How Do You Spell HEEL?

Pronunciation: [hˈiːl] (IPA)

The word "heel" is spelled as /hiːl/ in IPA phonetic transcription. The first sound in the word is the long E sound /iː/. The letter H is pronounced as a glottal fricative sound /h/ in most dialects of English. The second sound is the long E sound again followed by the velarized L sound /l̴/ which is pronounced with the back of the tongue touching the soft palate. The spelling of "heel" represents the pronunciation of the word in most dialects of English.

HEEL Meaning and Definition

Heel is a noun that possesses multiple meanings and can be used to describe various things or concepts. One of its primary definitions refers to the back part of the human foot below the ankle. This area is characterized by its strong and often flexible structure, acting as a connection between the foot and the leg. Additionally, heel can also refer to the rear part of any anatomical structure resembling the human foot, such as the foot of a quadruped animal or the back part of a shoe.

Heel is also used metaphorically to represent the back or hindmost part of an object or thing. For instance, the heel of a loaf of bread refers to the rearmost or bottom part of the bread. Furthermore, heel can denote a certain position used for certain activities, such as in dance or sports. In dance, the proper placement of the heel is pivotal for maintaining balance and executing correct movements. In sports like figure skating or skiing, heel is utilized to describe specific techniques or maneuvers involving the utilization of the heel for control or balance.

Another meaning for heel relates to a person's behavior or character. In this context, heel refers to someone who is selfish, deceitful, or untrustworthy. It is often used as a derogatory term to describe someone who lacks loyalty or tends to act immorally.

Overall, heel encompasses a range of meanings, including the back part of the foot or shoe, the hindmost part of a structure or object, a specific position in dance or sports, and an undesirable personality trait in a person.

Top Common Misspellings for HEEL *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for HEEL

Etymology of HEEL

The word "heel" has an interesting etymology. Its origin can be traced back to the Old English word "hēla", which means "heel of foot" or "back of the foot". This word is believed to have come from the Proto-Germanic word "hanhilōn", which also meant "heel". Furthermore, this Proto-Germanic word is thought to have derived from the Proto-Indo-European root word "*kenk-", meaning "bend", "hook", or "angle". The concept of the heel being the part of the foot that bends or angles backward led to the development of the word "heel". Over time, its meaning expanded beyond the anatomical heel to include other things with similar physical characteristics or functions, such as the end of a loaf of bread or the hind part of a ship.

Idioms with the word HEEL

  • under the heel of sth/sb The idiom "under the heel of sth/sb" typically means being under the control or domination of something or someone. It refers to a situation where someone is oppressed, subjugated, or subjected to another person or entity's authority or power.
  • bring/call sth/sb to heel The idiom "bring/call something/someone to heel" means to establish control or discipline over something or someone, typically by asserting authority or taking decisive action. It is often used to describe the process of gaining control over a difficult situation or unruly individual, making them obedient or submissive.
  • come to heel The idiom "come to heel" means to obey instructions or commands, typically after resisting or acting independently. It is derived from the practice of training dogs to walk by their owner's side, right next to their heel, which signifies obedience and submission. In a broader sense, "come to heel" can be used metaphorically to describe someone or something being brought under control or being made to conform to a particular set of rules or expectations.
  • an Achilles' heel The idiom "an Achilles' heel" refers to a vulnerable or weak point in someone or something that can lead to their downfall or failure. It originates from Greek mythology, where the warrior Achilles was invulnerable, except for his heel, which eventually led to his death.
  • Achilles' heel The idiom "Achilles' heel" refers to a vulnerable or weak point in a person's character or abilities despite their overall strength or superiority. It originates from Greek mythology, referring to the legendary hero Achilles, who was invulnerable except for his heel, ultimately leading to his downfall.
  • couldn't pour water out of a boot (if there was instructions on the heel) The idiom "couldn't pour water out of a boot (if there was instructions on the heel)" is a humorous expression that is used to portray someone as extremely incompetent or lacking basic skills. It suggests that the person is so unintelligent or inept that they would struggle with even the simplest tasks, such as pouring water out of a boot, even if clear instructions were given. Essentially, it highlights a person's extreme inability or incompetence.
  • bring to heel The idiom "bring to heel" means to bring someone or something under control, often by exerting authority or discipline. It originates from the practice of commanding a dog to walk closely beside its owner, ensuring obedience and subordination. Thus, the expression is commonly used to describe the act of making someone or something follow instructions or obey orders.
  • bring a dog to heel The idiom "bring a dog to heel" means to regain control or discipline over a person or situation. It originates from the world of dog training, specifically in reference to bringing a dog back to a position alongside the handler's heel. So, figuratively, it means to assert authority and establish order.
  • turn on heel The idiom "turn on heel" means to abruptly change direction or reverse course, typically in a sudden or hasty manner. It often implies a quick and decisive change of mind or action.
  • under heel The idiom "under heel" typically refers to someone who is completely under the control or dominance of another person or group. It suggests being oppressed, subdued, or kept in a state of servitude.
  • at heel The idiom "at heel" refers to being under someone's close supervision or control. It typically implies being obedient or submissive to someone, similar to how a well-trained dog walks closely beside its owner's heel.
  • down at the heel The idiom "down at the heel" means to be in a poor or shabby state, particularly relating to someone's appearance or the condition of their shoes or clothing. It implies a lack of care, upkeep, or financial stability.
  • heel in The idiom "heel in" refers to the act of complying or conforming to rules, orders, or instructions given by someone in a position of authority or power. It implies obeying or following commands without question or protest, similar to a dog or horse that obediently heels or follows its master's commands.
  • out at the heel (or heels) The idiom "out at the heel (or heels)" refers to someone who is looking shabby, worn-out, or impoverished. It is often used to describe someone whose clothes or shoes are in poor condition and suggests a state of neglect or lack of means.
  • turn on one's heel The idiom "turn on one's heel" typically means to make a sudden or abrupt about-face, especially when leaving or departing from a particular place or situation. It suggests a quick change in direction or decision.
  • Achilles heel The idiom "Achilles heel" refers to a person's vulnerable or weak point. It originates from Greek mythology, where Achilles, a legendary warrior, was invulnerable except for his heel, which ultimately led to his downfall when it was struck by an arrow. Hence, the term signifies a person's most susceptible or easily exploited area.
  • turn/spin on your heel The idiom "turn/spin on your heel" refers to a quick and abrupt movement made by someone, typically by pivoting on their heel. It often indicates that the person is leaving or quickly changing direction in a decisive manner. This idiom is metaphorical, emphasizing a swift and determined action or reaction rather than a literal physical movement.
  • an Achilles heel The idiom "an Achilles heel" refers to a person's vulnerability or weak point. It originates from Greek mythology, where the warrior Achilles was invulnerable, except for his heel, which led to his downfall when it was struck by an arrow. Hence, it commonly represents a person's one area of weakness or susceptibility in an otherwise strong character or situation.
  • an/somebody's Achilles' heel The idiom "someone's Achilles' heel" refers to a vulnerable or weak point in someone's character or personality. It represents a flaw or susceptibility that can be exploited or used against a person. The phrase alludes to the mythological Greek hero Achilles, who was invulnerable in every part of his body except for his heel, which ultimately led to his downfall.
  • beef to (the) heel like a Mullingar heifer The idiom "beef to (the) heel like a Mullingar heifer" is an Irish colloquial expression. It is used to describe someone who is very strong, powerful, or appearing tough. It is derived from a Mullingar heifer, which typically refers to a type of cattle raised in the Mullingar area of Ireland known for their strength and resilience.
  • bring (someone) to heel The idiom "bring (someone) to heel" means to regain control over someone, typically by establishing authority or discipline over them. It originates from the practice of training dogs to walk obediently alongside their owner by tightening their leash, hence "bringing them to heel." In a broader context, the phrase refers to getting someone to comply with rules, commands, or expectations.
  • call (someone) to heel The idiom "call (someone) to heel" refers to exerting control or discipline over someone, typically in a commanding or authoritative manner. It is often used when someone needs to be brought under control, obedient, or kept in check. The idiom originates from the action of making a dog return to its owner's side and walk obediently beside them.
  • down at heel The idiom "down at heel" is used to describe someone or something that is in a poor or neglected state, both physically and financially. It can refer to a person who is shabby or unkempt in appearance, or to something that is run-down or dilapidated.
  • to heel The idiom "to heel" typically means to follow or obey someone closely, especially in a subservient or obedient manner. It can refer to someone being highly attentive and conforming to another's instructions or commands, much like a well-trained dog walking close to its owner's heel.
  • turn on your heel The idiom "turn on your heel" refers to a quick and sudden change of direction or decision, often characterized by an abrupt shift in attitude or behavior. It implies the act of swiftly altering one's course, viewpoint, or response, typically as a result of a new information or strong emotions.
  • under (one's) heel The idiom "under (one's) heel" means to be under someone's control or domination. It implies having a significant influence or power over someone, often leading to their subordination or submission.
  • under the heel of The idiom "under the heel of" refers to being under someone's control or dominance, often implying oppression or subjugation. It describes a situation where someone is being subjected to another person's authority, influence, or power, with limited freedom or autonomy.
  • under the heel of (someone) The idiom "under the heel of (someone)" refers to being under someone's control or power, usually in a submissive or oppressed position. It implies that the person in question has authority or dominance over others and can dictate their actions or decisions.
  • under the heel of somebody The idiom "under the heel of somebody" means to be under someone's control or dominance, with little to no power or freedom. It suggests that the person in question is being oppressed, subjugated, or oppressed by another individual or entity.
  • you heel

Similar spelling words for HEEL

Plural form of HEEL is HEELS

Conjugate verb Heel

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have heeled
you would have heeled
he/she/it would have heeled
we would have heeled
they would have heeled
I would have heel
you would have heel
he/she/it would have heel
we would have heel
they would have heel

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been heeling
you would have been heeling
he/she/it would have been heeling
we would have been heeling
they would have been heeling

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would heel
you would heel
he/she/it would heel
we would heel
they would heel

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be heeling
you would be heeling
he/she/it would be heeling
we would be heeling
they would be heeling

FUTURE

I will heel
you will heel
he/she/it will heel
we will heel
they will heel

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be heeling
you will be heeling
he/she/it will be heeling
we will be heeling
they will be heeling

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have heeled
you will have heeled
he/she/it will have heeled
we will have heeled
they will have heeled

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been heeling
you will have been heeling
he/she/it will have been heeling
we will have been heeling
they will have been heeling

IMPERATIVE

you heel
we let´s heel

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to heel

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was heeling
you were heeling
he/she/it was heeling
we were heeling
they were heeling

PAST PARTICIPLE

heeled

PAST PERFECT

I had heeled
you had heeled
he/she/it had heeled
we had heeled
they had heeled

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been heeling
you had been heeling
he/she/it had been heeling
we had been heeling
they had been heeling

PRESENT

I heel
you heel
he/she/it heels
we heel
they heel

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am heeling
you are heeling
he/she/it is heeling
we are heeling
they are heeling

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

heeling

PRESENT PERFECT

I have heeled
you have heeled
he/she/it has heeled
we have heeled
they have heeled

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been heeling
you have been heeling
he/she/it has been heeling
we have been heeling
they have been heeling

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it heel

SIMPLE PAST

I heeled
you heeled
he/she/it heeled
we heeled
they heeled

Infographic

Add the infographic to your website: