implies a strong hold on someone, indicating dominance, influence, or leverage over their actions or decisions.
  • have a wolf by the ears The idiom "have a wolf by the ears" means to be in a difficult or dangerous situation where both letting go and holding on are equally problematic. It suggests being trapped or caught in a dilemma where there is no easy solution, and any action taken could potentially result in negative consequences.
  • have a/the wolf by the ear(s) The idiom "have a/the wolf by the ear(s)" typically means to be in a difficult or precarious situation, where both holding onto and letting go of something pose risks. It reflects being caught in a dilemma with no easy solution, similar to how holding onto a wolf by its ears is dangerous but letting go might also result in harmful consequences.
  • have by The idiom "have by" generally means to deceive or trick someone, often through manipulation or cunning tactics. It implies gaining an advantage over someone through clever or dishonest means.
  • have passed your sell-by date The idiom "have passed your sell-by date" refers to a person or thing that is considered to be past its prime or no longer useful or relevant. It suggests that the individual or object is outdated or ineffective in a particular context or situation.
  • have someone by the short and curlies The idiom "have someone by the short and curlies" is a colloquial expression that means to have complete control or power over someone, leaving them in a vulnerable or trapped position. It often implies having someone at a disadvantage or in a situation where they have no other choice but to comply with the demands or wishes of another person.
  • have something by the ears The idiom "have something by the ears" means to have complete control or dominance over a situation or person. It refers to being firmly in control, often implying that one has a strong or powerful hold on something or someone.
  • have the world by the tail The idiom "have the world by the tail" means to feel confident, successful, and in control of one's life. It implies a sense of having achieved great success or prosperity, with the world seemingly under one's control.
  • eat one's cake and have it, too The idiom "eat one's cake and have it, too" refers to a situation where someone wants to have or enjoy the benefits of two contradictory options simultaneously or to have or achieve incompatible things at the same time. It highlights the impossibility of satisfying conflicting desires or obtaining all the advantages without any consequences.
  • you can't have your cake and eat it The idiom "you can't have your cake and eat it" means that one cannot have or enjoy the benefits or advantages of something while still preserving it or using it as if nothing has changed. It expresses the idea that one must make a choice or decision and accept the consequences that come with it.
  • Can I have (one) call you? The idiom "Can I have (one) call you?" usually means asking for permission to pass someone's contact information to a third party or to refer them to someone else who wishes to speak or connect with them. It implies seeking consent to facilitate communication between two parties.
  • have first call The idiom "have first call" means to have the highest or primary priority or privilege in making a choice or decision. It suggests having the right to choose or decide before others and being given priority in a particular situation.
  • have first call on (something) The idiom "have first call on (something)" means to have the priority or exclusive right to use or obtain something before others. It implies having the initial opportunity or privilege to make use of or acquire a particular resource or item.
  • not have a minute to call (one's) own The idiom "not have a minute to call one's own" means to be extremely busy or occupied, having no free time or personal space. It implies that the person is constantly engaged in various activities or responsibilities and is unable to find any time for oneself.
  • (I) can't say that I have The idiom "(I) can't say that I have" is used to express that the speaker has not experienced or done the thing being mentioned. It indicates that the speaker does not have personal knowledge or experience regarding the subject matter.
  • Can I have a lift? The idiom "Can I have a lift?" refers to a request for a ride or transportation in someone else's vehicle.
  • you can have too much of a good thing The idiom "you can have too much of a good thing" means that even something enjoyable or beneficial in moderation can become unpleasant or harmful when taken to excess.
  • have (one's) thinking cap on The idiom "have (one's) thinking cap on" means to be focused, attentive, and using one's mental abilities to think and solve problems. It suggests that someone is actively engaged in a task or problem-solving activity, emphasizing the importance of thinking critically and creatively.
  • have a card up (one's) sleeve The idiom "have a card up (one's) sleeve" means to have a secret or hidden advantage or plan that can be used to gain an advantage over someone else or to achieve a desired outcome. It often refers to being prepared with a backup plan or an unexpected solution to a problem. This idiom is derived from the practice of cheating in card games, where a player hides a valuable card up their sleeve to use it to their advantage later in the game.
  • have the cares of the world on (one's) shoulders The idiom "have the cares of the world on (one's) shoulders" means to feel burdened or overwhelmed by a multitude of worries, responsibilities, or problems. It implies that someone is carrying a heavy load of stress or concerns, similar to the weight of the entire world's troubles.
  • have cause to do The idiom "have cause to do" means to have a valid reason or justification for doing something. It implies that there are circumstances or events that necessitate a particular action or decision.
  • not have a red cent The idiom "not have a red cent" means to be completely without money or to have no funds at all. It suggests that the person is financially destitute and lacks even a single cent or any form of currency.
  • have a bird The idiom "have a bird" typically means to become extremely angry or agitated over something.
  • have had the biscuit The idiom "have had the biscuit" typically means that someone or something is past their prime or is no longer effective or useful. It can also suggest that someone has reached the point of no return or has lost their chance or opportunity.
  • have a bite The idiom "have a bite" means to eat a small amount of food. It can also be used more generally to refer to satisfying one's appetite or taking a break to eat something.
  • I could have bitten my tongue off The idiom "I could have bitten my tongue off" is used to express regret or frustration over saying something that one immediately realizes was inappropriate, foolish, or insensitive. It implies a strong desire to take back what was said and emphasizes the feeling of extreme regret.
  • not have a penny to bless yourself with The idiom "not have a penny to bless yourself with" means to be extremely poor or financially destitute, having no money at all. It implies a complete lack of financial resources or assets.
  • have a blond moment The idiom "have a blond moment" refers to a light-hearted and often self-deprecating term used to describe a temporary lapse in memory, a momentary confusion, or a simple mistake made by someone, regardless of their hair color. It does not imply any actual correlation between intelligence and hair color and is typically used in a humorous or playful manner.
  • have (someone's) blood on (one's) head The idiom "have (someone's) blood on (one's) head" means to be responsible for someone's injury, harm, or death. It signifies that the person is accountable for the consequences resulting from their actions or decisions. The phrase carries a heavy metaphorical weight, implying a deep sense of guilt or culpability.
  • have a rush of blood to the head The idiom "have a rush of blood to the head" means to become temporarily overwhelmed by strong emotions or impulsive thoughts, often resulting in irrational behavior or decision-making. It implies a loss of rationality or control due to an intense or sudden surge of emotion, passion, or excitement in a person.
  • have blood on your hands The idiom "have blood on your hands" means to have caused someone's injury or death, either through direct actions or indirect responsibility. It implies being morally culpable or guilty for someone's harm or demise.
  • have sporting blood The idiomatic expression "have sporting blood" typically refers to someone who possesses a natural inclination or passion for competitive activities, especially sports or games. It suggests that the individual enjoys and thrives in competitive situations, demonstrating a willingness to participate actively and enthusiastically in various forms of competition. This idiom implies a competitive spirit and a desire to engage in contests or challenges.
  • have a pink/blue fit The idiom "have a pink/blue fit" is used to describe someone reacting with extreme anger, outrage, or frustration. It implies that the person's emotional reaction is so intense that their face turns pink or blue, vividly highlighting their heightened emotions.
  • have no chance in hell The idiom "have no chance in hell" is used to express a situation where the likelihood of success or achieving a particular goal is extremely remote or unlikely. It implies that the chances of success are nearly impossible, comparing the situation to the impossibility of something happening in Hell.
  • not have a chance in hell (of doing something) The idiom "not have a chance in hell (of doing something)" means that it is virtually impossible or exceedingly unlikely for someone to achieve or succeed in a particular endeavor. It conveys the idea that the chances of success are so slim that they are comparable to having no chance at all, as a reference to the impossibility of success for someone in Hell.
  • not have a ghost of a chance The idiom "not have a ghost of a chance" means that someone or something has no possibility or very little chance of succeeding or being successful. It implies that the chances of success are so slim or nonexistent, akin to a ghost's ability to interact with the physical world.
  • not have the ghost of a chance The idiom "not have the ghost of a chance" means to have no possibility or hope of success in a particular task or situation. It suggests that the chances of achieving a desired outcome are extremely slim or non-existent. The expression often implies a lack of capability, resources, or favorable circumstances to achieve a desired goal.
  • have a charmed existence The idiom "have a charmed existence" means to lead a life that is unusually fortunate, successful, or seemingly protected from harm or adversity. It implies that the person referred to has had a series of fortunate experiences or always seems to be in the right place at the right time.
  • have (hand)writing like chicken scratch The idiom "have (hand)writing like chicken scratch" refers to someone's handwriting that is messy, illegible, or difficult to read. It suggests that the person's writing resembles the erratic and random marks left by a chicken's claws, making it hard for others to decipher or understand.
  • the devil's children have the devil's luck The idiom "the devil's children have the devil's luck" is a phrase used to convey the idea that those who engage in immoral or unethical behavior are often fortunate or lucky in their endeavors. It implies that people who partake in wicked actions often seem to experience positive outcomes or escape negative consequences despite their wrongdoing.
  • what does that have to do with the price of tea in China The idiom "What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?" is used to express that something is completely irrelevant or unrelated to the current topic or situation being discussed. It implies that the mentioned factor or information has no impact or significance in the context and is deemed as insignificant or unrelated.
  • have a Chinaman at (one's) neck The idiom "have a Chinaman at (one's) neck" is an outdated and racially offensive expression that originated in the early 20th century. It is important to note that its usage is considered derogatory and racially insensitive. However, historically, the idiom was used to describe a situation where someone is under constant pressure, scrutiny, or unwanted attention from someone of authority or power. The phrase implied that this person was being closely monitored or controlled, similar to how a supervisor might oversee an employee's work.
  • have a chip on (one's) shoulder To "have a chip on one's shoulder" means to be easily offended, angry, or constantly looking for a reason to argue or prove oneself. It refers to a person who carries a sense of hostility or resentment, often due to a perceived injustice or a belief of being treated unfairly.
  • have had (one's) chips The idiom "have had (one's) chips" means to have reached a point of total defeat or failure, usually in the context of a competition or endeavor. It implies that there is no chance of recovery or redemption. The phrase originates from the game of poker, where "chips" represent a player's money or bets.
  • have something cinched The idiom "have something cinched" means to have something secured, guaranteed, or accomplished with great certainty or ease. It implies that the task, goal, or outcome is under complete control and unlikely to fail.
  • clean hands, have The idiom "clean hands" typically means having no involvement or responsibility in a wrongdoing or immoral act. The phrase "clean hands, have" could be an incomplete or incorrect form of the idiom, as it doesn't provide a clear meaning. It is important to note that the idiom is usually used in its complete form without any additions.
  • have a clean conscience The idiom "have a clean conscience" means to have a clear and guilt-free mind. It refers to the feeling of inner peace and satisfaction that comes from knowing one has acted ethically and in accordance with one's values. Having a clean conscience implies freedom from remorse or wrongdoing, allowing an individual to feel confident and morally upright.
  • have a mountain to climb The idiom "have a mountain to climb" means to face a daunting or challenging task, often involving significant effort, perseverance, or overcoming obstacles to achieve a particular goal. It suggests that the task at hand is like attempting to climb a large mountain, requiring determination and resilience to reach the summit.
  • have (a) skeleton(s) in (one's)/the closet The idiom "have (a) skeleton(s) in (one's)/the closet" refers to someone having a secret or embarrassing past event or information that they would prefer to keep hidden or undisclosed from others. It implies that there is a scandal or dark secret from the person's past that could be damaging if exposed to the public.
  • head in the clouds, have one's The idiom "head in the clouds, have one's" means to have unrealistic or impractical thoughts or ideas, being detached from the reality of a situation. It refers to a person who is often daydreaming or excessively focused on their own thoughts and imagination, rather than being grounded in practicality or facing practical matters.
  • have a clue (about something) The idiom "have a clue (about something)" means to possess knowledge or understanding about a particular subject or situation. It implies having enough information or insight to comprehend and evaluate something.
  • have (or get) a cob on The idiom "have (or get) a cob on" is a British slang phrase that means to be angry, annoyed, or in a bad mood. It is often used to describe someone's state of mind when they are holding a grudge or feeling irritable about a particular situation or person.
  • down cold, have To have something "down cold" means to have a thorough, complete understanding or mastery of it. It refers to being very knowledgeable or skilled in a particular subject or task.
  • have (something) down cold The idiom "have (something) down cold" means to have mastered or learned something completely and thoroughly. It suggests that a person has acquired a deep understanding and knowledge of a particular skill, subject, or task to the point where they can perform or demonstrate it flawlessly and effortlessly.
  • have someone cold The idiom "have someone cold" generally means to know someone extremely well or to have complete knowledge or understanding of someone, their behavior, or their intentions.
  • have (someone) coming and going The idiom "have (someone) coming and going" means to have complete control or advantage over someone in every possible situation. It implies a situation where someone is trapped or constantly manipulated by another person, allowing them to be taken advantage of in multiple ways.
  • have (something) coming The idiom "have (something) coming" refers to the situation where someone deserves a particular outcome or consequence due to their actions or behavior. It implies that the person has done something wrong or unacceptable, and thus deserves the negative consequence that is impending.
  • have (something) coming out of (one's) ears The idiom "have (something) coming out of (one's) ears" is used to describe an excessive or abundant quantity of something. It implies that there is an overwhelming amount that exceeds what is necessary or what can be handled.
  • have it coming to you The idiom "have it coming to you" means that someone deserves or will soon receive the consequences or punishment for their actions or behavior. It implies that the person's actions have led to an inevitable outcome, typically a negative one.
  • have it/that coming The idiom "have it/that coming" means to deserve or merit something, usually referring to receiving punishment or negative consequences as a result of one's actions or behavior. It implies that the person had done something wrong or inappropriate which led to the consequences they are now experiencing.
  • have something coming out of your ears The idiom "have something coming out of your ears" means to have an excessive or overwhelming amount of something. It implies having an abundance or an excessive quantity of something to the point where it cannot be managed or contained.
  • have steam coming out of your ears The idiom "have steam coming out of your ears" means to be extremely angry or infuriated. It implies that one's anger is so intense that it is almost visible, like steam coming out of their ears.
  • have a good command of something The idiom "have a good command of something" means to possess a high level of skill, understanding, or knowledge in a particular subject, concept, language, or task. It suggests that the person has a strong ability to comprehend, control, or manage that specific area effectively.
  • have (something) in common (with someone or something) The idiom "have (something) in common (with someone or something)" means to share a characteristic, interest, experience, or trait with someone or something. It implies a similarity or connection between two or more individuals or things.
  • have in common The idiom "have in common" means to share similar traits, interests, experiences, or characteristics with someone or something else. It implies that there are certain aspects or qualities that are mutually shared or possessed by multiple individuals or objects.
  • have something in common The idiom "have something in common" means to share similarities or interests with someone or something else. It refers to finding shared qualities, experiences, or opinions that create a mutual connection or understanding between two or more people.
  • have confidence in someone The idiom "have confidence in someone" means to trust and believe in someone's abilities, judgment, or character. It implies having faith and reliance on the person's capabilities and being assured of their competence or reliability.
  • have (something) on (one's) conscience The idiom "have (something) on (one's) conscience" means to feel guilty or responsible for something that one has done or failed to do. It refers to the burden of guilt or remorse that weighs on a person's mind and conscience.
  • have a clear conscience (about someone or something) The idiom "have a clear conscience (about someone or something)" means to feel guiltless or untroubled about one's actions, decisions, or involvement in a particular situation. It suggests having a sense of moral integrity, knowing that one has acted honestly and ethically, with nothing to hide or regret.
  • have contact with (one) The idiom "have contact with (one)" means to communicate or maintain a relationship with someone, whether through direct interaction, correspondence, or any form of connection. It implies regularly staying in touch or exchanging information and experiences with the person in question.
  • courage of one's convictions, have the The idiom "courage of one's convictions, have the" means to have the confidence and determination to stand up for and steadfastly defend one's beliefs, principles, or opinions, even in the face of opposition, criticism, or adversity. It refers to the ability to stay true to one's convictions without wavering or compromising, displaying boldness and determination in defending what one believes is right or just.
  • have (someone) in (one's) corner To have someone in one's corner means to have their support, loyalty, or advocacy in a situation or conflict. It suggests that the person is willing to stand up for and defend you, providing assistance, guidance, or support when needed.
  • have a corner on the market The idiom "have a corner on the market" means to have a dominant or monopoly-like position in a specific industry or market. It refers to being the sole or primary supplier of a particular product or service, holding a substantial competitive advantage over others and controlling a significant portion of the market share.
  • have cornered The idiom "have cornered" means to have gained complete control or dominance over something or someone. It often refers to a situation where someone or something is trapped or surrounded, leaving no escape or options.
  • have in corner The idiom "have someone in your corner" means to have someone who supports and advocates for you, especially in a conflict or challenge. It refers to having someone on your side or in your favor, providing assistance, encouragement, or guidance when you need it. This person is metaphorically seen as standing in your corner, like a boxer's coach or a supporter during a wrestling match.
  • you could have knocked me, etc. down with a feather The idiom "you could have knocked me down with a feather" is used to express extreme surprise or astonishment. It implies that the speaker is so shocked by something unexpected that they feel as though the slightest touch could knock them over.
  • have a couple The idiom "have a couple" typically refers to consuming or having a drink or beverage. It means to enjoy or consume a few drinks, usually of the same type or kind, often in a casual or social context.
  • day in court, have one's To have one's day in court means to have an opportunity to present one's case or defend oneself in a legal proceeding. It refers to the right or opportunity to have a fair and impartial trial where one's arguments, evidence, and rights are considered. This idiom often implies a desire for justice or to be heard and vindicated in a legal setting.
  • have (one's) day in court The idiom "have (one's) day in court" refers to the opportunity for someone to present their case or defend themselves in a court of law and have their argument or side of the story thoroughly heard and considered by the judge or jury. It implies that justice will be served, and the individual will receive a fair and impartial judgment or resolution to their legal situation.
  • Don’t have a cow! The idiom "Don't have a cow!" is an American colloquial expression that essentially means "don't overreact" or "don't get so upset." It is often used when someone is becoming excessively angry, frustrated, or distressed over a situation. The phrase originated from the 1980s television show "The Simpsons," in which the character Bart Simpson frequently exclaims it to calm down his overly dramatic sister, Lisa.
  • have a crack at (something) The idiom "have a crack at (something)" means to attempt or try something, especially when it is challenging or unfamiliar. It conveys the idea of giving it a go or making an effort to see if one can succeed or accomplish the task at hand.
  • have first crack at (something) The idiom "have first crack at (something)" means to have the opportunity to do or attempt something before anyone else. It suggests being given the initial chance or advantage in a particular situation.
  • have (something) stick in one's craw The idiom "have (something) stick in one's craw" means to feel bothered, annoyed, or irritated by something. It refers to a feeling of resentment or irritation towards a particular situation, statement, or action that feels difficult to swallow or accept.
  • have wires crossed The idiom "have wires crossed" means to have a miscommunication or misunderstanding with someone, resulting in confusion or a disagreement. It refers to a situation where messages or information are not properly transmitted or understood, leading to crossed wires similar to the tangles of electrical wires.
  • have a crush on (someone) The idiom "have a crush on (someone)" means to have strong romantic or infatuated feelings for someone, usually without those feelings being reciprocated. It typically refers to a temporary and intense attraction towards someone, often a person that the individual doesn't know very well.
  • have (a) skeleton(s) in (one's)/the cupboard The idiom "have (a) skeleton(s) in (one's)/the cupboard" refers to the existence of a secret or embarrassing fact, usually from someone's past, that they wish to keep hidden. It implies that there is something unpleasant or potentially damaging that someone doesn't want others to know about. The idiom alludes to the idea of hiding unwanted things in a cupboard, the skeleton being a metaphorical representation of such hidden secrets.
  • have (one's) work cut out The idiom "have (one's) work cut out" means to have a difficult or challenging task ahead. It implies that a lot of effort, time, or resources will be required to complete or succeed in the given task. It can also indicate having a demanding or strenuous workload.
  • have (one's) work cut out for (one) The idiom "have (one's) work cut out for (one)" means to have a difficult or challenging task ahead, usually involving a lot of effort and perseverance to accomplish it successfully.
  • have your work cut out The idiom "have your work cut out" is used to indicate that a task or job will be extremely challenging and demanding. It refers to being faced with a difficult undertaking that requires significant effort and perseverance to accomplish successfully.
  • Every dog will have its day The idiom "Every dog will have its day" means that everyone, no matter how insignificant or overlooked, will eventually have their moment of success, recognition, or good fortune.
  • have a good day The idiom "have a good day" is a common expression used to convey well wishes and optimism for someone's day. It essentially encourages the person to experience positive and enjoyable moments throughout the day.
  • have had its/(one's) day The idiom "have had its/(one's) day" refers to something or someone that was once popular, successful, or influential, but is no longer relevant or effective in the present time. It suggests that the peak period of its existence has already passed.
  • have had your/its day The idiom "have had your/its day" means that something or someone was once prominent, successful, or influential, but has now lost its significance or power. It suggests that the time of relevance or success has passed and will not return.
  • have its/(one's) day The idiom "have its/(one's) day" typically means that something or someone is given an opportunity to shine or achieve success after waiting patiently or being overlooked for a period of time. It refers to a situation where a person, idea, or thing gets the recognition, attention, or importance it deserves at some point in time.
  • have one's day The idiom "have one's day" refers to a situation where an individual or a group of individuals finally gets the recognition, attention, or success they deserve after a period of time. It implies that they have been acknowledged or celebrated for their accomplishments or abilities.
  • have seen (one's) day The idiom "have seen (one's) day" means that someone or something was once influential, successful, or notable, but has now lost its former significance or effectiveness. It suggests that the person or thing has experienced a decline or is past their prime.
  • have (one) dead to rights The idiom "have (one) dead to rights" means to have conclusive evidence or proof of someone's guilt or wrongdoing. It signifies catching someone in the act or possessing irrefutable evidence against them.
  • have someone dead to rights The idiom "have someone dead to rights" means to catch someone in the act of doing something wrong or illegal, having undeniable evidence or proof of their wrongdoing.
  • have deep pockets The idiom "have deep pockets" means that someone has a lot of money or resources, and is willing to spend or invest it freely. It refers to an individual or entity that is financially well-endowed and capable of financing various endeavors or expenses.
  • delighted to have you The idiom "delighted to have you" typically expresses a warm and enthusiastic welcome or pleasure in having someone present or joining a group or gathering. It conveys a sense of genuine happiness and appreciation for the person's presence.
  • have designs on (someone or something) To "have designs on someone or something" means to have a secret intention or plan to deceive, manipulate, or gain control over them or it. It implies having ulterior motives or ambitions with the intention of achieving personal gain or advantage.
  • have designs on someone The idiom "have designs on someone" means that someone has a romantic or ulterior motive or intention towards another person. It implies that the person has a plan or ambition to pursue a romantic relationship or gain some advantage from the other person.
  • have dibs on (something) The idiom "have dibs on (something)" means to claim or reserve something for oneself prior to others, typically by asserting a prior or superior right.
  • have dibs on The idiom "have dibs on" means to have claimed or reserved something for oneself before others, expressing one's priority or right to possess or use it.
  • have swallowed a dictionary The idiom "have swallowed a dictionary" refers to a person who speaks or writes using an excessive amount of sophisticated or complicated words, displaying a highly extensive vocabulary. It implies that the person is attempting to impress others with their linguistic knowledge and is often used in a slightly mocking or humorous manner.
  • not have two nickels to rub together The idiom "not have two nickels to rub together" is used to describe someone who is extremely poor or has very little money. It suggests that the person doesn't even possess the basic amount of money needed to rub two nickels together.
  • have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners The idiom "have (done) more (something) than (one) has had hot dinners" is used to emphasize that someone has a great amount of experience, skill, or knowledge in a particular field or activity. It implies that the person has done something extensively, surpassing the number of meals they have consumed. It emphasizes a high level of expertise or familiarity in a particular area.
  • Do I have to draw a picture? The idiom "Do I have to draw a picture?" is used to express frustration or annoyance when someone fails to understand or comprehend a simple or obvious concept. It suggests that the speaker finds the situation so clear or straightforward that they shouldn't need to provide further explanation. The phrase implies that the listener should be able to grasp the idea without any additional help or visual aids.
  • Do I have to draw you a picture? The idiom "Do I have to draw you a picture?" is a rhetorical question used to express frustration or disbelief when someone fails to understand or comprehend a simple or obvious concept or situation. It suggests that the speaker believes the explanation or instruction should be clear and easily understandable without needing any additional visual aids or explanations.
  • Do I have to paint a picture? The idiom "Do I have to paint a picture?" means that someone is expressing frustration or disbelief over having to explain something that they believe is already obvious or easily understood. It implies that the situation or information should be clear without further explanation.
  • Do I have to paint you a picture? The idiom "Do I have to paint you a picture?" is a rhetorical question used to express frustration or exasperation when someone fails to understand or comprehend something that seems obvious or self-explanatory. It implies that the person asking the question feels that providing further explanation or detail would be unnecessary or overly simplified.
  • do unto others as you would have them do unto you The idiom "do unto others as you would have them do unto you" refers to the principle of treating others in the same way you would like to be treated. It embraces the idea of empathy, kindness, and fairness, promoting the notion that if you desire respect, compassion, and consideration from others, you should display those qualities towards them. It suggests that one should behave toward others with the same respect and goodwill as they expect to receive, fostering harmonious interactions and positive relationships. This principle is also known as the "golden rule."
  • do you have a problem with that? The idiom "do you have a problem with that?" is a rhetorical question often used to confront someone who might disagree or express displeasure with a particular decision, statement, or action. It challenges the person to voice their opposition or discontent openly.
  • have a dog in the hunt The idiom "have a dog in the hunt" means to have a personal or vested interest in a particular situation or outcome. It implies being directly involved or having a stake in the matter being discussed or decided.
  • have a hand in (something) The idiom "have a hand in (something)" means to be involved or to play a role in something. It suggests that the person has contributed, influenced, or participated in a particular event, decision, or outcome.
  • have a job doing/to do something The idiom "have a job doing/to do something" means to find a task or responsibility challenging, difficult, or demanding. It can imply that the particular task requires significant effort, skill, or perseverance.
  • have a stab at (doing something) The idiom "have a stab at (doing something)" means to attempt or try something, often for the first time, without being certain of one's success or without having much experience or knowledge in that particular area. It implies making an effort or taking a shot at something even if one might not be fully prepared or skilled.
  • have a stab at something/at doing something The idiom "have a stab at something/at doing something" means to attempt or try something, often without being sure of success. It implies making an effort or taking a chance at doing something, even if there is doubt or uncertainty about the outcome.
  • have a way of doing something The idiom "have a way of doing something" means to have a particular method or approach in accomplishing tasks or achieving results. It implies that someone or something consistently follows a specific way or pattern when dealing with certain situations.
  • have the honour of something/of doing something The idiom "have the honour of something/of doing something" refers to being given the privilege or opportunity to do or have something esteemed or esteemed. It implies being recognized for a commendable act, position, or accomplishment.
  • not have a hope in hell (of doing something) The idiom "not have a hope in hell (of doing something)" means to have virtually no chance or possibility of achieving or succeeding in a particular task or goal. It implies that the chances of success are extremely low or impossible, likening it to having no chance at all, even in the unlikely scenario of an afterlife.
  • not have (one's) heart in (something) The idiom "not have one's heart in something" means that someone lacks enthusiasm, passion, or commitment for a particular task, activity, or goal. It implies that the individual is not fully invested emotionally or mentally and may be doing it reluctantly or with indifference.
  • not have a penny to (one's) name The idiom "not have a penny to (one's) name" means to have no money or any financial resources at all. It implies complete destitution and a lack of possessions or assets.
  • not have the stomach for (something) The idiom "not have the stomach for (something)" means lacking the courage, resolve, or ability to tolerate or handle a particular situation, task, or experience. It implies feeling too weak, queasy, or unwilling to confront or deal with something difficult, unpleasant, or challenging.
  • you don't have to be a rocket scientist The idiom "you don't have to be a rocket scientist" refers to the perception that a particular task or concept is not overly complicated or difficult to understand. It implies that basic intelligence or knowledge is sufficient to comprehend or perform the task at hand, without requiring specialized or advanced expertise.
  • you don't have to be a rocket scientist (to do something) The idiom "you don't have to be a rocket scientist (to do something)" means that a particular task or situation does not require a high level of intelligence or expertise. It implies that the task at hand is relatively simple or straightforward, and anyone can easily comprehend or accomplish it without possessing specialized knowledge or skills.
  • have done with The idiom "have done with" means to finish or cease something, to be done or finished with a particular task, situation, or person. It implies a desire to end or conclude a matter.
  • have done with (someone or something) The idiom "have done with (someone or something)" means to have finished or ended a relationship, task, or situation with someone or something, often due to a feeling of frustration, annoyance, or a desire for closure. It implies a desire to move on or sever ties.
  • have work done The idiom "have work done" typically refers to getting renovations or improvements done on a property or having a cosmetic procedure. It means to hire professionals to carry out the necessary work or changes to enhance or repair something.
  • who are you, and what have you done with (someone) The idiom "who are you, and what have you done with (someone)" is a playful expression used when someone's behavior or actions are unusual or unexpected, often suggesting that they are acting out of character. It is typically used in a lighthearted manner to express surprise or confusion towards someone's unusual behavior.
  • have a foot in the door The idiom "have a foot in the door" means to have an initial advantage or opportunity to potentially achieve something or gain entry into a particular domain or field. It usually implies being in a position that can potentially lead to additional advantages or opportunities in the future.
  • have your doubts The idiom "have your doubts" means to be uncertain or skeptical about something, to have a feeling of doubt or hesitation, often about the likelihood or success of a particular outcome or situation. It implies not fully believing in or being confident about something.
  • have a downer on (one) The idiom "have a downer on (one)" means to have a strong and persistent dislike or prejudice towards someone, often causing negative judgments or treatment towards that person. It implies harboring negative feelings or being critical of someone without any real reason or justification.
  • have a down on someone/something To "have a down on someone/something" means to have a strong and unjustified dislike or animosity towards a particular person or thing. It implies holding negative opinions or prejudices against them/it, often without any valid reason or evidence.
  • have a downer on someone/something The idiom "have a downer on someone/something" means to have a strong feeling of dislike or prejudice towards a particular person or thing. It implies having a negative attitude or holding negative opinions that bias one's perspective or treatment of the subject.
  • have the drop on The idiom "have the drop on" means to have a tactical advantage over someone, usually by having a weapon aimed at them. It suggests having control, power, or the upper hand in a particular situation.
  • have the drop on (someone or something) The idiom "have the drop on (someone or something)" refers to a situation where someone has the advantage over others, typically by having the upper hand or being in a position of control. It originates from the practice of pointing a firearm at someone, with "the drop" referring to having a gun ready to shoot while the other person does not. In a figurative sense, it represents being in a position of power or advantage over someone or something.
  • have (one's) druthers The idiom "have (one's) druthers" means to have one's own way or preference regarding a specific situation or choice. It implies having the freedom or opportunity to make decisions according to one's personal liking or desires.
  • have (one's) ducks in a row The idiom "have (one's) ducks in a row" means to be organized, prepared, and have all necessary things and details in order before undertaking a task or making a decision. It suggests that one is ready and capable of dealing with a situation efficiently and effectively.
  • the Dutch have taken Holland The idiom "the Dutch have taken Holland" means that a situation or task has been efficiently and effectively completed by the people who are most skilled or experienced in that particular endeavor. It suggests that when the Dutch are involved in something related to Holland (a region in the Netherlands), they are most likely to succeed due to their expertise and proficiency in that area.
  • ear to the ground, have one's The idiom "have one's ear to the ground" means to be watchful, observant, or attentive to the happenings and news around a particular situation or community. It refers to someone who is actively listening for information or staying informed about the latest developments or trends. This phrase typically implies that a person is well-informed, knowledgeable, or connected to specific sources of information.
  • have (one's) ear The idiom "have (one's) ear" means to have someone's complete attention or influence over them. It implies that the person is receptive to hearing and considering the ideas, opinions, or advice of the individual who "has their ear."
  • have (one's) ears lowered The idiom "have (one's) ears lowered" refers to the act of getting a haircut. It is a lighthearted or humorous way to say that someone is going to the barber or hair salon to have their hair trimmed or styled, specifically the hair around their ears.
  • have a tin ear The idiom "have a tin ear" refers to someone's inability to understand or appreciate music, tone, or rhythm. It implies that the person lacks sensitivity or comprehension when it comes to auditory or musical elements.
  • have a word in (one's) ear The idiom "have a word in (one's) ear" refers to privately speaking to someone about a particular matter or issue. It suggests having a confidential conversation or advising someone discreetly.
  • have a word in somebody's ear To "have a word in somebody's ear" means to speak privately, confidentially, or discreetly to someone, typically in order to give them advice, share information, or convey a message that should not be heard by others. It implies a conversation that is meant to be kept between the two individuals involved.
  • have a word in someone's ear The idiom "have a word in someone's ear" means to have a private conversation with someone in order to provide advice, give a suggestion, or express a concern. It implies a discreet and confidential conversation between two parties.
  • have somebody's ear The idiom "have somebody's ear" means to have someone's complete attention or be in a position of influence over them. It implies having someone's trust and confidence, allowing one to communicate ideas, opinions, or requests effectively to that person.
  • have someone's ear The idiom "have someone's ear" means to have someone's attention, especially in order to influence or persuade them. It refers to a situation where someone is actively listening and paying attention to what another person is saying.
  • have the ear of (one) The idiom "have the ear of (one)" refers to having the ability to speak to or influence someone in a direct and powerful way. It means that the person who "has the ear" of someone is able to gain their attention, trust, and influence their decisions or actions.
  • have the ear of someone The idiom "have the ear of someone" means to have the attention, favor, or influence over someone, particularly a person in a position of power or authority. It implies that one has the opportunity to communicate with and be heard by that person, often suggesting a close and influential relationship.
  • little pitchers have long ears The idiom "little pitchers have long ears" means that children are often more aware and astute than they may appear, and they overhear or comprehend things they are not supposed to or are intended for adults only. It implies that adults need to be careful and mindful of what they say or discuss in front of children because they might understand or remember more than expected.
  • walls have ears, the The idiom "walls have ears" means that one should be cautious and careful about what they say because there may be spies or eavesdroppers listening in secret. It implies that private conversations may not be as confidential as assumed.
  • have it easy The idiom "have it easy" means to experience little or no difficulty or hardship in a particular situation or in life overall. It typically implies that someone's circumstances are advantageous or that they face fewer challenges compared to others. It suggests that they are fortunate or have a relatively easy life.
  • have something to eat The idiom "have something to eat" means to consume food or have a meal. It implies the act of eating or satisfying one's hunger.
  • have to eat (one's) words The idiom "have to eat (one's) words" means to admit that one's previous statement or belief was incorrect or false and to accept the consequences or embarrassment of doing so. It suggests being proven wrong and being forced to retract one's words or retract a strongly held opinion.
  • have (someone) eating out of the palm of (one's) hand The idiom "have (someone) eating out of the palm of (one's) hand" means to have complete control, influence, or power over someone, usually resulting in their obedience, adoration, or loyalty. It implies that the person being controlled or influenced is utterly devoted to the one exerting control, following their every command and catering to their wishes.
  • have somebody eating out of your hand The idiom "have somebody eating out of your hand" means to have complete influence or control over someone, often by captivating or manipulating them to the point where they are completely obedient or submissive.
  • have someone eating out of your hand The idiom "have someone eating out of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often to the point where they will do anything you ask or desire without hesitation.
  • have the edge on (one) The idiom "have the edge on (one)" means to have a slight advantage or be ahead of someone else in a particular situation or competition. It implies having a slight superiority or being in a more favorable position.
  • have one over (the) eight The idiom "have one over (the) eight" typically means to be intoxicated or drunk, often to a significant or excessive extent.
  • egg on one's face, have The idiom "egg on one's face, have" means to look silly, embarrassed, or foolish due to one's own actions or words. It refers to a situation where someone's behavior or statements have led to an embarrassing or humiliating outcome for themselves.
  • have egg on one’s face The idiom "have egg on one’s face" means to feel embarrassed, ashamed, or humiliated due to one's own mistake, failure, or foolishness. It refers to the imaginary act of having raw egg on one's face, which symbolizes a public display of humiliation or a visible sign of an error.
  • have enough on (one's) plate The idiom "have enough on (one's) plate" means to have a lot of tasks, responsibilities, or problems to deal with at the moment. It implies being busy or overwhelmed with various obligations or challenges.
  • have enough on your plate The idiom "have enough on your plate" means to have a sufficient amount or more than enough tasks, responsibilities, or problems to deal with. It indicates being busy or overwhelmed with various obligations or difficulties.
  • have enough sense to pound salt The idiom "have enough sense to pound salt" means to possess basic wisdom or intelligence. It implies that someone is knowledgeable enough to perform even the simplest tasks, as pounding salt is a very straightforward and effortless action.
  • have enough sense to pound sand The idiom "have enough sense to pound sand" means to be intelligent enough or have the common sense to realize that a particular task or action is pointless, futile, or unreasonable. It implies that the person should engage in more meaningful activities instead of wasting their time.
  • have enough, a lot, etc. on your plate The idiom "have enough, a lot, etc. on your plate" means to have a significant amount of tasks, responsibilities, or problems to deal with at a particular moment. It refers to the feeling of being overloaded or overwhelmed with various obligations or issues that one needs to address or handle.
  • have a (good/solid/sound/etc.) grasp of/on (something) The idiom "have a (good/solid/sound/etc.) grasp of/on (something)" means to have a thorough understanding or comprehension of a particular subject or topic. It implies that a person possesses a firm mental comprehension or command of the subject matter, demonstrating a level of knowledge or skill that allows them to navigate it effectively.
  • have a good pair of lungs The idiom "have a good pair of lungs" means to have a strong and powerful voice or vocal capacity. It typically refers to someone who can speak loudly, shout, or sing with great volume and intensity.
  • have a lot, something, nothing, etc. going for you The idiom "have a lot, something, nothing, etc. going for you" means to have various advantages, strengths, or positive aspects that contribute to one's success or appeal in a particular situation. It implies that the person has favorable circumstances or qualities that work in their favor.
  • have many, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have many irons in the fire" means to be involved in or have several projects, tasks, or opportunities at the same time. It implies that a person is actively pursuing multiple endeavors simultaneously.
  • have money, time, etc. to play with The idiom "have money, time, etc. to play with" means to have an extra or surplus amount of a particular resource, such as money or time, that can be used or spent freely and with flexibility, without any immediate burden or stress. It implies having enough of the resource to comfortably enjoy or utilize it for leisure or non-essential activities.
  • have several irons in the fire The idiom "have several irons in the fire" means to be involved in or pursuing multiple projects or endeavors simultaneously. It implies that a person has many tasks or opportunities ongoing, indicating a busy or active state.
  • have something, nothing, little, etc. to show for something The idiom "have something, nothing, little, etc. to show for something" means that despite having put in a significant effort or invested time, resources, or energy into something, there is no tangible or worthwhile result, achievement, or reward. It implies not having any visible or concrete evidence of one's efforts or not reaping any significant benefits from them.
  • have your good, plus, etc. points The idiom "have your good, plus, etc. points" refers to expressing both the positive and negative aspects of a situation, argument, or opinion. It implies presenting a balanced perspective by acknowledging and highlighting the strong arguments from both sides or addressing the strengths and weaknesses of a particular position.
  • have your, his, its, etc. uses The idiom "have your, his, its, etc. uses" refers to something or someone having practical purposes, value, or benefits in a given situation or context. It implies that the subject is suitable, relevant, or applicable for a particular purpose or function.
  • finger in the pie, have a The idiom "have a finger in the pie" means to be involved in something or to have a share or part in something. It refers to a person who has influence or control over a situation, often in a secretive or undisclosed manner.
  • have a/(one's) finger in every pie The idiom "have a/(one's) finger in every pie" means to have involvement or influence in various different activities or endeavors. It implies that the person is knowledgeable or interfering in multiple matters simultaneously.
  • if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail The idiom "if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail" means that when a person only possesses one particular skill, approach, or tool, they tend to perceive every problem or situation as one that can be solved using that singular skill, approach, or tool. It implies a limited perspective or a tendency to apply a single solution to all circumstances, regardless of whether or not it is appropriate or effective.
  • have eye out The idiom "have an eye out" usually means to be on the lookout or to be actively searching for something or someone.
  • have eyes like saucers The phrase "have eyes like saucers" is an idiom that is used to describe someone whose eyes are wide open or excessively wide due to astonishment, surprise, or excitement. It suggests a state of being extremely amazed or shocked.
  • have one eye on (someone or something) The idiom "have one eye on (someone or something)" means to be attentively or vigilantly watching or monitoring someone or something, often with suspicion or a sense of caution. It implies that the person is not fully focused on the present task or situation because their attention is divided, indicating a level of distrust or wariness.
  • have scales fall from (one's) eyes The idiom "have scales fall from (one's) eyes" is a figurative expression used to describe a sudden realization or awareness of something that was previously hidden or misunderstood. It refers to the biblical story of Saul's conversion to Paul, where scales fell from his eyes after a divine intervention. Thus, this idiom signifies a moment of clarity or enlightenment when one sees the truth or understands a situation more clearly.
  • have square eyes The idiom "have square eyes" refers to someone who spends an excessive amount of time staring at a screen, such as a television, computer, or smartphone. It is used to describe someone who spends so much time watching or using electronic devices that their eyes become tired or strained, as if they have formed square shapes.
  • have stardust in eyes The idiom "have stardust in eyes" refers to the state of having a dreamy or idealistic outlook on life, often characterized by pursuing ambitious goals with enthusiasm and optimism. It implies being inspired or captivated by grand ideas, fueled by a sense of wonder and longing for something extraordinary.
  • have stars in eyes The idiom "have stars in eyes" refers to being dazzled, captivated, or infatuated by someone or something; usually used to describe someone who has strong feelings of admiration, excitement, or romantic interest. It implies that one's vision or perception is figuratively clouded or influenced by their intense emotions.
  • have stars in your eyes The idiom "have stars in your eyes" typically means to have an optimistic or idealistic perception or high expectations about something or someone, often to the point of being unrealistic or overly hopeful. It often describes a state of infatuation or being completely captivated by a romantic or ambitious goal, causing one to overlook potential challenges or flaws.
  • have the sun in (one's) eyes The idiom "have the sun in (one's) eyes" refers to the situation where someone is facing or looking towards the direction of the sun, causing them difficulty in seeing clearly due to the glare or brightness. It can be used metaphorically to describe someone who is facing challenges or obstacles that make it difficult for them to perceive or understand a situation properly.
  • have your eye on somebody/something The idiom "have your eye on somebody/something" means to watch or monitor someone or something closely with interest or intention. It implies paying attention and being highly interested or desirous of someone or something.
  • only have eyes for (one) The idiom "only have eyes for (one)" means to be completely infatuated or enamored with a specific person and to show exclusive romantic interest or devotion towards them. It implies that one is not interested in or attracted to anyone else.
  • only have eyes for somebody The idiom "only have eyes for somebody" means to have romantic or affectionate feelings exclusively for one person, often implying complete adoration or infatuation without any interest in others.
  • only have eyes for someone The idiom "only have eyes for someone" means to be romantically or exclusively attracted to a specific person, often to the exclusion of others. It implies a deep emotional or physical connection to that individual and a lack of interest or attention towards anyone else.
  • only have eyes for something The idiom "only have eyes for something" means to be completely infatuated or devoted to someone or something, often to the exclusion of others. It indicates that a person's attention, affection, or passionate interest is solely focused on a particular person or object.
  • stars in one's eyes, have The idiom "stars in one's eyes" refers to a state of being optimistic, idealistic, or having a sense of wonder and anticipation. It is often used to describe someone who is enthusiastic or dreams of achieving great success or experiencing exciting opportunities.
  • have the face to The definition of the idiom "have the face to" is: To possess the audacity, nerve, or boldness to do something, especially when it is considered inappropriate, rude, or disrespectful. It implies the act of confidently and shamelessly committing an action despite the potential negative consequences or the disapproval of others.
  • not have the face The idiom "not have the face" means that someone does not possess the audacity, courage, or moral authority to do or say something. It is often used when referring to a situation where someone lacks the confidence or grounds to behave in a certain way.
  • have had more than (one's) fair share of (something) The idiom "have had more than (one's) fair share of (something)" means to have experienced an excessive or disproportionately large amount of something, typically implying that it has been burdensome or overwhelming. It suggests that the person has received or endured more than what is considered reasonable or equitable.
  • have faith in The idiom "have faith in" means to trust or believe in someone or something, especially during difficult times or when faced with uncertainty. It implies having confidence, reliance, or a strong belief in the abilities, character, or reliability of a person, concept, or situation.
  • have the feel of (something) The idiom "have the feel of (something)" typically means to have a sense or experience that is similar to the thing being referred to. It describes a situation where one can sense the atmosphere, ambiance, or characteristics associated with a particular object, concept, or surroundings. Additionally, it implies having familiarity or an understanding of something, typically through personal experience or observation.
  • have mixed feelings The idiom "have mixed feelings" means to have conflicted or ambivalent emotions regarding a particular situation, person, or decision. It implies that one's feelings are not entirely positive or negative, but rather a combination of both.
  • have feet on the ground The idiom "have feet on the ground" means to be practical, level-headed, and have a realistic understanding of situations and one's own capabilities. It refers to a person who remains grounded and does not get carried away by fantasies or unrealistic ideas. They remain sensible, down-to-earth, and practical in their thinking and behavior.
  • have something at your feet The idiom "have something at your feet" typically means to have control, power, or influence over something or someone. It refers to being in a position of authority or dominance.
  • have the world at (one's) feet The idiom "have the world at one's feet" means to have complete control, power, or influence over a situation, or to have the ability to achieve whatever one desires. It conveys a sense of tremendous success, stature, and popularity.
  • have your feet on the ground The idiom "have your feet on the ground" means to be practical, down-to-earth, or to have a realistic mindset. It refers to someone who is sensible, has a practical approach to life, or is aware of and in touch with reality.
  • two left feet, have The idiom "two left feet" refers to someone who is awkward or clumsy when it comes to dancing or other physical activities. It is often used to describe someone who has difficulty coordinating their movements or lacks rhythm. So, to "have two left feet" means to possess a lack of coordination or gracefulness in physical activities.
  • have a few The idiom "have a few" typically refers to consuming alcoholic beverages, particularly when one intends to drink more than just a couple. It suggests having a moderate or leisurely amount of drinks, often in a social setting.
  • have a few kangaroos loose in the top paddock The idiom "have a few kangaroos loose in the top paddock" is an Australian slang phrase used to describe someone who is considered crazy, eccentric, or mentally unstable. It implies that the person's mind is like an open paddock where kangaroos (symbolizing wild and unpredictable thoughts) roam freely.
  • have a loose screw The idiom "have a loose screw" generally refers to a person who is deemed mentally unstable, eccentric, or crazy. It implies that the person's thinking or behavior is irrational or unpredictable, as if there is a literal loose screw in their head affecting their mental state.
  • have a head for figures The idiom "have a head for figures" refers to someone who has a natural talent or ability in understanding and working with numbers, mathematics, calculations, and financial matters. They possess good numerical analytical skills and are able to comprehend and work with complex numerical data easily.
  • have on file The idiomatic expression "have on file" refers to having a record or document of something or someone in a storage system or database for easy access or reference. It implies that the information is readily available when needed.
  • have (one's) fill (of something) The idiom "have (one's) fill (of something)" means to have enough of something, to be satisfied or content with the amount or intensity of a particular thing or experience. It implies reaching a point where one does not desire or crave any more of it.
  • have had your fill of The idiom "have had your fill of" means to have reached a point of satisfaction or contentment after experiencing or consuming something to the point of being satisfied or fed up with it. It implies that someone has had enough of a particular thing or situation and no longer desires further involvement or engagement with it.
  • have had your fill of somebody/something To have had your fill of somebody/something means to have experienced or consumed enough of someone or something, to the point of being satisfied or no longer interested. It often implies a sense of being tired, bored, or annoyed with someone or something and wanting to move on or have a break from it.
  • have had your fill of something The idiom "have had your fill of something" means to have had enough or to be completely satisfied or content with something, usually implying that any more of it would be excessive or undesirable.
  • have (one's) finger on the pulse The idiom "have (one's) finger on the pulse" means to be well-informed, aware, and up-to-date about something, especially important developments, trends, or changes in a particular field or situation. It suggests having a deep understanding of what is happening and being in touch with the current state of affairs.
  • have (one's) fingers in the till The idiom "have (one's) fingers in the till" means that someone is stealing or embezzling money. It refers to a person illicitly taking funds from a cash register or financial accounts for their own personal gain.
  • have (someone) turned round (one's) (little) finger The idiom "have (someone) turned round (one's) (little) finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, to effortlessly manipulate their actions or decisions. It implies that the person being controlled or influenced is easily swayed or submissive, as if they can be guided or manipulated as easily as rotating one's finger.
  • have (someone) twisted round (one's) (little) finger The idiom "have (someone) twisted round (one's) (little) finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often to the point where they are easily manipulated or very obedient. It suggests that the person being described can effortlessly make others do what they want by using their charm, persuasion, or manipulation skills.
  • have (someone) wound round (one's) (little) finger The idiom "have (someone) wound round (one's) (little) finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually through manipulation or charm. It suggests that the person in control can easily make the other person do whatever they want, as if they were spinning them around with a finger.
  • have (someone) wrapped round (one's) (little) finger The idiom "have (someone) wrapped round (one's) (little) finger" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often implying that they are easily manipulated or persuaded to do what you want. It suggests that someone has such a strong hold on another person that they can easily bend them to their will.
  • have your hand in the till The idiom "have your hand in the till" means to steal or embezzle money from a company or organization that one works for, especially in a position of trust or responsibility. It implies misusing one's authority for personal gain or engaging in illicit financial activities.
  • have something at one's fingertips The idiom "have something at one's fingertips" means to have easy and quick access to something, either because it is physically close or because one is highly familiar with it and can easily retrieve or access the information or resource.
  • have a lot of irons in the fire The idiom "have a lot of irons in the fire" means to have multiple tasks, projects, or responsibilities in progress or underway simultaneously. It suggests that someone is engaged in various activities or pursuits, often juggling multiple commitments or endeavors at the same time.
  • have many irons in the fire The idiom "have many irons in the fire" means to be involved in or managing multiple projects, tasks, or activities simultaneously. It implies that someone is actively pursuing or working on several different things at once.
  • have a shit-fit The idiom "have a shit-fit" is an informal way of expressing someone's intense anger, frustration, or outrage over a situation. It implies a dramatic and exaggerated reaction to something disagreeable or upsetting.
  • have a fix on (something) The idiom "have a fix on (something)" means to have a strong understanding or accurate knowledge of something, typically a location or situation. It originates from the context of navigation or tracking, where a fix refers to determining the exact position of a vessel or object. Therefore, to have a fix on something metaphorically means to have a precise grasp or clear idea about it.
  • have a fling (with someone) The idiom "have a fling (with someone)" refers to engaging in a brief, casual, and often passionate romantic or sexual relationship with someone, typically without any long-term commitment or expectations. It implies a temporary affair or casual involvement, often characterized by intense emotions or excitement.
  • have the floor The idiom "have the floor" means to have the opportunity to speak or be heard in a formal or public setting, such as a meeting, discussion, or debate, where one is given the attention and authority to speak. It suggests that the person is the current speaker, in control of the conversation, and has the right to express their opinions, thoughts, or ideas.
  • not have the foggiest The idiom "not have the foggiest" is used to express a complete lack of knowledge or understanding about something. It means that the person has absolutely no clue or idea about a particular subject matter or situation.
  • not have the foggiest (idea or notion) The idiom "not have the foggiest (idea or notion)" means to have absolutely no understanding or knowledge about something. It implies a complete lack of comprehension or awareness.
  • have (one's) foot on (someone's) neck The idiom "have (one's) foot on (someone's) neck" refers to having complete control or dominance over someone, typically exerting power or influence to maintain authority or suppress their actions or progress. It implies a position of superiority and restriction on the other person's freedom or ability to act independently.
  • one foot in the grave, have The idiom "one foot in the grave, have" refers to someone who is very old or in very poor health and is nearing the end of their life. It implies that the person is close to death or that their condition is deteriorating rapidly, often suggesting that they may not survive for very much longer.
  • have a forked tongue The idiom "have a forked tongue" refers to someone who speaks deceitfully or dishonestly, often saying one thing but meaning another. It implies that the person cannot be trusted and has a tendency to manipulate or deceive with their words. The idiom alludes to the image of a snake or serpent with a split tongue, traditionally associated with dishonesty and trickery.
  • have other (or bigger) fish to fry The idiom "have other (or bigger) fish to fry" means to have more important, pressing, or significant matters or concerns to attend to, rather than focusing on a particular issue or task at hand. It implies that one has more significant or urgent responsibilities or priorities to address, making the current matter seem less important or worth their attention.
  • have (one's) plate full The idiom "have (one's) plate full" means to have a lot of tasks, responsibilities, or commitments to deal with. It implies being busy and overwhelmed with various obligations or demands.
  • have a snoot full The idiom "have a snoot full" typically means to consume a substantial amount of alcohol, often to the point of becoming intoxicated. It can also refer more broadly to indulging excessively in anything pleasurable or addictive, not necessarily limited to alcohol consumption.
  • have (or gain) the upper hand The idiom "have (or gain) the upper hand" means to have control or the advantage in a situation or conflict. When someone has the upper hand, they are in a superior position or have more power and influence compared to others involved.
  • have the gall to do something The idiom "have the gall to do something" refers to someone having the audacity, nerve, or the boldness to do or say something, even when it is considered offensive, rude, or inappropriate. It implies that the person is displaying an unreasonable sense of confidence or self-importance in their actions or behavior.
  • have game The idiom "have game" typically refers to someone who possesses the necessary skills, charm, or attractiveness to be successful in a particular area, usually related to dating or attracting others. It suggests that the person is competent, confident, and able to achieve desired outcomes in matters of romance or social interactions.
  • have skin in the game The idiom "have skin in the game" means to have a personal stake or financial interest in a particular situation or undertaking. It implies that the individual is directly affected by the outcome and is therefore more motivated and invested in making sure it turns out favorably. It often refers to someone who has contributed their own resources, time, or effort, and is thus liable for the potential risks and rewards associated with the venture.
  • have (one's) guts for garters The idiom "have (one's) guts for garters" is an expression used to convey extreme anger or fury towards someone. It suggests that the speaker is so furious with someone that they would metaphorically rip out their intestines (guts) and fashion them into garters, indicating a desire for revenge or punishment. It is an exaggerated phrase used to emphasize strong feelings of anger or hatred towards another person.
  • have someone's guts for garters The idiom "have someone's guts for garters" is an exaggerated expression that means being extremely angry or wanting to harm or punish someone severely. It implies intense hostility or a strong desire for revenge.
  • have a gas The idiom "have a gas" is an informal expression that means to have a great time, to enjoy oneself immensely, or to have a lot of fun in a particular situation or event.
  • have cold feet The idiom "have cold feet" means to feel nervous, hesitant, or reluctant about doing something that one had initially planned or agreed to do.
  • look as if you have seen a ghost The idiom "look as if you have seen a ghost" means to appear extremely shocked, frightened, or overwhelmed by something unexpected or terrifying. It implies a facial expression or body language that reveals intense surprise or fear.
  • have a gift for (doing) something The idiom "have a gift for (doing) something" means to possess a natural talent or ability for a particular skill or activity. It suggests that the person is inherently good at something, often without much effort or training.
  • have a heart of glass The idiom "have a heart of glass" typically refers to someone who is emotionally fragile or sensitive, easily hurt or broken, and lacks resilience or toughness when faced with adversity or criticism.
  • have a glow on The idiom "have a glow on" typically refers to being slightly intoxicated or having consumed alcohol, resulting in a visible glow or flushed complexion on one's face.
  • have (one's) eyes glued to (something) The idiom "have (one's) eyes glued to (something)" means to be intensely focused or completely absorbed by something, often to the point of not being able to look away. It implies a strong and unwavering attention towards a specific object, event, or situation.
  • have (someone) going The idiom "have (someone) going" means to successfully deceive, manipulate, or trick someone into believing or doing something, usually by being persuasive or convincing. It implies that the person is being easily fooled or misled.
  • have going The idiom "have going" typically refers to having or maintaining a level of success, progress, or momentum in a specific situation or endeavor. It describes someone or something that is evenly or actively moving forward and making things happen.
  • have going for one The idiom "have going for one" means to possess certain advantages, qualities, or attributes that can contribute to one's success or popularity in a particular situation or endeavor. It refers to the positive factors or assets that one has on their side.
  • have going for you The idiom "have going for you" refers to the positive attributes, qualities, or advantages that an individual possesses, which can contribute to their success or help them achieve their goals. It is often used to highlight the favorable aspects or strengths that someone has or can leverage in a particular situation.
  • have it going on The idiom "have it going on" is used to describe someone who possesses qualities or characteristics that make them attractive, successful, or impressive. It implies that the person is confident, capable, and appealing in various aspects of their life, such as appearance, skills, or accomplishments.
  • have nothing going for (someone or something) The idiom "have nothing going for (someone or something)" means that someone or something lacks positive qualities, advantages, or significant accomplishments. It implies a lack of potential, opportunities, or desirability.
  • have (the) golden touch The idiom "have (the) golden touch" refers to someone who has the ability to be consistently successful in their endeavors. It implies that whatever they touch or are involved in turns out to be profitable or successful.
  • good head on one's shoulders, have a The idiom "good head on one's shoulders" refers to someone who has intelligence, wisdom, and good judgment. It suggests that the person is sensible and level-headed in their thinking and decision-making.
  • have (a) bad press The idiom "have (a) bad press" refers to the negative or unfavorable coverage and criticism that someone or something receives from media outlets or public opinion. It implies that the reputation or image of a person, organization, or an idea suffers due to widespread disapproval or negative commentary.
  • have (a) good press The idiom "have (a) good press" typically refers to someone or something receiving positive publicity or favorable coverage in the media. It implies that the person, organization, or product is portrayed in a positive light, often generating a positive public image or reputation.
  • have (someone's or something's) good points The idiom "have (someone's or something's) good points" means to acknowledge or recognize the positive qualities or attributes of a person or thing, even if one does not necessarily agree with them entirely or find them to be totally favorable. It implies that there are certain aspects of the person or thing being considered that are commendable or beneficial.
  • have (someone's or something's) plus points The idiom "have (someone's or something's) plus points" refers to the positive or favorable aspects or qualities associated with a person or thing. It implies that there are certain advantages or strengths that make someone or something more appealing, valuable, or deserving of recognition.
  • have a bad night The idiom "have a bad night" means to experience a challenging or unpleasant time or situation during the evening or nighttime hours. It typically refers to a string of unfortunate events, poor luck, or emotional distress that occurs during the night.
  • have a bad opinion of (someone or something) The idiom "have a bad opinion of (someone or something)" refers to the act of having a negative perception or judgment about someone or something. It means forming an unfavorable view or belief based on personal observations, experiences, or preconceived notions.
  • have a good head on (one's) shoulders The idiom "have a good head on (one's) shoulders" means to be intelligent, rational, and wise. It refers to someone who possesses good judgment and the ability to make sound decisions. This person is seen as reliable, level-headed, and capable of thinking clearly in various situations.
  • have a good name (somewhere or in something) The idiom "have a good name (somewhere or in something)" means to have a favorable reputation or a respected standing in a particular place or context. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is well-regarded and highly esteemed by others. This can have implications for trustworthiness, credibility, integrity, or overall positive perception.
  • have a good night The idiom "have a good night" is a phrase used to wish someone well and express the hope that their evening or night is enjoyable, restful, or pleasant. It is commonly used as a farewell or goodbye, usually said when parting ways in the evening or before going to bed.
  • have a good one The idiom "have a good one" is a casual and informal way of expressing well wishes or saying goodbye. It is often used as a friendly send-off or to wish someone a pleasant experience or day.
  • have a good opinion of (someone or something) To have a good opinion of someone or something means to form a favorable or positive judgment, belief, or assessment about them. It implies that one holds a positive view and has trust, admiration, or respect for the person or thing in question.
  • have a good run for (one's) money The idiom "have a good run for (one's) money" means to receive an enjoyable or worthwhile experience in exchange for the effort, time, or money one has invested. It implies that the person has obtained good value, satisfaction, or enjoyment from a particular activity, event, or situation.
  • have a high opinion of (someone or something) The idiom "have a high opinion of someone or something" means to think very positively or to hold a favorable perception towards a person or an object. It suggests that one regards them with great esteem, value, or admiration.
  • have a low opinion of (someone or something) The idiom "have a low opinion of (someone or something)" means to have a negative or unfavorable view or judgment about someone or something. It signifies not holding a high regard or having doubts about their worth, abilities, or qualities.
  • have a whale of a (good) time The idiom "have a whale of a (good) time" means to have an exceptionally enjoyable and exciting experience. It implies having a great amount of fun and entertainment. It can be used to describe an enjoyable event or a time spent with friends, where one thoroughly enjoys themselves and feels joyous.
  • have good antennae The idiom "have good antennae" means to have a keen intuition or sensitivity to pick up on subtle signals or cues from one's surroundings. It refers to being perceptive, observant, and able to accurately assess people or situations.
  • have good vibes The idiom "have good vibes" means to exude or experience positive energy, which can create a pleasant or harmonious atmosphere. It refers to the feeling of overall well-being and positivity that someone or something emits or possesses. Having good vibes implies an optimistic outlook, a cheerful and friendly demeanor, and a general sense of contentment.
  • have the (good) grace to (do something) The idiom "have the (good) grace to (do something)" means to show proper manners, politeness, or consideration by performing a certain action. It implies that the person should act in a way that is expected or appropriate for a particular situation.
  • have the goods on (someone) The idiom "have the goods on (someone)" means to possess incriminating or damaging evidence or information about someone, which can be used against them to prove their guilt or wrongdoing in a particular situation.
  • never have a good word to say about (someone of something) The idiom "never have a good word to say about (someone or something)" means to consistently speak critically or negatively about someone or something, without ever finding anything positive or praiseworthy to say. It implies a persistent habit of being uncomplimentary or disparaging.
  • never have a good word to say for (someone of something) The idiom "never have a good word to say for (someone or something)" refers to someone who consistently speaks negatively or critically about a specific person or thing, never offering any positive comments or praise. This person habitually finds faults, flaws, or shortcomings in others or certain matters without acknowledging any commendable aspects.
  • not have a good word to say about (someone of something) The idiom "not have a good word to say about (someone or something)" means that someone consistently speaks negatively or critically about a person, group, or thing. It indicates a complete lack of positive remarks or opinions towards that particular entity.
  • not have a good word to say for (someone of something) The idiom "not have a good word to say for (someone or something)" means that a person has nothing positive or complimentary to say about the mentioned person or thing. It implies that there is a complete lack of praise or favorable opinion.
  • have (got) (one's) number The idiom "have (got) (one's) number" means to have someone figured out or understood, especially when it comes to their true intentions, behavior, or character. It implies that the person's motives or true nature are known and can be easily anticipated or predicted.
  • have (got) (someone) pegged as (something) The idiom "have (got) (someone) pegged as (something)" means to form a fixed or definite opinion or perception about someone, usually based on their characteristics, behavior, or appearance. It implies that the person has been categorized or labeled as a certain type or with certain qualities, often without knowing them fully or accurately.
  • have (got) a knack for (something) The idiom "have (got) a knack for (something)" refers to possessing a natural talent or skill for a particular activity or task. It implies that the person is innately skilled and able to perform the specific activity effortlessly or with exceptional proficiency.
  • have (got) to hand it to (someone) The idiom "have (got) to hand it to (someone)" means to acknowledge or give credit to someone for their impressive or praiseworthy qualities, achievements, or actions. It is typically used to express admiration or recognition for someone's abilities, skills, or accomplishments.
  • have (one) taped The idiom "have (one) taped" means to fully understand someone's intentions, behavior, or character, often suggesting that the person's true nature or motives are known and can be anticipated or manipulated. It implies having gained a comprehensive understanding or insight into someone's patterns, habits, or underlying motivations.
  • have (something) to do The idiom "have (something) to do" can be defined as having a responsibility, task, or obligation that requires attention or involvement. It implies that something needs to be accomplished or attended to.
  • have a loud mouth The idiom "have a loud mouth" refers to a person who talks too much or speaks without filtering their thoughts, often being outspoken or tactless. It commonly implies someone who is talkative, opinionated, and lacks discretion in their speech.
  • have a mind like a sieve The idiom "have a mind like a sieve" refers to someone who has a poor memory or is easily forgetful. It implies that their mind is full of holes like a sieve, through which thoughts and memories easily slip away or cannot be retained.
  • have got it in (one) The idiom "have got it in (one)" means to have successfully guessed or answered something correctly on the first attempt. It implies that the person has a keen understanding or intuition regarding the subject or situation at hand.
  • have got something taped The idiom "have got something taped" means to fully understand or have complete knowledge and ability in handling or dealing with a particular task, situation, or concept. It suggests that someone has a clear understanding or mastery of something.
  • have got to (do something) The idiom "have got to (do something)" is an informal way to express a strong obligation or necessity to do something. It indicates a sense of urgency or importance attached to the action. It is similar in meaning to "have a duty to" or "must."
  • have nothing to do The idiom "have nothing to do" is used to describe a situation where a person is not engaged in any specific activity or task. It suggests that the person is not occupied or involved in anything particular at the moment.
  • have the mouth of a sailor The idiom "have the mouth of a sailor" refers to someone who uses foul or offensive language, often swearing or cursing consistently or excessively. It implies that the person speaks with the same vulgar language used by sailors, who are traditionally known for their coarse and profane speech.
  • have to The idiom "have to" is often used to express necessity or obligation to do something. It refers to having no choice other than performing a particular action, often due to external circumstances or responsibilities.
  • I have only got one pair of hands The idiom "I have only got one pair of hands" means that a person has limitations and it is not possible for them to do everything at once or accomplish an excessive amount of tasks, typically implying that they are overwhelmed or in need of assistance.
  • not have a penny The idiom "not have a penny" refers to a person who doesn't have any money or is completely broke. It implies a state of extreme poverty or being financially destitute.
  • you have (got) to laugh The idiom "you have (got) to laugh" is typically used as a way of expressing the importance of finding humor or amusement in difficult or challenging situations. It implies that laughter can be a coping mechanism or a way to maintain a positive attitude in the face of adversity.
  • you have got to be kidding (me) The idiom "you have got to be kidding (me)" is used to express disbelief or incredulity towards something that is difficult to believe, often in a sarcastic or ironic tone. It implies that the speaker thinks the information or situation is so absurd or unrealistic that it must be a joke.
  • have the grace to do something The idiom "have the grace to do something" means to behave or act in a considerate, courteous, or respectable manner when confronted with a certain situation or when faced with having to perform a specific action. It implies showing good manners, humility, and tact.
  • have a grasp of The idiom "have a grasp of" means to understand or comprehend a certain topic, concept, or idea. It implies having a sufficient level of knowledge or awareness about something.
  • have gravy on one’s grits The idiom "have gravy on one’s grits" refers to someone who is very fortunate or lucky. It suggests that the person's situation is not only good but even better than expected, as having gravy on one's grits is considered an additional, delicious addition to a meal.
  • have a grip on (something) The idiom "have a grip on (something)" means to have a firm understanding, control, or knowledge of something. It refers to being capable and knowledgeable about a particular subject or situation and being able to handle and manage it effectively.
  • have a tight grip on (someone or something) The idiom "have a tight grip on (someone or something)" means to have complete control or power over someone or something. It implies having a firm hold or influence, often with a strong sense of control or dominance.
  • have both feet on the ground The idiom "have both feet on the ground" means to be practical, realistic, and level-headed in one's thinking and actions. It indicates that a person is sensible, down-to-earth, and not carried away by unrealistic dreams or ideas. They possess a practical approach to problems and tend to make decisions based on logic and reason rather than emotions or impracticality.
  • have grown whiskers The idiom "have grown whiskers" is a figurative expression that means someone or something has become outdated, old-fashioned, or obsolete. It can also imply that an idea, concept, or way of doing things has become stale or no longer relevant in the current context.
  • have a gun to (one's) head The idiom "have a gun to (one's) head" means that someone is under extreme pressure or facing a high-stakes situation where there are severe consequences if they fail to act or make a decision. It is often used metaphorically to describe a situation where someone is forced to make a choice under intense and possibly life-threatening circumstances.
  • have a gun to your head The idiom "have a gun to your head" refers to a situation where someone is under a significant amount of pressure or facing an imminent threat. It symbolizes being in a position where one must make a crucial decision or take immediate action, often with severe consequences if the wrong choice is made.
  • have somebody's guts for garters The idiom "have somebody's guts for garters" is an expression that indicates extreme anger or the desire to severely punish or harm someone. It is a figurative way of saying that someone is very angry and would metaphorically use their opponent's intestines as garters (a decorative band worn to hold up stockings) to display their triumph over them.
  • have the guts The idiom "have the guts" means to possess the courage, bravery, or audacity to do something challenging or risky. It implies having the necessary strength and determination to face a difficult or intimidating situation.
  • have the guts (to do something) The idiom "have the guts (to do something)" means to have the courage, determination, or bravery necessary to do something difficult, unpopular, or risky. It implies having the strength of character or resolve to face and overcome challenges or obstacles.
  • have one’s mind in the gutter The idiom "have one's mind in the gutter" means to have lewd or vulgar thoughts or to interpret innocent or harmless statements or actions in a suggestive or sexual manner. It implies that someone's thinking is focused on inappropriate or base subjects.
  • have (a) hollow leg(s) The idiom "have (a) hollow leg(s)" is used to describe someone who has an unusually large appetite or the ability to consume large quantities of food without seeming to become full. It implies that the person's stomach is hollow, metaphorically suggesting they can eat more than the average person without feeling full.
  • have (a) method in (one's) madness The idiom "have (a) method in (one's) madness" means that even though someone's behavior might appear strange, there is likely a logical or rational purpose behind it. It suggests that despite their unconventional or eccentric approach, there is a deliberate method or strategy that is not immediately apparent to others.
  • have (a) method to (one's) madness The idiom "have (a) method to (one's) madness" means that despite appearing chaotic, disorganized, or unconventional, there is a hidden or underlying logic, reasoning, or purpose behind someone's actions or behavior. It suggests that even though someone's approach may seem odd or strange, there is a deliberate strategy or plan behind it.
  • have (an amount of) plates spinning The idiom "have (an amount of) plates spinning" typically refers to a situation where a person is managing multiple tasks or responsibilities simultaneously. It originates from the image of a performer who spins multiple plates on thin poles, needing to keep each plate spinning without letting any fall. Therefore, having plates spinning implies maintaining control over various tasks or commitments successfully.
  • have (one) in fits The idiom "have (one) in fits" means to cause someone to experience uncontrollable bouts of laughter or intense emotional reactions. It suggests that something is incredibly funny, surprising, or shocking to the point of causing extreme and sudden bursts of emotional expression from that person.
  • have (one) on a short leash The idiom "have (one) on a short leash" refers to exercising tight control or close supervision over someone. It suggests that the person in control is closely monitoring and restricting the actions or freedom of the individual being referred to.
  • have (one) on the run The idiom "have (one) on the run" means to cause someone to be constantly busy or preoccupied, making it difficult for them to keep up or respond effectively. It suggests that the person is being overwhelmed or pressured by various tasks or challenges.
  • have (one's) (name and) number on it The idiom "have (one's) (name and) number on it" is typically used to mean that something is perfectly suited or destined for a specific person. It implies that a particular thing has been reserved or intended specifically for an individual, suggesting that it is an ideal match or fit for their preferences or needs.
  • have (one's) (own) way The idiom "have (one's) (own) way" means to get or do exactly what one wants, often in a determined or insistent manner, without considering or accommodating the wishes or opinions of others. It implies a sense of stubbornness or insistence on fulfilling one's desires or preferences.
  • have (one's) head in the sand The idiom "have one's head in the sand" refers to the act of deliberately ignoring or avoiding unpleasant or difficult situations, issues, or information. It typically depicts someone who is refusing to acknowledge the reality or truth of a particular matter, often due to fear, denial, or the desire to avoid facing consequences. This idiom is derived from the notion of an ostrich sticking its head in the sand as a defense mechanism, mistakenly believing this will make it invisible or immune from danger.
  • have (one's) head read The idiom "have (one's) head read" means to suggest or recommend that someone seek professional help or therapy due to their irrational or crazy behavior or thoughts. It implies that the person's actions or ideas are so absurd or nonsensical that they require professional intervention for treatment.
  • have (one's) head screwed on (right) The idiom "have (one's) head screwed on (right)" means to be sensible, rational, or level-headed. It refers to someone who possesses good judgment, logical thinking, or a composed mindset.
  • have (one's) heart in (something) The idiom "have (one's) heart in (something)" means to be deeply committed, passionate, or emotionally invested in a particular pursuit, activity, or endeavor. It implies that one is fully dedicated to something and genuinely cares about its success or outcome.
  • have (one's) name taken The idiom "have (one's) name taken" refers to a situation where someone's name is recorded or noted, often for a negative or problematic reason. It implies that individual's actions or behavior have attracted attention, scrutiny, or potential consequences. It can also suggest being implicated in a wrongdoing or being recognized for something of importance or significance.
  • have (one's) nose in a magazine The idiom "have (one's) nose in a magazine" means to be fully engrossed or absorbed in reading a magazine or any written material. It implies that the person is so engaged in reading that they are oblivious to their surroundings or ignoring what is happening around them.
  • have (one's) pick of (something) The idiom "have one's pick of something" means to have the opportunity to choose from a variety of options or alternatives, usually indicating a situation where one is allowed to select the best or most desirable option. It suggests that someone has many choices available to them, giving them the advantage of choosing what they prefer or find most advantageous.
  • have (one's) say The idiom "have (one's) say" means to have the opportunity or right to express one's opinion or make one's views known about a particular matter or issue. It implies the ability to actively participate in a discussion, decision-making process, or any situation where one's input is taken into consideration.
  • have (one's) share of (something) The idiom "have (one's) share of (something)" means to experience or possess an adequate or fair portion of something, usually referring to both positive and negative experiences or responsibilities. It implies having an amount or quality of something that is expected or customary, without exceeding or falling short of it.
  • have (sexual) relations (with someone) The idiom "have (sexual) relations (with someone)" refers to engaging in sexual activity or having a sexual relationship with another person. It implies a consensual and intimate interaction of a sexual nature.
  • have (someone or something) in (one's) sights The idiom "have (someone or something) in (one's) sights" means to have identified a target or goal and be actively pursuing it with determination and focus. It often refers to a targeted approach to achieving something specific.
  • have (someone or something) on (one's) mind The idiom "have (someone or something) on (one's) mind" refers to the situation when someone is continuously thinking about or preoccupied with someone or something. It implies that the person or thing occupies a significant amount of their thoughts or attention.
  • have (someone) at (one's) mercy The idiom "have (someone) at (one's) mercy" means to have complete control or power over someone, generally in a situation where they are vulnerable or defenseless. It implies that the person has the ability to treat the other person as they please, without any resistance or opposition.
  • have (someone) on a tight leash The idiom "have (someone) on a tight leash" means to exert strict control or authority over someone, keeping them closely monitored and restricted in their actions or behavior. It implies that the person in control has a firm grip on the other person's actions and does not allow them much freedom or independence.
  • have (someone) under (one's) spell The idiom "have (someone) under (one's) spell" means to have such a strong influence or control over someone that they are completely captivated or enamored by the person or their words. It refers to holding someone's absolute attention or being able to manipulate and influence them effortlessly.
  • have (someone) under (one's) wing The idiom "have (someone) under (one's) wing" means to offer guidance, protection, or mentorship to someone, especially someone who is inexperienced or in need of support. It implies taking someone under one's care, providing them with assistance and looking after their well-being.
  • have (someone's) number on it The idiom "have (someone's) number on it" refers to a situation or outcome that is specially tailored or targeted for a particular person. It implies that whatever is being discussed, such as an event, task, or situation, is specifically meant for or designed to affect or involve that individual. It can also suggest that the person is likely to be the recipient of a negative outcome or unfavorable consequences.
  • have (something) at heart To have (something) at heart means to deeply care about or have a strong emotional attachment or concern for something or someone. It implies that the particular thing or person holds great importance or significance to an individual, and they are genuinely invested in its well-being or success.
  • have (something) coming to (someone) The idiom "have (something) coming to (someone)" refers to the idea that someone deserves or should expect to receive a punishment, consequence, or reward for their actions or behavior. It implies that the person's actions have merited a certain outcome, usually something negative or adverse.
  • have (something) down to a science The idiom "have (something) down to a science" means to have a particular skill, process, or task mastered or perfected to a high degree of efficiency and expertise. It implies that the person or group involved has studied and understood the subject matter thoroughly, and has developed a systematic and precise approach to accomplishing it.
  • have (something) off pat The idiom "have (something) off pat" means to have something fully mastered or memorized to the point of being able to recite it perfectly without any mistakes or hesitation.
  • have (something) on the go The idiom "have (something) on the go" means to be involved or engaged in a particular task, project, or activity. It signifies being busy or actively working on something.
  • have (something) to offer The idiom "have (something) to offer" means to possess qualities, skills, or resources that are valuable or beneficial to others. It implies having something of value that can be shared, contributed, or used to provide a benefit or advantage in a particular situation.
  • have (something) to play with The idiom "have (something) to play with" means to possess or have something available to use or enjoy casually, often implying that there is extra or surplus of that thing. It can refer to having an abundance of resources, options, or opportunities that one can explore or experiment with for leisure or entertainment purposes.
  • have (something) up the wazoo The idiom "have (something) up the wazoo" is an informal expression commonly used to indicate having an excessive amount of something. It implies possessing a large quantity of the mentioned item beyond what is necessary or manageable. The term "wazoo" is often considered a humorous and euphemistic way of referring to the backside or posterior. Therefore, the phrase suggests having an overwhelming abundance or surplus of something.
  • have (something) up the yin-yang The idiom "have (something) up the yin-yang" means to possess an excessive amount or an overwhelming abundance of something. It is often used to emphasize an immense quantity or the intensity of a particular situation or state. The phrase "up the yin-yang" refers to the Eastern concept of the "yin-yang" symbol, representing the balance between opposing forces.
  • have (the) time The idiom "have (the) time" typically means to have the opportunity, freedom, or availability to engage in a particular activity or pursue a particular interest. It implies having enough time to do something without any constraints or responsibilities interfering.
  • have a (sudden) rush of blood to the head The idiom "have a (sudden) rush of blood to the head" means to act impulsively or recklessly, often due to a surge of excitement, anger, or adrenaline. It refers to the momentary loss of rational thinking or control over one's actions due to an overwhelming emotional response.
  • have a blue fit The idiom "have a blue fit" typically refers to someone becoming extremely angry, upset, or agitated. It implies a sudden and intense emotional outburst or reaction.
  • have a cadenza The idiom "have a cadenza" typically refers to a situation where someone is given the opportunity to showcase their skill, talent, or creativity. It originates from the world of music, specifically in classical music when a soloist is allowed to perform a cadenza—a passage where they can demonstrate their virtuosity and improvisational abilities within a larger musical piece. In a broader sense, "have a cadenza" means to have a moment to shine, take center stage, or display one's abilities in any field or context.
  • have a clear head The idiom "have a clear head" means to be calm, focused, and able to think or make decisions rationally, especially when facing challenges or difficult situations. It implies being free from distractions, emotional influences, or any impairments that could hinder reasoning or judgment.
  • have a cob on The idiom "have a cob on" is a colloquial expression primarily used in British English. It means to be in a state of irritation, annoyance, or a bad mood. It can describe someone who is sulking, grumpy, or upset about something.
  • have a free hand The idiom "have a free hand" means to have complete freedom, authority, or discretion to do something without any limitations or restrictions. It implies having the ability to make decisions or take action without needing approval or interference from others.
  • have a go (at someone or something) The idiom "have a go (at someone or something)" means to criticize, attack, or confront someone or something, often with great force or determination. It implies making an attempt to deal with a problem or challenge directly, without hesitation or fear.
  • have a handle on (something) The idiom "have a handle on (something)" means to have control, understanding, or expertise in dealing with a particular situation, task, or subject. It implies that the person has a firm or confident grip on the matter at hand and is able to manage it effectively.
  • have a hankering for (something) The idiom "have a hankering for (something)" means to have a strong and persistent desire or craving for something. It implies a longing or yearning for a particular thing or experience.
  • have a hard head The idiom "have a hard head" is typically used to describe someone who is stubborn, obstinate, or resistant to change. It refers to someone who is unwilling to listen to advice or suggestions, and who often persists in their opinions or courses of action despite any evidence or arguments presented to them.
  • have a head for (something) The idiom "have a head for (something)" means having a natural ability or aptitude for a particular activity, skill, or topic. It implies having a strong intellectual or mental predisposition that allows someone to understand or excel at a specific field or subject.
  • have a head for heights The idiom "have a head for heights" means to have the ability to cope with or not feel scared or uncomfortable when in high or elevated places. It refers to someone who is fearless or confident in situations that involve great heights or elevated positions.
  • have a heavy heart The idiom "have a heavy heart" refers to feeling great sadness, guilt, or sorrow. It often describes a profound emotional burden or the weight of a difficult decision or situation.
  • have a hide like a rhinoceros The idiom "have a hide like a rhinoceros" refers to someone who is extremely thick-skinned or insensitive, not easily affected by criticism or negative comments. It implies that the person is able to handle and brush off insults or harsh words without being emotionally affected.
  • have a high old time The idiom "have a high old time" means to have a very enjoyable and lively experience. It suggests having a great deal of fun, excitement, or pleasure during a particular event or period.
  • have a jag on The idiom "have a jag on" means to be in a state of anger, irritation, or annoyance. It can also refer to someone being in a moody or grumpy disposition.
  • have a job The idiom "have a job" typically refers to being employed or having a steady, paid occupation. It generally suggests that a person is working or has the means of earning a living through employment.
  • have a lash at (something) The idiom "have a lash at (something)" means to try or attempt something, often with enthusiasm or eagerness, despite not having much prior experience or skill in it. It implies taking a chance or giving it a go, even if success is uncertain.
  • have a late night The idiom "have a late night" means to stay awake or be active late into the night, usually engaged in social activities, work, or recreation. It implies staying up beyond one's usual bedtime.
  • have a leak The idiom "have a leak" typically refers to the act of urinating or experiencing an unintentional release of bodily fluids, usually in reference to the need to use a restroom.
  • have a lean patch The idiom "have a lean patch" means to experience a period of difficulty or hardship. It signifies a temporary phase wherein one's performance or productivity declines, or there is a lack of success or progress in a particular area of life.
  • have a light heart The idiom "have a light heart" means to feel cheerful, carefree, and without burdens or worries. It implies a feeling of joy and contentment, often associated with a positive outlook on life.
  • have a long memory The idiom "have a long memory" typically means to remember an offense, grudge, or past wrongdoing for an extended period of time. It implies that the person is unlikely to forget or forgive easily and may hold on to negative feelings or resentment for a significant period.
  • have a lot on The idiom "have a lot on" refers to being very busy or having many tasks, responsibilities, or commitments to deal with at a given time.
  • have a lump in (one's) throat The idiom "have a lump in (one's) throat" refers to the feeling of emotional or physical constriction in the throat, often accompanied by an intense emotion such as sadness, joy, or gratitude. It signifies a strong emotional response that can be overwhelming and makes it difficult to speak or swallow.
  • have a mind to (do something) The idiom "have a mind to (do something)" means to have a strong inclination or intention to do something. It implies a strong desire or determination to take a particular course of action.
  • have a monopoly on (something) The idiom "have a monopoly on (something)" means to have exclusive control or dominance over a particular product, service, or market, with no or very limited competition. It refers to a situation where one person, company, or entity possesses complete or almost exclusive ownership or control over something, giving them the power to set prices, dictate terms, and restrict access.
  • have a nose (round) The idiom "have a nose (round)" means to have a strong sense of smell or be particularly adept at detecting odors or scents. It often implies that the person possesses a keen ability to perceive and recognize various smells.
  • have a part in (something) The idiom "have a part in (something)" means to be involved or play a role in a particular situation, event, or activity. It implies having some level of responsibility, influence, or contribution to the matter at hand.
  • have a part to play The idiom "have a part to play" means to have a role or responsibility in a particular situation or event. It implies that someone is expected to contribute to an outcome or fulfill a specific function. It originated from the language of theater, where actors have assigned roles to portray in a play or performance.
  • have a pink fit The idiom "have a pink fit" is an informal expression that refers to getting extremely angry, frustrated, or upset about something. It suggests a highly emotional and often exaggerated reaction to a particular situation or event. The term "pink fit" is used metaphorically to convey the intensity of the emotional outburst.
  • have a point (there) The idiom "have a point (there)" means that someone's argument or statement is valid or has some truth to it. It acknowledges that there is merit or reason in what the person is expressing.
  • have a prayer The idiom "have a prayer" typically means to have little or no chance of success or achievement, as if one's chances are as slim as saying a prayer. It implies that the situation or goal is highly unlikely or almost impossible to attain.
  • have a price on (one's) head The idiom "have a price on (one's) head" typically means that someone is being sought after or targeted, usually for capture or harm, in exchange for a sum of money as a reward or bounty. It suggests that someone is in significant danger or at risk due to being a wanted individual.
  • have a ringside seat The idiom "have a ringside seat" means to have a very close vantage point or a privileged position to observe an event or situation. It originates from boxing matches, where the spectators seated at ringside have the best and closest view of the action happening in the ring.
  • have a ringside view The idiom "have a ringside view" means to have a close and advantageous position from which one can observe and closely witness an event or situation as it unfolds. It often implies being able to see all the details, intricacies, and actions with clarity and firsthand perspective, similar to being seated near the boxing ring where all the action is visible.
  • have a role in (something) The idiom "have a role in" means to play a part or be involved in something. It refers to contributing or being responsible for a particular aspect or function of a situation, event, or organization.
  • have a rough patch The idiom "have a rough patch" means to experience a difficult and challenging period in life or in a particular situation. It could refer to facing obstacles, setbacks, or struggles that make things tough temporarily.
  • have a rough ride The idiom "have a rough ride" means to experience a difficult or challenging situation, often involving obstacles, setbacks, or hardships. It implies enduring a period of adversity or turbulence.
  • have a rough trot The idiom "have a rough trot" means to experience a difficult or challenging period of time. It implies facing a series of unfortunate events, setbacks, or hardships. It can also suggest going through a rough patch or struggling for an extended period.
  • have a say (in something) The idiom "have a say (in something)" means to have the right or ability to express one's opinion or contribute to a decision or outcome regarding a particular matter. It suggests having influence, power, or a voice in determining or influencing a situation.
  • have a score to settle The idiom "have a score to settle" means to have a lingering grievance or unresolved conflict with someone that needs to be addressed or avenged. It implies the desire or need for personal justice or retribution.
  • have a shot at (someone or something) The idiom "have a shot at" is typically used to mean making an attempt or trying to do something, especially if it seems challenging or difficult. It can also refer to making an effort to achieve a particular goal or to compete with someone.
  • have a shy at (something) The idiom "have a shy at (something)" means to make an attempt or try something, usually with limited expectation of success or without much confidence. It implies taking a shot at something despite potential uncertainty or hesitation.
  • have a silver tongue The idiom "have a silver tongue" refers to someone who has the ability to speak eloquently, persuasively, and convincingly. It implies that the person has a charming and persuasive way with words, allowing them to easily manipulate or influence others with their speech.
  • have a skin like a rhinoceros The idiom "have a skin like a rhinoceros" means to have a thick or tough skin that is not easily affected by criticism, insults, or negative comments. It implies having a strong ability to remain unaffected by others' opinions or emotions and to tolerate difficult situations without being deeply hurt or offended.
  • have a smack at (something) The idiom "have a smack at (something)" means to make an attempt or try something, often with confidence or enthusiasm. It implies taking a shot at doing or achieving something, regardless of the potential outcome or difficulty.
  • have a spring in (one's) step The idiom "have a spring in (one's) step" means to walk or move with a lively and energetic manner, often indicating a person's happiness, enthusiasm, or confidence.
  • have a stake in (something) The idiom "have a stake in (something)" typically means to have a financial or personal interest in the outcome or success of something. It refers to having a significant involvement or investment in a particular project, decision, or situation. This involvement can range from having a direct monetary stake to having a strong emotional investment in the outcome.
  • have a swollen head The idiom "have a swollen head" means to have an inflated or exaggerated sense of one's own worth, importance, or abilities. It refers to a person who is excessively proud, arrogant, or full of themselves.
  • have a thick head The idiom "have a thick head" refers to someone who is slow to understand or comprehend things, often suggesting that the person is being stubborn or close-minded. It implies that they have difficulty grasping concepts or accepting new ideas.
  • have a thick skull The idiom "have a thick skull" refers to someone who is considered dull, unintelligent, or slow to understand or learn. It suggests that the person is resistant to new ideas, criticism, or advice, as if their skull is dense and impenetrable.
  • have a thin skin The idiom "have a thin skin" refers to a person who is easily offended, sensitive, or easily hurt by criticism or negative comments. Such individuals are more likely to take things personally and feel deeply affected by even minor insults or remarks.
  • have a thing The idiom "have a thing" refers to having a strong liking or attraction towards someone or something. It implies a deep or intense affection, interest, infatuation, or connection with a particular person, activity, hobby, or idea.
  • have a thing for (something) The idiom "have a thing for (something)" means to have a strong liking or attraction towards something or someone. It implies having a particular interest, preference, or fascination for a particular thing.
  • have a tight rein on (someone or something) The idiom "have a tight rein on (someone or something)" means to have strict control over someone or something, maintaining careful oversight and exerting authority to ensure they behave or operate as desired. It implies a firm and close management style with little tolerance for deviation or independence.
  • have a time of it The idiom "have a time of it" means to have difficulty or face challenges while trying to accomplish something. It implies that the task or situation is a struggle or requires a lot of effort.
  • have a touch of class The idiom "have a touch of class" refers to someone or something possessing elegance, sophistication, or refinement. It suggests that the person or thing in question displays superior qualities and demonstrates a high level of taste or style.
  • have a vested interest (in something) The idiom "have a vested interest (in something)" means to have a personal or financial stake in a particular outcome or situation. It implies a strong motivation or interest based on personal gain or benefit. This interest is often enduring and can influence one's actions or decisions related to that particular matter.
  • have a voice (in something) The idiom "have a voice (in something)" means to have the right or ability to express one's opinions, ideas, or preferences in a particular matter or decision-making process. It implies having influence or the opportunity to be heard and contribute to the discussion or outcome.
  • have a working knowledge of (something) The idiom "have a working knowledge of (something)" means to possess a practical understanding or familiarity with a particular subject or skill. It implies that the individual has enough knowledge to effectively apply or utilize that knowledge in a functional or operational manner.
  • have a yen for (something) The idiom "have a yen for (something)" means to have a strong desire or craving for something, especially something that is not easily obtained or is considered unconventional. It often implies a persistent longing or yearning for that particular thing.
  • have a/(one's) foot in the door The idiom "have a/(one's) foot in the door" means to have achieved an initial point of entry or opportunity in a particular situation or field. It refers to having gained a small but significant advantage or foothold that could potentially lead to further progress or success.
  • have an early night The idiom "have an early night" means to go to bed or sleep earlier than usual or one's usual bedtime. It implies the intention or desire to get more rest and sleep.
  • have an easy ride The idiom "have an easy ride" means to have a situation or experience that is effortless, uncomplicated, or without difficulties. It implies that someone is facing little to no obstacles or challenges in a particular endeavor.
  • have anything on The idiom "have anything on" typically means to have evidence or information about something or someone, especially something incriminating or embarrassing. It refers to being aware of certain details or having leverage over someone. It can also imply having a secret advantage or possessing more knowledge about a particular subject compared to others.
  • have both oars in the water The idiom "have both oars in the water" means being in a state of being focused, aware, and balanced. It refers to someone who is thinking clearly, making rational decisions, and fully engaging in a task or situation. It implies that the person has control over their actions and is effectively managing their responsibilities.
  • have Buckley's (chance) The idiom "have Buckley's (chance)" is an Australian and New Zealand expression that means having little to no chance of success or achievement. It originated from the namesake of a department store, Buckley & Nunn, which had a reputation for being notoriously difficult to locate items in. Therefore, having "Buckley's chance" implies having an extremely slim or almost impossible chance of something happening.
  • have had a basinful The idiom "have had a basinful" typically means that someone has reached their limit or tolerance of something, often referring to an unpleasant or overwhelming experience. It expresses the feeling of being fed up or having endured enough of a certain situation. The phrase implies that someone has had more than enough and cannot take any more.
  • have had a basinful (of something) The idiom "have had a basinful (of something)" means to have reached the limit of one's tolerance, patience, or endurance with a particular situation, person, or thing. It expresses a feeling of being completely fed up or overwhelmed.
  • have had it with (someone or something) The idiom "have had it with (someone or something)" means to reach a point of extreme frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with someone or something. It suggests that one can no longer tolerate or endure the situation and desires a change or resolution.
  • have had one too many The idiom "have had one too many" typically refers to being intoxicated or drunk, implying that someone has consumed more alcohol than they can handle or that it has negatively affected their behavior or judgement.
  • have had the pleasure The idiom "have had the pleasure" is generally used to indicate that someone has had the opportunity to experience something enjoyable or positive. It implies that the person expressing it had a positive or enjoyable encounter or experience with someone or something.
  • have had the radish There doesn't seem to be a widely recognized idiom or expression "have had the radish." It is possible that it is a less common or regional idiom, or it might be a variation or misinterpretation of a different idiom. It is always important to consider the context in which the phrase was used to understand its intended meaning.
  • have it away (with someone) The idiom "have it away (with someone)" is a colloquial or slang expression that refers to engaging in a sexual or romantic relationship, often in a secretive or illicit manner. It implies a level of excitement, passion, or infidelity in the relationship.
  • have it in (one) The idiom "have it in (one)" is a colloquial expression that typically means to bear a grudge or to harbor resentment towards someone. It signifies a deep-seated negative feeling or intention towards an individual.
  • have it in for (someone) The idiom "have it in for (someone)" means to hold a strong and often negative bias or grudge against someone. It implies having a persistent desire to harm, oppose, or cause trouble for another person.
  • have it off (with someone) The idiom "have it off (with someone)" means to engage in sexual intercourse or have a physical relationship with someone. It refers to having a sexual encounter or a brief and possibly casual sexual relationship.
  • have it on (one's) toes The idiom "have it on (one's) toes" typically means to keep someone alert, attentive, or on guard by creating a sense of constant vigilance or readiness. It refers to the state of being physically or mentally prepared to respond quickly to unexpected situations or challenges.
  • have it out (with someone) The idiom "have it out (with someone)" means to confront or argue with someone about a disagreement, issue, or problem in order to resolve it or come to a resolution. It implies a direct and sometimes heated confrontation with the intention of reaching a resolution or understanding.
  • have it out for (someone) The idiom "have it out for (someone)" means to harbor negative feelings or animosity towards someone and to be determined to confront or harm them in some way. It implies a persistent and intentional desire to cause trouble or seek revenge against someone.
  • have itchy fingers "Have itchy fingers" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who is eager or impatient to touch or take something, especially when it is not their own or when it is inappropriate to do so. It implies a strong desire or temptation to act upon something, often referring to a mischievous or greedy inclination.
  • have its/(one's) moments The idiom "have its/(one's) moments" means that something or someone has both good and bad moments, with varying degrees of success or positive attributes. It implies that even though there may be flaws or shortcomings, there are also noteworthy or impressive aspects.
  • have jam on it The idiom "have jam on it" typically means to have an advantage, benefit, or something extra included. It suggests that there is a special or favorable addition to something.
  • have kangaroos in (one's)/the top paddock The idiom "have kangaroos in one's/the top paddock" is an Australian slang phrase that means someone is mentally unstable or crazy. It suggests that the person's mind is akin to having kangaroos, which are known for their erratic behavior and jumping around, in the top paddock (field). It implies a lack of sanity or rational thinking.
  • have kissed the Blarney Stone To "have kissed the Blarney Stone" is an idiom originating from Ireland. It refers to someone who has the ability to speak eloquently and convincingly, often with the intention of persuading or manipulating others. The idiom is based on the legend that kissing the Blarney Stone, a stone set in the Blarney Castle near Cork, Ireland, would grant the gift of eloquence and persuasive speaking skills. Therefore, someone who has "kissed the Blarney Stone" is thought to possess the knack for charming and persuasive speech.
  • have lead in (one's) pants The idiom "have lead in one's pants" typically refers to someone who is slow-moving, lazy, or lacking in motivation. It suggests that the person is weighed down by a heavy substance, like lead, which impedes their ability to act or progress quickly.
  • have more money than sense The idiom "have more money than sense" means that someone has a lot of money but lacks good judgment or common sense when it comes to managing or using their wealth. It implies that the person tends to make extravagant or foolish decisions due to their excessive wealth.
  • have nine lives The idiom "have nine lives" means to have survived numerous dangerous or life-threatening situations, usually implying that someone or something has an uncanny ability to escape harm repeatedly. It is often used figuratively to describe individuals who seem to have an extraordinary capacity to overcome adversity or come out of difficult circumstances unscathed.
  • have no idea The idiom "have no idea" means to have no knowledge, understanding, or clue about something. It indicates a complete lack of information or awareness on a particular subject or issue.
  • have no part in/of (something) The idiom "have no part in/of (something)" means to not be involved or associated with a particular task, event, situation, or responsibility. It implies the absence of any participation in or connection to a specified matter.
  • have no time for (someone or something) The idiom "have no time for (someone or something)" means to express a lack of interest or patience toward a person, group, or thing. It implies that the individual does not want to invest time, attention, or energy in them due to various reasons such as dislike, disagreement, or busyness.
  • have none of (something) The idiom "have none of (something)" means to strongly refuse or reject a particular thing, idea, or proposal. It implies a complete lack of interest or willingness to be involved or associated with that thing.
  • have none of it/that The idiom "have none of it/that" typically means to refuse or reject something completely. It implies a strong disagreement or refusal to accept a proposition, idea, or behavior. It often indicates a sense of firm determination and unwillingness to be persuaded or convinced.
  • have not heard the half of it The idiom "have not heard the half of it" means that the current information or story being told is incomplete, and there is much more to it that has not been shared yet. It suggests that what has been explained or heard so far is just a portion of the whole story, and the undisclosed information might reveal even more surprising or significant details.
  • have occasion to (do something) The idiom "have occasion to (do something)" means to find or experience a reason or opportunity to do something. It implies encountering a situation or circumstance that calls for a specific action or behavior.
  • have sex The idiom "have sex" is a colloquial expression that refers to engaging in sexual intercourse or sexual activity with another person.
  • have snow on the mountain The idiom "have snow on the mountain" is an informal way to refer to someone who is older or elderly. It implies that the person has gray or white hair on their head, resembling snow on a mountain peak.
  • have snow on the roof The idiom "have snow on the roof" is a euphemism typically used to describe an older person who still possesses a youthful spirit or has a youthful outlook on life despite their advanced age. It suggests that even though the person may have gray or white hair (symbolizing snow), they are still vibrant, lively, and able to engage in activities associated with the younger generation.
  • have something to prove The idiom "have something to prove" means that someone feels the need to demonstrate their worth or abilities to others, often due to past doubts, criticism, or a desire to gain validation or recognition. It implies a strong motivation to succeed and show skeptics or competitors that they are capable.
  • have teething problems The idiom "have teething problems" refers to the initial difficulties or issues that arise in the early stages of implementing or starting something new, such as a project, system, product, or organization. It implies that these problems are typical and expected, similar to a baby experiencing discomfort during the teething process.
  • have teething troubles The idiom "have teething troubles" means experiencing initial difficulties or problems that occur when something new is introduced or launched. It often refers to the early stages of a project, product, or process where there may be hiccups and obstacles to overcome before it becomes fully functional or successful.
  • have the (brass) face to (do something) The idiomatic expression "have the (brass) face to (do something)" refers to someone having the audacity, boldness, or nerve to do something that is typically considered inappropriate, disrespectful, or outrageous. It implies that the person has no shame or embarrassment in their actions and is willing to push boundaries without regard for the consequences or social norms.
  • have the advantage of (something) The idiom "have the advantage of (something)" means to possess a beneficial or advantageous quality, factor, or circumstance which provides one with an edge over others. It implies having a favorable position, resource, or attribute that enables someone to achieve success or win in a particular situation or competition.
  • have the best of (something) The idiom "have the best of (something)" means to possess or enjoy the most favorable or advantageous aspect or part of something. It implies having a superior or advantageous position in a situation, often with a sense of winning or gaining an advantage over others.
  • have the bug The idiom "have the bug" typically means to have a strong enthusiasm or passion for something, often referring to a particular interest or hobby. It implies being deeply engrossed or obsessed with the subject or activity.
  • have the feeling The idiom "have the feeling" typically refers to having a sense or intuition about something, often without concrete evidence or explanation. It implies a strong perception or belief arising from personal instincts or emotions.
  • have the heart (to do something) The idiom "have the heart (to do something)" means to have the necessary courage, determination, or resolve to undertake a particular action or task, especially if it is difficult, morally challenging, or requires making tough decisions. It implies having the emotional strength or fortitude to confront and overcome obstacles or face challenging situations.
  • have the honor of (doing something) The idiom " have the honor of (doing something)" means to be given the privilege, opportunity, or responsibility to do something prestigious or important. It implies that the individual is being recognized or respected for their role or involvement in a specific task or event.
  • have the horn The idiom "have the horn" is a colloquial expression commonly used in British and Irish English to refer to someone who is "feeling sexually aroused" or "having a strong desire for sexual activity." It is a vulgar expression derived from the use of "horn," which symbolizes the erect male genital organ. It is important to note that this is a highly vulgar and informal expression, not suitable for formal or polite conversations.
  • have the jump on The idiom "have the jump on" means to have an advantage or head start over someone or something. It implies being in a position of control or being one step ahead in a situation.
  • have the last say The idiom "have the last say" means to have the final decision or the final word in a discussion or argument. It refers to the ability to make the final judgment or to have the ultimate authority in a particular matter.
  • have the last word The idiom "have the last word" means to assert one's opinion or viewpoint as the final or ultimate statement in a discussion or argument, leaving no room for further debate or rebuttal. It implies having the final say and ensuring that one's perspective prevails.
  • have the makings of (something) The idiom "have the makings of (something)" means to possess the necessary qualities or potential to become something significant, successful, or impressive. It implies having the initial components or abilities required for future development or achievement.
  • have the munchies The idiom "have the munchies" refers to feeling a strong craving or desire for snack foods, especially those that are typically consumed in large quantities or while indulging in a leisurely activity such as watching TV or movies. It often involves a heightened appetite, particularly for salty or sweet snacks. This idiom is commonly used to describe the side effect of increased hunger experienced after consuming marijuana or cannabis.
  • have the nerve to (do something) The idiom "have the nerve to (do something)" means to have the courage, audacity, or boldness to do something that is seen as impudent, daring, or socially unacceptable. It implies that the action in question may require confidence or daring beyond what is typically expected or appropriate.
  • have the patience of Job The idiom "have the patience of Job" means to be extremely patient and enduring in the face of difficult or challenging situations, just like the biblical figure Job who endured great suffering and remained steadfast in his faith.
  • have the run of (some place) The idiom "have the run of (some place)" means to have unrestricted access or control over a particular place. It implies that a person has the freedom to move around, use or explore the entire area as they please, without any limitations or restrictions.
  • have the shakes The idiom "have the shakes" typically refers to a physical condition where a person's body experiences trembling or shaking uncontrollably, often as a result of nervousness, anxiety, fear, or withdrawal from a substance like alcohol or drugs.
  • have the sniffles The idiom "have the sniffles" is an informal expression that refers to having a mild case of the common cold or experiencing symptoms such as a runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, or nasal congestion. It implies having a minor, temporary illness characterized by nasal discomfort or a slight cold.
  • have the snuffles The idiom "have the snuffles" refers to someone experiencing a mild or temporary case of the common cold, characterized by nasal congestion, sneezing, and a runny nose. It is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner when referring to someone with minor cold symptoms.
  • have the weight of the world on (one's) shoulders The idiom "have the weight of the world on (one's) shoulders" refers to the feeling of immense responsibility or burden that one carries. It signifies being overwhelmed with problems, worries, or obligations, as if carrying the weight of the entire world on one's shoulders. This expression is often used to emphasize the extraordinary pressure someone feels in a particular situation.
  • have the wind up The idiom "have the wind up" means to feel extremely nervous, anxious, or frightened about something.
  • have the world on a string The idiom "have the world on a string" means to have complete control or power over one's own circumstances and to feel confident and successful in every aspect of life. It implies a sense of mastery and achievement, as if one can effortlessly manipulate or influence the world to fulfill their desires.
  • have tickets on (oneself) The idiom "have tickets on oneself" is an informal expression that refers to someone who is excessively self-confident or conceited. It implies that the person holds a high opinion of themselves, often without any substantial basis or reason.
  • have to do with (something) The idiom "have to do with (something)" means to be connected or relevant to something, or to be related or involved in a particular matter or situation. It implies that there is a relationship or connection between the subject being discussed and the thing mentioned.
  • have truck with The idiom "have truck with" means to have any involvement, association, or contact with someone or something. It often implies a negative connotation, suggesting a lack of willingness or desire to engage or collaborate.
  • have whiskers The idiom "have whiskers" refers to something or someone being very old, outdated, or no longer relevant in a given context or situation. It suggests that the idea, practice, or object is as old as having whiskers on one's face, implying it is no longer fresh or in touch with current trends or developments.
  • have windmills in (one's) head The idiom "have windmills in one's head" means to have unrealistic or impractical ideas or plans; to have grandiose or fanciful ambitions that are unlikely to be realized. It implies that a person's thoughts or goals are whimsical or foolish in nature, similar to the concept of Don Quixote from Miguel de Cervantes' novel, who famously fought imaginary giants, mistaking them for windmills.
  • not have a lot on The idiom "not have a lot on" means that someone does not have many tasks, responsibilities, or commitments at a given time. It suggests that the person has a relatively free or unoccupied schedule.
  • not have the first idea The idiom "not have the first idea" means to have no knowledge or understanding whatsoever about a particular subject or situation. It implies a complete lack of awareness or comprehension.
  • not have the slightest idea The idiom "not have the slightest idea" means to have no knowledge or understanding about something. It implies a complete lack of awareness or clue regarding a particular subject or matter.
  • have straws in (one's) hair The idiom "have straws in (one's) hair" typically means that someone is behaving in a nonsensical or irrational manner. It is often used to describe a person who appears or acts crazy or mentally unstable.
  • have all the hallmarks of (someone or something) The idiom "have all the hallmarks of (someone or something)" refers to displaying or possessing all the characteristic qualities or features that are typically associated with a particular person, thing, or situation. It suggests that something closely resembles or embodies the distinct attributes or traits typically observed in a specific individual or entity.
  • have (one's) hand out The idiom "have (one's) hand out" means to constantly ask for or seek financial or material assistance from others, often in an aggressive or persistent manner. It implies a sense of dependence or reliance on others for support.
  • have (one's) hands on (something) The idiom "have (one's) hands on (something)" means to physically possess or have control over something. It conveys the idea of having immediate access to or being able to lay hold of something.
  • have (someone or something) on (one's) hands The idiom "have (someone or something) on (one's) hands" refers to being burdened or faced with the responsibility or task of dealing with someone or something that requires attention, care, or management. It implies having to handle a situation or individual that can be troublesome, difficult, or time-consuming.
  • have (someone) eating out of (one's) hand The idiom "have (someone) eating out of (one's) hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually to the point where they are willing to do anything one asks or desires. It implies that the person being influenced is submissive and readily complies with the wishes or demands of the person in control.
  • have (someone) in the palm of (one's) hand The idiom "have (someone) in the palm of (one's) hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often to the extent that they will do whatever you want or need. It suggests that the person is obedient or submissive, easily manipulated or controlled by another person.
  • have (something) in (one's) hands The idiom "have (something) in (one's) hands" means to possess or have control over something. It suggests having physical possession, managerial control, or the ability to influence something.
  • have somebody in the palm of your hand The idiom "have somebody in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone. It implies that the person is easily manipulable or highly dependent on the person who has them in their palm.
  • have someone in the palm of your hand The idiom "have someone in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often because they are dependent on or easily manipulated by you.
  • have time on (one's) hands The idiom "have time on (one's) hands" means to have free time or to have an abundance of spare time with nothing specific to do. It implies having no immediate or pressing responsibilities or tasks, and a surplus of idle time available.
  • have to hand it to somebody The idiom "have to hand it to somebody" means acknowledging or giving credit to someone for their accomplishments, abilities, or achievements. It expresses admiration, recognition, or respect towards someone's skills or actions.
  • have to hand it to someone The idiom "have to hand it to someone" means to give credit or acknowledge someone's abilities, achievements, or contributions. It expresses admiration or recognition for someone's efforts or accomplishments.
  • I only have one pair of hands The idiom "I only have one pair of hands" means that a person has limited capacity or ability to do several things at once. It implies that the person cannot handle or manage multiple tasks simultaneously because they have only one set of hands, symbolizing physical limitations or time constraints.
  • have a hard-on The idiom "have a hard-on" is a colloquial phrase that refers to being sexually aroused or having an intense attraction or desire for someone or something. It is often used informally and can be considered vulgar.
  • have a hard-on for someone The idiomatic expression "have a hard-on for someone," though vulgar, is used metaphorically to describe intense, usually negative, feelings of animosity, obsession, or resentment towards a person. It implies having a strong dislike or animosity that consumes one's thoughts and emotions, often resulting in a desire for confrontation or harm towards that person.
  • have (one) by the balls The idiom "have (one) by the balls" is a colloquial expression that means to have complete control or power over someone, often in a threatening or manipulative manner. It implies that someone has a firm grip or hold on another person, metaphorically likening the situation to having control over a sensitive and vulnerable area.
  • have (one) in stitches The idiom "have (one) in stitches" means to make someone laugh uncontrollably or to cause someone to burst into fits of laughter. It suggests that something is incredibly funny and causes great amusement.
  • have (one's) back to the wall The idiom "have (one's) back to the wall" means to be in a challenging, difficult, or desperate situation where one has few options or resources left for survival or escape. It signifies being cornered or trapped with limited or no room for maneuver or negotiation.
  • have (one's) heart on (one's) sleeve The idiom "have (one's) heart on (one's) sleeve" means to openly and easily display one's emotions, thoughts, or feelings, without attempting to hide or suppress them. It suggests that a person is transparent and does not keep their true emotions concealed or guarded.
  • have (one's) mind on (something) The idiom "have (one's) mind on (something)" means to be focused, preoccupied, or mentally intent on a particular thing or topic. It implies that someone's thoughts and attention are primarily directed towards a specific matter or situation.
  • have (one's) name on it The idiom "have (one's) name on it" means that something is specifically meant or destined for a particular person. It implies that the person is associated with or meant to possess the mentioned thing, often in a prominent or significant way.
  • have (someone's or something's) uses The idiom "have (someone's or something's) uses" means to have practical or beneficial purposes or advantages in utilizing someone or something. It implies that there is value or usefulness in having a particular person or thing available for specific tasks or functions.
  • have (something) to (one's) credit The idiom "have (something) to (one's) credit" means to have accomplished or achieved something noteworthy or positive that can be attributed to one's personal record or reputation. It implies that the mentioned achievement adds value or credibility to someone's achievements or accomplishments.
  • have a lock on (someone or something) The idiom "have a lock on (someone or something)" refers to having complete control, dominance, or monopoly over someone or something. It implies having a firm grasp or exclusive access, often in a competitive or strategic context.
  • have a mind of (one's)/its own When someone or something "has a mind of its/one's own," it means that they act or behave in an independent and unpredictable manner, disregarding external influences or commands. It suggests that the person or thing has its own desires, preferences, or intentions that may not necessarily align with those of others.
  • have a monkey on (one's) back The idiom "have a monkey on (one's) back" refers to the feeling or burden of having a persistent problem, addiction, or responsibility that is difficult to escape or overcome. It typically implies a sense of pressure, stress, or being weighed down by a troublesome issue that one cannot easily rid themselves of.
  • have a one-track mind The idiom "have a one-track mind" means to be excessively focused or preoccupied with a particular topic or idea, often to the exclusion of other subjects or interests. It signifies someone who lacks versatility and tends to be single-minded or obsessed with a specific thought or goal.
  • have a trick up (one's) sleeve The idiom "have a trick up (one's) sleeve" means to have a secret or hidden plan or strategy that can be used to achieve an advantage or overcome a difficult situation. It implies that someone has an unexpected or unconventional solution or tactic at their disposal. This idiom is often used to describe individuals who are cunning or resourceful, capable of surprising others with their actions or ideas.
  • have a way with (someone or something) The idiom "have a way with (someone or something)" means to possess a natural ability to interact, communicate, or relate effectively with a particular person or thing. It implies having a special skill or talent to deal with them in a successful or positive manner.
  • have a way with somebody/something The idiom "have a way with somebody/something" means to possess a natural skill or ability to handle, understand, or influence someone or something effectively. It refers to the capability to interact or deal with a person or situation in a particularly effective or charismatic manner.
  • have nothing on (someone or something) The idiom "have nothing on (someone or something)" means to lack evidence or proof of wrongdoing or incompetence compared to another person or thing. It suggests that the other person or thing is far superior or more impressive in comparison.
  • have nothing to do with (someone or something) The idiom "have nothing to do with (someone or something)" means to refuse involvement or association with someone or something, typically due to disinterest, disagreement, or the perception of being unfavorable or harmful. It implies wanting to maintain distance and avoid any connection or relationship.
  • have passed (someone or something's) sell-by date The idiom "have passed (someone or something's) sell-by date" refers to being no longer useful, relevant, or valuable, usually in reference to a person or thing that was once considered effective or popular but is now outdated or obsolete. It suggests that the individual or item has exceeded the expected period of usefulness or desirability, similar to a product that has expired past its specified date of sale.
  • have the say The idiom "have the say" means to have the authority or power to make a decision or have the final opinion on a matter. It refers to being in a position of influence or control, particularly in making choices or having the final say in a situation or discussion.
  • get/have butterflies The idiom "get/have butterflies" refers to the feeling of nervousness, excitement, or anticipation in one's stomach, typically before a significant event or situation. It can be described as a fluttery sensation or as a feeling of butterflies flapping their wings.
  • get/have somebody's undivided attention The idiom "get/have somebody's undivided attention" means to have someone's complete focus or concentration, without any distractions or interruptions. It implies that the person is fully attentive and listening carefully to whatever is being said or done.
  • get/have the hots for somebody The idiom "get/have the hots for somebody" means to have a strong desire or attraction towards someone, often of a romantic or sexual nature. It signifies being infatuated or having intense feelings of interest and attraction towards another person.
  • get/have the jitters The idiom "get/have the jitters" refers to feeling nervous, anxious, or having a sense of unease, typically before an important event or performance. It is usually used to describe a temporary state of nervousness that precedes something significant.
  • get/have the wind up The idiom "get/have the wind up" refers to feeling anxious, frightened, or terrified. It is often used to describe a state of apprehension or unease caused by a particular situation or impending event.
  • get/have your knickers in a twist The idiom "get/have your knickers in a twist" means to become excessively upset or agitated over a minor issue or problem. It implies that someone is overreacting or being overly concerned about something that is not worth the fuss. The idiom originates from British English, where "knickers" refers to women's underwear, and "twisted knickers" symbolize getting emotional or worked up unnecessarily.
  • get/have your way The idiom "get/have your way" means to achieve or obtain what you desire or insist upon, especially when faced with opposition or resistance from others. It implies successfully convincing or manipulating others to conform to your wishes or requests.
  • have (one's) bread buttered on both sides The idiom "have (one's) bread buttered on both sides" means to have the benefit or advantage of two or more favorable options simultaneously, sometimes in a way that is considered excessive or overly fortunate. It implies that someone is in a particularly fortunate position compared to others, often enjoying multiple privileges or opportunities without any significant sacrifices.
  • have (one's) doubts (about someone or something) The idiom "have (one's) doubts (about someone or something)" means to be skeptical or uncertain about someone or something, expressing a lack of confidence or belief. It suggests that one is not completely convinced or trustful and may harbor reservations or hesitations.
  • have (one's) heart set on (something) The idiom "have (one's) heart set on (something)" means to have a strong desire or determination to achieve or obtain a particular goal or thing. It implies that one's emotions and passion are deeply invested in that specific desire.
  • have (one's) knickers in a twist The idiom "have (one's) knickers in a twist" means to be overly worried, anxious, or upset about something that may not be very important or significant. It implies being in a state of agitation, frustration, or irritation.
  • have (one's) knife into (someone) To have one's knife into someone is an idiomatic expression that means to have a strong, often irrational, dislike or animosity towards someone. It implies a persistent desire or intention to harm or undermine the person in question, both physically or metaphorically. It typically involves personal grievances or conflicts that lead to hostility or antagonism.
  • have (one's) mind on other things The idiom "have (one's) mind on other things" means that someone is preoccupied or distracted by thoughts or concerns that are unrelated to the current situation or task at hand.
  • have (one's) money's worth The idiom "have one's money's worth" means to have received a satisfactory or adequate value in exchange for the money one has spent on something. It implies that one has obtained the expected or desired benefits, quality, or enjoyment from a particular product, service, or experience.
  • have (one's) monkey up
  • have (one's) name in lights The idiom "have (one's) name in lights" means to achieve fame or recognition, typically through a prominent public display or acknowledgment. It refers to someone's name being displayed prominently, often on a marquee or billboard, symbolizing their success or popularity.
  • have (one's) tail up The idiom "have (one's) tail up" typically means to be feeling confident, proud, or ready for action. It is often used to describe someone who is eager, enthusiastic, or in a positive mindset. It derives from the imagery of an animal raising its tail when alert or eager, ready to engage in a particular activity.
  • have (one's) way with (someone) The idiom "have (one's) way with (someone)" typically refers to exerting control or dominance over someone and getting them to comply with one's desires or demands, often in a forceful or manipulative manner. It can imply a sense of taking advantage of someone, physically or emotionally, without their consent or against their will.
  • have (one's) wicked way with (someone) The idiom "have (one's) wicked way with (someone)" refers to manipulating or dominating someone to get what one wants, often putting their own desires or intentions above the other person's. It usually implies taking advantage of someone or using them for personal gain or pleasure.
  • have (one's)/a beady eye on (someone or something) The idiom "have (one's)/a beady eye on (someone or something)" means to watch or observe someone or something closely, usually with suspicion or vigilance. It implies that the person is keeping a close eye on the actions or movements of the subject, often in a critical or curious manner.
  • have (someone or something) by the ears The idiom "have (someone or something) by the ears" typically means to have someone or something under one's control or domination. It implies that a person or entity has a firm grasp or influence on another, exerting power or authority over them.
  • have (someone or something) down as (something) The idiom "have (someone or something) down as (something)" means to form a specific impression or opinion about someone or something based on one's perception or knowledge of them. It implies having a certain belief or understanding regarding the nature, characteristics, or qualities of a person or thing.
  • have (someone or something) for breakfast The idiom "have (someone or something) for breakfast" is a metaphorical expression that means to completely overpower, defeat, or dominate someone or something with relative ease or confidence. It implies being so superior that the opponent is dealt with effortlessly, as if they were a simple meal.
  • have (someone or something) on (one's) side The idiom "have (someone or something) on (one's) side" means to have the support, assistance, or favor of someone or something. It implies that the person or thing mentioned is in a position to help or back someone up in a particular situation.
  • have (someone) on a string The idiom "have (someone) on a string" means to have complete control or influence over someone, typically in a manipulative or exploitative manner. It suggests that the person being controlled is like a puppet or marionette, entirely at the mercy of the one who has them on a string.
  • have (someone) on toast
  • have (someone) to thank The idiom "have (someone) to thank" means to be grateful or indebted to someone for something they have done or provided. It implies that the person should acknowledge and appreciate the help, assistance, or kindness that they have received from someone.
  • have (someone) under (one's) thumb The idiom "have (someone) under (one's) thumb" means to have complete control or influence over someone, often to the point where they are obedient and do whatever is asked of them. It implies that the person is submissive and easily manipulable.
  • have (someone's) (best) interests at heart The idiom "have (someone's) (best) interests at heart" means to genuinely care for someone and genuinely want what is best for them. It implies that the person has the other person's well-being and happiness as their primary concern.
  • have (someone's) cross to bear The idiom "have (someone's) cross to bear" means to have a burden, responsibility, or problem that one must endure or deal with on their own. It refers to the biblical reference of Jesus carrying the cross he was to be crucified on, symbolizing the idea of bearing a challenging or difficult ordeal.
  • have (someone's) undivided attention The idiom "have (someone's) undivided attention" means to have someone’s complete focus or concentration without any distractions or interruptions. It implies that the person is fully engaged and giving their complete attention to the matter at hand.
  • have (something) hanging over (one's) head The idiom "have (something) hanging over (one's) head" means to have a lingering or impending problem, responsibility, or obligation that causes worry, anxiety, or a sense of unresolved tension. It refers to the feeling of having something constantly on one's mind, typically related to a situation or task that needs to be addressed or resolved but has not yet been done so.
  • have (something) on (someone) The idiom "have (something) on (someone)" refers to possessing knowledge or evidence about someone's secrets, weaknesses, or wrongdoings that can be used to gain an advantage over them or to exert control or blackmail. It implies having leverage or something that can be used against someone in a particular situation.
  • have (something) to (one's) name The idiom "have (something) to (one's) name" means to possess or own a specific amount or type of something. It implies that the person has achieved or attained something, typically material or tangible, and can claim ownership of it.
  • have (something) to show for (something) The idiom "have (something) to show for (something)" means to have tangible evidence or results as a consequence of one's efforts, actions, or experiences. It refers to having an observable or measurable outcome that demonstrates the value or success of a particular endeavor.
  • have (something) to spare The idiom "have (something) to spare" means to possess or possess more than enough of something. It suggests having an excess or surplus of something, beyond what is necessary or required.
  • have (something) up (one's) sleeve The idiom "have (something) up (one's) sleeve" refers to having a secret plan, strategy, or backup solution to be used when needed. It signifies having a hidden advantage or resource that can be utilized to gain an advantage or overcome a challenge. It comes