How Do You Spell IN?

Pronunciation: [ˈɪn] (IPA)

The word "in" is a very common preposition in English language. It is spelled using the letters 'i' and 'n', with an IPA phonetic transcription of /ɪn/. The sound of the letter 'i' in 'in' can be pronounced as a short and unstressed sound or as a long and stressed sound, depending on the context. This simple two-letter word is vital in constructing sentences and is commonly used to describe location, direction, and time.

IN Meaning and Definition

In is a preposition that is used to indicate location, position, or movement within a particular space or time frame. It signifies being inside or enclosed by something.

In can denote physical location, indicating that someone or something is inside or within the boundaries of a specific place or object. For example, "She is in the house" implies that the person is inside the house.

In can also represent an abstract position or state, indicating involvement or participation within a particular area or domain. For instance, "She is an expert in mathematics" means that the person possesses expertise specifically related to the field of mathematics.

In can be used to specify a certain time or period during which an event occurs. For instance, "The meeting is scheduled to take place in the afternoon" denotes that the meeting will occur during the afternoon hours.

Additionally, in can express a sense of containment or inclusion. For example, "The ingredients in this recipe include flour, sugar, and butter" indicates that those items are part of the recipe.

In popular usage, "in" is also commonly used as an adverb to indicate a state of fashion, trend, or acceptance. For example, "That style of clothing is currently in" signifies that the mentioned clothing style is currently popular or fashionable.

Overall, in serves as a versatile preposition with multiple meanings depending on the context in which it is used.

Top Common Misspellings for IN *

  • int 29.3381626%
  • iin 14.422127%
  • ein 3.9512676%
  • oin 3.292723%
  • ina 2.8975963%
  • inb 2.5353967%
  • ini 1.8109976%
  • ijn 1.1853803%
  • isn 1.1195258%
  • uin 1.284162%
  • ib 1.152453%
  • ine 0.9878169%
  • ibn 0.9548896%
  • ing 0.9219624%
  • iun 0.7573263%
  • inm 0.6914718%
  • nin 0.6256173%
  • inf 0.6256173%
  • inj 0.5926901%
  • rin 0.5268356%
  • imn 0.3951267%
  • inr 0.3951267%
  • wn 0.3292723%
  • ino 0.3292723%
  • itn 0.2634178%
  • ih 0.2634178%
  • inl 0.1975633%
  • ikn 0.1975633%
  • iln 0.1646361%
  • ik 0.1317089%
  • ihn 0.1317089%
  • ln 0.856108%
  • inc 0.428054%
  • ind 0.428054%
  • xin 0.0987816%
  • inq 0.0987816%
  • pn 0.0987816%
  • inv 0.0987816%
  • ian 0.0987816%
  • in2 0.0658544%
  • inin 0.0658544%
  • inw 0.0658544%
  • ipn 0.0658544%
  • in3 0.0658544%
  • in12 0.0658544%
  • kn 0.0658544%
  • iny 0.0658544%
  • jn 0.0658544%
  • inp 0.0329272%
  • nn 0.0329272%
  • ifn 0.0329272%
  • iy 0.0329272%
  • ij 0.0329272%
  • inmy 0.0329272%
  • in1 0.0329272%
  • iu 0.0329272%
  • iz 0.0329272%
  • cin 0.0329272%
  • cn 0.0329272%
  • jin 0.0329272%

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for IN

Etymology of IN

The word "in" derives from Old English "in" and "inne", which can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic root "inni". This root is further connected to the Proto-Indo-European base "en", meaning "in" or "inside". The use of "in" as a preposition to indicate inclusion or location within something has remained relatively consistent throughout its etymological history.

Idioms with the word IN

  • run round in circles The idiom "run round in circles" means to engage in activity or discussion without making any progress or achieving any result. It implies a sense of frustration or being stuck in a repetitive cycle of actions without achieving a desired outcome.
  • go/run round in circles The idiom "go/run round in circles" means to engage in repetitive or pointless activities without making any progress or reaching a conclusion. It implies being stuck in a never-ending loop or cycle without achieving any desired outcome.
  • square peg (in a round hole) The idiom "square peg in a round hole" refers to a person or thing that does not fit or belong in a particular situation or environment. It suggests a mismatch or incongruity between the individual or object and the surrounding context, often implying that the person's skills, abilities, or characteristics are not well suited for the task or role at hand.
  • rub sb's nose in it The idiom "rub sb's nose in it" means to intentionally remind or emphasize someone's mistake, humiliation, or failure in order to make them feel even worse about it. It often involves continuously reminding someone of their past errors or making them feel guilty for their actions.
  • rub salt in/into the wound The idiom "rub salt in/into the wound" means to intentionally make someone's pain or distress worse, typically through additional comments, actions, or reminders of a difficult situation they are already experiencing.
  • run in the family The idiom "run in the family" means that a particular trait, characteristic, talent, or tendency is common among several members of a family, and it is often passed down from one generation to another. It implies that the trait or characteristic is inherited genetically or is a result of the shared environment and upbringing within the family.
  • run in/through sb's head/mind The idiom "run in/through someone's head/mind" refers to having thoughts constantly occupying one's thinking or continuously recurring thoughts or ideas in one's mind. It implies that a particular thought or concept is persistently present and revolving around in someone's mental activity.
  • in the long run The idiom "in the long run" means considering or taking into account the eventual outcome or consequences of a situation, especially over a lengthy period of time. It emphasizes the importance of looking beyond immediate results or short-term benefits and considering the eventual overall outcome or impact.
  • in the short run The idiom "in the short run" refers to a period of time that is relatively brief or immediate, typically referring to a short-term perspective or result, rather than long-term consequences or outcomes. It implies a limited time frame and highlights the temporary nature of a situation or decision.
  • in/out of the running The idiom "in/out of the running" refers to someone or something that is either still in contention or has been eliminated from a competition, race, or a particular endeavor. It is often used to describe individuals or entities who have a chance of winning or achieving something, or those who no longer have any chance of success.
  • in the bargain, at into the bargain The idiom "in the bargain" or "in addition to that" refers to something that happens or is received as an extra benefit or consequence of a situation or action. It emphasizes that the additional thing is obtained unexpectedly or as a bonus. Another similar idiom "at into the bargain" is used interchangeably to convey the same meaning.
  • in safe hands The idiom "in safe hands" generally means that someone or something is entrusted to someone who is reliable, capable, and likely to provide proper care or protection. It implies that the person or thing is secure and well taken care of, ensuring that potential dangers or risks will be effectively managed or avoided.
  • there's safety in numbers The idiom "there's safety in numbers" means that a group or collective is less likely to encounter danger or harm than an individual acting alone. It suggests that people are more secure and protected when they are in a larger group or when they have greater support and solidarity.
  • be in the same boat The idiom "be in the same boat" means to be in the same difficult or challenging situation as someone else. It implies that both individuals or groups are facing a common problem or circumstance.
  • not in the same league The idiom "not in the same league" means that two things or people cannot be compared because they are at different levels of quality, skill, or ability. It implies that one is far superior or inferior to the other and there is a significant difference in their capabilities or achievements.
  • in the same breath The idiom "in the same breath" means nearly simultaneously or without pause, often used when contradicting or contrasting two ideas or statements. It suggests that both statements are mentioned or discussed together, emphasizing the contradiction or incongruity between them.
  • be in the same ballpark The idiom "be in the same ballpark" means to be within a reasonable or similar range or estimate, especially when comparing two or more quantities, prices, numbers, or ideas. It suggests that two things or concepts are roughly comparable or aligned, although not necessarily identical.
  • be cast in the same mould The idiom "be cast in the same mould" means that two or more people or things share similar characteristics, qualities, or behaviors. It implies that they are alike in nature or have been shaped by the same influences or experiences.
  • not be in the same league The idiom "not be in the same league" refers to something or someone's inability to measure up or be on par with another person or thing in terms of capability, skill, importance, or quality. It suggests that there is a noticeable disparity or difference between two individuals or objects.
  • bury/have your head in the sand The idiom "bury/have your head in the sand" refers to someone who willfully chooses to ignore or avoid an unpleasant or problematic situation, often out of fear, denial, or a desire to avoid taking responsibility. It is based on the supposed behavior of an ostrich, which is often wrongly believed to bury its head in the sand when faced with danger.
  • have a, sm, etc. say in sth The idiom "have a say in something" means to have the opportunity or right to express one's opinion or contribute to a decision-making process about a specific matter. It suggests being involved and having influence or control over the outcome or direction of something.
  • in sb's eyes The idiom "in sb's eyes" refers to something that is perceived or seen from another person's perspective or viewpoint. It suggests that the following statement or action is subjectively experienced or judged by someone, often emphasizing the importance of their opinion or judgment.
  • there are plenty more fish in the sea The idiom "there are plenty more fish in the sea" means that if one opportunity or relationship doesn't work out, there are many other opportunities or potential partners available. It suggests that there are numerous possibilities or options to explore and encourages someone to move on from a disappointment or rejection.
  • in the hot seat The idiom "in the hot seat" is used to describe a situation where someone is facing intense scrutiny, pressure, or a difficult challenge. It refers to being in a position of responsibility or accountability, often where one is required to answer tough questions or make crucial decisions.
  • be in the driving seat The idiom "be in the driving seat" means to be in control or in a position of power or authority in a given situation. It refers to being in a position to make decisions and direct the course of events.
  • be in the driver's seat, at be in the driving seat The idiom "be in the driver's seat" or "be in the driving seat" is typically used to describe a situation where someone is in control or has power over a particular situation or decision-making process. It suggests that the person is leading or directing the course of events and has the ability to determine the outcome. Being in the driver's seat often implies being in a position of authority, influence, or leadership.
  • fannies in the seats, at bums on seats The idiom "fannies in the seats" or "bums on seats" refers to the presence or attendance of people in a particular place, especially in the context of events or performances. It signifies the importance of having a substantial number of people or audience members present for a successful or profitable event. The idiom emphasizes the idea that the ultimate goal is to have a full or well-attended venue.
  • in the first/second place The idiomatic expression "in the first place" or "in the second place" is used to introduce or emphasize a point or reason that supports an argument or explanation. It is often used when someone is discussing multiple reasons or factors contributing to a particular situation. It denotes the order of importance or sequence of events, with "in the first place" referring to the most important point or reason, and "in the second place" referring to the next important point or reason.
  • wrapped (up) in secrecy The idiom "wrapped (up) in secrecy" means to be surrounded by or involved in a situation or activity that is kept highly confidential or secretive. It refers to something being hidden or shrouded in mystery, with limited or no information available to the public.
  • be shrouded in secrecy/mystery The idiom "be shrouded in secrecy/mystery" means that something is cloaked or concealed with an air of secrecy or mystery, making it difficult for others to know or understand the truth about it. It suggests that there is limited or no information available, creating an aura of intrigue and uncertainty.
  • in secret The idiom "in secret" refers to an action or activity that is done covertly or discreetly, without the knowledge or awareness of others. It implies that something is kept confidential, hidden, or undisclosed from the public or others who may have an interest in knowing about it.
  • let sb in on a secret The idiom "let someone in on a secret" means to share private or confidential information with someone, allowing them to be included in the knowledge or understanding of something that others may not be aware of.
  • see sb in hell before ... The idiom "see sb in hell before..." is used to express extreme disagreement, refusal, or defiance towards someone or something. It implies that the person using the phrase would rather go to hell than engage in or agree to the action or situation mentioned. It signifies a strong negative sentiment or unwillingness to comply.
  • see in the New Year The idiom "see in the New Year" means to celebrate or welcome the arrival of the new year, typically by staying awake until midnight on New Year's Eve and participating in the countdown to midnight. It can also refer to attending or hosting New Year's Eve parties or events.
  • not know what sb sees in sb/sth The idiom "not know what someone sees in someone/something" is used when a person is unable to understand or comprehend the appeal or attraction another person has towards someone or something. It signifies a lack of understanding or appreciation for the qualities or traits that make someone or something appealing to another individual.
  • see things in black and white The idiom "see things in black and white" means to perceive or understand things as being either completely right or completely wrong, without considering any shades of gray or considering different perspectives or possibilities. It refers to a rigid and simplistic view of situations, lacking nuance or understanding of complexities.
  • send sb away with a flea in their ear The idiom "send sb away with a flea in their ear" means to dismiss or reject someone in a particularly harsh or reprimanding manner. It implies a scolding or rebuke that leaves the person feeling embarrassed, chastised, or humiliated.
  • not in the biblical sense The idiom "not in the biblical sense" is typically used to clarify that a statement or action should not be interpreted as having a sexual connotation or intention. It is often employed to humorously express innocence or to dismiss or reject any improper interpretation.
  • be set in your ways The idiom "be set in your ways" refers to a person who is resistant to change and prefers to stick to their established habits, routines, or beliefs. They are often unwilling or reluctant to try new things or consider alternative perspectives.
  • set foot in smw The idiom "set foot in" is commonly used to indicate the act of entering or stepping into a place or location. It implies physically being present or visiting a particular area. For example, "I will never set foot in that restaurant again" means the person will not visit or enter the mentioned restaurant in the future.
  • put/set sth in train The idiom "put/set something in train" means to initiate or start a process or plan. It refers to taking the necessary actions to get something started or underway.
  • put/set sth in motion The idiom "put/set something in motion" means to initiate or start a process or action. It refers to beginning a particular course of events or activities.
  • set the wheels in motion The idiom "set the wheels in motion" means to initiate or start a process or plan. It refers to taking the necessary actions to get things moving or progressing towards a desired outcome or goal.
  • not be set/carved in stone The idiom "not be set/carved in stone" means that something is not fixed or permanent, and can be changed or modified. It implies that a decision, plan, or rule is flexible or open to alteration based on circumstances or new information.
  • have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few, several, etc. irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects, plans, or opportunities that one is actively pursuing or involved in simultaneously. It implies that the person is engaged in various activities and keeping multiple options open in order to increase the chances of success or achieve desired outcomes.
  • put/leave sb in the shade The idiom "put/leave sb in the shade" means to surpass or outshine someone in a particular aspect, often in terms of achievements or abilities. It implies that the person being referred to is overshadowed or overlooked in comparison to someone else who is more accomplished, talented, or successful.
  • be in/under sb's shadow The idiom "be in/under sb's shadow" means to exist or work in the less prominent position or overshadowed by someone else who is more successful, respected, or powerful. It implies being constantly compared or overshadowed by the accomplishments or influence of another person.
  • in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" means performing a task quickly or completing something in a short period of time. It refers to the idea of something being done in just a few moments, as lambs are known to quickly shake their tails.
  • have bats in the belfry The idiom "have bats in the belfry" means to be crazy or mentally unstable. It is often used humorously to describe someone who behaves eccentrically or irrationally. The term originates from the image of bats inhabiting the belfry of a church, a place associated with strange and erratic behavior by these nocturnal creatures.
  • be in good shape The idiom "be in good shape" refers to being physically fit, healthy, or in good condition. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone or something as being well-prepared or well-positioned.
  • in the shape of sth The idiom "in the shape of something" typically means having the form or appearance of something, often used to describe the physical or visual resemblance to a particular object or entity.
  • (in) any way, shape, or form The idiom "(in) any way, shape, or form" means in any manner or under any circumstances. It implies that there are no exceptions or variations, emphasizing that something is completely prohibited or impossible.
  • a wolf in sheep's clothing The idiom "a wolf in sheep's clothing" refers to someone who appears harmless or friendly but is actually dangerous, deceitful, or malicious. It suggests that the person or thing in question is pretending to be gentle or innocent, yet has ulterior motives or harmful intentions.
  • like ships that pass in the night The idiom "like ships that pass in the night" refers to two or more people crossing paths or encountering each other briefly and then quickly moving on without getting to know one another or forming any lasting connection. It emphasizes the fleeting and transitory nature of the encounter, much like two ships passing each other in the darkness of the night without any interaction.
  • be in sb's shoes The idiom "be in somebody's shoes" means to imagine oneself in someone else's situation or circumstances, especially in order to understand their feelings, thoughts, or experiences. It represents the act of empathizing with another person's perspective by mentally placing oneself in their position.
  • if I were in your shoes The idiom "if I were in your shoes" means that if the speaker were in the same situation or facing the same circumstances as the person they are addressing, they would behave or react in a similar manner. It conveys empathy and understanding towards the other person's position and suggests that the speaker can imagine what it would be like to be in their position.
  • put yourself in sb's place/position/shoes The idiom "put yourself in someone's place/position/shoes" means to imagine how someone else feels or thinks, especially in a challenging or difficult situation, in order to empathize with them and understand their perspective.
  • shoot sth/sb down (in flames) The idiom "shoot something or someone down (in flames)" refers to rejecting or disproving an idea, proposal, or argument in a highly critical or decisive manner. It implies that the rejection is firm and comprehensive, leaving no room for doubt or further discussion. The phrase often suggests that the rejection is so thorough that it discredits the original idea or person completely.
  • shoot yourself in the foot The idiom "shoot yourself in the foot" means to inadvertently or self-destructively do something that hinders or defeats one's own efforts or goals. It refers to actions that ultimately harm oneself or one's own interests, often caused by poor decision-making or an inability to foresee negative consequences. By making a mistake or taking a counterproductive action, a person metaphorically inflicts damage or prevents their own success, similar to shooting oneself in the foot.
  • like a bull in a china shop The expression "like a bull in a china shop" is an idiom used to describe someone who is clumsy, reckless, or lacking finesse and causes damage or disruption in delicate, sensitive, or unfamiliar situations. It typically refers to a person who acts impulsively or without regard for the consequences, often on account of their physical size, strength, or lack of grace.
  • in short The idiom "in short" is used when summarizing or providing a concise explanation for something. It suggests that the following statement or explanation is a brief and concise version of a longer or more detailed account.
  • a shot in the arm The idiom "a shot in the arm" refers to an action or event that gives a boost or revitalizes something or someone's spirits, energy, or confidence. It can serve as a source of motivation, encouragement, or renewed strength.
  • a shot in the dark The idiom "a shot in the dark" refers to a wild guess or attempt at something without much hope of success, often based on very limited information or knowledge. It implies taking a chance or making an uncertain attempt without any clear expectations of positive results.
  • show sm in a bad light The idiom "show someone in a bad light" means to present or portray someone or something in a negative or unfavorable way, often by highlighting their faults, flaws, or negative aspects. It suggests that the representation is not a fair or accurate reflection of the person or thing being depicted.
  • show sb in their true colours The idiom "show sb in their true colours" means to reveal someone's true nature, character, or intentions, especially when they act differently in various situations or when they try to hide their true self. It refers to a situation where someone's real personality or motives are exposed, often highlighting negative qualities or hidden agendas that were previously unknown or disguised.
  • lost in the shuffle The idiom "lost in the shuffle" means being overlooked, dismissed, or forgotten due to a hectic, disorganized, or chaotic situation. It refers to a person or thing that is not given proper attention or recognition amidst competing priorities or a crowded environment.
  • thorn in your flesh/side The idiom "thorn in your flesh/side" refers to a person or thing that consistently causes trouble, annoyance, or discomfort. It implies that the individual or situation is a constant source of irritation, just like a thorn stuck in one's flesh or side.
  • born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family and has been provided with abundant resources and opportunities right from birth. It implies that their life has been marked by privilege and ease, often lacking first-hand experience of financial or social challenges.
  • live in sin The idiom "live in sin" typically refers to two unmarried individuals who are living together as a romantic couple, often implying that they are engaging in a sexual relationship, which is traditionally seen as morally objectionable.
  • sunk in thought The idiom "sunk in thought" refers to a person who is deeply engrossed or preoccupied in their own thoughts, often appearing distant or lost in contemplation.
  • sit in judgment on/over sb The idiom "sit in judgment on/over someone" means to have the authority or responsibility to make a judgment or decision about someone's actions, behavior, or character. It implies being in a position of power or authority to assess, evaluate, or pass judgment on someone.
  • at/in one sitting The idiom "at/in one sitting" refers to completing a task, particularly related to consuming food or drink, without taking a break or interrupting one's activity. It implies the ability to accomplish something in a single uninterrupted session.
  • pie in the sky The idiom "pie in the sky" refers to something that is considered very appealing or desirable, but is unlikely or impossible to achieve or obtain. It often refers to unrealistic dreams or promises that are unlikely to come true.
  • could do sth in your sleep The idiom "could do something in your sleep" means that a person is so familiar or proficient at a task that they can perform it effortlessly, easily, and without requiring much thought or concentration. It suggests a high level of skill or expertise.
  • in small doses The idiom "in small doses" is typically used to refer to something that is better or more enjoyable when experienced or consumed in limited quantities or for short periods of time. It suggests that excessive exposure to or prolonged use of something may be unpleasant, overwhelming, or even harmful.
  • be a big fish in a small pond The idiom "be a big fish in a small pond" means to be highly important, influential, or successful in a limited or confined environment. It implies that the person excels or stands out among a small or less competitive group, but might not have the same level of significance or recognition in a larger, more competitive setting.
  • good things come in small packages The idiom "good things come in small packages" means that something does not have to be large or extravagant in order to be valuable or beneficial. It suggests that small or seemingly insignificant things can bring joy, delight, or have a significant impact.
  • put/stick that in your pipe and smoke it! The idiom "put/stick that in your pipe and smoke it!" is a strong and confrontational expression that is used to assertively inform someone to accept or acknowledge a fact or a piece of information, often in a boastful or mocking manner. It implies that the person being addressed should think about the information or opinion given and accept it as true, regardless of their own beliefs or preferences. This idiom is typically used to emphasize a point or to triumphantly establish one's superiority in an argument or disagreement.
  • vanish/go up/disappear in a puff of smoke The idiom "vanish/go up/disappear in a puff of smoke" means to suddenly and mysteriously vanish or disappear. It refers to something or someone disappearing so quickly and completely that it almost seems like they have turned into smoke and vanished into thin air. It is often used figuratively to describe a sudden and unexpected disappearance or cessation.
  • be all in The idiom "be all in" means to be fully committed, dedicated, or invested in something, usually referring to putting all of one's energy, resources, or effort into a particular task, project, or endeavor. It implies giving one's maximum effort and not holding anything back.
  • be in bits The idiom "be in bits" means to be extremely upset, distressed, or emotionally devastated. It implies a state of being overwhelmed by sorrow, pain, or disappointment.
  • be quids in The idiom "be quids in" means to be in a financially advantageous situation or to have made a profit.
  • be in blossom The idiom "be in blossom" is used to describe something or someone that is thriving, flourishing, or experiencing a period of beauty, growth, or success. It originates from the visual imagery of flowers in full bloom, representing a state of vibrancy and richness.
  • be in full cry To be in full cry is an idiom that means to be in a state of intense pursuit or enthusiastic activity. It is commonly used to describe someone who is completely engaged in their actions or work, displaying a high level of passion, energy, or determination.
  • be well in there
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" means that someone or something has no possibility or chance of success or achieving a desired outcome. It emphasizes the extreme unlikelihood of a particular event or situation occurring, comparing it to the idea of a snowball surviving in the extremely hot conditions of Hell.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell, at not have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" (or "not have a cat in hell's chance") means that someone or something has no possibility or hope of success. It emphasizes the extreme unlikelihood or impossibility of a desired outcome or goal being achieved.
  • in so many words The idiom "in so many words" means expressing something directly or explicitly, without using subtle language or hints.
  • put a sock in it! The idiom "put a sock in it!" is used as a direct and sometimes rude way to tell someone to be quiet or stop talking. It is an expression that is typically used when someone's voice or words are irritating, unnecessary, or disruptive.
  • soft in the head The idiom "soft in the head" is used to describe someone who is considered foolish, silly, or lacking intelligence. It implies that the person's thoughts or decision-making processes are not rational or logical.
  • there's sth in sth The idiom "there's something in something" means that there is a certain quality, aspect, or truth within something that is being discussed or referred to. It suggests that there is some substance or value in that particular thing.
  • have sth in mind The idiom "have something in mind" means to have a specific plan, intention, or idea about something. It can refer to having a concept or goal in one's thoughts or being prepared to make a decision or take action based on a particular notion.
  • look like sth the cat brought/dragged in The idiom "look like something the cat brought/dragged in" is used to describe someone's disheveled or untidy appearance, suggesting that they appear messy, exhausted, or generally unwell. It implies that the person looks as if they have been through a rough or challenging experience.
  • in the depth(s) of smw The idiom "in the depths of" or "in the depth of" is used to signify being in the most profound or intense part of a certain experience, situation, emotion, or difficulty. It implies being fully immersed or deeply entrenched in something.
  • do bears shit in the woods? The idiom "do bears shit in the woods?" is a rhetorical question that is used to sarcastically emphasize the obviousness or certainty of something. It implies that the answer to the question is so evident or universally known that it should not even be asked. It can be used to express certainty, agreement, or disbelief towards a statement or situation.
  • be in the soup The idiom "be in the soup" means to be in trouble or facing a difficult situation. It suggests that someone is involved in a predicament or facing an unfavorable circumstance.
  • in spades The idiom "in spades" means to a great extent or in abundance.
  • speak in sb's favour The idiom "speak in sb's favor" means to express support or show approval for someone or their actions. It can refer to defending someone, advocating on their behalf, or providing a positive testimony or recommendation about them.
  • talk/speak in riddles The idiom "talk/speak in riddles" refers to the act of speaking in a confusing, cryptic, or obscure manner, making it difficult for others to understand the intended meaning. It may involve using ambiguous language, indirect references, or puzzles instead of straightforward communication.
  • in a manner of speaking The idiom "in a manner of speaking" means expressing something in a figurative or indirect way rather than stating it directly. It is often used to indicate that what is being said may not be entirely accurate or literal, but it serves as a way to convey a particular idea or sentiment.
  • in a spin The idiom "in a spin" refers to a state of extreme confusion, panic, or distress. It describes a situation in which someone is feeling overwhelmed or mentally disoriented, often due to stress, uncertainty, or an unexpected event.
  • turn over/spin in your grave, at turn in your grave The idiom "turn over/spin in your grave" refers to a hypothetical reaction from a deceased person if they were alive to witness or hear about something that goes against their strongly held beliefs or values. It implies that the deceased person would be so disturbed or horrified by the current situation that they would metaphorically move or rotate in their grave.
  • beauty is in the eye of the beholder The idiom "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" means that what is considered beautiful is subjective and can vary from person to person. It implies that beauty is not an inherent quality of an object or person but rather a perception that differs based on individual preferences and personal experiences.
  • in/within spitting distance The idiom "in/within spitting distance" is used to describe a location that is very close in proximity or distance. It implies that something is within a short distance, often used to indicate how close two objects or places are to each other.
  • many a true word is spoken in jest The idiom "many a true word is spoken in jest" means that often, a seemingly joking or humorous statement contains an element of truth or reveals deeper underlying thoughts or feelings. It suggests that humor or jokes can be a way people express their genuine opinions or beliefs.
  • be in a tight corner/spot The idiom "be in a tight corner/spot" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation where there are few or limited options available, often resulting in feeling trapped or uncertain about how to proceed.
  • be in bed with The idiom "be in bed with" is typically used metaphorically to describe a close or questionable association between individuals, organizations, or entities, often implying a secretive or unduly close relationship. It can refer to being in a partnership, alliance, or collusion, often with an unethical or suspicious nature. It suggests a high level of cooperation, collaboration, or dependency, which may not always be in the best interest of all parties involved.
  • in bed The idiom "in bed" typically refers to someone or something literally being positioned or located inside a bed. However, it can also be used figuratively to express involvement or association with a particular activity, thought, or state of mind.
  • you've made your bed and now you must lie in it The idiom "you've made your bed and now you must lie in it" means that someone has done something to create a difficult or unfavorable situation for themselves, and they must now accept the consequences of their actions without complaining or seeking help. It emphasizes personal responsibility for the outcomes of one's choices or actions.
  • a spring in your step The idiom "a spring in your step" refers to having an energetic, lively, or buoyant manner of walking or moving. It indicates that someone is feeling happy, optimistic, or enthusiastic about something, which is reflected in their physical movements.
  • stab sb in the back To "stab someone in the back" means to betray or deceive someone, typically a friend, by acting against their trust or doing something harmful to them behind their back. It refers to the act of attacking someone, usually figuratively, when they are not expecting it or aware of it.
  • stand sb in good stead The idiom "stand someone in good stead" means that someone's actions, experiences, or preparations will benefit them in the future or prove advantageous to them in a particular situation. It refers to how something will be useful or serve them well when it is needed or in the long run.
  • stand in the way of sth/sb The idiom "stand in the way of sth/sb" means to hinder or obstruct the progress, success, or achievement of something or someone. It refers to an action or behavior that blocks or prevents someone from reaching their goals or desired outcome. It implies acting as an obstacle or barrier in someone's path towards their objectives.
  • stand in sb's way, at stand in the way of sth/sb The idiom "stand in sb's way" or "stand in the way of sth/sb" refers to obstructing or hindering someone or something from achieving their goals or progress. It implies being a barrier or obstacle that prevents someone from moving forward or making desired advancements.
  • stand (out) in relief The idiom "stand (out) in relief" means to be strikingly distinct or noticeable in comparison to one's surroundings or counterparts. It refers to something or someone that stands out conspicuously, often due to its exceptional qualities, characteristics, or appearance, thus grabbing attention or appearing more prominent.
  • stare sb in the face The idiom "stare someone in the face" means to confront or be confronted with a clear and undeniable truth, fact, or reality, often referring to an obvious or impending outcome that can no longer be ignored or denied.
  • have a bee in your bonnet The idiom "have a bee in your bonnet" means to have an obsessive or fixed idea that occupies one's thoughts and causes an individual to act irrationally or excessively focused on a particular subject or topic.
  • be in/get into a state The idiom "be in/get into a state" means to be in a state of distress, anxiety, or agitation. It refers to someone being emotionally overwhelmed, upset, or extremely anxious about a particular situation.
  • in a good, bad, etc. state of repair, at in good, bad, etc. repair The idiom "in a good, bad, etc. state of repair" or "in good, bad, etc. repair" is used to describe the condition or quality of something, typically a physical object or a property. It indicates whether an item or property is well-maintained, functioning properly, and visually appealing, or alternatively, if it is poorly maintained, damaged, or deteriorated. This expression highlights the overall state of condition and repair of the particular object or property being referred to.
  • step back (in time) The idiom "step back (in time)" means to return or go back to a previous era or period, often to reflect on or experience something from the past. It can refer both to a literal time travel or figuratively symbolize reminiscing or engaging in activities reminiscent of an earlier time.
  • in a stew The idiom "in a stew" typically means to be in a state of worry, confusion, or agitation. It refers to feeling anxious or troubled, often about a particular situation or problem.
  • stew (in your own juice) The idiom "stew (in your own juice)" refers to a situation where someone is left to worry or suffer the consequences of their own actions or decisions. It describes a state of being left alone to deal with the negative consequences or frustrations that they have created for themselves, often without intervention or assistance from others.
  • in on sth The idiom "in on sth" typically means being involved or included in a particular situation, event, or activity, usually implying having knowledge or awareness of something. It signifies that someone is a participant or has access to information about a specific matter.
  • put stock in sth The idiom "put stock in something" means to have confidence in, believe in, or place importance on something. It implies trusting or relying on the value or validity of a certain concept, belief, or source of information.
  • stick in sb's mind/head/memory The idiom "stick in someone's mind/head/memory" means that something is remembered or remains vividly in someone's thoughts or memory for a long time. It suggests that the information, event, or experience has made a lasting impression on the person, often due to its uniqueness, significance, or emotional impact.
  • stick in sb's throat/craw The idiom "stick in someone's throat/craw" is used to describe something that is difficult for someone to accept or deal with, typically due to a sense of anger, resentment, or injustice. It refers to a situation, statement, or action that is hard to swallow or accept.
  • put/stick the knife in, at put/stick the knife into sb The idiom "put/stick the knife in, at put/stick the knife into sb" is a figurative expression that means to criticize or betray someone, often in a harsh or hurtful way, by making negative comments or actions towards them. It implies causing emotional pain or damage to someone through acts of betrayal or hurtful words.
  • put/stick your oar in The idiom "put/stick your oar in" means to meddle in or interfere with something that does not concern you, usually by offering unwanted advice or opinions. This expression is derived from rowing, as the image conveyed is that of someone inserting their oar into a situation in which they are not needed or welcome.
  • stick your snoot in/into (sth) The idiom "stick your snoot in/into (something)" means to interfere or involve oneself in someone else's business or affairs without being invited or desired. It often implies being nosy or intrusive in a situation where one's presence or opinion is not welcomed.
  • have a sting in the/its tail The idiom "have a sting in the/its tail" means that there is an unexpected or unpleasant surprise or consequence to something. It implies that even though something may initially seem positive or harmless, there is a hidden problem or disadvantage that will eventually reveal itself.
  • in stitches The idiom "in stitches" means to be laughing very hard or uncontrollably.
  • a stitch in time (saves nine) The idiom "a stitch in time (saves nine)" means that taking prompt action to fix a small problem now can prevent it from becoming a larger problem in the future. It emphasizes the importance of addressing issues early on to avoid more significant consequences or repairs later.
  • have butterflies (in your stomach) The idiom "have butterflies (in your stomach)" means to have a feeling of nervousness, anxiety, or excitement, often felt in the area of the stomach, before facing a particular situation or event.
  • carved in stone The idiom "carved in stone" refers to something that is fixed, permanent, or certain. It implies that a decision, rule, or fact is unchangeable and cannot be altered. It suggests a strong sense of finality and permanence, similar to information or instructions that are literally etched into stone.
  • not be carved/etched in stone, at not be set/carved in stone The idiom "not be carved/etched in stone" or "not be set/carved in stone" means that something is not permanently fixed or finalized and can still be subject to change or alteration. It implies that a particular decision, plan, or agreement is flexible and can be modified or adjusted as needed.
  • in store The idiom "in store" typically refers to something that is planned, expected, or likely to happen in the future. It suggests that an event, experience, or outcome is on its way or coming soon.
  • storm in a teacup The idiom "storm in a teacup" refers to an overblown or exaggerated reaction to a minor issue or problem. It implies that people are excessively concerned or making a big fuss about something relatively unimportant or trivial.
  • straw in the wind The idiom "straw in the wind" typically refers to a small, early sign or indication of a larger or upcoming change or trend. It denotes an initial hint or clue that suggests a future outcome or development.
  • the man/woman/person in/on the street The idiom "the man/woman/person in/on the street" refers to the average person, usually an ordinary citizen who does not have any specialized knowledge or expertise in a particular field. It represents the opinions, beliefs, or experiences of everyday individuals who may not have a deep understanding of complex issues or topics. It is often used to contrast with the views of experts or professionals.
  • take sth in your stride To "take something in your stride" means to handle or deal with a difficulty, setback, or unexpected situation in a relaxed or calm manner. It suggests that the person is able to easily accept and cope with the situation without getting excessively worried or upset.
  • take sth in stride, at take sth in your stride The idiom "take something in stride" or "take something in your stride" means to handle or deal with an adverse situation or criticism calmly and without let it affect or bother oneself too much. It reflects the ability to face challenges or setbacks with a positive attitude and to maintain composure or self-assurance amidst difficulties.
  • get stuck in The idiom "get stuck in" is used to encourage or describe someone engaging fully or energetically in a task, activity, or project. It implies taking a proactive and determined approach, often involving hard work, enthusiasm, and dedication. It can also imply a willingness to overcome obstacles and see a task or project through to completion.
  • get stuck into sth, at get stuck in The idiom "get stuck into something" or "get stuck in" means to enthusiastically engage in or start working on a task or activity. It implies a strong focus, determination, and eagerness to make progress or accomplish something. It suggests a willingness to put in effort, dedication, and concentrate fully on the task at hand.
  • be stuck in a groove The idiom "be stuck in a groove" means to be stuck in a repetitive or stagnant pattern of behavior, thoughts, or actions without making progress or experiencing any change. It often implies being trapped in a routine that lacks variety or innovation, leading to boredom or a lack of personal growth. The phrase is derived from the repetitive pattern made by a needle on a vinyl record that seems unable to move forward or explore different tracks.
  • have your head (buried/stuck) in a book The idiom "have your head (buried/stuck) in a book" means that a person is deeply engrossed in reading and paying full attention to the content of a book, often to the exclusion of other activities or distractions. It implies being fully absorbed in the world created by the book, often leading to a lack of awareness of one's surroundings or social interactions.
  • get/muscle in on the act The idiom "get/muscle in on the act" refers to someone trying to participate in or take advantage of a situation that is already happening or proving to be successful, typically to gain some benefit or attention for themselves. It implies entering into an ongoing activity or opportunity to ensure one also receives a share of the benefits or recognition.
  • in your birthday suit The idiom "in your birthday suit" refers to being completely naked or undressed, similar to the state you were in at birth when you entered the world without any clothes.
  • a place in the sun The idiom "a place in the sun" refers to a situation or position of prominence, success, or advantage. It often implies achieving a desired position, recognition, or a comfortable and favorable position in life.
  • get in a sweat To "get in a sweat" is an idiomatic expression that means to become anxious, worried, or stressed about something. It implies feeling overwhelmed or worked up about a particular situation or problem.
  • be in good, the best possible, etc. taste The idiom "be in good, the best possible, etc. taste" refers to something that is considered socially acceptable, tasteful, or appropriate according to established standards or norms. It implies that the particular item, action, or behavior is aesthetically pleasing, refined, and does not offend or shock others. It suggests a level of class, sophistication, and discernment in one's choices or actions.
  • be in bad, poor, the worst possible, etc. taste The idiom "be in bad, poor, the worst possible, etc. taste" refers to something that is considered offensive, inappropriate, or vulgar. It suggests that the act, statement, or behavior lacks decency, cultural sensitivity, or social awareness. It implies that the subject matter or execution is distasteful and may offend others.
  • leave a bad taste in sb's mouth The idiom "leave a bad taste in someone's mouth" means to have a negative or undesirable impression or feeling about something or someone. It usually refers to an experience that has left a person feeling unsatisfied, disappointed, or disgusted.
  • would not do sth for all the tea in China The idiom "would not do something for all the tea in China" means that one would not be willing to do something under any circumstances, no matter how tempting the offer or reward may be. It implies that the action or task is undesirable or unacceptable to the person using the idiom. The phrase originated from the immense value and significance of tea in Chinese culture and economy, emphasizing the extreme unwillingness to engage in the mentioned activity.
  • be in a tearing hurry The idiom "be in a tearing hurry" means to be in a state of extreme haste or urgency. It implies a sense of rushing or rushing through something quickly and forcefully.
  • it'll (all) end in tears The idiom "it'll (all) end in tears" means that a situation or course of action is likely to result in negative or disastrous consequences. It implies that there is an expectation of failure, conflict, or disappointment in the outcome.
  • kick in the teeth The idiom "kick in the teeth" refers to a severe setback, disappointment, or betrayal that deeply affects someone, often causing them emotional or psychological distress. It typically signifies an unexpected or harsh blow to one's hopes, plans, or sense of trust.
  • in the teeth of sth The idiom "in the teeth of something" refers to facing or confronting a difficult or challenging situation directly, without any hesitation or avoidance. It suggests a person or group's determination to face adversity head-on, even when circumstances are unfavorable or difficult.
  • in terror of your life The idiom "in terror of your life" means being extremely frightened or terrified, usually due to a dangerous or life-threatening situation. It implies a state of panic and intense fear for one's own safety or well-being.
  • like a thief in the night The idiom "like a thief in the night" refers to doing something in a secretive or unexpected manner, often without being noticed or causing alarm. It implies swift and stealthy actions, similar to how a thief operates, taking something or performing an act without being detected or arousing suspicion.
  • need sth like you need a hole in the head The idiom "need something like you need a hole in the head" is used to express a strong sentiment of not needing or not wanting something at all. It implies that the thing in question is completely unnecessary, undesirable, or burdensome. It emphasizes the lack of any personal benefit or value derived from having or experiencing that particular thing.
  • be like a deer/rabbit caught in the headlights The idiom "be like a deer/rabbit caught in the headlights" means to be frozen or stunned with fear and indecision, often in a situation where one feels overwhelmed or surprised. It refers to the behavior of a deer or rabbit when caught in the bright headlights of a vehicle, causing them to become momentarily paralyzed.
  • the matter in hand The idiom "the matter in hand" refers to the specific issue, problem, or task that needs to be dealt with or addressed at a particular moment or situation. It usually emphasizes the immediate focus or priority of attention.
  • the matter at hand, at the matter in hand The idiom "the matter at hand" or "the matter in hand" refers to the important or relevant issue or situation that is currently being discussed, dealt with, or focused on. It emphasizes the need to prioritize or give attention to the subject or problem that is currently under consideration or requires immediate action.
  • the job/matter in hand The idiom "the job/matter in hand" refers to the specific task or issue that is currently being discussed or worked on. It refers to the immediate and important obligation or problem that requires attention and focus.
  • the job/matter at hand, at the job/matter in hand The idiom "the job/matter at hand, at the job/matter in hand" refers to the specific task or situation currently being addressed or focused on. It indicates the immediate priority or concern that requires attention or action.
  • get in there! The idiom "get in there!" typically means to get involved, take action, or make a bold move. It is an informal expression used to encourage someone to actively participate or engage in a particular situation or activity with enthusiasm and determination.
  • hang in there, at hang on in there The idiom "hang in there" or "hang on in there" is an expression used to encourage someone to continue persevering or enduring through difficult or challenging circumstances without giving up. It emphasizes the importance of staying strong, patient, and maintaining resilience in the face of adversity.
  • hang on in there The idiom "hang on in there" means to persevere or continue to strive in difficult or challenging circumstances. It is often used as an encouragement or motivational phrase to urge someone to keep going despite obstacles or hardships.
  • there's nothing in sth The idiom "there's nothing in something" generally means that something lacks substance, value, or importance. It suggests that the subject being discussed has little or no worth or significance. It can also imply that there is no available explanation, evidence, or truth to support a particular claim or belief.
  • in the thick of sth The idiom "in the thick of something" refers to being fully immersed or deeply involved in a situation or activity. It signifies being in the most intense or crucial stage of something, typically a challenging or demanding task or project. It implies being actively engaged or surrounded by certain circumstances, often indicating a high level of participation or commitment.
  • things that go bump in the night The idiom "things that go bump in the night" refers to unspecified or mysterious noises or occurrences that are heard or witnessed during the night. It implies something strange, frightening, or supernatural happening in the dark, which can cause fear, anxiety, or unease.
  • the easiest thing in the world The idiom "the easiest thing in the world" is used to describe something that is exceptionally simple or effortless to accomplish. It suggests that the task or action being referred to requires minimal effort or difficulty, emphasizing how straightforward it is to complete.
  • moderation in all things The idiom "moderation in all things" means that it is important to maintain a balanced and moderate approach in various aspects of life. It suggests that excessive behavior or indulgence in any particular area is not desirable, and instead, one should strive for moderation and avoid extremes. This principle applies to a wide range of situations, including personal habits, lifestyle choices, work-life balance, and even emotional reactions. By practicing moderation, one can lead a more well-rounded and sustainable life.
  • deep in thought The idiom "deep in thought" refers to a person who is absorbed or engrossed in contemplation or intense thinking. It implies that the individual's mind is focused and involved in deep reflection, possibly oblivious to their surroundings or the happenings around them.
  • with the best will in the world The definition of the idiom "with the best will in the world" is that someone is sincerely trying their hardest or putting forth their utmost effort to achieve something or to behave in a certain way, even though the outcome may not be successful or as expected. This expression emphasizes the person's good intentions and genuine efforts, regardless of the final results.
  • have a frog in your throat The idiom "have a frog in your throat" means to have difficulty speaking or to have a temporary hoarseness or difficulty in producing sound when speaking, usually due to a sore throat or hoarseness.
  • be in line to the throne The idiom "be in line to the throne" refers to someone's position in the succession order for becoming the monarch or ruler of a country or organization. It implies that the person has a rightful claim and is next in line for assuming the position of power.
  • in/through all the years The idiom "in/through all the years" refers to a long or extended period of time, depicting a sense of continuity or endurance. It emphasizes the passage of time and the events or experiences that have occurred over the years. It suggests that something has remained constant, witnessed and persevered through the various stages or changing circumstances throughout a significant period.
  • throw sth back in sb's face The idiom "throw something back in someone's face" refers to the act of using something that was previously said or done by someone against them in a confrontational or argumentative manner. It involves bringing up and emphasizing a past action, statement, or favor in a way that is intended to embarrass, criticize, or discredit the person it is being thrown at.
  • throw in the towel/sponge The idiom "throw in the towel/sponge" means to give up, surrender, or admit defeat. It originates from the sport of boxing, where a competitor's coach may throw a towel into the ring to indicate their fighter is no longer able to continue.
  • throw up your hands in horror/despair The idiom "throw up your hands in horror/despair" means to express extreme shock, dismay, or frustration in response to a situation or event. It implies a feeling of helplessness or resignation, as if there is nothing more that can be done to improve the situation.
  • throw/chuck in the towel The idiom "throw/chuck in the towel" means to give up, surrender, or concede defeat. It originates from boxing, where a boxer's coach throws a towel into the ring to signal that the boxer is unable to continue fighting and is quitting the match.
  • throw sb in at the deep end, at jump in at the deep end To "throw someone in at the deep end" or "jump in at the deep end" means to suddenly force someone into a challenging or difficult situation, especially without any prior preparation or experience. It often implies immersing someone directly into a task or responsibility that may be overwhelming or outside their comfort zone.
  • put/throw a spanner in the works The idiom "put/throw a spanner in the works" means to disrupt or interfere with a plan or a process, causing difficulties or obstacles that hinder progress or prevent success. It refers to the unexpected introduction of a problem or complication that derails or complicates a situation, similar to how throwing a wrench (or spanner) into machinery causes it to malfunction.
  • throw a (monkey) wrench in the works, at put/throw a spanner in the works The idiom "throw a (monkey) wrench in the works" (also known as "put/throw a spanner in the works" in British English) means to create an unexpected problem or obstacle that disrupts or hinders progress or plans. It refers to the act of introducing a complication or interference that obstructs the smooth functioning or successful completion of a task, goal, or process. It implies the introduction of a sudden and unexpected difficulty that causes delays or complications.
  • people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones The idiom "people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones" means that one should not criticize or condemn others for their faults or mistakes when they themselves have similar flaws or shortcomings. It advises against pointing out the faults of others while neglecting one's own weaknesses. It emphasizes the importance of self-reflection and humility before passing judgment on others.
  • tie sb (up) in knots The idiom "tie sb (up) in knots" means to confuse or perplex someone to the point of great difficulty or frustration. It implies that the person is mentally or emotionally entangled, like being tied up in knots, struggling to find a solution or understanding.
  • be in a tight corner The idiom "be in a tight corner" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation where one has few options or resources available. It implies being trapped, figuratively speaking, and often refers to a predicament or a dilemma with no easy solution.
  • have your fingers in the till The idiom "have your fingers in the till" means to be embezzling money, specifically by stealing or misappropriating funds from a business, organization, or someone else's financial affairs. It implies a dishonest or unlawful act of profiting personally from otherwise entrusted funds.
  • all the time in the world The idiom "all the time in the world" means to have an abundance of time, indicating that you have no rush or urgency in completing something because you have a limitless amount of time available.
  • in good time The idiom "in good time" means doing something at the appropriate or expected time, without delay or rushing. It refers to completing a task within a reasonable period or being punctual.
  • all in good time The idiom "all in good time" means that something will happen or be done at the appropriate or suitable time, without rushing or forcing it. It suggests patience and the understanding that timing is important in accomplishing or experiencing something desired.
  • in the nick of time The idiom "in the nick of time" means doing something or arriving just in time, moments before it would have been too late or just before a critical or crucial moment. It signifies that someone or something narrowly avoided missing an opportunity or escaping an unfortunate or dangerous situation.
  • in the fullness of time "In the fullness of time" is an idiom that means at the right or appropriate time, when the circumstances are ideal or the necessary conditions have been met. It suggests that certain things or events will happen or be revealed naturally and without haste, according to the natural progression of time.
  • find it in your heart to do sth The idiom "find it in your heart to do something" means to have the compassion, empathy, or willingness to do something, especially something difficult or challenging, that might require forgiveness, understanding, or kindness. It implies the act of looking deep within oneself and discovering the capacity to do the said action despite any reservations or initial hesitations.
  • be in line to do sth The idiom "be in line to do sth" means to be next in order or next in line to do something. It suggests that someone is eligible or expected to do something based on their current position or circumstances.
  • be in no mood for sth/to do sth The idiom "be in no mood for sth/to do sth" means to have no desire or inclination to engage in or deal with something. It describes a state of not being emotionally or mentally prepared or willing for a particular activity or situation.
  • dip a/your toe in (the water) The idiom "dip a/your toe in (the water)" means to cautiously or tentatively try or experience something new or unfamiliar, usually as a way to assess or experiment without fully committing or taking a big risk. It refers to the act of literally putting one's toe in water to test the temperature and make a preliminary assessment before diving in completely.
  • tongue in cheek The idiom "tongue in cheek" means that someone is speaking or writing something in a way that is not meant to be taken seriously or literally. In other words, it refers to a statement or remark that is meant to be humorous, ironic, or sarcastic, often with a concealed or subtle meaning.
  • with your tongue in your cheek, at tongue in cheek The idiom "with your tongue in your cheek" or "tongue in cheek" is used to describe a statement, statement or action that is meant to be humorous or ironic, often containing a hidden meaning or sarcasm. It usually indicates that the speaker doesn't intend to be taken seriously and is making a joke or mocking something in a lighthearted manner.
  • in too deep The idiom "in too deep" typically means being involved in a situation or commitment that has become overwhelming or one cannot easily back out of. It refers to being extensively involved or attached to something, often in a negative or problematic way.
  • be long in the tooth The idiom "be long in the tooth" is used to describe someone who is old or advanced in age. It suggests that as a person ages, their teeth tend to appear longer due to the gums receding.
  • in your tracks The definition of the idiom "in your tracks" refers to the immediate and sudden halt or stopping of someone's movement, progress, or actions due to a surprising or startling event or discovery. It suggests that something has caused a person to stop abruptly and completely, as if frozen in their place.
  • every trick in the book The idiom "every trick in the book" refers to the use of every available method or technique to achieve a desired goal or to gain an advantage. It indicates that someone is employing all known strategies, tactics, or tricks in their possession or at their disposal to be successful.
  • the oldest trick in the book The idiom "the oldest trick in the book" refers to a tactic, strategy, or method that is widely known and commonly used, often to deceive or manipulate others, and has been in practice for a long time. It implies that the trick is so well-established and well-known that it is often anticipated and easily recognized.
  • fish in troubled waters The idiom "fish in troubled waters" refers to a situation where someone takes advantage of or benefits from a chaotic or problematic environment. It typically implies that the person is opportunistically capitalizing on the difficulties faced by others to achieve their own gains.
  • repose trust/confidence/hope in sb/sth The idiom "repose trust/confidence/hope in sb/sth" means to have faith or rely on someone or something. It implies entrusting or putting one's belief, confidence, or hope in someone or something.
  • turn in your grave The idiom "turn in your grave" means to express disapproval or disgust towards a current situation or action, as if a deceased person were aware of it and reacting negatively. It implies that the action or situation goes against the beliefs, values, or expectations of the deceased person if they were alive.
  • twist/turn the knife (in the wound) The idiom "twist/turn the knife (in the wound)" refers to deliberately aggravating or intensifying someone's suffering or distress, usually by reminding them of a painful situation or making their situation worse. It implies a metaphorical act of inflicting additional pain or emotional distress on someone who is already hurting.
  • get your knickers in a twist The idiom "get your knickers in a twist" means to become overly upset, agitated, or anxious over a trivial or unimportant matter. It suggests that someone is overreacting or making a mountain out of a molehill. The term "knickers" refers to women's underpants, adding a humorous or slightly derogatory tone to the expression.
  • be in two minds To be in two minds means to be uncertain or indecisive about something. It refers to a state of having conflicting thoughts or opinions about a particular matter, making it hard to make a definite choice or decision.
  • be of two minds, at be in two minds The idiom "be of two minds" or "be in two minds" means to be uncertain or indecisive about something. It refers to a situation where a person is mentally torn between two choices or conflicting opinions, finding it challenging to make a definite decision.
  • like two peas in a pod The idiom "like two peas in a pod" is used to describe two people or things that are extremely similar or nearly identical in appearance, behavior, or characteristics. It signifies a strong resemblance between two entities, emphasizing the notion that they are inseparable or closely associated with one another, just like peas in the same pod.
  • a bird in the hand (is worth two in the bush) The idiom "a bird in the hand (is worth two in the bush)" means that it is better to hold onto something you already have, even if it may seem less appealing, rather than risking it for something potentially better but uncertain. It advises against taking unnecessary risks or giving up a certain advantage for uncertain gains.
  • up in the air The idiom "up in the air" means that something is uncertain, undecided, or unresolved.
  • be up in arms The idiom "be up in arms" means to be extremely angry, outraged, or deeply offended about something. It refers to the idea of someone figuratively taking up weapons or being ready for a fight due to strong feelings of indignation or protest.
  • be up to your eyes in sth The idiom "be up to your eyes in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular task, situation, or responsibility. It implies being fully occupied or deeply involved in a situation to the point where it becomes difficult to manage or handle anything else.
  • be up to your ears in sth The idiom "be up to your ears in sth" is used to convey being extremely busy, overwhelmed, or deeply involved in a particular activity or situation. It implies being completely surrounded or immersed in something, to the point where it becomes difficult to handle or manage.
  • be up to your neck in sth To be up to your neck in something means to be deeply involved or overwhelmed by a particular situation or responsibility. It implies that someone is completely engrossed or consumed by a task, problem, or commitment, leaving little time or room for anything else.
  • be up to your eyeballs in sth The idiom "be up to your eyeballs in sth" means being heavily involved or overwhelmed by a particular task, responsibility, or situation. It implies being completely immersed or deeply engaged in something, usually to the point of feeling overwhelmed or swamped.
  • come in useful The idiom "come in useful" means to be helpful or beneficial in a particular situation or circumstance. It refers to something or someone being of practical use or value when needed.
  • be nothing/not much/very little in it The idiom "be nothing/not much/very little in it" is typically used to indicate that there is very little difference or distinction between two options or choices. It suggests that the options are almost identical in terms of quality, value, significance, or outcome.
  • in view of sth The idiom "in view of something" refers to the consideration or acknowledgment of a particular thing or situation. It implies that a decision, action, or opinion is made after taking into account a specific circumstance or fact.
  • be (down) in black and white The idiom "be (down) in black and white" means that something is clearly and explicitly stated or written, leaving no room for misinterpretation. It signifies having official documentation or evidence that can be easily understood and referred to. The phrase originated from the practice of using black ink for writing and printing, contrasting with white paper, which makes it easily readable and indisputable.
  • be in the black The idiom "be in the black" refers to a financial situation or status where one has a positive or profitable balance, usually in reference to a business or personal finances. It indicates that the individual or organization is making a profit rather than experiencing a loss.
  • wait in the wings The idiom "wait in the wings" means to be ready or prepared to take action or take over a role when the opportunity arises, often implying being on standby or in a position of anticipation. It originates from theater, where actors would wait in the wings (i.e., the areas just offstage) for their cue to enter the stage.
  • lie in wait The idiom "lie in wait" means to hide or be in a concealed position, often with the intention of ambushing, attacking, or surprising someone or something. It implies patiently waiting for an opportunity or advantage to take action.
  • in the wake of sth The idiom "in the wake of something" refers to the period of time following a significant event or occurrence, usually a negative one. It means being influenced or affected by the aftermath or consequences of that particular event.
  • leave sth in your wake The idiom "leave something in your wake" generally means to leave behind a noticeable impact or consequence as a result of one's actions or presence. It refers to the idea of leaving a trail or aftermath behind after passing through a situation or place.
  • a walk in the park The idiom "a walk in the park" refers to a task, activity, or situation that is very easy, simple, and effortless to handle. It suggests that the endeavor is as effortless as taking a leisurely stroll in a park, with no challenges or difficulties involved.
  • be in the wars The idiom "be in the wars" typically means to be injured or to have various physical or medical ailments. It can also refer to being involved in a series of unfortunate or difficult situations.
  • all's fair in love and war The idiom "all's fair in love and war" means that in certain intense and competitive situations, such as love and warfare, there are no rules or restrictions on the actions people can take to achieve their goals. It suggests that anything goes and that people are willing to employ unconventional or unethical tactics to win or succeed.
  • wash your dirty linen in public The idiom "wash your dirty linen in public" refers to the act of discussing or exposing one's private or personal problems, conflicts, or embarrassing issues publicly or in front of others, rather than dealing with them in a private or discreet manner. It implies a lack of discretion or a tendency to air one's grievances or issues in a public and possibly inappropriate manner.
  • be in deep water The idiom "be in deep water" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation, often one that is beyond one's control or ability to handle. It suggests being in a troublesome or risky position where finding a solution or resolution may be hard or uncertain.
  • be in hot water The idiom "be in hot water" means to be in trouble or facing a difficult or problematic situation, typically as a result of one's own actions or decisions. It implies being in a state of discomfort, vulnerability, or being at the mercy of authority figures or consequences.
  • get into deep water, at be in deep water The idiom "get into deep water" or "be in deep water" means to be in a difficult or dangerous situation, often due to making a mistake or encountering unexpected challenges. It implies being overwhelmed or having trouble finding a solution to a problem, similar to being caught in deep, turbulent waters where it is challenging to swim or stay afloat.
  • get into hot water, at be in hot water The idiom "get into hot water" or "be in hot water" means to be in trouble or facing a difficult situation due to one's actions or behavior. It implies that the person is facing consequences or is in a problematic circumstance that may lead to negative outcomes or punishments.
  • be dead in the water The idiom "be dead in the water" means to be completely unsuccessful, stagnant or without any chance of progress or success. It refers to a situation or endeavor that is unable to move forward or make any significant progress, similar to a boat that has stopped moving in the water and cannot continue.
  • in no way The idiom "in no way" is used to negate or emphasize a point, meaning that something is definitely not true or cannot be done. It expresses the complete opposite or denial of a statement or possibility.
  • be in a bad way The idiom "be in a bad way" refers to being in a poor or difficult condition, whether physically, mentally, emotionally, or financially. It signifies a state of distress, trouble, or adversity.
  • be in the family way The idiom "be in the family way" is an old-fashioned, polite way of saying that a woman is pregnant or expecting a baby.
  • in all weathers The idiom "in all weathers" means in any situation or regardless of the circumstances. It implies that someone or something remains constant, consistent, or reliable even when facing challenges, difficulties, or varying conditions.
  • be worth your/its weight in gold The idiom "be worth your/its weight in gold" means that someone or something is extremely valuable or worthy of high regard. It implies that the person or object's value is equivalent to the weight of gold.
  • well in (with) The idiom "well in (with)" typically means to have a close or favorable relationship with someone or a group, usually resulting in being accepted, liked, or valued by them. It implies that the person involved is in good standing or has a positive reputation within a particular social or professional circle.
  • in well with, at well in (with) The idiom "in well with" or "at well in (with)" refers to being in a favorable or harmonious relationship or situation with someone or a group of people. It implies that the person is well-liked, accepted, or respected by others and has their support or friendship.
  • put a spoke in sb's wheel The idiom "put a spoke in someone's wheel" means to hinder or disrupt someone's plans, progress, or efforts. It refers to the act of inserting a spoke into the wheel of a bicycle or cart, which consequently causes it to stop or slow down.
  • when in Rome (do as the Romans do) The idiom "when in Rome (do as the Romans do)" means that when you are in a different place or culture, you should adapt and behave according to the customs and practices of that place, rather than imposing your own customs. It suggests that one should respect and blend in with the local culture when visiting a foreign country or community.
  • when sb was a (mere) twinkle in their father's eye The idiom "when sb was a (mere) twinkle in their father's eye" refers to a period of time before someone was born or conceived. It suggests that the person being referred to did not yet exist, and their existence was merely a possibility or a future plan in the mind of their parent.
  • be in a whirl The idiom "be in a whirl" means to be in a state of confusion, excitement, or intense activity. It implies feeling overwhelmed or experiencing a flurry of emotions or events.
  • what, how, why, etc. in the world The idiom "what, how, why, etc. in the world" is used to express strong surprise, confusion, or disbelief about something. It signifies the speaker's astonishment or inability to comprehend the situation or action being discussed. It is often used to emphasize the intensity of the speaker's emotions or to highlight the unusual or unexpected nature of the subject matter.
  • be pissing in the wind The idiom "be pissing in the wind" means to engage in a futile or pointless activity, similar to urinating against the wind where one's effort is wasted or goes in the wrong direction. It suggests that the action or endeavor is ineffective, impractical, or has no chance of success.
  • in the dead of night/winter The idiom "in the dead of night/winter" refers to a specific time that is deep into the night or winter season, usually indicating a period that is late, dark, and extremely quiet or cold. It emphasizes a time when most people are asleep or when winter conditions are at their peak.
  • in the depth(s) of winter The idiom "in the depth(s) of winter" refers to the coldest and harshest period of the winter season. It conveys a sense of extreme coldness, darkness, and possibly difficult or challenging circumstances.
  • in his/her/their wisdom The idiom "in his/her/their wisdom" refers to a sarcastic or ironic way of describing a decision or action made by someone in a position of authority or power. It implies that the decision or action is questionable, illogical, or unintelligent, despite being made by someone who is expected to possess wisdom or expertise in the matter.
  • in sb's infinite wisdom The idiom "in someone's infinite wisdom" is used sarcastically to highlight a decision or action made by someone that appears foolish or illogical. It implies that the person's wisdom is so vast or boundless that it resulted in a seemingly unwise or questionable choice.
  • the man/woman in sb's life The idiom "the man/woman in someone's life" refers to a significant romantic partner or a person who holds a special and influential role in someone's emotional or romantic experiences. It typically implies that this person is of great importance and has a profound impact on the individual's day-to-day life and overall happiness.
  • wrap sb (up) in cotton wool The idiom "wrap (someone) (up) in cotton wool" means to excessively protect or coddle someone, often with the intention of preventing any harm or difficulties from occurring to them. It refers to treating someone delicately or with excessive care, as if they were fragile and needed constant protection.
  • have a word in sb's ear The idiom "have a word in sb's ear" means to speak privately with someone in a confidential or secretive manner, usually to give them advice, information, or make a request. It implies a more intimate and personal conversation between two people.
  • in a word The idiom "in a word" is typically used to preface a succinct and concise summary or description of something, often emphasizing its essence or main point.
  • in sb's words The idiom "in sb's words" refers to stating or expressing something using the exact phrasing or language that someone else has used. It implies quoting or paraphrasing a person's own words to convey their perspective, opinions, or ideas.
  • in your own words The idiom "in your own words" means expressing something using your own way of speaking or writing, rather than directly quoting someone else or using predetermined phrases. It refers to expressing a concept or idea using one's own unique language and understanding.
  • in words of one syllable The idiom "in words of one syllable" means to explain or speak in a simple and easy-to-understand manner. It refers to using short and straightforward words to ensure clear communication without any complexity or confusion.
  • not get a word in edgeways The idiom "not get a word in edgeways" means to be unable to speak or contribute to a conversation because someone else is talking incessantly or dominating the discussion. It suggests that no matter how hard one tries to interject or say something, there is no opportunity to be heard due to the dominant presence of another person.
  • put in a good word for sb The idiom "put in a good word for someone" means to speak positively or recommend someone to another person or organization in order to help them secure a benefit or opportunity. It involves vouching for the person's character, abilities, or suitability for a particular situation. This act of advocacy or support can enhance someone's chances of being selected, hired, or chosen for something.
  • put words in/into sb's mouth The idiom "putting words in/into someone's mouth" means to attribute words or opinions to someone that they did not actually say or hold. It refers to the act of speaking on behalf of someone else, often in an attempt to misrepresent or manipulate their views.
  • be the last word in sth The idiom "be the last word in sth" means to be the most advanced, modern, or cutting-edge example of something. It implies that the thing being referred to is the ultimate or highest standard within its category.
  • not get a word in edgewise, at not get a word in edgeways The idiom "not get a word in edgewise" or "not get a word in edgeways" refers to someone being unable to speak or express their thoughts because another person is talking incessantly, dominating the conversation with their constant chatter. It implies that the person has no opportunity to interject or contribute to the discussion.
  • be in work/out of work The idiom "be in work/out of work" refers to someone's employment status, indicating whether they are currently employed or unemployed. "Being in work" means having a job or being employed, while "being out of work" means being unemployed or not having a job.
  • all in a day's work The idiom "all in a day's work" means that something, typically a task or responsibility, is considered routine, normal, or expected as part of one's job or daily activities. It implies that the task at hand is not particularly challenging or remarkable and should be handled without fuss or complaint.
  • go/come down in the world The idiom "go/come down in the world" means to experience a decline in social status or financial standing. It refers to a situation where someone has lost wealth, success or prestige and their overall situation has deteriorated.
  • go/come up in the world The idiom "go/come up in the world" refers to someone's advancement or improvement in their social or economic status. It implies that the person has achieved a higher position, wealth, or success than before.
  • in a world of your own The idiom "in a world of your own" means to be completely absorbed in one's own thoughts, daydreams, or imagination, often resulting in a lack of awareness or detachment from one's surroundings. It suggests that a person is mentally disconnected or preoccupied and not fully present or engaged with the present moment or reality.
  • in another world, at in a world of your own The idiom "in another world" or "in a world of your own" refers to a state where someone is mentally or emotionally detached from their surroundings or preoccupied with their own thoughts. It suggests that the person is not fully engaged or attentive to the present situation, often lost in their own imagination or mental space.
  • move up in the world, at go/come up in the world The idiom "move up in the world" or "go/come up in the world" refers to the act of improving one's social or financial status. It signifies achieving higher levels of success, recognition, or prosperity in life compared to one's previous situation. This idiom implies a positive shift in circumstances, indicating progress, advancement, and upward mobility in one's personal or professional life.
  • move down in the world, at go/come down in the world The idiom "move down in the world" or "go/come down in the world" refers to the decline in social status or financial prosperity. It is used to describe a situation where one's position or circumstances deteriorate compared to their previous state, indicating a decrease in their social standing, wealth, or success.
  • come/go down in the world The idiom "come/go down in the world" means to experience a decline in social status, wealth, or overall standing in society. It refers to a person's descent from a higher position or level of success to a lower one.
  • without a care in the world The idiom "without a care in the world" means to be completely carefree or unconcerned about anything. It suggests a state of being peaceful, relaxed, and not burdened by worries or responsibilities.
  • not a care in the world, at without a care in the world The idiom "not a care in the world" or "without a care in the world" implies a state of being completely unconcerned or free from worry or serious responsibility. It describes a person who doesn't have any immediate concerns or troubles, experiencing a sense of blissful contentment or carefree happiness.
  • for anything (in the world) The idiom "for anything (in the world)" is used to emphasize that someone is willing to do or give something to a great degree or under any circumstances. It portrays a strong commitment, dedication, or preference without any hesitation.
  • be (living) in a dream world The idiom "be (living) in a dream world" means to have unrealistic or impractical beliefs, expectations, or perceptions about a situation. It implies that someone is disconnected from reality and may be overly optimistic or oblivious to practical limitations.
  • the oldest profession (in the world) The idiom "the oldest profession (in the world)" refers to prostitution, suggesting that selling sex is the oldest occupation known to humankind.
  • be wrapped up in sth/sb The idiom "be wrapped up in something/somebody" means to be fully engrossed, absorbed, or preoccupied with something or someone, often to the extent that it becomes the central focus or priority in one's life. It implies being deeply involved or immersed in a particular activity or relationship.
  • wrap yourself in the flag The idiom "wrap yourself in the flag" typically means to use patriotism or national pride to defend or justify one's actions or beliefs. It refers to the act of symbolically covering oneself with the national flag as a way to evoke a sense of patriotic duty or righteousness.
  • written in the stars The idiom "written in the stars" refers to the belief that destiny or fate has predetermined certain outcomes or events in one's life. It suggests that something is inevitable or bound to happen, as if it has been written or planned by a higher power.
  • year in, year out The idiom "year in, year out" is used to describe something that happens consistently, without interruption or change, over a long period of time. It implies a repetitive nature or a consistent pattern of occurrence, irrespective of external factors or circumstances.
  • in years, at for years
  • in the zone The idiom "in the zone" refers to a state of elevated focus, concentration, and performance where someone is completely absorbed in their task or activity, often experiencing a sense of flow. It implies that the individual is performing at their best and is fully immersed in the present moment, able to disregard distractions and perform with utmost efficiency and skill.
  • in the country of the blind, the oneeyed man is king The idiom "in the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king" refers to a situation where someone with limited or mediocre abilities is considered superior or extraordinary, solely because everyone else around them is even less competent or knowledgeable. It implies that even a person with a slight advantage or skill can appear remarkably outstanding when surrounded by individuals lacking the same abilities.
  • in the blink of an eye The idiom "in the blink of an eye" means that something happens or occurs very quickly, almost instantaneously or without any delay.
  • be in the/sb's blood The idiom "be in the/someone's blood" refers to a natural or innate tendency or talent that runs in a person's family or is a fundamental part of their nature. It suggests that a specific skill, behavior, or trait is inherited or deeply ingrained in someone's personality or abilities.
  • in cold blood The idiom "in cold blood" is generally used to describe an act that is done deliberately, without any emotion or pity, and often with premeditation or a lack of remorse or empathy. It refers to actions that are committed in a cool, calculated manner, devoid of any passion or compassionate consideration for others.
  • steeped in blood The idiom "steeped in blood" typically refers to something or someone that is deeply involved or tainted with violence, crime, or bloodshed. It implies a strong association with gruesome or immoral acts, often indicating a history or association of violent actions.
  • once in a blue moon The idiom "once in a blue moon" is used to describe something that happens very rarely or infrequently. It refers to the occurrence of a second full moon within a calendar month, which is considered quite uncommon and happens approximately once every two to three years.
  • until you are blue in the face The idiom "until you are blue in the face" means to continue doing or saying something to the point of exhaustion or frustration, often resulting in no change or impact on the situation.
  • the boys in blue The idiom "the boys in blue" typically refers to the police or law enforcement officers. It is often used to reference police officers who wear uniforms that are usually blue in color.
  • at/in one fell swoop The idiom "at/in one fell swoop" means completing or accomplishing something in a single, swift, and decisive action or event, typically with significant or far-reaching consequences. It refers to accomplishing multiple tasks, goals, or changes with efficiency and speed.
  • pale beside sth/sb, at pale in comparison The idiom "pale beside something/someone" or "pale in comparison" means to appear weak, inferior, or less significant when compared to something or someone else. It suggests that the other thing or person is much more impressive, outstanding, or influential.
  • sb's heart is in his/her boots The idiom "sb's heart is in his/her boots" means that someone is feeling extremely discouraged, disheartened, or filled with intense sadness or fear. It implies that the person's morale or spirit has sunk, leaving them emotionally defeated.
  • caught in the crossfire The definition of the idiom "caught in the crossfire" is being unintentionally involved or affected by a conflict or dispute between two or more opposing sides. It often refers to an individual or a group who becomes a victim or suffers the consequences amid a situation where conflicting parties are exchanging gunfire or engaged in a heated argument.
  • feel it in your bones To "feel it in your bones" means to have a strong intuitive sense or deep conviction about something, often without any tangible evidence or logical reasoning. It refers to a strong gut feeling or a deep instinctive knowledge that is difficult to explain or disregard. This idiom implies a deep understanding or certainty about a situation or future event, as if one can sense it at a fundamental level within their being.
  • be in sb's good/bad books The idiom "be in someone's good/bad books" means to be in someone's favor or disfavor, respectively. It suggests that someone's actions or behavior have influenced their opinion or judgment of you, leading them to either view you positively or negatively.
  • in my book "In my book" is an idiomatic expression that means in one's personal opinion or according to one's personal judgment. It signifies a subjective viewpoint or assessment based on someone's preferences, values, or beliefs. It is often used to emphasize that the following statement is true or important in the speaker's perspective.
  • have your nose in a book The idiom "have your nose in a book" means that someone is deeply engrossed or absorbed in reading a book. It implies that the person is so captivated by the content of the book that they are completely focused on it, often to the extent of disregarding their surroundings or other activities.
  • put the boot in The idiom "put the boot in" typically means to deliver a forceful or merciless attack, either physically or verbally, often when someone is already in a vulnerable or weakened position. It emphasizes inflicting further damage or taking advantage of a person's misfortune.
  • in all my (born) days The idiom "in all my (born) days" is an expression used to emphasize that in a person's entire lifetime or experience, they have never seen or encountered something before. It highlights astonishment, disbelief, or amazement at the situation or event being referred to.
  • jump in with both feet The idiom "jump in with both feet" means to enthusiastically and wholeheartedly start or participate in something without hesitation or reservation. It suggests diving into a situation or task with complete commitment and a readiness to take on challenges or risks.
  • have a foot in both camps The idiom "have a foot in both camps" means to be involved or associated with two conflicting or opposing parties, groups, or ideas. It implies the ability or status of someone to maintain connections or affiliations with different sides of an argument, situation, or issue without fully committing to either. They often maintain a neutral position, giving them a unique perspective or advantage.
  • by/in leaps and bounds The idiom "by/in leaps and bounds" means making rapid progress or improvement in a significant or noticeable manner. It refers to advancement that occurs quickly and in large increments, as if jumping forward in large strides.
  • be in the process of doing sth The idiom "be in the process of doing something" means to currently be engaged or actively involved in the act or procedure of doing something. It implies that the action or task is ongoing and has not yet been completed.
  • in the brain/looks department The idiom "in the brain/looks department" is used to compare or contrast someone's mental capacity and physical appearance. It refers to evaluating or assessing someone's intelligence or attractiveness.
  • a place for everything and everything in its place The idiom "a place for everything and everything in its place" means that everything should have its designated spot or purpose, and it should always be returned to that spot after use or completion. It emphasizes the importance of organization and orderliness in managing one's belongings or tasks.
  • in your stocking(ed) feet The idiom "in your stocking(ed) feet" refers to being barefoot or wearing only socks, typically without shoes. It emphasizes the absence of footwear and suggests being in a relaxed or casual state.
  • got it in one! The idiom "got it in one!" means that someone has correctly guessed or understood something immediately, without any mistakes or need for further explanation. It implies that the person's response or comprehension was absolutely spot-on.
  • broad in the beam The phrase "broad in the beam" is an idiom used to describe someone or something as having a wide or large waist or hips. It typically refers to a person who has a fuller figure or a wider body shape.
  • in broad daylight The idiom "in broad daylight" refers to something that is done or seen openly and without any attempt to hide or conceal it, typically referring to an activity or event that would normally take place under the cover of darkness or in secret. It emphasizes the audacity and lack of concern for being caught or noticed.
  • beard the lion (in his/her den) To "beard the lion (in his/her den)" means to confront or challenge someone, usually a person in a position of power or authority, in their own territory or domain. The idiom implies a brave and direct confrontation, often against someone who may be difficult to approach or defy.
  • sb's heart is in his/her mouth The idiom "sb's heart is in his/her mouth" refers to a state of extreme fear, anxiety, or anticipation. It implies that someone's heart rate has increased to the point where it feels as if their heart is pounding in their mouth. It is often used to describe a situation that evokes intense emotions or nervousness.
  • her/his heart is in the right place The idiom "her/his heart is in the right place" means that someone has good intentions or good moral values, even if their actions or decisions may not always reflect it. It is used to emphasize that their underlying intent or concern for others is genuine and sincere.
  • wouldn't know sth if it hit you in the face, at wouldn't know sth if you fell over one/it The idiom "wouldn't know something if it hit you in the face" means that someone is very oblivious or ignorant about a particular thing, even if it is extremely obvious or apparent. It implies that the person is so unaware that they wouldn't recognize the thing even if it had a direct impact or was right in front of them. A similar variation of the idiom is "wouldn't know something if you fell over one/it," which suggests that the person would still remain clueless about something even if they stumbled or had a physical encounter with it.
  • in ones and twos The idiom "in ones and twos" refers to doing something or occurring in small groups or gradually, rather than all at once or in large numbers.
  • in this day and age The idiom "in this day and age" refers to the present time or current era, often used to highlight the changes or advancements that have occurred compared to the past. It implies that the speaker believes certain events, practices, or beliefs are no longer appropriate, considering the progress or developments made in society.
  • in/by fits and starts The idiom "in/by fits and starts" means to progress, work, or happen irregularly or intermittently, often in an unsteady or inconsistent manner. It describes a situation or activity that lacks consistency and experiences periods of abrupt starts and stops.
  • go (and) jump in the lake The idiom "go (and) jump in the lake" is an informal expression that is used to dismiss or reject someone's suggestion, demand, or request in a light-hearted or slightly sarcastic manner. It implies telling the person to go away or go do something unimportant or trivial, akin to taking a swim in a lake.
  • go in one ear and out the other The idiom "go in one ear and out the other" means that something is easily forgotten or completely ignored. It refers to the situation where information or advice is heard but not comprehended or retained.
  • in buckets The idiom "in buckets" means in large quantities or abundantly.
  • a drop in the bucket, at a drop in the ocean The idiom "a drop in the bucket, at a drop in the ocean" is used to describe something that is considered insignificant or a small, insignificant part of a larger whole. It suggests that the contribution or impact being made is so minimal that it would have little effect on the overall situation or outcome.
  • Rome wasn't built in a day The idiom "Rome wasn't built in a day" means that achieving something significant or substantial takes time and effort. It reminds us that great accomplishments or developments require patience, perseverance, and a long-term commitment. It emphasizes the need for gradual progress and discourages expecting immediate results.
  • fall into line, at fall in line The idiom "fall into line" or "fall in line" means to conform or comply with established rules, standards, or expectations. It refers to the act of joining a group or following a particular course of action that is considered acceptable or desired within a given situation. It suggests aligning oneself with others and obeying the prescribed norms or instructions.
  • the fat is in the fire The idiom "the fat is in the fire" means that a situation has become difficult or dangerous and there is no way to avoid the consequences. It implies that a mistake or action has been taken that cannot be undone, and now the negative consequences are inevitable.
  • burn a hole in sb's pocket The idiom "burn a hole in someone's pocket" means having a strong desire to spend money; feeling compelled to spend money quickly or impulsively.
  • be in business The idiom "be in business" means to be engaged in or involved in a particular activity or occupation, typically with the intention of making a profit. It suggests being active or functioning in a given field or industry.
  • not be in the business of sth The idiom "not be in the business of something" means that someone or something is not involved or concerned with a particular activity, task, or responsibility. It suggests that something is not within their scope of expertise or interest. It often implies a lack of intention or desire to participate or engage in a specific matter.
  • in all but name The idiom "in all but name" is used to describe something or someone that is essentially or effectively the same as what is being referred to, even though it may not be officially or explicitly recognized or named as such. It suggests that the only thing lacking is formal acknowledgment or recognition.
  • pain in the ass/butt, at a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "pain in the ass/butt" (alternatively "pain in the arse/backside") is an informal expression used to describe something or someone that is extremely irritating, frustrating, or troublesome. It refers to a situation or individual that causes inconvenience, discomfort, or annoyance.
  • a kick in the butt/pants, at a kick up the arse/backside The idiom "a kick in the butt/pants" or "a kick up the arse/backside" refers to a metaphorical action of receiving a strong dose of motivation, often as a result of someone being scolded, criticized, or pushed to improve their efforts or behavior. It implies a figurative kick that serves as a wake-up call to take action or make necessary changes.
  • in my day The idiom "in my day" is used to express nostalgia or a feeling of superiority about the past. It refers to a time period in the speaker's personal experience, typically their youth, implying that things were different or better during that time.
  • in light of, at in the light of sth The idiom "in light of" or "in the light of" is used to indicate that something is being considered or evaluated in relation to a particular event, circumstance, or new information. It suggests that a decision or judgment is being made based on a fresh perspective or the additional insight provided by the mentioned factor.
  • in advance The phrase "in advance" refers to an action or event that occurs before a particular time, deadline, or expected occurrence. It typically indicates that something is done or prepared beforehand, with the intention of being ready or ahead in time.
  • in advance of sth/sb The idiom "in advance of something/somebody" means to happen or occur before a particular event or person, or to be in a position or situation ahead of someone or something. It implies being prepared or making arrangements beforehand.
  • in the can The idiom "in the can" means that something is completed or finished, often referring to a project or task that has been successfully accomplished or concluded. It originates from the era of film production when completed movie reels were stored in metal film cans.
  • go cap in hand to sb The idiom "go cap in hand to someone" means to humbly approach or request something from someone, often with a clear sense of vulnerability or dependence. It suggests that the person seeking assistance or favor feels subordinate to the other person and is willing to beg or plead to fulfill their need.
  • a feather in your cap The idiom "a feather in your cap" refers to an accomplishment, achievement, or honor that a person can be proud of and is often used as a symbol of success or recognition. It can represent something noteworthy or impressive that adds to one's reputation or personal achievements.
  • your heart isn't in it The idiom "your heart isn't in it" means that someone lacks enthusiasm, passion, or interest in something. It implies that the person is not emotionally invested or committed to the task or activity at hand.
  • in the buff The idiom "in the buff" refers to being completely naked or undressed without any clothing or covering on the body.
  • in the club The idiom "in the club" typically refers to a person being accepted or included in a particular group or society. It often signifies that the person is part of an exclusive or privileged circle and enjoys the benefits or advantages associated with it.
  • in the air The idiom "in the air" refers to a situation or feeling that is prevalent, widespread, or sensed by many people, often hinting at an imminent event or change. It can also mean a sense of uncertainty or anticipation in the atmosphere.
  • in the pink The idiom "in the pink" means to be in very good health or in a perfect condition, both mentally and physically.
  • in the raw The idiom "in the raw" refers to something that is in its natural or original state, exposed or uncovered without any modifications, alterations, or embellishments. It typically describes something that is unprocessed, crude, or unrefined.
  • in the flesh The idiom "in the flesh" means to meet or see someone in person, as opposed to seeing or knowing them through a picture, video, or description. It implies the actual presence or appearance of a person.
  • put sb in their place The idiom "put somebody in their place" means to assert authority or dominance over someone who has been acting in an arrogant or disrespectful manner, making them aware of their lower position or role in a particular situation. It is often used when someone is being boastful, condescending, or trying to take advantage of others.
  • point sb towards/in the direction of sth The idiom "point sb towards/in the direction of sth" means to provide guidance or advice to someone on how to find or pursue something. It can be used metaphorically to indicate guiding someone towards a particular goal, destination, solution, or opportunity.
  • be in the cards, at be on the cards The idiom "be in the cards" or "be on the cards" means that something is likely or possible to happen in the future. It suggests that there is a reasonable chance or probability of a specific event or outcome occurring. This idiom originates from the practice of fortune-telling or divination using playing cards, in which the cards are used to predict and indicate potential events or situations.
  • what's sth in aid of? The idiom "what's [something] in aid of?" is typically used to question the purpose or benefit of a particular action or event. It expresses skepticism about the usefulness or value of something.
  • in harness with The idiom "in harness with" is used to describe a situation where individuals or entities collaborate closely or work together towards a common goal. It implies that they are functioning as a team, coordinating their efforts in a cooperative manner. The phrase "in harness" conjures the image of a team of horses working together, all pulling in the same direction to accomplish a task. Thus, "in harness with" suggests collaboration and mutual cooperation.
  • in line with sth The idiom "in line with something" means to be aligned or consistent with a particular standard, expectation, or guideline. It implies that someone or something is following or conforming to the indicated criteria or direction.
  • have it in you The idiom "have it in you" means to possess the necessary abilities, skills, or qualities to accomplish something or exhibit a particular behavior. It suggests that someone has the capability or capacity to do or be something despite initial doubt, hesitation, or uncertainty.
  • in your face The idiom "in your face" is typically used to describe something or someone that is bold, confrontational, or aggressive in their behavior, often intended to provoke or challenge someone. It refers to a direct, upfront approach without concern for politeness or subtlety.
  • in your dreams! The idiom "in your dreams!" is an exclamation used to dismiss or reject an unrealistic or unlikely proposition or idea. It is often used sarcastically to convey that something is impossible or out of reach.
  • your luck's in! The idiom "your luck's in!" is used to express to someone that they are experiencing or about to experience a stroke of good luck or fortune. It implies that the person is in a favorable situation or that things are working out in their favor.
  • be in command (of yourself) The idiom "be in command (of yourself)" means to be in control of one's actions, emotions, or behavior. It implies maintaining composure, self-discipline, and a sense of authority over oneself, especially in challenging situations.
  • cover yourself in/with glory The idiom "cover yourself in/with glory" means to achieve great success or gain exceptional recognition in a particular endeavor. It implies a situation where someone has accomplished something outstanding, often resulting in admiration, praise, or honor.
  • castles in the air The idiom "castles in the air" is used to describe unrealistic or improbable fantasies or plans that have little chance of becoming a reality. It refers to ambitions or dreams that lack practicality or feasibility, often suggesting that they are built on thin air and likely to dissipate or collapse.
  • not have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "not have a cat in hell's chance" is used to mean that someone or something has no possibility or chance of success or achieving a desired outcome. It implies that the situation or odds are incredibly difficult or impossible to overcome, much like a cat surviving in the fiery depths of hell.
  • be/get in on the ground floor The idiom "be/get in on the ground floor" refers to being involved or starting something at its early stages or inception. It often implies having the advantage of being part of a new opportunity or venture from the beginning, which could potentially lead to greater benefits, success, or influence in the future.
  • an iron hand/fist in a velvet glove The idiom "an iron hand/fist in a velvet glove" refers to someone who appears gentle and mild on the surface, but in reality, they possess a strong and decisive approach in their actions or decision-making. It suggests that while a person may seem kind and benevolent, they also have the ability and willingness to exercise power and authority when necessary.
  • take sb's name in vain The idiom "take someone's name in vain" means to use someone's name disrespectfully or irreverently, especially in a casual or thoughtless manner. It typically refers to mentioning or invoking a person's name without genuine reverence or without proper regard for their importance or significance. This expression often carries a religious connotation, as it originally derived from the biblical commandment "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain" which admonishes against using God's name flippantly or for trivial purposes. However, the idiom is commonly used more broadly to refer to any situation where a person's name is used inappropriately or without due respect.
  • take your life in your hands The idiom "take your life in your hands" means to engage in a dangerous or risky activity where one's safety and well-being are at great risk. It implies assuming full responsibility for the potential consequences or dangers involved in a particular situation or decision.
  • in good, bad, etc. repair The idiom "in good, bad, etc. repair" refers to the physical condition or state of something, typically an object or a place. It describes how well-maintained or functioning the item is. If something is in good repair, it means it is in excellent or well-maintained condition. Conversely, if something is in bad repair, it indicates that it is in poor or deteriorated condition, in need of repair or maintenance. The phrase can also be used with other adjectives, such as "fair," "excellent," or "poor," to further specify the condition of the object or place.
  • rot in jail, prison, etc. The idiom "rot in jail, prison, etc." is an expression used to express one's strong desire for someone to be incarcerated for a long period of time and suffer the consequences of their actions. It conveys the idea that the person deserves to remain imprisoned and experience the negative aspects of confinement.
  • have a nice, good, etc. line in sth
  • be an actor, cook, etc. in the making The idiom "be an actor, cook, etc. in the making" refers to someone who has the potential, talent, or qualities to become a successful actor, cook, or any other profession mentioned. It implies that the person is currently on the path of developing their skills and abilities in a particular field, and they have the potential to excel in it in the future.
  • the proof of the pudding (is in the eating) The idiom "the proof of the pudding (is in the eating)" means that the true value or quality of something can only be determined through firsthand experience or by trying it, rather than solely relying on appearances, promises, or descriptions. It suggests that the evidence or final judgment comes from the practical application or consumption of something, whether it is a product, idea, or action.
  • one in a million The idiom "one in a million" is used to describe something or someone extremely rare, unique, exceptional, or extraordinary. It implies that the subject being referred to is exceptionally special or outstanding, standing out from a large group or population.
  • be one in a million The idiom "be one in a million" means to be extremely rare, unique, or outstanding. It emphasizes the exceptional qualities or characteristics of a person or thing, highlighting that they stand out from the rest.
  • keep a civil tongue in your head The idiom "keep a civil tongue in your head" means to speak respectfully and refrain from using offensive or rude language. It suggests exercising self-control and manners in one's speech to maintain a polite and constructive communication.
  • be in the clear The idiom "be in the clear" means to be free from any problems, danger, or suspicion. It implies being in a situation where there are no obstacles or risks, and there is no cause for worry or concern.
  • skeleton in the/your cupboard/closet The idiom "skeleton in the/your cupboard/closet" refers to a shameful or embarrassing secret, usually from one's past, that they would rather keep hidden or undisclosed. It implies that the secret is something that, if revealed, could damage one's reputation or cause embarrassment or scandal. The idiom suggests that the secret is locked away, unseen, and hanging like a skeleton in a cupboard or closet.
  • be in the pudding club The idiom "be in the pudding club" is an old-fashioned British expression that means to be pregnant.
  • in the cold light of day The idiom "in the cold light of day" means to see or evaluate something in a clear, realistic, and objective manner, usually after the initial emotions or excitement surrounding it have faded. It refers to examining a situation, decision, or event with a more rational and unemotional perspective.
  • leave sb out in the cold The idiom "leave sb out in the cold" means to exclude or neglect someone, usually causing them to feel rejected, ignored, or left without support or assistance in a particular situation.
  • be backward in coming forward The idiom "be backward in coming forward" means to be hesitant, shy, or reluctant to speak up or take action in a particular situation. It refers to someone who often holds back, lacks assertiveness, or is slow to express their thoughts, opinions, or desires.
  • in commission The idiom "in commission" means that something is actively being used or operated. It refers to a state where equipment, machinery, or systems are functioning and ready for use. It can also imply that someone is officially carrying out their duties or responsibilities.
  • nose in the air The idiom "nose in the air" refers to someone who displays an attitude of superiority or arrogance. It suggests that the person behaves as if they consider themselves better than others and often looks down upon or ignores those they perceive as inferior.
  • be in good company The idiom "be in good company" means to be in the presence or association of esteemed, respected, or accomplished individuals. It suggests that being surrounded by such individuals reflects positively on one's own character or achievements.
  • in the strictest confidence "Strictest confidence" is an idiom used to indicate that information or a secret should be kept confidential and not disclosed to anyone else under any circumstances. It suggests the highest level of trust and confidentiality between the speaker and the listener.
  • in all conscience The idiom "in all conscience" means to act in a way that is morally right or ethically acceptable. It refers to making a decision or taking a certain course of action based on one's own sense of honesty, integrity, and what is considered morally upright. It implies doing something without guilt, in accordance with one's principles, and with a clear conscience.
  • in good conscience, at in all conscience The idiom "in good conscience" or "in all conscience" describes an action or decision made with a clear and ethical mindset. It means to act or judge based on one's own sense of right and wrong, considering moral values or principles. It implies that the person believes they are acting in accordance with their own conscience and can justify their actions morally.
  • a couple of shakes, at in two shakes (of a lamb's tail) The idiom "a couple of shakes" or "in two shakes (of a lamb's tail)" refers to a very short period of time or a quick action. It can be used to convey that something will be done or completed rapidly, implying that it will take no more than a few moments or "shakes" to accomplish. The idiom is often used in casual or informal conversations.
  • have your day in court The idiom "have your day in court" means to have the opportunity to present one's case or argument before a judge or jury in a legal proceeding. It refers to the right to a fair trial or legal process, where one can defend themselves or seek justice for a grievance.
  • the ball is in sb's court The idiom "the ball is in sb's court" means that it is someone else's turn or responsibility to take action or make a decision in a situation. It implies that the person has the power to influence or control the outcome, and now it is up to them to take initiative.
  • not/never in your wildest dreams The idiom "not/never in your wildest dreams" refers to something that is extremely unlikely or unimaginable to happen or be true. It implies that the event or outcome is beyond one's imagination or expectations.
  • have friends in high places The idiom "have friends in high places" means to have influential or powerful connections or contacts who can assist or support you in achieving goals or dealing with problems. It implies having connections to individuals in positions of authority, wealth, or influence, which can be advantageous in various aspects of life.
  • the jewel in the crown The idiom "the jewel in the crown" refers to something or someone that is the most valuable, impressive, or important part of a larger whole. It alludes to the jewel that adorns the crown worn by a monarch, symbolizing the most precious and treasured possession.
  • in full cry The idiom "in full cry" refers to a situation where people or animals, particularly hounds, are pursuing or chasing something excitedly and vigorously. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone passionately and actively engaged in a task or pursuit.
  • be dancing in the streets The idiom "be dancing in the streets" means to be extremely joyful, ecstatic, or exuberant, typically in response to a highly positive or celebratory event or outcome. It conveys a sense of overwhelming happiness or delight, often suggesting that the person or people involved are so overjoyed that they cannot contain their excitement and express it openly by dancing in public spaces.
  • be in the dark The idiom "be in the dark" refers to a state of being uninformed, lacking knowledge, or unaware of a particular situation or information. It implies being clueless or ignorant about something.
  • a leap in the dark The idiom "a leap in the dark" refers to taking a risk or making a decision without being fully aware of the potential consequences or outcome. It implies an act of uncertainty or venturing into the unknown.
  • day in day out The idiom "day in day out" is used to describe repetitive or monotonous tasks or routine activities that are done continuously, without a break or variation. It implies that something is done consistently and regularly, without any change or respite.
  • back in the day The idiom "back in the day" refers to a time in the past, often nostalgic and remembered fondly, when referring to events, trends, or customs that were prevalent or significant during that specific period. It is typically used to reminisce about a previous, simpler time or to highlight how things have changed since then.
  • late in the day The idiom "late in the day" typically means that something is happening or being done at a point in time when it is too late to have a significant impact or effect. It refers to a situation or action occurring towards the end of a process or event, when it is no longer advantageous or useful.
  • in your salad days The idiom "in your salad days" refers to the period of one's youth, typically referring to a time when someone is at their most inexperienced, naive, or carefree. It symbolizes a time of youthful exuberance and innocence, similar to the freshness and vibrancy associated with a salad.
  • be in at the death The idiom "be in at the death" typically refers to being present or involved until the very end or the culmination of a certain event or situation, often a difficult or dramatic one. It can imply persistence, determination, or resolve in seeing something through to its conclusion, even in challenging circumstances.
  • jump in at the deep end The idiom "jump in at the deep end" means to start or begin an undertaking or activity without prior experience or preparation, often involving taking a risk or being thrust into a challenging situation. It implies jumping directly into the most difficult or advanced aspects, rather than starting with the basics.
  • in all The idiom "in all" typically means the total sum or amount of something, considering all the individual components or items. It is often used to indicate a comprehensive or complete quantity.
  • all done in, at done in The idiom "all done in" or "at done in" is used to describe someone who is physically or mentally exhausted, worn out, or completely tired. It implies that the person has exerted a lot of effort, possibly to the point of being unable to continue.
  • in a rut The idiom "in a rut" means being stuck in a monotonous or unproductive routine or pattern, often leading to a feeling of boredom, frustration, or lack of progress in one's personal or professional life. It implies a state of being stuck in a fixed and unvarying situation, lacking inspiration or motivation to make any significant changes.
  • in a flash The idiom "in a flash" means to happen very quickly or suddenly, almost instantaneously.
  • in a dream The phrase "in a dream" is an idiomatic expression that is used to describe something that seems too good, unreal, or impossible to happen in reality. It implies a situation or experience that is imaginary, fanciful, or idealized, similar to how one might envision things in a dream.
  • in a pinch, at at a pinch The idiom "in a pinch" or "at a pinch" refers to a situation where one is facing difficulty or a tight spot, usually in terms of resources, time, or options. It signifies a moment when immediate action or a quick solution is required, even if it may not be ideal or preferred. In such circumstances, one may have to make do with what is available or come up with creative alternatives to overcome the challenge or problem at hand.
  • (all) in one piece The idiom "(all) in one piece" means to be unharmed or undamaged after a dangerous or risky situation. It can also refer to completing a journey or task without any major problems or difficulties.
  • put all your eggs in one basket The idiom "put all your eggs in one basket" means to invest or risk everything in a single venture, idea, or opportunity, rather than diversifying or spreading the risk across multiple options. It advises against relying solely on one particular thing, as the failure or loss of that one thing could result in losing everything.
  • in all honesty/seriousness/truthfulness The idiom "in all honesty/seriousness/truthfulness" is used to emphasize that what is being said is sincere, genuine, and truthful. It indicates that someone is speaking without any pretense, deception, or exaggeration. It conveys a sense of complete honesty and authenticity in the situation or statement being made.
  • or die in the attempt The idiom "or die in the attempt" means being determined to achieve a particular goal or objective, even if it involves great risk or potentially fatal consequences. It emphasizes an unwavering commitment or dedication to the task at hand, indicating that one is willing to go to any lengths, even risking their life, in order to accomplish it.
  • be/live in each other's pockets The idiom "be/live in each other's pockets" refers to people who spend a lot of time together or are in constant close proximity to each other. It implies a close and sometimes overwhelming relationship where individuals have little personal space or independence.
  • draw/pull in your horns The idiom "draw/pull in your horns" means to become more cautious, reserved, or submissive in one's behavior or actions, especially after a period of being assertive, aggressive, or self-confident. It refers to the action of retracting or restraining oneself, like a horned animal withdrawing its horns to avoid confrontation or danger.
  • be in a different league The idiom "be in a different league" means to be significantly superior or in a class of one's own compared to others in terms of skill, ability, or quality. It suggests that a person or thing is on a level that surpasses or stands above the competition or average.
  • be wreathed in smiles The idiom "be wreathed in smiles" means to be displaying a wide, joyful, and radiant smile. It typically refers to a person who is extremely happy, content, or amused, so much so that their face is adorned with smiles, resembling a wreath.
  • dig your heels in The idiom "dig your heels in" means to firmly refuse to change your opinion, attitude, or course of action, even if there is opposition or pressure to do so. It implies a stubborn determination to stand your ground and not give in to outside pressures.
  • poke/dig sb in the ribs The idiom "poke/dig someone in the ribs" means to jab or nudge someone with one's elbow or fist, usually in a playful or secretive manner, in order to draw their attention to something or to convey a message.
  • the rot sets in The idiom "the rot sets in" refers to a situation where a process or structure begins to deteriorate or decline due to internal problems, inefficiencies, or corruption. It suggests that once this deterioration starts, it is difficult to stop or reverse.
  • have your head in the clouds The idiom "have your head in the clouds" means to be daydreaming or not paying attention to reality. It refers to someone who is often lost in their own thoughts or lacks attention to practical matters.
  • in knots The idiom "in knots" means to be extremely nervous, anxious, or tense. It refers to the feeling of one's stomach or muscles tightening into knots due to stress or worry.
  • go up in flames The idiom "go up in flames" means that something, typically a plan, idea, or situation, fails dramatically or disastrously. It refers to a sudden and complete failure or destruction, often with significant consequences.
  • in fits (of laughter) The idiom "in fits (of laughter)" refers to a state of uncontrollable laughter or fits of hysterical amusement. It suggests that someone is laughing so hard that they are unable to control themselves and may experience outbursts of laughter at irregular intervals.
  • done in The idiom "done in" means to be exhausted or very tired, often from physical or mental exertion.
  • head over heels (in love) The idiom "head over heels (in love)" means to be completely and deeply in love with someone. It refers to a state of overwhelming or intense emotions, where one is consumed by their feelings for another person.
  • be in bondage to sth The definition of the idiom "be in bondage to something" means to be controlled or dominated by something, often an addiction, habit, or some other form of negative influence. It suggests being trapped or enslaved by a particular thing or situation, unable to free oneself from its hold.
  • in ribbons The idiom "in ribbons" typically means to be torn apart or completely destroyed, usually in a physical sense. It suggests that something has been completely disintegrated or reduced to small, ragged pieces, resembling the state of torn ribbons. This expression can also be used metaphorically to describe the emotional state of someone who is utterly devastated or emotionally broken.
  • do sb's head in The idiom "do sb's head in" means to annoy, confuse, or bother someone to the point of frustration or mental exhaustion. It implies that someone's actions or behavior are causing significant irritation or distress to another person.
  • butter wouldn't melt in sb's mouth The idiom "butter wouldn't melt in someone's mouth" is used to describe a person who appears innocent, pure, or overly sweet and wholesome, often to mask their true cunning, manipulative, or mischievous nature. It implies that the person's outward appearance does not reflect their true character or intentions.
  • a dog in the manger The idiom "a dog in the manger" refers to a person who selfishly withholds or prevents others from using or enjoying something that they themselves have no use for or interest in. It originates from the fable "The Dog in the Manger," attributed to Aesop, in which a dog lies in a manger filled with hay, preventing the other animals from eating it. Consequently, this phrase is often used to describe someone who exhibits possessiveness, spitefulness, or a lack of altruism.
  • get a/your foot in the door The idiom "get a/your foot in the door" means to establish an initial connection or opportunity, often by gaining entry or access to a particular industry, organization, or group. It refers to the first step towards achieving a goal or starting a career, providing an initial chance to demonstrate skills, abilities, or potential for further progress or success.
  • down in one The idiom "down in one" refers to the action of consuming the entirety of a beverage or drink in a single gulp or swallow, without pausing or taking breaks. It is often used to depict a person's impressive ability to finish their drink quickly.
  • (down) in the dumps The idiom "(down) in the dumps" means to feel sad, depressed, or in low spirits. It refers to a state of feeling downhearted or disheartened.
  • be down in the mouth The idiom "be down in the mouth" means to be sad, unhappy, or in low spirits. It refers to a person who appears gloomy or depressed, often characterized by a downward turn of the corners of the mouth.
  • a hole in one The idiom "a hole in one" is used to refer to a remarkable achievement or success, often in sports or any other endeavor. It originally comes from the game of golf, where it signifies hitting the ball directly into the hole with a single stroke from the tee. The phrase has since been adapted to describe any exceptional accomplishment or stroke of luck.
  • be in a minority of one The idiom "be in a minority of one" means to hold an opinion or belief that is not shared or supported by anyone else. It implies being the only person with a particular viewpoint, often suggesting that the opinion is unconventional or outside of the mainstream.
  • a drop in the ocean The idiom "a drop in the ocean" is used to describe a situation or action that has very little impact or importance in comparison to the overall problem or objective. It implies that the contribution being made is too small to make a significant difference.
  • not a dry eye in the house The idiom "not a dry eye in the house" is used to describe a scenario where everyone present, whether in a physical or emotional setting, is moved to tears or deeply moved by a heartfelt or emotional event. It implies that the situation has evoked such strong emotions that nobody remains unaffected, and tears are shed by all.
  • in the line of duty The idiom "in the line of duty" refers to performing one's responsibilities or duties, especially in a professional capacity, despite the risks and potential harm that may be involved. It commonly refers to individuals, such as police officers, soldiers, firefighters, or other public service personnel, who are expected to fulfill their obligations even if it exposes them to danger, injury, or sacrifice.
  • have sb eating out of the palm of your hand, at have sb in the palm of your hand To have someone eating out of the palm of your hand, or to have someone in the palm of your hand, is an idiomatic expression that means to have complete control, influence, or power over someone. It implies that the person is so easily manipulated or swayed by you that they would do anything you ask or follow your lead without question.
  • be in your element The definition of the idiom "be in your element" is to be in a situation or environment that one is particularly suited for or comfortable in. It refers to a state where a person feels confident, natural, and able to perform at their best.
  • an elephant in the room The idiom "an elephant in the room" refers to a glaring or obvious issue, problem, or topic that everyone is aware of but deliberately avoids discussing. It signifies a sensitive or uncomfortable subject that is being ignored, often due to the discomfort it may cause or the desire to avoid conflict.
  • be etched on/in sb's memory The idiom "be etched on/in sb's memory" means that something, usually an event or experience, is firmly and indelibly imprinted in someone's mind, making it impossible to forget. It implies that the memory is vivid, lasting, and deeply ingrained.
  • have a finger in every pie The idiom "have a finger in every pie" means to be involved or have influence in many different activities or endeavors. It refers to someone who has a hand in multiple projects, businesses, or areas of interest. This person often seeks to exert control or maintain an active role in various aspects of their life or the lives of others.
  • be one in the eye for sb The idiom "be one in the eye for sb" means to deliver a setback, defeat, or humiliation to someone, typically unexpected and surprising. It refers to an action or event that undermines someone's authority, status, or reputation, causing them to feel embarrassed or defeated. It can also imply getting revenge on someone or proving them wrong.
  • have eyes in the back of your head The idiom "have eyes in the back of your head" means to be extremely vigilant or aware so that one is able to perceive or notice things that others might miss. It suggests that someone possesses an exceptional ability to be observant and alert in all situations, as if they have an extra set of eyes at the back of their head.
  • keep your eye in
  • be in the public eye The idiom "be in the public eye" means to be widely known or famous, often as a result of being constantly observed, criticized, or subject to public scrutiny. It refers to being in a prominent or influential position where one's actions, behavior, and character are constantly visible to the public or media.
  • in your mind's eye The idiom "in your mind's eye" refers to the ability to visualize something vividly or to mentally imagine and perceive something, often when recalling past events or envisioning future scenarios. It specifically pertains to the power of one's imagination or the ability to form mental images in one's mind.
  • here's mud in your eye! The idiom "here's mud in your eye" is a colloquial expression often used when making a toast, especially during celebratory or drinking occasions. It is said while raising a glass to wish good luck or to honor someone. The phrase holds no literal meaning but is used figuratively to convey well-wishes, cheer, or a jovial spirit.
  • in the twinkling of an eye The idiom "in the twinkling of an eye" means to happen very quickly or instantaneously. It implies an action or event that occurs so rapidly that it can be compared to the speed of an eyelid blinking.
  • not look sb in the eye/face The idiom "not look someone in the eye/face" refers to the act of avoiding direct eye contact or interaction with another person. It often indicates a lack of confidence, guilt, or honesty and can suggest that the person is avoiding confrontation or hiding something.
  • be in sb's face The idiom "be in someone's face" means to be confrontational, assertive, or overly present in someone's personal space, often in an intrusive or annoying manner, challenging their boundaries. It describes a situation where someone is overwhelming another person with their presence or actions.
  • in the face of sth "In the face of something" is an idiomatic expression that means despite or in spite of a challenging or difficult situation or circumstance. It refers to the act of confronting or dealing with something unpleasant or adverse with determination, courage, or perseverance. It implies overcoming obstacles, difficulties, or resistance.
  • laugh in sb's face The idiom "laugh in someone's face" means to openly and contemptuously mock or ridicule someone, usually in response to something they have said or done.
  • fly in the face of sth The idiom "fly in the face of something" means to openly oppose or contradict a commonly accepted belief, rule, or convention, often in a bold or defiant manner. It implies acting against prevailing expectations or norms, demonstrating a disregard for established conventions or opinions.
  • put/place your faith in sth/sb The idiom "put/place your faith in something/somebody" means to believe in and rely on something or someone. It refers to the act of trusting or having confidence in a particular thing or person. It implies a willingness to count on the reliability, abilities, or integrity of the subject of faith.
  • in good faith The idiom "in good faith" refers to acting or behaving sincerely, honestly, and with genuine intentions in a particular situation or agreement. It implies that someone engages in an action or transaction with trust and reliability, without any hidden motives or deceitful intentions.
  • fall in line The idiom "fall in line" typically means to conform to or follow rules, expectations, or guidelines established by a group or authority. It implies compliance, obedience, or adhering to a specific direction or order.
  • fall in love The idiom "fall in love" refers to the experience of suddenly developing strong romantic feelings or a deep emotional attachment towards someone or something. It implies an intense and often uncontrollable attraction or affection, usually associated with passionate emotions and a sense of vulnerability.
  • collapse/fall in a heap The idiom "collapse/fall in a heap" refers to a situation in which a person or thing suddenly loses energy, strength, or support and becomes extremely exhausted or helpless. It often implies that someone or something has experienced a sudden and complete physical or emotional breakdown, rendering them incapable of continuing their previous activities. It can also describe a sudden and dramatic failure or downfall in various situations.
  • in the lap of the gods The idiom "in the lap of the gods" means to leave something to fate or to be entirely dependent on external circumstances or forces beyond one's control. It suggests surrendering control and relying solely on chance or destiny for the outcome.
  • life in the fast lane The idiom "life in the fast lane" refers to living a fast-paced, hectic, and often reckless lifestyle, characterized by rapid and intense activity, constant busyness, and a disregard for potential consequences. It conveys the idea of a life centered around high-speed pursuits and constant movement, often driven by ambition, impatience, or a desire for excitement.
  • be out in left field The idiom "be out in left field" means to be completely mistaken, misunderstood, or having an opinion, idea, or belief that is completely unfounded or illogical. It refers to being far from the mainstream or normal viewpoint, similar to a baseball player being positioned in the left field, away from the action happening at home plate.
  • an ace in the hole, at an ace up your sleeve The idiom "an ace in the hole" or "an ace up your sleeve" refers to having a secret advantage or resource that can be used to ensure success or gain an advantage in a particular situation, especially when it is unexpected. It originates from the game of poker, where an ace card is a valuable and powerful asset that can turn the tide of the game if kept hidden.
  • in the last/final analysis "In the last/final analysis" is an idiom that means considering all the important factors or considering something thoroughly and completely. It refers to looking at a situation or problem from a comprehensive perspective, taking into account all relevant details and information before making a final judgment or forming a conclusion.
  • another/the final nail in the coffin The idiom "another/the final nail in the coffin" refers to an event, action, or statement that has a significant negative impact on a situation or ultimately leads to its failure or conclusion. It implies that the situation was already struggling or on the verge of collapsing, and the event or action mentioned serves as the last contributing factor to its demise.
  • have a finger in the pie The idiom "have a finger in the pie" means to have involvement or influence in a particular matter or situation. It implies that the person has a share or part in something, often referring to having a role or control in a project, decision, or enterprise.
  • in the firing line The idiom "in the firing line" refers to being in a position where one is subjected to criticism, blame, or scrutiny. It usually denotes being in a vulnerable or exposed position where one may face direct attacks or criticism from others.
  • in the line of fire, at in the firing line The idiom "in the line of fire" or "in the firing line" refers to being in a position of immediate danger or vulnerability, particularly in a situation where one is exposed to criticism, attack, or harm. It metaphorically originates from being within the range of gunfire in a combat or military context.
  • on the firing line, at in the firing line The idiom "on the firing line" or "in the firing line" typically refers to being in a position of vulnerability or danger, especially in a situation where one is subject to criticism, attack, or scrutiny. It alludes to the military concept of being in the line of fire during combat, where one is most exposed and at risk. In a broader sense, it can also imply being directly involved or responsible for dealing with a challenging or difficult task or situation.
  • be in the first flush of The idiom "be in the first flush of" refers to being in the early stages or initial period of a particular condition, experience, or emotion. It typically implies a state of enthusiasm, excitement, and freshness that comes with something new or recently started.
  • a flash in the pan The idiom "a flash in the pan" means something or someone that initially shows great promise or talent but ultimately fails or disappoints. It refers to a short-lived or unsuccessful attempt that fails to have a lasting impact or influence. The expression originates from the flintlock musket, where a flash in the pan occurs when the gunpowder ignites in the pan, but fails to fire the main charge, resulting in a momentary burst of light and noise without any significant result.
  • quick as a flash, at in a flash The idiom "quick as a flash" or "in a flash" is used to describe something that happens very quickly or without delay. It implies that the action is done swiftly, as if it were instant or almost instantaneous.
  • in flower The idiom "in flower" refers to a state when something, typically a plant or a garden, is blooming with flowers in full bloom or at the peak of its flowering period. It denotes a time when the flowers are vivid, vibrant, and visually appealing.
  • in the flower of sb's youth "In the flower of someone's youth" is an idiom used to describe the period of time when a person is in their prime, typically referring to their physical, mental, or creative abilities during the early or most vibrant stages of adulthood. It signifies a time of vitality, energy, and beauty, often associated with youthfulness and a sense of possibility.
  • in a flutter The idiom "in a flutter" refers to a state of nervousness, excitement, or agitation. It describes a feeling of being unsettled or anxious, often due to anticipation or uncertainty.
  • fly in the ointment The idiom "fly in the ointment" refers to a small but significant flaw, obstacle, or problem that spoils an otherwise positive or pleasing situation. It represents an unexpected and inconvenient element that detracts from the overall enjoyment or success of something.
  • follow in sb's footsteps The idiom "follow in sb's footsteps" means to pursue a similar path or career as someone else, usually a family member or a predecessor, and try to achieve similar success or accomplish similar things as they did.
  • couldn't organize a pissup in a brewery The idiom "couldn't organize a pissup in a brewery" is a humorous and sarcastic expression often used to describe someone who is extremely disorganized or incompetent in planning even the simplest things. It implies that the person would struggle to successfully manage or coordinate even the most straightforward or obvious tasks, like arranging a social gathering in an environment as straightforward as a brewery.
  • have one foot in the grave The idiom "have one foot in the grave" means to be very close to death, usually due to old age or serious illness. It implies that the person is extremely frail or in a weakened state physically and may not have much time left to live.
  • put .your foot in it The idiom "put your foot in it" means to say or do something unintentionally embarrassing, tactless, or offensive, usually by mistake or without thinking. It refers to making a blunder or committing a social faux pas.
  • hardly/barely put one foot in front of the other The idiom "hardly/barely put one foot in front of the other" is used to describe someone who is extremely fatigued, physically weak, or mentally overwhelmed. It implies that the person can barely manage to walk or continue with their activities due to exhaustion or difficulty.
  • put your foot in your mouth, at put .your foot in it The idiom "put your foot in your mouth" or "put your foot in it" is used to describe a situation where someone says or does something inadvertently embarrassing, rude, or tactless, usually by accident or without thinking. It refers to making a verbal blunder that leads to an awkward or uncomfortable situation, often resulting in regret or embarrassment for the person speaking.
  • a friend in need is a friend indeed The idiom "a friend in need is a friend indeed" means that a person who helps or supports you in times of difficulty or need is a true friend, as opposed to someone who only pretends to be your friend when things are going well.
  • be in the front line The idiom "be in the front line" typically means to be in the most important or dangerous position in a situation or endeavor. It generally refers to being at the forefront of a particular activity or being the first to confront challenges or risks.
  • a game in hand The idiom "a game in hand" refers to a situation in sports, particularly in a league or tournament, where one team has played fewer matches than their competitors. It means that the team with a game in hand has the advantage of potentially earning more points and improving their position in the standings if they win the additional match.
  • get your arse in gear, at get off your arse The idioms "get your arse in gear" and "get off your arse" are both expressions used to urge someone to start working or taking action. They convey a sense of urgency and impatience, emphasizing the need for the person to stop being lazy or idle and to begin doing what needs to be done.
  • get in sb's hair The idiom "get in someone's hair" means to annoy, frustrate, or bother someone by constantly being present or interfering in their activities or personal space. It suggests that someone or something is getting in the way or becoming a source of irritation and making it difficult for the person to focus or carry on with their tasks.
  • be/get in with sb The idiom "be/get in with someone" means to gain acceptance, favor, or friendship with someone or a group of people. It implies establishing a close relationship or becoming part of someone's social or professional circle.
  • get it in the neck The idiom "get it in the neck" means to receive punishment, reprimand, or blame for something, often in an unfair or undeserved manner. It suggests facing the consequences or negative repercussions of a situation.
  • get/put your own house in order The idiom "get/put your own house in order" is used to encourage someone to address and resolve personal issues or problems before trying to criticize or intervene in the affairs of others. It implies the need for self-reflection, self-improvement, or taking responsibility for one's actions before attempting to judge or control others.
  • have/get your snout in the trough The idiom "have/get your snout in the trough" refers to someone who is excessively or greedily seeking personal gain, often at the expense of others. It is often used to criticize individuals who are taking advantage of a situation or abusing their authority for personal benefit. The imagery of a snout, like that of a pig, emphasizes the idea of indulgence and greed.
  • never look a gift horse in the mouth The idiom "never look a gift horse in the mouth" means that when receiving a gift or benefit, one should not scrutinize or question its value or quality. It originates from the practice of examining a horse's teeth to determine its age and overall health. By metaphorically "looking a gift horse in the mouth," one is being ungrateful or overly critical of something they have received for free.
  • in glorious technicolor The idiom "in glorious technicolor" is used to describe something that is vivid, colorful, and visually spectacular. It refers to the old Technicolor film process, which was known for its vibrant and realistic color reproduction. When something is said to be "in glorious technicolor," it signifies a visually stunning or vivid experience or display.
  • in glorious technicolour, at in glorious technicolor The idiom "in glorious technicolour" or "in glorious technicolor" is used to describe a vivid, colorful, or brilliant display or depiction of something. It originates from Technicolor, a trademark for a color motion picture process that was popular in the mid-20th century. The idiom is often used figuratively to emphasize the vividness or intense quality of an experience, event, or description.
  • bask/bathe in reflected glory The idiom "bask/bathe in reflected glory" means to experience or enjoy a sense of pride, success, or accomplishment through association with someone else's achievements or recognition. It refers to gaining satisfaction or feeling important by being closely connected to someone else's glory or accomplishments.
  • hand in glove The idiom "hand in glove" means to be closely and cooperatively working together, often in a secretive or conspiratorial manner. It expresses a close and harmonious relationship between individuals or groups.
  • hand and glove, at hand in glove The idiom "hand and glove" or "at hand in glove" is used to describe a close or intimate relationship between two or more people. It implies that the individuals involved work together harmoniously or are in complete agreement with each other, often collaborating closely to achieve a common goal.
  • move/go in for the kill The idiom "move/go in for the kill" means to take decisive action to achieve a final and crushing victory or to finish off a task or opponent quickly and decisively. It is often used to describe someone who acts ruthlessly or aggressively to secure success or to achieve their ultimate goal.
  • go hand in hand with sth The idiom "go hand in hand with something" means that two things are closely connected or always occur together. It implies that the two things are dependent on each other and often support or complement each other.
  • in tow The idiom "in tow" refers to being accompanied or followed closely by someone or something. It typically implies that the person or thing being referred to is under someone else's control, influence, or supervision.
  • in foal The idiom "in foal" refers to a female horse being pregnant or expecting a foal (a baby horse).
  • in hand The idiom "in hand" typically means that something is under control, being managed, or being worked on. It implies that the required or necessary actions are being taken to tackle a situation or task.
  • in kind The idiom "in kind" typically refers to an act or payment made using goods or services rather than money. It means to give or repay something equivalent or similar to what was received.
  • lived in The idiom "lived in" refers to something, usually an object or place, that appears well-used or weathered due to continuous use or occupancy over a long period of time. It implies a sense of comfort, familiarity, and a history associated with the object or place.
  • in tandem The idiom "in tandem" refers to two or more things or individuals working or occurring together, often in a coordinated or synchronized manner. It suggests a close collaboration or partnership where two or more elements are consciously or naturally aligned, complementing or supporting each other.
  • in concert The idiom "in concert" typically means to work together or cooperate, often in a planned or orchestrated manner, towards a common goal or objective. It can also refer to a musical performance by multiple artists or musicians, where they collaborate and perform together on stage.
  • in arrears The idiom "in arrears" refers to the state of being behind schedule, overdue, or late in making a payment, usually in terms of financial obligations or debts. It implies that the payment is not made on time and is owed for a previous period.
  • in rotation The idiom "in rotation" refers to the practice of regularly alternating or changing things in a fixed sequence or order. It is often used to describe a system or schedule in which various items or individuals take turns or are cycled through on a regular basis.
  • in sb's pocket The idiom "in someone's pocket" means to be under someone's influence, control, or power, often in a way that compromises one's integrity or independence. It implies that the person being referred to is easily manipulated or influenced by another individual.
  • in sth's name, at in the name of sth The idiom "in something's name" or "in the name of something" refers to doing something on behalf of or in representation of that thing or idea. It implies that an action or decision is being made with the authority or permission of a particular entity or in support of a cause. It usually indicates that the action is done to honor, acknowledge, or align with the perceived intentions or wishes of that entity or cause.
  • in God's/heaven's name The idiom "in God's/heaven's name" is an exclamatory expression used to convey the speaker's surprise, frustration, or strong emotion while emphasizing the urgency or importance of a matter. It implies a plea or request for assistance, guidance, or clarification from a higher power.
  • in sb's/sth's name, at in the name of sb/sth The idiom "in sb's/sth's name" or "in the name of sb/sth" refers to acting or speaking on behalf of someone or something. It means to carry out an action, make a decision, or express oneself using the authority or authorization of another person or entity. It signifies that the person or thing mentioned is the source of approval, endorsement, or responsibility for the action or statement.
  • in sb's capable hands The idiom "in sb's capable hands" means that someone is entrusted with a task or responsibility and is able to handle it confidently, competently, and skillfully. It implies that the person is reliable and can be trusted to successfully complete the given job or take care of an important matter.
  • chink in sb's armour The idiom "chink in sb's armour" refers to a weakness or vulnerability that someone possesses, specifically in their character or defense. It highlights a flaw that can be exploited or used against them. The term "chink" refers to a small crack or opening, often in reference to armor, which can leave someone exposed or susceptible to attack.
  • in sb's hour of need The idiom "in someone's hour of need" refers to being there for or providing support to someone when they are faced with a difficult or challenging situation. It implies offering assistance or comfort during times of crisis or trouble.
  • not be in sb's vocabulary The idiom "not be in someone's vocabulary" means that a particular concept, word, or idea is not something that a person is familiar with or inclined to use or understand. It implies that the person lacks knowledge or familiarity regarding the subject in question.
  • be (like) putty in sb's hands The idiom "be (like) putty in someone's hands" means to be easily influenced, controlled, or manipulated by someone else. It implies that the person being referred to has no resistance or ability to assert their own will, similar to how putty can be easily molded and shaped by a person's hands.
  • be in the grip of sth The idiom "be in the grip of sth" means to be strongly influenced or controlled by a powerful force or emotion. It implies a state of being unable to escape the hold or impact of something that has a firm control over one's thoughts, actions, or circumstances.
  • be in the groove The idiom "be in the groove" typically means being in a state of optimal competence, synchronized or aligned with the task at hand, or being at the peak of one's performance or productivity. It refers to being in a rhythm or flow, where everything feels effortless and natural.
  • hand in hand The idiom "hand in hand" means to occur or happen simultaneously or in close association with something or someone else. It suggests a strong and inseparable connection between two or more things or people.
  • have sth in hand The idiom "have something in hand" means to have possession or control over something, or to have made preparations or arrangements for something. It implies having a situation under control or having a backup plan in place.
  • keep your hand in The idiom "keep your hand in" means to continue practicing or maintaining a particular skill or activity in order to stay proficient or knowledgeable in it, even when not actively engaged in it on a regular basis. It emphasizes the importance of staying active and involved in something to prevent skills or knowledge from declining or becoming rusty.
  • put your hand in your pocket The idiom "put your hand in your pocket" typically means to contribute or give money or resources, often for a charitable or generous cause. It implies a willingness to help or support financially.
  • have sb in the palm of your hand The idiom "have someone in the palm of your hand" means to have complete control or influence over someone, usually by being able to manipulate or persuade them easily. It implies that the person is submissive or highly compliant to the desires or whims of the other person.
  • be back in harness The idiom "be back in harness" means to return to work or resume one's responsibilities and duties after a period of absence or retirement. It often implies a person's return to a position of authority or a specific professional role.
  • marry in haste, repent at leisure The idiom "marry in haste, repent at leisure" means that making impulsive decisions, especially when it comes to marriage, can lead to unhappiness or regret later on. It suggests that rushing into a marriage without carefully considering the consequences may result in long-term dissatisfaction or disappointment. The phrase emphasizes the importance of thoroughly evaluating a decision before committing to it, particularly in matters of great significance such as marriage.
  • have it in for sb The idiom "have it in for someone" means to harbor strong negative feelings or hostility toward a specific person, typically seeking to harm, criticize, or sabotage them in some way. It signifies having a grudge or vendetta against someone.
  • not have a pot to piss in The idiom "not have a pot to piss in" is a slang expression that refers to someone being very poor or lacking any financial resources. It suggests a state of extreme poverty, indicating that an individual does not even have a basic essential item like a pot or container to engage in the most basic bodily functions, let alone any money or possessions.
  • not have a hope in hell The idiom "not have a hope in hell" is used to describe a situation in which someone has very little or no chance of success or achieving their goal. It implies that the likelihood of a positive outcome is extremely low, similar to the chances of someone succeeding in a hopeless situation.
  • be in over your head The idiom "be in over your head" means to be involved in a situation or task that is too difficult or overwhelming to handle. It implies being out of one's depth or lacking the necessary skills, knowledge, or experience to effectively manage the situation.
  • in your heart of hearts The idiom "in your heart of hearts" refers to the deepest, most sincere, and genuine feeling or belief that a person holds within themselves. It represents the innermost thoughts, desires, or convictions that a person truly and honestly holds regardless of external factors or any pretense they may put up.
  • in the heat of the moment The idiom "in the heat of the moment" refers to making impulsive decisions or reacting emotionally without thinking clearly due to being caught up in intense or stressful circumstances.
  • be in seventh heaven The idiom "be in seventh heaven" means to be extremely happy or blissful. It refers to a state of utmost joy or euphoria.
  • in the name of God/heaven, at in God's/heaven's name The idiom "in the name of God/heaven" or "in God's/heaven's name" is an expression used to emphasize or call upon a higher power to support or validate something. It is typically employed when someone is perplexed, astonished, or shocked by an action, event, or situation and seeks to convey their disbelief or appeal to a divine authority for an explanation.
  • hold sb in high/low repute The idiom "hold someone in high/low repute" means to have a strong opinion or regard for someone, either in a positive or negative way. "Hold someone in high repute" suggests that the person is highly respected, esteemed, or admired, while "hold someone in low repute" implies that the person is disrespected, looked down upon, or regarded with disdain.
  • a pig in a poke The idiom "a pig in a poke" means to buy or accept something without fully knowing or understanding its true nature or quality, often resulting in a bad or disappointing outcome. It refers to a situation where someone makes a purchase or takes a risk without examining or verifying the item beforehand, much like buying a pig (or any other animal) inside a bag that prevents the buyer from seeing its actual condition.
  • a page in/of history The idiom "a page in/of history" refers to a significant event or era that has influenced or shaped the course of history. It indicates that something or someone has left a lasting impact or has become a memorable part of the historical narrative.
  • romp home/in The idiom "romp home/in" is used to describe a situation where someone or something easily or effortlessly wins a competition, race, or victory. It implies that the victory was achieved with great ease and without much effort or opposition.
  • in hot pursuit The idiom "in hot pursuit" means to actively chase or follow someone or something with strong determination and intensity, typically in order to capture, apprehend, or catch up with them. It is often used in the context of a pursuit by law enforcement, but can also be applied to any situation where there is a relentless pursuit or pursuit with urgency.
  • in blissful ignorance The idiom "in blissful ignorance" refers to a state of not being aware or knowledgeable about something that may be unpleasant or distressing. It suggests that the person or group is happily unaware of a certain situation or fact, which can often lead to a sense of contentment or peace.
  • be in applepie order The idiom "be in apple-pie order" means to be meticulously organized, neat, and tidy.
  • be in line for sth The idiom "be in line for sth" means to have a high possibility or likelihood of receiving or achieving something in the future. It implies being next or in a favorable position for that particular thing.
  • in for a penny (in for a pound) The idiom "in for a penny (in for a pound)" is used to express the idea that if one is already involved or committed to something, it is better to fully commit and take on the risks or costs associated with it rather than hold back or do it halfway. It suggests that once a person has made a small commitment or invested a small amount of effort or money, they might as well go all the way and commit fully, regardless of the potential consequences or additional expenses.
  • be in league with sb The idiom "be in league with somebody" means to be in a secret alliance or partnership with someone, typically for dishonest, deceptive, or illegal purposes. It implies a collusive or conspiratorial relationship, often used to suggest that individuals or groups are working together for their personal gain at the expense of others.
  • in name only The idiom "in name only" refers to something or someone that is said or claimed to be a certain thing, but in reality does not possess the essential characteristics or qualities associated with it. It implies that the person or thing carries the title or label, but lacks the substance, true nature, or genuine inclusion in the specified category.
  • in the name of sth The definition of the idiom "in the name of sth" is to act, speak, or do something with the authority, power, or justification provided by a particular person, group, or cause. It can also imply that something is being done as a means of honoring, promoting, or supporting a particular idea, belief, or cause.
  • in the name of sb/sth The idiom "in the name of sb/sth" is used to indicate that someone is acting on behalf of or in the authority of someone or something. It implies that an action or decision being taken is made in representation or with the approval of someone or something.
  • live (on) in the memory The idiom "live (on) in the memory" means to be remembered or to remain in one's thoughts for a long time. It refers to something or someone that has left a lasting impression, creating a significant and memorable impact on someone's mind or in history.
  • in the right place at the right time The idiom "in the right place at the right time" refers to being in a favorable or advantageous situation due to fortunate timing or circumstances. It implies that one's presence or actions align perfectly with an opportunity, leading to a successful outcome or favorable result.
  • be not (quite) right in the head The idiom "be not (quite) right in the head" is used to describe someone who is considered mentally unstable or crazy. It implies that the individual's mental faculties are not functioning correctly or are abnormal in some way.
  • be in the middle of sth The idiom "be in the middle of something" means to be actively engaged in or occupied with a particular task, situation, or event. It implies that the person is in the midst of an ongoing activity, typically unable to interrupt or abandon it at that moment.
  • (in) the middle of nowhere The idiom "in the middle of nowhere" refers to a location that is extremely remote, secluded, or isolated, usually far away from populated or developed areas. It describes a place that is difficult to reach, lacking amenities, and often characterized by vast open spaces or wilderness. It can also imply a sense of feeling lost, detached, or disconnected from civilization.
  • in the person of sb The idiom "in the person of sb" refers to someone who represents or embodies a particular role or characteristic. It implies that the individual serves as an example or symbol of a larger group or concept.
  • be joined in marriage/matrimony The idiom "be joined in marriage/matrimony" means to enter into a legally recognized union of marriage, where two individuals pledge their commitment to each other and vow to share their lives together as spouses. It represents the bond, unity, and lifelong partnership formed through the marriage ceremony.
  • keep sb in the picture The idiom "keep someone in the picture" means to keep someone informed or updated about a particular situation or development. It suggests that you are providing information and involving someone in ongoing discussions or events so that they remain knowledgeable about the matter at hand.
  • in/out of keeping (with sth) The idiom "in/out of keeping (with sth)" refers to whether something is or is not consistent or compatible with a particular situation, style, or context. If something is "in keeping" with something else, it means it is compatible and consistent with it. On the other hand, if something is "out of keeping" with something else, it means it is not consistent or compatible with it.
  • be in the land of nod The idiom "be in the land of nod" is a colloquial expression that means to be fast asleep or in a deep state of sleep. It refers to being in the dream world or the realm of sleep, often used to describe a person who is soundly and completely asleep.
  • be in the land of the living The idiom "be in the land of the living" means to be alive and present. It is often used to describe someone who has returned or awakened from a state of unconsciousness, sleep, or even a period of inactivity. It highlights the contrast between being absent or not alive and being fully present and alive.
  • in the lap of luxury The idiom "in the lap of luxury" means to be in a state of extreme comfort and extravagance. It refers to living a life of great wealth, with all needs and desires easily fulfilled.
  • in the last resort, at as a last resort The idiom "in the last resort" or "as a last resort" refers to something done or considered only after all other options or alternatives have been exhausted. It is a final course of action taken when all other attempts have failed, or when there are no better options available.
  • not in the least The idiom "not in the least" is used to indicate that something is not at all or not even the smallest amount true, significant, or relevant. It emphasizes a complete absence or lack of something.
  • leave sb in the lurch The idiom "leave someone in the lurch" means to abandon or desert someone in a difficult or challenging situation, typically when they are counting on your support or assistance. It implies leaving them without the help they expected or needed, causing them to feel confused, stranded, or let down.
  • a knight in shining armour The idiom "a knight in shining armor" refers to a person, typically a man, who bravely and gallantly rescues someone from a difficult situation or provides unwavering support and protection. It implies that the person is a heroic figure, like the chivalrous knights in medieval times, ready to come to the aid of others and save them from harm or adversity.
  • in the light of sth The idiom "in the light of something" means considering or taking into account a particular fact, situation, or event when forming an opinion, making a judgment, or making a decision. It signifies that new information or circumstances have emerged, prompting a reevaluation or reconsideration of a specific matter.
  • live/be in clover The idiom "live/be in clover" means to enjoy a comfortable and luxurious lifestyle, often referring to someone who is living in favorable or ideal circumstances. It implies a life of ease, prosperity, and indulgence.
  • be in the loop/be out of the loop The idiom "be in the loop/be out of the loop" refers to being informed and involved in a particular situation or activity, or on the contrary, being uninformed or excluded from important information or events. It commonly describes someone's level of knowledge or participation in a given context.
  • be in/out of luck The idiom "be in/out of luck" means to have good or bad fortune respectively. It implies that one is either fortunate and likely to succeed, or unfortunate and unlikely to succeed in their endeavors.
  • be in at the kill The idiom "be in at the kill" refers to someone being present or involved in the final decisive or successful stage of an endeavor or a conquest. It implies being there to witness or participate in the victory or achievement. The expression often originated from hunting, where being present at the moment when the prey is killed was considered a significant part of the experience and a mark of bravery.
  • a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "a pain in the arse/backside" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone or something that is irritating, bothersome, or difficult to deal with. It refers to a person, task, or situation that causes frustration, inconvenience, or annoyance.
  • have method in your madness The idiom "have method in your madness" means to appear or behave in a peculiar or eccentric manner, but not without purpose or reason. It suggests that there is some underlying logic or strategy behind someone's seemingly irrational or chaotic actions.
  • have a method to your madness, at have method in your madness The idiom "have a method to your madness" (or "have method in your madness") is used to describe someone who may seem strange, unpredictable, or chaotic in their actions or behavior, but actually has a sensible or logical motive behind it. It implies that there is a purpose or strategy behind their seemingly unconventional or irrational behavior.
  • be in the (right) ballpark The idiom "be in the (right) ballpark" means to be in the approximate or correct range or area regarding an estimate, calculation, or statement. It implies that someone's guess or approximation is close or near enough to be considered acceptable or reasonable.
  • at/in the back of your mind The idiom "at/in the back of your mind" refers to a thought or idea that is not at the forefront of your thoughts or immediate attention, but still present in your subconscious. It suggests that although you may not be actively thinking about it, it is still lingering somewhere in your mind.
  • in the making The idiom "in the making" refers to something that is in the process of being developed, formed, or becoming. It is often used to describe an ongoing or evolving situation, project, or person that has the potential to achieve significant accomplishments or changes in the future.
  • a pain (in the neck) The idiom "a pain in the neck" refers to someone or something that is annoying, troublesome, or bothersome. It describes a person, situation, or task that causes frustration or difficulty.
  • be in the hole The idiom "be in the hole" typically means to be in debt or financial difficulty. It refers to a situation where someone owes more money than they have or are unable to meet their financial obligations.
  • play in the hole The idiom "play in the hole" refers to a sports tactic, commonly used in baseball or softball. It describes the fielding position that is behind the shortstop but in front of the third baseman. The person playing in the hole is responsible for covering ground balls hit to the left side of the infield, between shortstop and third base. This idiom is mainly used in the context of discussing defensive strategies or positions in these sports.
  • be in a hole The idiom "be in a hole" typically means to be in a difficult or challenging situation, often characterized by a sense of being trapped, overwhelmed, or facing a problem without a clear solution. It implies a state of adversity or hardship that can be difficult to navigate or overcome.
  • make a hole in sth The idiom "make a hole in sth" typically refers to the act of significantly reducing or depleting a particular resource or amount, often referring to money or a budget. It suggests using or spending a substantial portion of something, leaving a noticeable void or impact.
  • in the process The idiom "in the process" refers to being in the middle of doing or completing something. It implies that someone or something is currently engaged in a particular activity or task and has not yet finished it.
  • be in a funk The idiom "be in a funk" means to be in a state of feeling unhappy, depressed, or emotionally downcast. It refers to a temporary period of feeling low or finding it difficult to find joy or motivation in one's daily life.
  • be in the bag The idiom "be in the bag" typically means that something is certain to happen or achieve success. It suggests that the outcome is almost guaranteed and there is no doubt or uncertainty about it.
  • be in the red The idiom "be in the red" means to be in a state of financial loss or debt, where expenses exceed income or funds are insufficient to cover debts. It is often used to describe a negative balance in a person's or company's financial accounts.
  • be in a mood The idiom "be in a mood" refers to someone who is experiencing a particular state of mind or emotional disposition that may be negative, irritated, or having a grumpy attitude. It typically implies that the person is not in a pleasant or cooperative mood and may display a sullen or moody demeanor.
  • be in convulsions The idiom "be in convulsions" means to be in extreme laughter or uncontrollable fits of laughter. It suggests that something was so funny or amusing that it caused physical and uncontrolled spasms or shaking due to excessive laughter.
  • be in a lather The idiom "be in a lather" means to be in a state of extreme agitation, anxiety, or excitement. It suggests that someone is worked up or overly stressed about something. The phrase originates from the literal meaning of "lather," which refers to a frothy foam produced when soap is mixed with water or when a horse sweats excessively. Just as soap creates a foamy lather, the idiom implies that the person's emotions or state of mind are similarly frothy and turbulent.
  • be rolling in it The idiom "be rolling in it" means to have a large amount of money or wealth. It implies that someone is extremely wealthy or financially prosperous.
  • be in the money The idiom "be in the money" means to be in a fortunate or advantageous financial position. It refers to having an abundance of wealth or resources, often as a result of winning a lottery, receiving an unexpected windfall, or experiencing financial success.
  • be in the mood The idiom "be in the mood" means to have the desire, interest, or inclination to do or experience something specific. It refers to being in a particular mental or emotional state that enables a person to enjoy or engage in a particular activity, whether it is listening to music, watching a movie, socializing, or even working.
  • be in the shithouse The idiom "be in the shithouse" refers to being in a difficult or unfavorable situation, usually implying a state of trouble, discomfort, or misfortune. It can also suggest being in a position of disapproval or receiving criticism.
  • the man in the moon The idiom "the man in the moon" refers to the popular belief or perception of seeing a human face or figure on the surface of the moon. It implies the idea of finding familiar shapes or objects in random patterns, often reflecting the human tendency to perceive meaningful images even where there may be none.
  • be not in your right mind The phrase "not be in your right mind" is an idiom used to describe a situation where someone is not thinking or behaving rationally, sensibly, or reasonably. It implies that the person is mentally or emotionally disturbed, confused, or influenced by some outside factor that affects their decision-making abilities.
  • be in a (pretty/right) pickle The idiom "be in a (pretty/right) pickle" means to be in a difficult or troublesome situation. It suggests being stuck or faced with a problem that is challenging or unfavorable, often implying a sense of confusion or uncertainty about how to resolve it.
  • in memory of sb The idiom "in memory of sb" refers to doing or creating something to honor and remember someone who has passed away or is no longer present. It is a way to pay tribute to the person's life and legacy.
  • put sb in mind of sth The idiom "put someone in mind of something" means to remind or evoke memories or thoughts of a particular thing or situation in someone's mind. It implies that something or someone triggers a memory or association that resembles or is similar to the thing being referred to.
  • be mixed up with/in sth The idiom "be mixed up with/in something" is commonly used to describe being involved or associated with something, especially a negative or undesirable situation. It implies a state of confusion, entanglement, or being intertwined with a particular circumstance or group of people. It can refer to both physical or metaphorical entanglement.
  • rolling in money, at be rolling in it The idiom "rolling in money" or "rolling in it" is an expression used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy or has a large amount of money. It conveys the notion of abundance and the ability to enjoy a luxurious lifestyle without any financial constraints.
  • not in a month of Sundays The idiom "not in a month of Sundays" means something that is extremely unlikely or will never happen. It is used to emphasize the improbability or impossibility of an event or situation occurring.
  • be in one of your moods The idiom "be in one of your moods" refers to a situation when someone is displaying a particular temperament or attitude that is different from their usual behavior. It implies that the person is in a state of irritability, sensitivity, or emotional volatility, often resulting in a negative or moody disposition.
  • nip sth in the bud The idiom "nip something in the bud" means to stop or end a problem or situation at an early stage, before it becomes more serious or develops into something more difficult to control.
  • in/out of pocket The idiom "in/out of pocket" can have two different meanings depending on the context: 1) In reference to expenses or financial matters: "Out of pocket" means that someone has spent their own money or incurred expenses, typically for something that should have been covered by someone else (like an employer, insurance, or organization). Conversely, "in pocket" means that the expenses have been reimbursed or covered. Example: After my business trip, I realized that some of my expenses were out of pocket, and I need to submit them for reimbursement. 2) In reference to availability or accessibility: "Out of pocket" means that someone is temporarily unavailable, either physically or mentally, often due to being away from their usual working or living environment
  • garbage in, garbage out The idiom "garbage in, garbage out" refers to the concept that if you input low-quality or incorrect data or information into a system, you can expect to get equally inaccurate or poor-quality output from that system. It suggests that the quality of the output or results is directly dependent on the quality of the input or data being used.
  • in phase/out of phase The idiom "in phase/out of phase" refers to the synchronization or lack of synchronization between two or more things, usually referring to their timing or alignment. "In phase" indicates that two or more things are synchronized or aligned properly, while "out of phase" implies a lack of synchronization, coordination, or alignment between the elements involved. This idiom is often used to describe situations where people or objects are either working together harmoniously or not coordinating effectively.
  • in your own right The idiom "in your own right" refers to being accomplished or recognized independently, having achieved a certain status or reputation on one's own merit, rather than simply by association with someone else or relying on external factors. It emphasizes individual capabilities and qualities.
  • joker in the pack The idiom "joker in the pack" refers to a person or thing that is unpredictable, untrustworthy, or has hidden intentions, causing disruption or uncertainty in a situation. It can also refer to an unexpected or disruptive element that impacts a group or system.
  • pale in comparison The idiom "pale in comparison" means that something is significantly less impressive, important, or remarkable when compared to something else.
  • have ants in your pants The idiom "have ants in your pants" means to be unable to sit still or remain calm due to excessive restlessness, fidgeting, or impatience.
  • rest in peace The idiom "rest in peace" is a phrase used to express wishes for someone who has died to find eternal peace and tranquility in the afterlife. It is often used as a traditional and respectful way to bid farewell or show condolences for the deceased.
  • pick holes in sth The idiom "pick holes in something" means to find and point out flaws, faults, or errors in something, often in a critical or nitpicking manner. It implies a meticulous examination with the intention of finding and highlighting any weaknesses or imperfections.
  • put sb in the picture The idiom "put someone in the picture" means to inform or update someone about a situation or provide them with the necessary information to understand a particular matter or context. It refers to the act of giving someone a clear and comprehensive understanding of a situation or topic.
  • have sth in your pocket The idiom "have something in your pocket" means to be prepared, knowledgeable, or well-prepared for a particular situation or task. It implies having access to valuable information, resources, or strategies that can be advantageous or helpful in accomplishing something successfully.
  • make/put a dent in sth The idiom "make/put a dent in sth" means to make progress or achieve a significant impact on something, typically a task, goal, or problem. It implies that there has been noticeable progress or a substantial effect on the object or situation in question. The phrase often conveys the idea of making a notable change, even though it may not completely solve the problem or accomplish the entire task.
  • put sth/sb in a pigeonhole The idiom "put sth/sb in a pigeonhole" means to categorize or classify something or someone based on preconceived notions or stereotypes, often ignoring their individuality or unique characteristics. It implies simplistically assigning someone or something to a particular group or category without considering their true complexity.
  • in the balance The idiom "in the balance" means that something is in a state of uncertainty or being weighed or considered. It refers to a situation where the outcome is undecided or where there is equal possibility of success or failure.
  • abet sm in sth The idiom "abet someone in something" means to encourage, support, or assist someone in carrying out a particular action, usually one that is unethical, illegal, or wrong.
  • in abeyance The idiom "in abeyance" refers to something that is temporarily suspended or put on hold, usually referring to a decision, action, or activity. It suggests that a particular situation is inactive or in a state of temporary postponement until further notice or clarification.
  • hold sth in abeyance The idiom "hold something in abeyance" means to temporarily postpone, suspend, or delay a decision, action, or event until a later time or until certain conditions are met. It implies keeping something on hold or in a state of temporary inaction.
  • abound in sth The idiom "abound in sth" means to have a large quantity or a great amount of something. It implies that there is an abundance or a plentiful supply of the particular thing being referred to.
  • in the absence of sm or sth The idiom "in the absence of someone or something" is used to describe a situation when a person or thing is missing or not present. It means that without that person or thing, something else is used as a substitute or alternative.
  • absorb oneself in sm or sth The idiom "absorb oneself in something" means to fully engage, immerse, or occupy oneself in a particular activity, task, or subject. It implies being deeply engrossed, focused, or absorbed in that specific thing to the extent that one loses track of time or surroundings.
  • absorb sth in(to) sth The idiom "absorb sth in(to) sth" means to integrate or incorporate something into something else in a way that it becomes a part of it. It refers to the process of assimilating or taking in information, ideas, or material into a larger whole or system.
  • absorb sm in(to) sth The idiom "absorb sm in(to) sth" means to fully immerse oneself or become completely engrossed in something, such as a task, activity, or environment. It implies a deep concentration, focus, or involvement in the subject matter or situation at hand.
  • in accord (with sm or sth) (about sm or sth) The idiom "in accord (with someone or something) (about something)" means to be in agreement, harmony, or alignment with someone or something regarding a particular topic or issue. It suggests mutual understanding, shared opinions, or a similar viewpoint between individuals or ideas.
  • in accordance with sth The idiom "in accordance with something" means to do something or act in a way that agrees or aligns with a particular rule, guideline, law, principle, or standard. It implies following or adhering to a specific requirement or set of instructions.
  • an ace in the hole The idiom "an ace in the hole" refers to having a hidden advantage or resource that can be used strategically, especially in a challenging or critical situation. It originates from the game of poker, where an ace card held in a player's hand can significantly improve their chances of winning.
  • ace in(to sth) The idiom "ace into something" generally means to perform exceptionally well or to excel at a particular activity or task. It implies achieving success effortlessly or flawlessly, as if holding an unbeatable "ace" card in a game.
  • ace in the hole The idiom "ace in the hole" is typically used to refer to a powerful or secret resource or plan that is kept hidden until it is needed to gain an advantage or ensure success in a specific situation. It represents a hidden advantage or a trump card that can be utilized at a crucial moment.
  • red in the face The idiom "red in the face" refers to a person's face turning red due to embarrassment, anger, or exertion. It typically implies a strong emotional or physical reaction that is evident by the reddening of the cheeks or skin on the face.
  • in the red The idiom "in the red" refers to a situation where a person or an organization is experiencing financial losses or debts rather than profits. It signifies that one's expenses or liabilities exceed their income or assets, resulting in a negative account balance, represented traditionally by red ink.
  • caught in the act The idiom "caught in the act" means to be discovered or observed in the midst of doing something wrong, illegal, or shameful. It implies being caught red-handed or in the very act of committing an offense or engaging in an improper behavior.
  • in reduced circumstances The idiom "in reduced circumstances" refers to a situation where someone experiences a significant decline or loss in their financial or social status. It is typically used to describe someone who was once wealthy, successful, or influential, but now finds themselves living in poverty or experiencing a significant decrease in their standard of living.
  • reef a sail in The idiom "reef a sail in" refers to the action of reducing the area of a sail by folding or rolling it up and securing it in order to lessen the sail's exposure to strong winds or heavy weather. This is typically done to maintain control, stability, and safety of the boat in rough conditions.
  • reel in sb/sth The idiom "reel in sb/sth" typically means to attract, entice, or draw someone or something closer, often with the intention of gaining control or influence over them. It is commonly used in situations where there is a gradual persuasion or manipulation involved in bringing someone or something under one's control or in acquiring or achieving a desired outcome.
  • reel sth in The idiom "reel something in" means to draw or pull something closer, typically by winding or retrieving it using a rod, line, or reel. It is often used metaphorically to describe the process of attracting or gaining control over something, such as a person or a situation. It implies gradually bringing or capturing something within reach or under one's influence.
  • in reference to sth "In reference to something" is an idiom used when discussing or mentioning a particular topic or subject. It indicates that the following statement or discussion is related to the mentioned subject matter. It is often used to clarify the context or provide background information.
  • in reference to sm or sth The idiom "in reference to someone or something" means mentioning or discussing someone or something specifically, often with the intention of providing additional information or clarification on a particular topic or subject matter. It indicates that the statement or conversation is related to the mentioned person or thing.
  • reflected in sth The idiom "reflected in something" means that a particular quality, characteristic, or aspect is clearly visible or evident in something. It suggests that the subject or object being referred to accurately represents or portrays a specific attribute or trait.
  • in the act The idiom "in the act" refers to someone being caught or observed while doing something, usually something they were not supposed to be doing, thus exposing their actions.
  • in on the act The idiom "in on the act" means to participate in an activity or endeavor, especially in a way that shares or competes for attention or credit with others. It refers to someone joining an action, event, or opportunity as an active participant or contributor.
  • in earnest The idiom "in earnest" is defined as doing something sincerely, seriously, or with full commitment and determination. It refers to engaging in an activity or pursuing a goal with genuine dedication and a strong sense of purpose.
  • get in the act The idiom "get in the act" refers to joining or participating in a particular activity, usually when someone else has already started or established it. It implies that the person wants to become involved in a group or situation and contribute to it. Additionally, it can also suggest that someone is seeking attention or recognition by becoming part of something that has gained visibility or momentum.
  • get in on the act The idiom "get in on the act" means to become involved in a situation or activity that is already underway or in progress, often for personal benefit or to gain an advantage. It refers to joining in on something that others are already participating in or taking advantage of.
  • catch in the act The idiom "catch in the act" refers to the act of witnessing or discovering someone engaging in an activity or behavior, especially something wrong or dishonest, while they are in the midst of doing it. It implies catching someone in the very moment of their action, providing undeniable evidence of their wrongdoing.
  • in action The idiom "in action" refers to something being done or witnessed, indicating actual progress, performance, or implementation of a task or activity. It often implies observing or experiencing something firsthand instead of merely discussing or imagining it.
  • take refuge in sth The idiom "take refuge in sth" means to seek shelter, protection, or safety in something, especially during times of difficulty, danger, or despair. It can refer to finding solace or comfort in a place, activity, or belief system to escape from unpleasant or threatening situations.
  • in this regard The idiom "in this regard" means in relation to or concerning the aspect or aspect previously mentioned or under discussion. It is used to connect or refer to a specific point or matter that has been mentioned or referenced.
  • in that regard The idiom "in that regard" refers to discussing or considering a specific aspect or point previously mentioned. It is used to shift the focus or address a particular aspect of a topic that has been stated or discussed.
  • hold sm or sth in low regard The idiom "hold someone or something in low regard" means to have a negative opinion or lack of respect for someone or something. It implies that the person or thing is not highly valued or esteemed by the individual.
  • hold sm or sth in high regard The idiom "hold someone or something in high regard" means to have a great amount of respect, admiration, or esteem for someone or something. It implies valuing and considering someone or something as worthy, important, or deserving of admiration.
  • register in sth The idiom "register in sth" typically refers to the act of formally signing up or enrolling in a program, course, or organization. It implies formally joining or becoming a member of something.
  • register sm in sth The idiom "register someone in something" typically means to officially enroll or record someone as a member or participant in a particular event, organization, or system.
  • run in place The idiom "run in place" means to exert effort or engage in activity without making any progress or achieving desirable results. It refers to a situation where someone is putting in effort but not moving forward or making any significant advancement towards their goal or objective.
  • sit in judgment (of sth) The idiom "sit in judgment (of sth)" means to form an opinion or make a judgment about something or someone, often in a critical or evaluative manner. It implies assuming a role as the arbiter or judge to evaluate the merits or faults of a particular situation, action, or person.
  • sit in judgment (of sb) The idiom "sit in judgment (of sb)" means to assess or form an opinion about someone's actions, behavior, or character. It refers to the act of assuming a position of authority or superiority in evaluating or passing judgment on someone.
  • sit in judgment (up)on sm or sth The idiom "sit in judgment (up)on someone or something" means to make a critical evaluation or judgment of someone or something, often while presiding over a situation or passing a verdict. It implies having authority or responsibility to decide the worth, value, or outcome of someone or something.
  • in rehearsal The idiom "in rehearsal" refers to the process of practicing and preparing for a performance or event, typically in the context of performing arts such as theater, music, or dance. It implies that the event or performance is not yet ready or finalized, but is currently being practiced and refined before it is presented to an audience.
  • in addition (to sth) The idiom "in addition to (sth)" means to have something extra or additional, in conjunction with something else that has already been mentioned or is already present.
  • rein in sb/sth The idiom "rein in sb/sth" means to exert control or restrict someone or something from getting out of control or exceeding specified limits. It often refers to curtailing excessive actions, behaviors, or tendencies by bringing them under control. The term "rein", originating from horsemanship, refers to the straps used to guide and control a horse, thereby symbolizing the act of bringing someone or something into line or obedience.
  • rein sm or sth in The idiom "rein (something or someone) in" means to control or restrain something or someone, usually to prevent or limit their actions, behavior, or impact. It implies bringing something or someone under control to prevent them from becoming excessive, extravagant, or out of hand. This idiom is often used when referring to reining in emotions, impulses, spending, or any situation where control or moderation is needed.
  • reinstate sm in sth The idiom "reinstate someone in something" means to restore or bring someone back to a previous position, role, or state that they were previously in. It can refer to returning someone to a job, position of authority, or a specific situation or condition that they were previously a part of.
  • rejoice in sm or sth The idiom "rejoice in something" means to feel great joy, happiness, or satisfaction about someone or something. It refers to experiencing a sense of delight or pleasure in a particular person, situation, or thing.
  • in relation to sth The idiom "in relation to something" refers to a connection or comparison between two or more things, usually indicating a link or relevancy between them. It often signifies discussing or considering the specific aspects or context of a particular thing and how it relates to other factors or entities.
  • in relation to sm or sth The idiom "in relation to" means in connection or concerning something or someone. It is often used to describe the relationship or comparison between two things or ideas. It signifies the topic or subject being discussed and the perspective it is being viewed from. It implies that there is some sort of connection, association, or relevance between the two subjects.
  • admit sm (in)to (sm place) The idiom "admit someone (in)to (somewhere)" means to allow or grant someone access to a particular place or location. It can refer to physical entry into a place or gaining permission for someone to participate or be included in a particular group or situation.
  • relocate sm or sth in sth The idiom "relocate someone or something in something" means to move or transfer someone or something to a different place or position within a particular context or setting.
  • in the back of your mind The idiom "in the back of your mind" refers to a thought or idea that is continuously present but not at the forefront of one's thoughts or focus. It implies that the notion is somewhat subconscious, lingering in a person's mind without them actively acknowledging or addressing it.
  • remain in (sth) The idiom "remain in (sth)" means to continue or stay in a particular state, condition, or situation without any change or movement. It implies staying in the same position, place, or circumstance.
  • Keep in touch. The idiom "Keep in touch" means to maintain communication or contact with someone, often implying a desire for ongoing connection or updates between individuals.
  • keep in touch (with sm or sth) The idiom "keep in touch with someone or something" means to maintain communication or contact with someone or something, usually through regular or occasional interactions, updates, or correspondence. It implies sustaining a connection over time and not losing touch, even if physical distances or other circumstances separate individuals or situations.
  • remand sm (in)to the custody of sm The idiom "remand someone (in)to the custody of someone" means to order or send someone back into the care or control of another person or institution, typically in reference to legal proceedings. It often implies that the person in custody will be returned to a prison, jail, or detention center under the supervision of the assigned authority.
  • remember sm in one's will The idiom "remember someone in one's will" refers to the act of including someone as a beneficiary or providing them with an inheritance in one's last will and testament. It signifies that the person intends to leave a bequest or financial provision for that individual after their death. This expression extends beyond physical possessions and can also denote leaving a lasting legacy or providing for someone in a significant way.
  • in remission The idiom "in remission" refers to a temporary or prolonged period during which the symptoms of a disease or a condition disappear or are under control. It is commonly used in the medical field, particularly in relation to cancer, to indicate that the cancer is no longer showing signs of activity or growth. However, it can also be used in other contexts to describe the temporary improvement or subsiding of any disease, condition, or problem.
  • sb's heart isn't in sth The idiom "sb's heart isn't in sth" means that someone lacks interest, enthusiasm, or passion for something they are doing or pursuing. They may not be fully committed or dedicated to the task or activity.
  • in advance (of sth) The idiom "in advance (of sth)" means doing or preparing something before a particular event or deadline. It implies being proactive and acting ahead of time to be well-prepared or to have a head start.
  • pay in advance The idiom "pay in advance" refers to the act of making a payment for something before it is received or used. It involves providing funds or compensation ahead of time, ensuring that the service or product will be delivered or provided at a later date.
  • render sth in(to) sth The idiom "render sth in(to) sth" means to transform or convert something into a different form or state. It refers to the process of making something into a particular condition, often with the purpose of changing its nature or functionality.
  • in good repair The idiom "in good repair" refers to something being well-maintained, functioning properly, or in excellent condition. It implies that an object, property, or system is regularly inspected, repaired, or renovated to ensure its optimal functioning and appearance.
  • Marry in haste, (and) repent at leisure. The idiom "Marry in haste, (and) repent at leisure" means that making impulsive decisions, specifically in regards to marriage, can lead to regret and unhappiness later on. It suggests that rushing into a marriage without careful consideration may result in long-term consequences or remorse.
  • report in sick The definition of the idiom "report in sick" is to inform one's employer or supervisor that one is unable to come to work due to illness or poor health.
  • report in The idiom "report in" refers to the act of providing an update or giving information to a higher authority or supervisor. It typically implies the requirement for individuals to communicate their progress, whereabouts, or completion of a task to a designated person or department. It is often used in work or military contexts.
  • repose in sth To repose in something means to find rest, peace, or confidence in it. It implies a sense of trust, comfort, or reliance on a particular object, idea, or place.
  • represent sm in sth The idiom "represent someone/something in something" means to serve as a symbol, spokesperson, or advocate for someone or something within a particular context or situation. It can also refer to acting on behalf of someone or something, and displaying their interests, opinions, or ideals within a specific group, organization, or event.
  • There is a tide in the affairs of men. "There is a tide in the affairs of men" is a quote from William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar. It refers to the idea that there are pivotal moments or opportunities in life which must be seized upon and taken advantage of. It emphasizes the importance of recognizing and acting upon these moments, as they can lead to significant changes or advancements in one's life or circumstances.
  • in the affirmative The idiom "in the affirmative" refers to answering a question or making a statement in a positive or affirmative manner. It indicates agreement, confirmation, or affirmation of something.
  • resemble sm or sth in sth The idiom "resemble someone or something in something" means to have a similar appearance or characteristic to someone or something in a particular aspect or quality. It suggests a degree of similarity or likeness between two entities in a specific context or attribute.
  • in reserve The idiom "in reserve" means to be kept apart or saved for future use, rather than being used immediately. It implies having a supply or resource available for future needs or contingencies.
  • hold sm or sth in reserve and keep sm or sth in reserve The idiom "hold something in reserve" or "keep something in reserve" means to keep something as a backup or to save it for future use. It suggests having something available or prepared and ready to be used when needed. It implies the act of not using or revealing something immediately, but instead, keeping it in reserve for a later time.
  • reside in sm or sth The idiom "reside in sm or sth" means that the essence or true nature of something can be found or exists within someone or something. It suggests that the key or fundamental qualities or characteristics can be attributed to a particular person or thing.
  • reside in The idiom "reside in" means to exist or be found within something or someone, often referring to a quality, characteristic, or source of a particular thing. It implies that the essence or true nature of something can be attributed or located in a specific place or entity.
  • a babe in the woods The idiom "a babe in the woods" refers to someone who is inexperienced, naive, or vulnerable in unfamiliar or dangerous situations. It implies that the person lacks knowledge or understanding and is easily deceived or taken advantage of.
  • babe in the woods The idiom "babe in the woods" refers to an inexperienced or naive person who is easily deceived or vulnerable due to lack of knowledge or worldly experience.
  • babe in arms The idiom "babe in arms" refers to a very young or small child, typically a baby, who is being carried in someone's arms. It implies that the person or child is extremely young or vulnerable and requires constant care and protection.
  • in an age of years
  • in a coon's age The idiom "in a coon's age" is an informal expression used to describe a long period of time. It suggests that a significant amount of time has passed since a particular event or occurrence. Originating from American English, the term "coon" in this context is a colloquial abbreviation for raccoon.
  • in sm respects The idiom "in some respects" means that something is true or applicable to a certain extent or in certain aspects, although there may be exceptions or limitations. It suggests that there are particular qualities, characteristics, or conditions in which the subject aligns or agrees with a statement or comparison.
  • rest in
  • restore sm's trust in sth The idiom "restore someone's trust in something" means to regain or rebuild someone's belief, confidence, or faith in a particular thing or concept, especially after it has been damaged or lost. It involves taking actions or demonstrating behavior that proves one's reliability, honesty, or effectiveness in order to rebuild the confidence and trust that someone once had.
  • result in sth The idiom "result in sth" refers to the outcome or consequence of a particular action or event that leads to the occurrence of something specific. It implies that a particular action or event directly causes or produces a specific outcome or consequence.
  • Birds in their little nests agree. The idiom "Birds in their little nests agree" means that people who live or work together in close quarters are more likely to maintain harmony and avoid conflicts. It implies that individuals who coexist peacefully in their respective roles or environments tend to avoid disagreements or arguments.
  • agree (with sth) (in sth)
  • in agreement The idiom "in agreement" refers to a state or condition where two or more parties have the same opinion, belief, or understanding about a particular topic or issue. It implies that there is consensus or harmony between the involved parties.
  • retire (in)to sth The idiom "retire (in)to sth" means to withdraw from active social life or work and settle into a particular place or activity, typically for relaxation, rest, or pursuing personal interests or hobbies. It implies moving away from the demands and pressures of one's previous lifestyle and embracing a more peaceful and tranquil existence.
  • be in aid of The idiom "be in aid of" means to support or contribute to a cause or charity by organizing an event, activity, or fundraising campaign with the intention of raising funds or generating awareness for the cause.
  • aid sm in doing sth The idiom "aid someone in doing something" means to assist or help someone in accomplishing a task or activity. It implies lending support, providing resources, guidance, or any form of assistance to make their actions or objectives easier to achieve.
  • aid sm in sth The idiom "aid someone in something" means to provide assistance or help to someone in doing or accomplishing something. It implies offering support, guidance, or resources to enable someone to be successful in a particular task or endeavor.
  • in retrospect The idiom "in retrospect" means looking back on something or considering something after it has happened, especially with the benefit of hindsight or a new perspective. It involves reflecting on a past event or situation with a greater understanding or clarity than was possible at the time.
  • in return (for sth) The idiom "in return (for sth)" means to do or give something as a response or exchange for something else that has been done or given. It implies a reciprocal action or compensation.
  • in return for (sm or sth) The idiom "in return for (something or someone)" is used to describe a situation where you do or give something or someone with the expectation or understanding that you will receive something in response or as a reward. It implies a mutual exchange or reciprocity between two parties.
  • revel in sth To "revel in something" means to take great pleasure or delight in it, often with an outward display of enjoyment. It implies a sense of indulgence, enjoyment, and enthusiasm in fully embracing or experiencing something positive.
  • with nose in the air The idiom "with nose in the air" refers to someone behaving in a prideful, arrogant, or snobbish manner. It describes a person who carries themselves with a haughty attitude, displaying a sense of superiority or self-importance.
  • wash dirty laundry in public The idiom "wash dirty laundry in public" refers to the act of discussing personal or embarrassing matters openly and publicly, rather than keeping them private.
  • stick nose up in the air The idiom "stick nose up in the air" refers to a person displaying an arrogant or haughty attitude, often by being dismissive or condescending towards others. It implies that the person believes they are superior or more important than those around them. The idiom is derived from the physical action of someone tilting their head backward, raising their nose higher than normal, which is commonly associated with a snobbish or superior attitude.
  • one's nose is in the air The idiom "one's nose is in the air" is used to describe someone who is arrogant, haughty, or snobbish. It implies that the person thinks highly of themselves and looks down upon others. It suggests an attitude of superiority and condescension.
  • nip in the air The idiom "nip in the air" refers to a chilly or cold feeling in the atmosphere, indicating the onset of colder weather or the approach of winter. It implies that there is a slight, brisk sensation in the air, often felt during the autumn or early winter months.
  • leave up in the air The idiom "leave up in the air" means to leave something unresolved, uncertain, or undecided. It refers to a situation or decision that has not been finalized or determined yet, leaving it in a state of ambiguity or suspense.
  • have nose in the air To have one's nose in the air means to behave in a condescending or arrogant manner, typically by displaying a superior attitude or looking down upon others. It signifies a sense of superiority or haughtiness.
  • build castles in the air The idiom "build castles in the air" means to have unrealistic or impractical plans or dreams that are unlikely to happen or be achieved.
  • be up in the air The idiom "be up in the air" refers to a situation or decision that is uncertain or not yet determined. It means that something is still undecided, unresolved, or in a state of limbo.
  • be in the air The idiom "be in the air" is used to describe a situation, event, or feeling that can be sensed or felt by many people, usually indicating that something is about to happen or change. It suggests that there is a strong presence or anticipation of something in the atmosphere or among the people.
  • air dirty linen in public The idiom "air dirty linen in public" means to publicly discuss or disclose private or embarrassing matters that should be kept confidential. It refers to the act of exposing personal or unpleasant details about oneself or someone else in a public or inappropriate manner, often leading to unnecessary scandal or embarrassment.
  • a nip in the air The idiom "a nip in the air" refers to a slight chill or coldness felt in the atmosphere, usually during the fall or winter seasons. It describes the feeling of the temperature dropping slightly, indicating the onset of colder weather.
  • pass in review The idiom "pass in review" is often used to describe a formal inspection or evaluation of a group or individuals, typically performed by a superior or an audience. It refers to the act of participants walking or presenting themselves in front of the reviewing party, who then observes and assesses their appearance, performance, or overall quality. This term originated from military practices, where troops would march before high-ranking officers to demonstrate discipline, readiness, and precision. However, today it is also used more broadly in various contexts to convey the idea of being assessed or scrutinized by others.
  • lean in (to sth) The idiom "lean in (to sth)" typically means to actively engage or fully commit oneself to a particular situation, task, or idea. It originated from the book "Lean In" by Sheryl Sandberg, encouraging women to assert themselves and take on leadership roles in various aspects of life. However, the idiom has now gained broader usage, emphasizing the act of actively participating, contributing, or showing enthusiasm towards something.
  • rolling in the aisles The idiom "rolling in the aisles" means to be laughing uncontrollably or finding something extremely humorous. It implies that someone is laughing so hard that they are physically rolling on the floor or rolling in the aisles of a theater or auditorium. It is often used to describe something that is incredibly funny and elicits intense laughter.
  • have sb rolling in the aisles The idiom "have someone rolling in the aisles" means to cause someone to laugh hysterically or uncontrollably. It implies that something is incredibly funny and entertaining, bringing immense joy and amusement to the person or a group of people.
  • horn in (on sb/sth) The idiom "horn in (on sb/sth)" means to intrude or impose oneself on someone or a situation, often without being invited or welcomed. It refers to interfering or interrupting in a way that can be seen as pushy or aggressive.
  • horn in (on sth) The phrase "horn in (on sth)" means to intrude or interrupt someone else's business or activity without being invited or welcome. It implies inserting oneself or interfering in a situation where one does not belong.
  • draw in one's horns and pull in one's horns The idiom "draw in one's horns" or "pull in one's horns" means to become more cautious, reserved, or less assertive in one's behavior. It refers to the metaphorical image of a horned animal retracting or pulling in its horns as a defensive or submissive gesture. The idiom is typically used to describe a person's retreat from a confrontational or aggressive stance in order to avoid conflict, display humility, or protect oneself.
  • rich in sth The idiom "rich in sth" is used to describe a person, thing, or place that possesses a significant quantity or quality of something, often relating to abundance, wealth, or diversity. It suggests that the subject has an extensive or valuable amount of the specified attribute.
  • ride off in all directions The idiom "ride off in all directions" means to scatter or disperse, often without a clear purpose or direction. It implies that a group or individuals are separating and going their own separate ways, engaging in various activities without coordination or unity. The idiom can also signify chaos, confusion, or a lack of organization.
  • talk in riddles The idiom "talk in riddles" means to speak in a confusing or unclear manner, often using ambiguous or puzzling language that makes it difficult for others to understand. It implies a lack of straightforwardness or directness in communication.
  • walk right in The idiom "walk right in" typically means to enter or approach a place without any hindrance, invitation, or prior arrangement. It suggests that someone can easily and confidently access a location or situation without any obstacles or obstacles.
  • right in the kisser The idiom "right in the kisser" is an informal expression that means to be hit or struck forcefully in the face, typically referring to a punch or blow. It is often used to emphasize a sudden and direct impact on the person's face.
  • one's heart is in the right place The idiom "one's heart is in the right place" refers to a person who has good intentions or a kind and compassionate nature, even if their actions or choices may not always reflect that. It implies that the person genuinely cares and means well, despite any mistakes or shortcomings they may have.
  • in the right The idiom "in the right" means to be correct, justifiable, or having the morally superior position in a particular situation or dispute.
  • in right mind The idiom "in right mind" refers to a person being mentally sound, rational, or sane. It means that the person is making decisions or judgments based on logical reasoning and not influenced by irrational thoughts or emotions.
  • in own right The idiom "in one's own right" means that someone possesses a particular quality, status, or position independently, separate from anyone else or any other affiliation they may have. It emphasizes their individual accomplishments or qualifications rather than being recognized solely because of someone else or external factors.
  • heart is in the right place The idiom "heart is in the right place" is used to describe someone who, while they may have made a mistake or acted in a misguided way, had good intentions or a well-meaning spirit behind their actions. It implies that despite their errors, the person's motives were good and pure.
  • have heart in the right place The idiom "have heart in the right place" is used to describe someone who has good intentions or good moral intentions despite perhaps not always making the best decisions or actions. It means that even if their methods or approach may be flawed, their intentions are sincere and well-meaning.
  • God's in his heaven all's right with the world The idiom "God's in his heaven, all's right with the world" typically refers to a sentiment or belief that everything is fine or in order because a higher power (usually God) is overseeing and taking care of everything. It implies a sense of reassurance or comfort that things will work out as they should, regardless of any temporary difficulties or uncertainties.
  • go in the right direction The idiom "go in the right direction" means to progress or make advancements toward a desired outcome or goal. It suggests that someone or something is moving or developing in a positive or satisfactory manner.
  • Come right in The idiom "Come right in" is an invitation or a welcoming gesture for someone to enter a place, indicating that they are welcome and encouraged to enter immediately and without hesitation.
  • be right in the head The idiom "be right in the head" means to be mentally stable or rational. It implies that the person has a sound or healthy mind, showing no signs of mental illness or instability.
  • be in the right place at the right time The idiom "be in the right place at the right time" refers to being lucky or fortunate enough to be present or available at the perfect moment or situation in order to achieve success, seize an opportunity, or experience favorable circumstances. It implies that one's presence or availability aligns perfectly with the timing and requirements of a particular situation or event, leading to advantageous outcomes.
  • a step in the right direction The idiom "a step in the right direction" refers to a positive action or decision taken towards achieving a particular goal or outcome. It signifies progress or improvement, even if it is just a small or initial one.
  • send away with a flea in ear The idiom "send away with a flea in ear" refers to someone being dismissed or reprimanded in such a manner that they feel ashamed, embarrassed, or insulted. It conveys the idea of being sent off with a lingering feeling of being scolded or criticized.
  • ring in ears The idiom "ring in ears" refers to experiencing a persistent or recurring sound or sensation similar to the sound of a ringing or buzzing. It often describes a condition called tinnitus where individuals perceive noises or ringing in their ears without any external source of the sound.
  • pull in ears
  • in one ear and out the other The idiom "in one ear and out the other" is used to describe someone who quickly forgets or ignores something they have heard or been told. It implies that information or advice goes into their mind but does not stay there or have any lasting impact.
  • In a pig's eye! The idiom "In a pig's eye!" is an exclamation used to express disbelief, skepticism, or strong disagreement with a statement or suggestion. It indicates that the speaker considers the idea being presented as outrageous, absurd, or highly unlikely.
  • have a word in ear The idiom "have a word in ear" means to privately speak to someone in order to share important or confidential information or to offer advice, instruction, or criticism. It implies a one-on-one conversation that is discreet and meant for the recipient's ears only.
  • be up to ears in The idiom "be up to ears in" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular activity or task. It implies that someone is deeply involved or immersed in something, to the point where they have no time or capacity for anything else.
  • throw hat in the ring "Throwing hat in the ring" is an idiomatic expression that means to announce one's candidacy for a position or competition. It refers to the act of physically throwing a hat into a ring or arena, symbolizing a person's entry into a contest or election.
  • ring in the new year The idiom "ring in the new year" refers to the act of celebrating or welcoming the beginning of a new year. It typically involves various festivities, such as parties, countdowns, fireworks, and other traditions. The phrase "ring in" symbolizes the idea of ushering in or announcing the arrival of the new year.
  • rip sth in half The idiom "rip sth in half" means to tear something into two equal parts forcefully and rapidly, creating two separate pieces where there was originally only one. It suggests a strong and forceful action, often used metaphorically to describe a situation where something is completely destroyed, split, or divided.
  • rise in The idiom "rise in" means an increase or upward movement in a particular quantity, level, or occurrence. It is often used to indicate a rise or growth in something, such as prices, population, or statistics.
  • line up in The idiom "line up in" means to form or arrange oneself in a straight or organized line. It is often used in contexts such as queues, military formations, or groups of people waiting their turn.
  • keep in line The idiom "keep in line" means to obey the rules or follow the established regulations, standards, or expectations. It suggests maintaining discipline or conformity within a group or organization.
  • in the line of fire The idiom "in the line of fire" refers to being in a dangerous or vulnerable position, typically used to describe someone who is exposed to direct criticism, danger, or harm. It originates from military contexts, where it describes individuals who are within the path of gunfire or facing immediate threat. In a broader sense, it can also apply to anyone facing potential harm or responsibilities due to their position or involvement in a situation.
  • in line with The idiom "in line with" refers to something that is aligned or consistent with a particular standard, guideline, or expectation. It suggests that whatever is being discussed or done adheres to or follows the established principles or norms.
  • in line for The idiom "in line for" typically means to be next in order or to have a reasonable chance of receiving or achieving something in the near future. It suggests that someone or something is positioned or expected to follow or obtain something in a logical or predetermined sequence.
  • in line The idiom "in line" means to be positioned or situated in proper order, sequence, or alignment with something else, typically in a queue or formation. It can also refer to adhering to a particular set of rules, regulations, or expectations.
  • in keeping The idiom "in keeping" means conforming to or maintaining consistency with something, usually a particular style, atmosphere, or expected standard. It refers to supporting or matching the prevailing or desired characteristics, qualities, or surroundings.
  • draw a line in the sand The idiom "draw a line in the sand" means to establish a limit or boundary beyond which one is unwilling to compromise or accept any further action or behavior. It often signifies making a definitive stand or indicating the point at which one's patience, tolerance, or cooperation ends.
  • be in the firing line The idiom "be in the firing line" refers to being in a vulnerable or exposed position, typically where one could face criticism, blame, or potential consequences. It originates from military terminology, where soldiers or targets in the firing line are at risk of being shot at or attacked. In a broader sense, it is often used to describe someone who is directly involved or responsible for a challenging or risky situation.
  • be in line for The idiom "be in line for" means to be expected or likely to receive or achieve something, often as a result of one's efforts, actions, or qualifications. It suggests being next in order or having a strong chance of obtaining a particular opportunity, reward, promotion, or success.
  • be in line The idiom "be in line" refers to being in accordance with or conforming to a particular set of rules, expectations, or guidelines. It suggests that one's actions or behaviors are aligned with what is considered appropriate or acceptable in a given situation or context.
  • rival sm in sth The idiom "rival someone in something" means to compete against or be equally skilled, talented, or successful as someone else in a particular area or activity. It implies that the person being referred to is a worthy competitor or equal in a specific field or pursuit.
  • wide place in the road The idiom "wide place in the road" refers to a small or insignificant settlement or town, often located in a remote or rural area. It implies that the place lacks significant features or attractions and only serves as a brief stop along a longer journey.
  • in the road
  • up in years The idiom "up in years" refers to being advanced in age or old.
  • have rocks in one's head The idiom "have rocks in one's head" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is perceived as being stupid, foolish, or lacking intelligence. It implies that the person's head or mind is filled with rocks instead of a proper functioning brain.
  • in the altogether The idiom "in the altogether" is a colloquial expression that means being completely naked or undressed.
  • rocket (in)to sth The idiom "rocket (in)to something" typically means to quickly and energetically move or progress into a specific situation or state. It conveys the idea of rapid advancement or acceleration towards a particular goal or destination.
  • When poverty comes in at the door, love flies out of the window The idiom "When poverty comes in at the door, love flies out of the window" means that financial hardships can often strain or ruin a relationship. When a couple is faced with poverty or financial difficulties, their love and affection for each other may diminish or fade away.
  • Lucky at cards, unlucky in love The idiom "Lucky at cards, unlucky in love" means that someone who has success or good fortune in gambling or financial matters often lacks luck or happiness in their romantic relationships. It suggests that there is a trade-off between being fortunate in one aspect of life and experiencing difficulties or setbacks in another aspect.
  • in love The idiom "in love" refers to a state or feeling of deep affection, fondness, or attachment towards someone or something. It typically implies a romantic or emotional connection and can often lead to elevated happiness and strong emotions.
  • fall head over heels in love The idiom "fall head over heels in love" means to completely and passionately fall in love with someone, often describing a sudden, intense, and uncontrollable attraction towards someone.
  • play a part in sth To "play a part in something" means to have a role or contribute to an event, situation, or outcome. It suggests that someone or something is involved or influential in a particular context.
  • turn in grave The idiom "turn in grave" refers to an expression used when a deceased person's hypothetical reaction or disapproval is being implied, usually in response to something shocking, unexpected, or contrary to their beliefs or values. It suggests that if the deceased were alive, they would be so deeply disturbed or agitated by the current situation that they would physically "turn" or twist in their grave.
  • rolling in The idiom "rolling in" typically means having an abundant or excessive amount of something, especially money or wealth. It suggests being in a state of affluence or prosperity.
  • roll up in
  • roll over in grave The idiom "roll over in grave" refers to the exaggerated notion that a deceased person would be so shocked, outraged, or deeply disturbed by a certain action, event, or statement happening after their death that they would figuratively roll over in their grave. It implies that the deceased individual would strongly disapprove or be greatly angered by what has occurred.
  • roll in The idiom "roll in" has two main definitions depending on the context: 1. To arrive in large numbers or quantities: When used in this sense, "roll in" means to come or arrive in large quantities or numbers. It implies a rapid and significant influx of something. For example, "The donations started to roll in after the charity event" means that a substantial amount of donations were received after the event. 2. To be extremely wealthy or to have a lot of money: This definition of "roll in" refers to having a significant amount of wealth or being financially well-off. For instance, "He's rolling in money" means that the person is very rich or has a great abundance of money. Note: The actual definition
  • have rolling in the aisles The idiom "have rolling in the aisles" means to cause people to laugh uncontrollably or to be highly amused, resulting in laughter or amusement that is hard to control.
  • a roll in the hay The idiom "a roll in the hay" is used to describe a casual sexual encounter or a short-lived romantic affair. It often implies a sense of spontaneity, excitement, and physical intimacy that may not necessarily lead to a lasting relationship.
  • have mind in the gutter The idiom "have one's mind in the gutter" refers to someone who has vulgar, lewd, or inappropriate thoughts, usually in a sexual context. It suggests that the person's mind tends to focus on or interpret things in a crude or impure manner.
  • have it made in the shade The idiom "have it made in the shade" means to have achieved great success or to be in a comfortable and advantageous position. It implies being well-off, having everything in your favor, or having a simple and worry-free life.
  • have ass in a sling The idiom "have ass in a sling" is an informal expression that means to be in a troublesome or difficult situation, often as a result of one's own actions or choices. It implies being in a predicament with little or no means of escape or relief. The phrase can also convey a sense of being vulnerable, helpless, or having consequences to face.
  • Rome was not built in a day. The idiom "Rome was not built in a day" means that significant achievements or complex tasks require time, effort, and patience to be accomplished. It emphasizes that worthwhile endeavors cannot be hastily completed and need consistent dedication.
  • the roof caves/falls in The idiom "the roof caves/falls in" is used to describe a situation where everything suddenly goes wrong or falls apart. It symbolizes a catastrophic failure, often indicating a sudden and unexpected collapse of a plan, a structure, or a situation.
  • the boys in the back room The idiom "the boys in the back room" refers to a group of influential, powerful, or decision-making individuals who work behind the scenes and often exercise significant control or influence over a particular organization, political party, or a larger system. These individuals typically operate discreetly and are not in the public eye, but are instrumental in shaping decisions or policies. The phrase is often used to imply secretive or undemocratic operations, especially in politics or business.
  • rooted in sth The idiom "rooted in sth" refers to something that has a strong foundation, basis, or origin in a particular thing or idea. It implies that the subject matter or concept being discussed is deeply connected to or influenced by the mentioned element, forming an essential part of its essence or nature.
  • root sth in sth The idiom "root something in something" means to establish or base something firmly or deeply on a particular concept, idea, belief, or foundation. It implies that the subject or concept is deeply ingrained or supported by the specific thing mentioned.
  • in hot water The idiom "in hot water" means to be in trouble or facing difficulties, often as a result of one's actions or decisions. It refers to a situation where someone is facing scrutiny, criticism, or consequences for their behavior.
  • rope in sb/sth The idiom "rope in sb/sth" means to persuade or convince someone or something to participate in a particular activity, project, or plan, often by using persuasion, coercion, or manipulation. It suggests the act of involving someone or something, often unwillingly, in a situation they may not have initially wished to be a part of. It can also imply the act of enlisting or recruiting someone or something for a particular purpose.
  • put the roses in sb's cheeks The idiom "put the roses in someone's cheeks" refers to someone blushing or becoming flushed, usually due to embarrassment, excitement, or affection. It is used to describe the visible change in color or the rosy appearance of someone's face when experiencing a particular emotion.
  • Everything in the garden is rosy. The idiom "Everything in the garden is rosy" is a figurative expression used to describe a situation or a condition that is favorable, perfect, or going well.
  • sth is rotten in (the state of) Denmark. The idiom "something is rotten in (the state of) Denmark" is a phrase often used to imply that there is something fundamentally wrong or corrupt in a particular situation or system. It is derived from a line spoken by the character Marcellus in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, who points out the corruption and underlying deceit within the Danish court. The idiom is generally used to suggest that there are hidden problems or unethical practices within an organization, a government, or any other set-up.
  • rough in The idiom "rough in" typically refers to the preliminary or initial phase of a construction or installation process. It involves the basic or initial setting up of various components, such as pipes, wires, ducts, or frames, before the final finish or detailing work takes place. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the early stages or foundational work of any project or endeavor.
  • in the rough The idiom "in the rough" typically refers to something or someone who is in a raw or unrefined state, often implying the potential for development or improvement. It denotes something or someone that may possess underlying qualities or talents that are not immediately apparent. It can also be used to describe an object or a situation that is not yet complete or polished, needing further work or refinement.
  • diamond in the rough The idiom "diamond in the rough" refers to a person or thing that has great potential or talent, but lacks refinement or polish. It implies that even though someone or something may appear unimpressive or unrefined on the surface, there is untapped beauty, skill, or value waiting to be discovered or developed.
  • a diamond in the rough The idiom "a diamond in the rough" refers to something or someone that has a great potential or talent, but currently lacks refinement or polish. It suggests that although the outward appearance or current state may be unimpressive, there is hidden value or exceptional quality waiting to be discovered or developed.
  • rough sth in The idiom "rough sth in" refers to creating a preliminary or rough version of something, such as a sketch, outline, or plan. It suggests a quick and informal representation or draft that will later be refined or finalized.
  • in round numbers The idiom "in round numbers" refers to expressing an approximate or approximate figure instead of an exact or precise value. It suggests using general or rounded figures to provide an estimate or a summary rather than specific details.
  • go round in circles The idiom "go round in circles" means to engage in repetitive or unproductive actions that do not lead to any progress or resolution. It suggests that someone is stuck, repeatedly going over the same ideas or problems without finding a solution or making any meaningful headway.
  • go around in circles The idiom "go around in circles" refers to a situation where someone or something is engaging in repetitive or fruitless activity without making any progress or achieving a desired outcome. It implies that one is stuck in a repetitive cycle, unable to move forward or find a resolution to a problem.
  • say sth in a roundabout way To say something in a roundabout way means to express or convey an idea or message indirectly or indirectly, often using unnecessarily complex or convoluted language. It involves beating around the bush or using a lot of words to express something that could have been said more directly or succinctly.
  • put an amount of time in on sth The idiom "put an amount of time in on sth" means to devote or allocate a specific period of time to work on or engage in a particular task, activity, or project. It implies the act of investing or dedicating one's time and effort in order to achieve progress or completion in a specific endeavor.
  • bring an amount of money in The idiom "bring an amount of money in" generally means to earn or generate a specific sum of money. It implies that someone is able to produce or collect a particular amount of cash, typically through their work or business endeavors.
  • in a row The idiom "in a row" refers to consecutive or successive occurrences of something happening without interruption or break. It implies that multiple instances or events have happened sequentially, one after the other.
  • have your ducks in a row The idiom "have your ducks in a row" means to be well organized, prepared, or coordinated. It refers to having everything in order or arranged systematically, much like a row of ducks following one another.
  • get your ducks in a row The idiom "get your ducks in a row" means to get organized or prepared, to have all of one's tasks, responsibilities, or plans properly arranged and ready. It suggests the need to align everything in a systematic order or to gather all the necessary resources or information prior to proceeding with an action or decision.
  • get one's ducks in a row The idiom "get one's ducks in a row" means to organize or prepare things or oneself in a systematic and orderly manner before proceeding with a task or plan. It refers to arranging or aligning everything in the correct order, similar to how ducks are often seen walking or swimming in a neat line.
  • rub salt in the wound The idiom "rub salt in the wound" means to worsen a painful or distressing situation by adding insult or humiliation to someone who is already suffering or upset. It refers to making a difficult situation even more unbearable or causing additional emotional pain.
  • rub salt in a wound The idiom "rub salt in a wound" refers to exacerbating or intensifying someone's emotional pain or distress by reminding them of a painful or unfortunate situation.
  • rub nose in it The idiom "rub nose in it" means to intentionally remind or show someone their mistake or failure in a way that embarrasses or humiliates them. It implies a desire to make someone feel regret or shame for their actions or shortcomings.
  • rub it in The idiomatic expression "rub it in" means to intentionally make someone feel worse or add insult to injury by constantly reminding them of a mistake, failure, or misfortune they have experienced. It involves emphasizing or dwelling on someone's disappointment or embarrassment, often in a taunting or gloating manner.
  • rub in The idiom "rub in" is typically used when someone repeats or emphasizes something in order to cause someone else to feel embarrassed, humiliated, or upset about their mistake or failure.
  • lie in sth The idiom "lie in sth" means to be primarily or fundamentally based on something, to be rooted in or to exist as a result of something. It often describes a situation where the essence or main cause of a particular matter can be attributed to a specific factor.
  • lie in The idiom "lie in" refers to the act of staying in bed longer than usual or past one's normal waking time, typically for rest or relaxation purposes. It implies indulging in extra sleep or simply choosing to remain in bed without any particular urgency or responsibility.
  • have a bun in the oven The idiom "have a bun in the oven" means that someone is pregnant. It is a lighthearted and often informal way of referring to someone's pregnancy.
  • break in sth To "break in something" means to make it more comfortable or familiar through use or experience, particularly in relation to objects or activities that require adaptation or adjustment. It often involves overcoming initial difficulties or stiffness associated with something new, so that it becomes more functional, efficient, or comfortable.
  • break in The idiom "break in" typically refers to the act of making or becoming accustomed to something new, such as breaking in a new pair of shoes or breaking in a new employee. It can also refer to forcefully entering a building or property without permission, but this meaning is less common in everyday usage.
  • break in (to sth or sm place) The idiom "break in (to something or someplace)" refers to the act of forcefully entering or gaining unauthorized access to a place or building. It typically implies an illegal or unauthorized entry, often with the intention of committing a crime or mischief, such as burglary or trespassing. It can also refer to the act of forcibly opening a lock or breaking a barrier to gain access.
  • break sth in The idiom "break something in" refers to the process of using or wearing something new or stiff until it becomes more comfortable, flexible, or functional. It often applies to breaking in new shoes, clothes, or equipment by wearing or using them repeatedly until they fit better or work smoothly.
  • break sm in The idiom "break someone in" means to train or acclimate someone to a new job, role, or situation. It often involves teaching someone the necessary skills, protocols, or routines to perform well in a particular role or environment.
  • cut in The idiom "cut in" has multiple definitions depending on the context: 1. To interrupt or intrude into a conversation, activity, or line: This typically refers to the act of entering a conversation or group activity without being invited or creating a disruption. For example, "He continuously cuts in during our discussion, making it difficult to have a coherent conversation." 2. To interrupt or disrupt the flow or sequence of something: This can refer to the act of inserting oneself into an ongoing process or event, causing a disturbance or change in its course. For instance, "The unexpected announcement by the CEO cut in on our plans for the project." 3. To abruptly take over or replace someone in a dancing or partner activity: This refers specifically to
  • cut in(to sth) The idiom "cut in (to something)" has multiple meanings depending on the context. Here are a couple of definitions: 1. To interrupt or intrude into a conversation, activity, or event unexpectedly or without permission. It implies that someone else was already engaged in the conversation or activity. For example: "She tried to cut in during their conversation to offer her opinion." 2. To move ahead of others in a line or queue. It suggests that someone bypasses or jumps ahead of the established order. For example: "He cut in at the front of the line without waiting his turn." Overall, the idiom "cut in (to something)" typically expresses the notion of interrupting or intruding into a situation or overriding the established
  • cut sm in (on sth) The idiom "cut someone in (on something)" typically means to include or involve someone in a particular activity, sharing, or business venture, usually by granting them a portion of the profits or benefits.
  • line sm or sth up (in sth) The idiom "line sm or sth up (in sth)" means to arrange or organize something or someone in a specific way or order for a particular purpose. It typically refers to preparing or setting up something in advance or in a systematic manner. This can involve scheduling appointments, tasks, events, or aligning objects or individuals in a straight line or orderly fashion.
  • be as snug as a bug in a rug The idiom "be as snug as a bug in a rug" means to be incredibly comfortable and cozy in a specific situation or place. Similar to a bug being nestled securely in a rug, it implies a sense of warmth, safety, and contentment. It implies that someone is feeling at ease, snugly settled, and happily situated, often in a literal or metaphorical environment that provides a sense of peace and comfort.
  • roll in sth The idiom "roll in sth" generally means to have a large amount of something or to be abundantly supplied with something. It can refer to being rich, having a surplus of money, or having an abundance of a particular resource or item. It conveys the idea of being in a fortunate or advantageous position.
  • roll in (to sm place) The idiom "roll in (to sm place)" typically means to arrive or enter a place in a casual, relaxed, or carefree manner. It can imply a sense of ease, confidence, or nonchalance while entering a location.
  • roll sth in sth The idiom "roll sth in sth" typically means to cover or coat something with a particular substance or material. It implies the action of enveloping or encasing one thing with another. For example, you could roll a piece of meat in breadcrumbs to coat it before cooking, or roll a ball in sugar to cover it completely.
  • roll sth in The idiom "roll something in" means to mix, incorporate, or fold something into a larger mixture or overall process. It often refers to adding or including additional ingredients or elements to enhance the final result or to make it more complete or successful. It can be used in various contexts, such as cooking, business strategies, creative projects, or problem-solving methods.
  • roll sm or sth (up) in sth The idiom "roll something (up) in something" generally means to wrap or envelop something with or in another material or substance. It can also refer to the act of folding or twisting something, often with the intention of securing it.
  • tie in (to sth) The idiom "tie in (to sth)" means to be connected or related to something else. It refers to a relationship, connection, or association between different elements, concepts, or events that contribute to a common theme or purpose. It signifies how multiple things are linked or integrated together to form a cohesive whole.
  • lie in ruins The idiom "lie in ruins" typically refers to a state or condition where something has been completely destroyed or severely damaged, often indicating a sense of devastation, disarray, or total loss. It can be used metaphorically to describe a physical location, a plan, or even a person's life, suggesting the complete collapse or failure of what was once there.
  • fill in sth The idiom "fill in something" refers to completing or providing missing or required information, details, or answers for something. It can also mean temporarily replacing or substituting someone in a task, position, or duty.
  • fill in (for sb) The idiom "fill in (for sb)" means to temporarily take someone else's place or perform someone else's duties in their absence. It is often used when someone is substituting or acting as a replacement for another person.
  • fill sb in The idiom "fill sb in" means to provide someone with all the necessary or missing information about something, usually by giving a detailed explanation or recounting the relevant details. It can also imply updating someone on a situation or informing them of recent developments.
  • fill in (for sm or sth) The idiom "fill in (for someone or something)" refers to temporarily taking the place or performing the duties or responsibilities of another person or thing who is absent or unavailable. It often implies filling a role, position, or function until the original person or thing returns or a permanent replacement is found.
  • fill in The idiom "fill in" means to complete or substitute for someone or something temporarily, typically in their absence or when there is a need for additional support. It can refer to completing a form, covering a shift, providing information, or acting as a replacement or stand-in.
  • fill sth in The idiom "fill sth in" typically means to provide or complete missing information or details on a form, document, or any other written or spoken account. It can also refer to updating someone with relevant information about a specific topic or situation.
  • fill sm in (on sm or sth) The idiom "fill someone in (on someone or something)" means to provide someone with all the necessary information or details about a person or thing. It implies giving someone a comprehensive update or explaining a situation thoroughly so that they are well-informed.
  • rule in favor of sm or sth The idiom "rule in favor of someone or something" means to make a decision or judgement supporting or favoring a particular person or thing in a legal or official context. It typically implies that the judgment is in their best interest, granting them a specific right or benefit.
  • throw in sth The idiom "throw in something" generally means adding or including something as part of a deal, offer, or situation. It implies adding an extra item, bonus, or concession to make the overall offer more appealing or advantageous.
  • write in (sth) The idiom "write in (sth)" generally means to express one's opinion or vote for a particular candidate, issue, or idea through a written form, such as a letter, email, or ballot. It refers to the act of submitting one's viewpoint in written form instead of verbally or in person.
  • write in (to sth) (for sth) The idiom "write in (to sth) (for sth)" refers to the act of sending written communication or correspondence to a specific person, organization, or publication in order to express one's opinions, ask questions, or request something. It often involves writing a letter or email to actively participate in a discussion or provide feedback on a particular topic or issue.
  • write sm in (on sth) The idiom "write sm in (on sth)" means to inscribe or jot down something on a surface, typically with a writing instrument, such as a pen or a pencil. It refers to the act of putting words or information onto a tangible object, like paper, a whiteboard, or a document.
  • drive in (to sth) The idiomatic expression "drive in (to sth)" refers to the act of arriving or entering a place, typically a vehicle, by driving onto or into it. It can describe situations where a person or object enters a particular location or destination using a vehicle.
  • in the final analysis The idiom "in the final analysis" means at the end of a comprehensive examination or careful consideration of all the relevant factors and details. It suggests reaching a conclusion or making a judgment after thoroughly evaluating all the information and perspectives.
  • run off in all directions The idiom "run off in all directions" means to scatter or disperse in various ways or without a clear focus or direction. It implies a lack of organization or a situation where everyone is going their own way, often causing confusion or ineffectiveness.
  • run in circles The idiom "run in circles" means to be continuously busy or occupied with activities that do not lead to productive results or progress. It indicates a situation in which one is seemingly engaged in constant motion or effort but without making any meaningful or effective advancements. It implies a sense of repetitiveness and lack of direction in one's actions or endeavors.
  • run in The idiom "run in" typically refers to the act of detaining or apprehending someone who is suspected of a crime or wrongdoing by the authorities. It can also refer to encountering unexpected problems or challenges while pursuing a particular task or objective.
  • run around like a chicken with its head cut off and run in circles The idiom "run around like a chicken with its head cut off" means to behave or act in a frenzied, disorganized, or chaotic manner. It usually implies a state of panic, confusion, or aimlessness. Similarly, "run in circles" refers to going through repetitive, unproductive, or fruitless motions without making any progress or finding a solution. These idioms depict a lack of direction or purpose in one's actions.
  • pull in sth The idiom "pull in" can have different meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To bring or attract something or someone closer, usually with force or effort. Example: The fishermen pulled in the net filled with a variety of fish. 2. To earn or generate a certain amount of money or profit. Example: The movie pulled in millions of dollars in its opening week. 3. To arrive at a particular place or destination, especially by vehicle. Example: The train pulled in just as we were about to give up and leave. 4. To arrest or detain someone. Example: The police officers pulled in the suspect for questioning. 5. To pause or stop the progress of something. Example: We had
  • pull in sb/sth The idiom "pull in sb/sth" typically refers to the act of attracting or drawing someone or something towards a particular place or situation. It can also imply the act of making someone or something come closer or be included in a certain group or activity.
  • pull in The idiom "pull in" has several meanings depending on the context: 1. To pull a vehicle or object into a specific location or area; typically used when referring to parking a vehicle. Example: "He pulled in to the parking lot and found a spot to park his car." 2. To attract or draw someone's attention, interest, or support. Example: "The movie's captivating trailer pulled in a large audience on opening night." 3. To earn or generate a particular amount of money or revenue. Example: "The new marketing campaign helped the company pull in a substantial profit." 4. To apprehend or arrest someone. Example: "The police finally managed to pull in the suspect after weeks of investigation." 5. To arrive
  • pull in(to sm place) The idiom "pull in (to some place)" generally means to enter or arrive at a particular location or destination. It is commonly used to describe the act of bringing a vehicle or oneself to a stop and parking or docking somewhere. It can also refer to entering a building, station, or any specific area.
  • hedge sm in The idiom "hedge something in" means to protect or guard something by creating a barrier or obstacle around it, usually to prevent escape, intrusion, or outside influence. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • hedge sm or sth in The idiom "hedge something in" refers to the act of protecting or safeguarding oneself or something against potential risks or uncertainties by creating a defensive or secure barrier. It often involves taking precautionary measures to minimize potential losses or negative outcomes. This can be done through various strategies, such as insuring oneself or something, diversifying investments, or establishing safeguards or backup plans.
  • start sm up (in sth)
  • in the running The idiom "in the running" means to be actively competing or considered as a candidate for something, typically a competition, job position, or opportunity. It implies that someone or something has a chance or is being seriously considered among the contenders.
  • be in the running The idiom "be in the running" means to be a candidate or contender for something, especially in a competition or race. It implies that someone has a chance of winning or being selected for a particular position, opportunity, or achievement.
  • take a running jump (in the lake) The idiom "take a running jump (in the lake)" is a colloquial expression commonly used to dismiss or disregard someone's suggestion or request in an abrupt or somewhat rude manner. It implies someone's unwillingness to entertain or pay attention to what has been said, indicating that the speaker wants the person to go away or leave them alone.
  • stand in (for sm) The idiom "stand in (for someone)" refers to temporarily taking someone's place or filling in for someone who is absent or unavailable. It means to substitute for someone in a specific role or responsibility.
  • trade in sth To trade in something refers to the act of exchanging or substituting an old or unwanted item for a new one, typically by receiving a credit or discount on the purchase. It can also refer to giving up or replacing something in order to obtain a more desirable or advantageous alternative.
  • trade sth in (for sth) The idiom "trade something in (for something)" means to exchange or replace something with another thing, usually of similar value or significance. It often refers to the act of returning an old item in order to receive credit towards the purchase of a new item or to replace something with an updated or different version.
  • Fools rush in (where angels fear to tread). The idiom "Fools rush in (where angels fear to tread)" refers to the tendency of inexperienced or impulsive individuals to take risks or undertake ventures without considering the potential consequences or dangers involved. It suggests that those who lack proper judgment or insight often brazenly dive into situations that wiser, more cautious individuals would avoid. This expression highlights the contrast between reckless behavior and cautiousness, implying that it is foolish to heedlessly engage in something that even the most wise or knowledgeable individuals would approach with caution.
  • rush in The idiom "rush in" means to act or make decisions quickly, often without thinking or considering the consequences or risks involved. It implies acting impulsively or without caution.
  • in a mad rush The idiom "in a mad rush" refers to being in a frantic, hurried, or chaotic state. It signifies an intense or frenzied activity often due to time constraints or urgency.
  • step in The idiom "step in" means to intervene or become involved in a situation, typically to help or take over when someone else is unable or unwilling to continue.
  • step in(to sm place) The idiom "step in(to sm place)" means to enter or go into a particular location or venue. It implies physically moving into an area or environment, often with a purpose or intention.
  • step in (to the breach) The idiom "step in (to the breach)" means to take on a challenging or difficult task or responsibility, often when someone else is unable or unwilling to do so. It refers to the image of a breach or gap in a line of defense, and stepping in signifies the act of filling that gap or taking over a necessary role. It implies stepping up to the occasion in times of crisis or when leadership is required.
  • sit in (on sth) The idiom "sit in (on sth)" means to attend or observe a meeting, class, or event without actively participating. It typically refers to someone joining a gathering as an observer or for informational purposes, without having an official role or contributing to the discussion or proceedings.
  • sit in (for sb) The idiom "sit in (for sb)" refers to temporarily taking someone else's place or role, typically at a meeting, event, or performance. It can involve filling in for someone who is absent or unavailable.
  • fly in the face of sm or sth The idiom "fly in the face of someone or something" means to openly defy or contradict someone or something, usually in a bold or defiant manner. It refers to not conforming to established norms, expectations, or beliefs, going against commonly accepted ideas or principles.
  • be (stuck) in a rut The idiom "be (stuck) in a rut" typically refers to a situation where a person is in a repetitive and unchanging routine, lacking variety or progress. It suggests being stuck in a monotonous and unproductive pattern, without any new experiences or growth.
  • (stuck) in a rut The idiom "(stuck) in a rut" refers to being in a situation where one is stuck doing the same things repeatedly and feeling stagnant or unable to progress. It signifies being caught in a monotonous routine or being unable to break free from a pattern, resulting in a lack of growth or new experiences.
  • in your corner The idiom "in your corner" means to have someone's support, assistance, or advocacy. It is often used when someone is facing a challenge or a difficult situation and they have someone who is on their side, providing encouragement and help. It can also imply that the person is working together with someone else towards a common goal.
  • have sb in your corner The idiom "have someone in your corner" means having someone who supports, advocates, or allies with you. It refers to having someone on your team, someone who is loyal and helps you in difficult situations, gives advice, and stands up for you. Having someone in your corner ensures that you have a dedicated and reliable supporter.
  • have sm in one's corner The idiom "have someone in one's corner" means to have someone supporting or advocating for you, especially during challenging or difficult situations. It suggests that the person being referred to is on your side, providing assistance, guidance, or protection.
  • live in each other's pockets To "live in each other's pockets" is an idiom that conveys a close and constant proximity or relationship between people, typically referring to two or more individuals who spend a lot of time together and have a strong dependency on one another. It suggests that these individuals have little personal space or privacy and are intertwined in their everyday lives. It can apply to various contexts, such as family members, close friends, or colleagues who work closely together.
  • have sth burning a hole in your pocket The idiom "have something burning a hole in your pocket" means to have a strong desire to spend or use money quickly. It describes a person who cannot resist the urge to spend money as soon as they have it, often to the point that it feels like their money is literally burning a hole in their pocket. This idiom is typically used to convey impulsive or extravagant spending habits.
  • be in sb's pocket The idiom "be in someone's pocket" means to be under someone's control or influence, usually because of a close personal or financial relationship. It implies that the person has a strong hold or power over someone else's actions or decisions, often leading to favoritism or bias.
  • Money burns a hole in sm's pocket. The idiom "Money burns a hole in someone's pocket" means that a person cannot resist spending money as soon as they have it. They have a strong urge or temptation to spend their money quickly, without being able to save or hold onto it for long.
  • have sm in one's pocket The idiom "have someone or something in one's pocket" means to have complete control, influence, or domination over someone or something. It implies that the person or thing is under the speaker's power and can be manipulated or managed as desired.
  • in the saddle The idiom "in the saddle" refers to being in a position of control, power, or authority. It is derived from the image of someone being in control while sitting on a horse saddle, which requires balance and authoritative command. It can also imply being actively engaged or taking charge of a situation.
  • back in the saddle The idiom "back in the saddle" typically refers to returning to a familiar or comfortable situation or activity after a period of absence or difficulty. It originated from the image of a cowboy mounting a horse and getting back to riding after falling off or being away. It denotes a sense of resuming or regaining control, confidence, or competence in a given task or responsibility.
  • be in the saddle The idiom "be in the saddle" means to be in control or in a position of authority. It is often used to describe someone who is taking charge or leading a situation, similar to a rider being in control of a horse while being in the saddle.
  • in good hands The idiom "in good hands" refers to the assurance or confidence that someone or something is being well taken care of by competent or reliable individuals or institutions. It conveys a sense of trust and reliance on someone's abilities or the quality of a service or organization.
  • be in safe hands The idiom "be in safe hands" means to be under the care, protection, or guidance of someone who is competent, reliable, and trustworthy. It is often used to reassure someone that they are in a secure situation and can trust the person or entity responsible for their well-being.
  • (there is) safety in numbers The idiom "there is safety in numbers" means that being in a large group or having support from many people can decrease the chance of harm or increase protection in a given situation. It suggests that there is a sense of security and strength when one is not alone, as individuals are less vulnerable to danger when surrounded by others.
  • safety in numbers The idiom "safety in numbers" means that being part of a group or having the support of many people can provide protection and security.
  • beard sb in their den The idiom "beard someone in their den" means to confront or challenge someone, especially in their own space or territory, where they typically feel safe or powerful. It implies the act of confronting someone directly, usually in a confrontational or assertive manner, in order to expose, question, criticize, or challenge their actions, beliefs, or authority.
  • beard the lion in his den To "beard the lion in his den" means to confront or challenge someone powerful or dangerous in their own territory or domain. It is akin to facing a daunting or intimidating situation head-on, even when the odds are against you. The term derives from the image of a lion, known for its strength and fierceness, being confronted in its own den or lair.
  • a marriage made in heaven The idiom "a marriage made in heaven" refers to a perfect or highly compatible union between two people. It implies that the couple is exceptionally well-suited for each other, as if their relationship was predestined or ordained by a higher power.
  • a marriage/match made in heaven The idiom "a marriage/match made in heaven" refers to a perfect or well-suited union, typically between two people. It suggests that the two individuals involved are an ideal match, complementing each other perfectly with great compatibility, happiness, and love. This idiom often implies that the relationship is destined or blessed.
  • Marriages are made in heaven. The idiom "Marriages are made in heaven" refers to the belief that the union of two people in marriage is predestined or arranged by fate or a higher power. It suggests that the coming together of a couple is meant to be, as if it were planned and ordained by a divine force. It implies the idea that some cosmic or spiritual force brings soulmates or compatible partners together, creating an everlasting bond between them.
  • take or an animal in The idiom "take after an animal" means to resemble or show characteristics similar to a particular animal, usually in terms of physical appearance or behavior.
  • fence an animal in The idiom "fence an animal in" means to enclose or confine an animal within a fence or barrier, typically to prevent it from roaming or escaping. This idiom can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of restricting or confining someone or something within certain limits or boundaries.
  • dead in or an animal's tracks The idiom "dead in or an animal's tracks" means to come to an abrupt halt or stop suddenly, similar to how an animal might freeze or stop instantly upon sensing danger or a threat. The phrase implies that something has ended or been halted abruptly and completely without any further progress or movement.
  • chase in sm place
  • sail in (to sth) The idiom "sail in (to sth)" typically means to begin doing or participating in something enthusiastically and energetically. It often suggests a person's eagerness and readiness to engage in a task or activity.
  • in one's salad days The idiom "in one's salad days" refers to a period of someone's youth or early adulthood, when they are inexperienced, carefree, and full of youthful vigor. It represents a time of idealism, enthusiasm, and vitality, often associated with the innocence and freshness of a salad.
  • be the meat in the sandwich The idiom "be the meat in the sandwich" refers to a situation where someone is caught between two conflicting or opposing parties or forces, often feeling trapped or squeezed in the middle. It implies being in a difficult or uncomfortable position where one has to navigate and manage two opposing sides or situations.
  • like a blind dog in a meat market The idiom "like a blind dog in a meat market" refers to someone who is completely overwhelmed or clueless in a particular situation. It implies that the person is surrounded by various enticing possibilities, possibilities they are unable to appreciate or understand due to their own limitations or lack of awareness.
  • be in another world The idiom "be in another world" means to be completely absorbed or preoccupied with one's thoughts or imagination, often to the point of being unaware of one's surroundings or the present situation. It refers to being mentally absent or distracted from reality.
  • another nail in the coffin The idiom "another nail in the coffin" is often used to describe an event, action, or circumstance that contributes to the decline, demise, or failure of something or someone. It refers to an additional negative factor or development that worsens an already difficult or hopeless situation, akin to adding another nail to a coffin, symbolizing further finality or irrevocable damage.
  • What in (the) Sam Hill? The idiom "What in (the) Sam Hill?" is an exclamation used to express surprise, frustration, or astonishment. It is often used as a mild way of expressing disbelief or confusion about a situation or statement. It is typically a rhetorical question and does not expect a literal answer. The origin of this idiom is unclear, with "Sam Hill" possibly being a euphemism for "hell" to avoid using offensive language.
  • not in the same league with The idiom "not in the same league with" means that someone or something is significantly lower in skill, ability, or quality compared to another person or thing. It highlights a vast difference in competence or level of accomplishment between two entities.
  • in the same league The idiom "in the same league" is used to describe two or more people, things, or situations that are similar in ability, talent, quality, or status. It suggests that they belong to a similar group or category and are comparable in some way.
  • in the same boat The idiom "in the same boat" means that two or more people are experiencing the same difficult or challenging situation together. It implies that they all face a common problem or share a similar predicament.
  • in the same ballpark The idiom "in the same ballpark" means to be approximately or roughly the same range or category, particularly when discussing numbers, figures, estimates, or values. It suggests that two or more things are reasonably close or comparable, although not necessarily exact.
  • cast in the same mold The idiom "cast in the same mold" means that two or more people or things share similar qualities, characteristics, or traits. It implies that they are alike or similar in some way, often suggesting that they have been influenced or shaped in a similar manner.
  • hide your head in the sand The idiom "hide your head in the sand" means willful ignorance or avoidance of a problem or an unpleasant reality. It refers to the idea of an ostrich sticking its head in the sand, mistakenly believing that by doing so, it becomes invisible or protected from danger. Thus, when someone is said to be hiding their head in the sand, it implies that they are ignoring or denying a situation rather than facing or addressing it.
  • bury your head in the sand The idiom "bury your head in the sand" refers to the act of ignoring or avoiding an unpleasant or threatening situation, often by pretending it does not exist or choosing to remain uninformed about it. It is derived from the notion that an ostrich, a large flightless bird, will supposedly bury its head in the sand when faced with danger, mistakenly believing that by doing so, it becomes invisible. The idiom is commonly used to criticize someone's unwillingness to confront or deal with a problem.
  • bury one's head in the sand The idiom "bury one's head in the sand" means to ignore or avoid reality, particularly to refuse to acknowledge or confront a problem or an unpleasant situation. It refers to the behavior of an ostrich, which is believed to bury its head in the sand when it feels threatened, mistakenly thinking that by doing so, it becomes invisible or protected.
  • in any shape or form The idiom "in any shape or form" means in any manner or condition, regardless of how it appears or manifests. It emphasizes that something is unacceptable or undesirable regardless of the specific way it is presented or created.
  • in any event The idiom "in any event" means regardless of what happens or regardless of the circumstances. It is used to indicate that the outcome or result of a situation is uncertain or irrelevant, emphasizing that regardless of the specific details or circumstances, a certain action, decision, or conclusion will still be true or will happen.
  • in any case The idiom "in any case" means regardless of the situation or circumstances, or as a final point or consideration.
  • any port in a storm The idiom "any port in a storm" means that in difficult or desperate situations, any solution or help available, regardless of its quality or preference, can be accepted or used. It emphasizes the willingness to accept less-than-ideal options when faced with adversity.
  • packed (in) like sardines The idiom "packed (in) like sardines" refers to an overcrowded or tightly packed situation, where people or objects are squeezed together with very little space to move. It is often used to emphasize cramped conditions or a crowded environment.
  • pack sm or sth (in) like sardines The idiom "pack (someone or something) in (or like) sardines" means to tightly or overcrowd a group of people or objects into a limited space, often leaving very little room for movement or comfort. It suggests a situation where individuals are closely packed together, resembling the tight packaging of sardines in a can.
  • sit in judgment on The idiom "sit in judgment on" means to form an opinion or make a decision about someone or something, often in a critical or evaluative manner. It refers to the act of assessing or judging a person or situation.
  • sit in judgment The idiom "sit in judgment" refers to the act of evaluating or forming an opinion about someone or something. It suggests the role of a judge or a critic who assesses a situation or a person's actions, often with the power to make a decision or pass a verdict based on their judgment.
  • sit in The definition of the idiom "sit in" is to attend or participate in a meeting, discussion, or event as an observer, often without active participation or involvement. It is typically used when someone fills a seat or stays present during a gathering to simply listen or observe what is happening.
  • Come in and sit a spell The idiom "Come in and sit a spell" is an invitation for someone to enter a place and take a seat for a little while. It implies a sense of hospitality and warmth, encouraging the person to relax and spend some time in a comfortable and leisurely manner.
  • appear in court The idiom "appear in court" means to formally present oneself before a judge or a court of law, typically as a defendant, plaintiff, witness, or any other party involved in a legal proceeding. It refers to physically attending a court hearing or trial as required by the legal process.
  • appear in sth The idiom "appear in sth" means to make a visible or noticeable presence in a particular thing or event, usually with a certain purpose or role. It refers to the act of being seen or observed in a specific context or situation.
  • put in an appearance (at sth) The idiom "put in an appearance (at sth)" means to attend or make a brief appearance at a particular event, gathering, or place, often to show respect, fulfill an obligation, or simply to be seen. It implies a minimal or symbolic presence rather than active participation or engagement.
  • stitch in time saves nine The idiom "a stitch in time saves nine" means that taking timely and immediate action to address or fix a small problem or issue can prevent it from becoming a much bigger and more difficult problem in the future. It emphasizes the importance of early intervention and prevention.
  • prophet is not without honor save in his own country The idiom "prophet is not without honor save in his own country" refers to the common phenomenon where individuals are often not recognized or appreciated in their own familiar or hometown environment, but gain recognition and respect elsewhere. It suggests that people are more likely to be appreciated, admired, or respected in unfamiliar or foreign settings rather than in their own local community or among their own acquaintances.
  • in the interest of saving time The definition of the idiom "in the interest of saving time" is engaging in a particular action or decision to be more efficient and reduce the amount of time required to complete a task or achieve a goal.
  • say in a roundabout way The idiom "say in a roundabout way" means to express something indirectly or ambiguously, often using complex or lengthy explanations instead of being direct and straightforward. It implies that the speaker avoids addressing the topic directly and instead chooses to hint or imply their intended meaning.
  • in plain language The idiom "in plain language" means to express something in a simple and straightforward manner that is easily understood by the average person. It refers to communicating information or ideas without using complicated or technical terms. It aims to make complex concepts or discussions more accessible to a wider audience by using clear and concise language.
  • dip in The idiom "dip in" typically refers to the action of briefly engaging in or participating in something, often temporarily or casually. It usually implies a temporary involvement or immersion in a particular activity, subject, or experience without committing to a long-term commitment.
  • dip sth in(to) sth The idiom "dip something in(to) something" means to briefly submerge or insert an object into a liquid or substance, often with the purpose of coating or saturating it. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of becoming involved in or experiencing something briefly or partially.
  • I wasn't brought up in the woods to be scared by owls The idiom "I wasn't brought up in the woods to be scared by owls" means that the person is not easily frightened or intimidated by things that are considered common or trivial. It implies that the individual has grown up in a environment that toughened them and they are not easily influenced or frightened by minor challenges or obstacles.
  • in the scheme of things The idiom "in the scheme of things" means considering the larger perspective or overall context of a situation. It refers to the understanding that something is relatively insignificant or unimportant when compared to the grand scheme or bigger picture. It encourages a broader view or sense of perspective, suggesting that a particular issue or event may not have significant consequences or should not be given excessive attention.
  • in the grand/great scheme of things The idiom "in the grand/great scheme of things" means considering or looking at something in the broader context or bigger picture. It suggests taking a more comprehensive perspective, usually beyond immediate concerns or details, to understand the ultimate significance or consequences of a situation.
  • arbitrate in (a dispute) The idiom "arbitrate in (a dispute)" means to act as a neutral third party and help settle or make a decision in a conflict or disagreement between two or more parties.
  • school sm in sth The idiom "school someone in something" typically means to teach, educate, or train someone in a specific subject or skill. It implies that the person being schooled is lacking knowledge or skill in the particular area, and the one doing the schooling is more knowledgeable or experienced. It can also imply a strong mastery or dominance over someone in a particular field.
  • he/she doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his/her body The idiom "he/she doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind, etc. bone in his/her body" is used to describe a person who is inherently good-natured and lacking negative qualities such as envy, cruelty, or unkindness. It implies that the person has a consistently kind and generous disposition, with no trace of negative emotions or behaviors.
  • mission in life The idiom "mission in life" refers to an individual's overarching purpose or goal in life that guides their actions, decisions, and overall direction. It denotes the quest or objective that someone feels driven to pursue and fulfill throughout their life journey. It represents a deeply personal and meaningful purpose that often relates to one's values, passions, or aspirations.
  • up in arms The idiom "up in arms" is used to describe a state of anger, outrage, or protest about a particular situation or issue. It signifies being highly agitated or ready to fight against something perceived as unjust or unacceptable.
  • shot in the arm The idiom "shot in the arm" refers to something that provides a boost or revitalizes someone or something, typically in terms of energy, motivation, or encouragement. It can also imply a positive influence or stimulus that helps in overcoming obstacles or challenges.
  • arm in arm The idiom "arm in arm" refers to two or more individuals walking or standing side by side with their arms linked or hooked together, symbolizing mutual support, closeness, or camaraderie between them.
  • a knight in shining armor The idiom "a knight in shining armor" refers to a person who comes to someone's rescue in a difficult situation or provides protection, support, or assistance when it is needed the most. This phrase often implies a sense of heroism, chivalry, and bravery in the manner of a medieval knight.
  • a chink in sb's armour The idiom "a chink in someone's armor" refers to a weakness or vulnerability that a person has, usually in terms of their defenses or abilities. It suggests that although someone may generally be strong or competent, they still have a specific area that can be exploited or targeted. The phrase originates from the image of a knight in armor, suggesting that even the most well-protected person can have a small opening or weak spot.
  • chink in one's armor The idiom "chink in one's armor" refers to a vulnerable or weak point in someone's character, defense, or capabilities. It implies that despite an individual's overall strength or competence, there is a specific area or aspect in which they are susceptible to being defeated, criticized, or taken advantage of. The term is often used metaphorically, drawing on the image of a knight with a flaw in their armor that could potentially be exploited by an opponent.
  • rattle around in The idiom "rattle around in" refers to an object or idea that is loosely contained within a space, causing it to move, make noise, or be unsettled due to the excess or empty space around it.
  • push about in The idiom "push about in" refers to the act of moving or rearranging objects or things in a careless or disorganized manner. It implies the lack of order or control in handling something.
  • cruise around in The idiom "cruise around in" refers to casually and aimlessly driving or moving about in a vehicle, typically to enjoy oneself or explore without a specific destination or purpose in mind.
  • in force The idiom "in force" means something is in effect or operational. It refers to a situation where rules, regulations, laws, or agreements are being actively enforced or implemented. It can also imply that a group or entity is present or exerting influence in a particular area.
  • (just) in the nick of time The idiom "in the nick of time" means to barely or narrowly manage to do something just before it is too late or just before a crucial moment or deadline. It refers to the exact or critical moment when something is about to happen or when an action or intervention is urgently needed.
  • There are plenty of (other) fish in the sea. The idiom "There are plenty of (other) fish in the sea" is used to console or encourage someone who has recently experienced a rejection or breakup, implying that there are numerous other potential romantic partners available. It suggests that there are plenty of other opportunities and options available, and one should not become overly discouraged by the loss of one specific person or relationship.
  • in the mood (for sth) The idiom "in the mood (for sth)" refers to being inclined or desired to do or experience something. It means feeling a particular inclination, desire, or readiness for a specific activity, often implying enthusiasm or interest.
  • in no mood to do sth The idiom "in no mood to do something" means that a person is not feeling inclined or motivated to engage in a specific activity or task. It implies a lack of desire, willingness, or enthusiasm to perform the mentioned action.
  • in quest of sm or sth The idiom "in quest of someone or something" means to be actively searching or seeking someone or something, typically with considerable effort or dedication. It implies a determined pursuit or an ardent desire to find or obtain someone or something specific.
  • go out in search of sm or sth The idiom "go out in search of someone or something" refers to the act of actively looking or seeking for someone or something. It implies that the person is leaving their current location or venturing beyond their usual surroundings in order to find the desired person or thing.
  • in season The idiom "in season" refers to the time when something is at its peak of availability, freshness, or popularity. It typically applies to agricultural produce, such as fruits and vegetables, which are harvested and sold during their natural growing season. However, it can also be used in a broader sense to describe anything that is currently fashionable, trending, or fitting for a particular time or occasion.
  • come in(to) heat The idiom "come in(to) heat" is typically used when referring to animals, particularly female mammals, such as dogs or cats. It describes the period when a female animal is sexually receptive and physically capable of mating. In broader terms, it can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is currently experiencing strong sexual desire or displaying flirtatious behavior.
  • in the driver's seat The idiom "in the driver's seat" means to be in control or in a position of power or authority. It implies that someone is taking charge and making decisions.
  • in the catbird seat The idiom "in the catbird seat" refers to being in a favorable or advantageous position. It is often used to describe someone who has complete control or is in a position of power or advantage over others.
  • be (sitting) in the catbird seat Being (sitting) in the catbird seat is an idiom that means to be in a favorable or advantageous position. It suggests that someone has a commanding or superior position from which they have control or influence over a situation or others.
  • set sth in motion The idiom "set something in motion" means to initiate or start something, to make it begin or happen. It is often used to describe the act of initiating a process, a project, or a series of actions.
  • in the second place The idiom "in the second place" typically refers to introducing a secondary or additional point or reason in an argument or discussion. It implies that the speaker has already mentioned a preceding point and now wishes to address another relevant aspect.
  • in one's second childhood The idiom "in one's second childhood" refers to someone behaving childishly or engaging in behaviors associated with their earlier years, usually due to old age or a state of regression. It implies a return to a childlike state of mind, often characterized by playfulness, naivety, or a lack of inhibition.
  • in (just) a second The idiom "in (just) a second" is used to indicate that something will happen very quickly or without delay. It can also imply a sense of urgency or an immediate response or action.
  • cloak sm or sth in secrecy The idiom "cloak someone or something in secrecy" means to hide, conceal, or keep someone or something secret or confidential. It implies that the information or actions are kept away from public knowledge or scrutiny.
  • ask in The idiom "ask in" typically means to invite or allow someone to enter a place, such as a house, office, or room, in order to have a conversation or get to know each other better. It implies extending an invitation for someone to come inside and engage in discussion or interaction.
  • ask sm in(to) (sm place) The idiom "ask someone in(to) (some place)" means to invite or request someone to enter or join a particular location or area. It implies that the person is asked or welcomed to come inside or go to a specific place.
  • would see in hell before would
  • see you in a little while The idiom "see you in a little while" is used to say goodbye to someone with the expectation of seeing them again relatively soon. It implies that the separation will not be lengthy, and that the person expects to see the other person again in a short period of time.
  • see in hell before The idiom "see in hell before" is an informal expression used to convey a strong refusal or the speaker's determination to never allow something to happen. It suggests that the speaker would rather go to hell or face extreme consequences rather than agreeing to or accepting a particular proposal, action, or event.
  • see in a new light The expression "see in a new light" means to perceive or understand something in a different way, often with a fresh perspective or newfound understanding. It implies a shift in one's perception or interpretation of a situation, idea, or person, leading to a new and possibly more insightful viewpoint.
  • see in The idiom "see in" can have different meanings depending on the context. However, one common definition for this idiom is: To accompany someone to their home or place of departure, ensuring they arrive safely or seeing them off.
  • meet in the flesh The idiom "meet in the flesh" refers to actually meeting someone face-to-face, as opposed to communicating or interacting with them in a virtual or remote manner. It implies a physical encounter with someone rather than merely through electronic means.
  • in the cards The idiom "in the cards" means that something is likely to happen or is a possibility. It is often used when discussing future events or outcomes that seem probable or predetermined.
  • have name in lights The idiom "have name in lights" means to achieve fame or recognition, typically in a theatrical or entertainment context, where one's name is prominently displayed in a lit-up sign or marquee. It signifies being celebrated or acknowledged prominently.
  • Could I see you in my office? The idiom "Could I see you in my office?" typically refers to a request made by someone in a position of authority, such as a boss or supervisor, to hold a private meeting or discussion with another person. It often implies that the conversation may entail something important, sensitive, or confidential.
  • can't see hand in front of face The idiom "can't see hand in front of face" is used to describe a situation where visibility is extremely poor, to the point that one cannot see even a short distance ahead. It signifies a lack of clarity, understanding, or perception, often in a metaphorical sense.
  • can't see a hole in a ladder The idiom "can't see a hole in a ladder" means being oblivious to an obvious problem or flaw. It implies a lack of awareness or perceptiveness towards something that should be easily noticeable.
  • putty in your hands The idiom "putty in your hands" typically means having complete control or influence over someone. It suggests that the person is easily manipulated or influenced, similar to how putty can be shaped and molded according to one's will.
  • I've never felt/heard/seen etc. sth in all my (born) days! The idiom "I've never felt/heard/seen etc. sth in all my (born) days!" is used to express extreme surprise or disbelief about something, emphasizing that the person has never experienced or encountered such a thing before in their entire life.
  • (I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays. The idiom "(I) haven't seen you in a month of Sundays" means that one has not seen or encountered someone for a very long time, typically indicating a significant period of absence or separation. It emphasizes the prolonged duration of time since their last meeting.
  • (I) haven't seen you in a long time. The idiom "(I) haven't seen you in a long time" is used to express surprise or joy upon meeting someone after a significant period of time has passed since the last encounter. It indicates that the person expressing it has missed the other person's presence and is acknowledging the extended period of separation.
  • seep in (to sth) The idiom "seep in (to sth)" means to gradually permeate or penetrate something, often referring to an idea, concept, or influence entering one's mind or becoming integrated into a situation. It suggests a slow, subtle, and unnoticed process of infiltration or absorption.
  • assist in sth The phrase "assist in something" means to help or contribute to a particular task, activity, or process. It implies offering support, aid, or guidance in order to achieve a desired outcome or goal.
  • assist sm in sth The idiom "assist someone in something" refers to helping or supporting someone in a particular task or endeavor. It means to lend a hand, provide aid, or give guidance to someone in order to facilitate their progress or success in a specific activity or situation.
  • Don't spend it all in one place The phrase "Don't spend it all in one place" is an idiomatic expression commonly used to advise someone against using up or wasting all of their money or resources in a single location or on a single purchase. It implies that individuals should distribute their spending or investment wisely, rather than squandering everything in a single instance.
  • don't have a pot to piss in The idiom "don't have a pot to piss in" is a colloquial expression used to describe someone who is extremely poor or lacking in financial resources. It conveys the idea of not having even the most basic or essential possessions, symbolized by not owning a pot to urinate in.
  • Don't get your bowels in an uproar!
  • muscle in on sth The idiom "muscle in on sth" refers to the act of intruding or forcing one's way into a situation or activity, usually with the intention of gaining an advantage or taking control. It implies assertiveness, dominance, and often disregarding others' rights or interests. It can also suggest using physical strength or influence to overshadow or outcompete others.
  • muscle in (on sm or sth) The idiom "muscle in (on someone or something)" refers to forcefully inserting oneself or interfering in someone's personal or professional affairs without any invitation or authorization. It conveys the idea of using one's physical, political, or influential power to gain control or take advantage of a situation that may not involve them originally.
  • in situ The definition of the idiom "in situ" is: in its original or existing place, position or context, without being moved or altered.
  • be a athlete/star/writer etc. in the making The idiom "be a athlete/star/writer/etc. in the making" refers to someone who displays exceptional talent, potential, or promise in a particular field or endeavor. It suggests that the person in question has the necessary qualities and abilities to become successful and accomplished in their chosen field in the future.
  • send in for The idiom "send in for" means to request or order something by submitting a form or making a formal written request. It usually refers to sending a request for a product, service, or information by mail or electronically.
  • send in The idiom "send in" refers to the act or process of submitting or presenting something or someone to a particular person or place, typically for evaluation, judgment, or consideration. It often implies that the thing or person being sent in is being offered for a specific purpose or role.
  • send in sth The idiom "send in something" typically means to submit or provide something, typically in response to a request or requirement. It may refer to sending in documents, application forms, reports, contributions, or any other requested materials.
  • send in sb The idiom "send in sb" typically refers to the act of completely engaging or mobilizing a particular person or group for a specific task or purpose. It often implies that someone or a team is being called upon or requested to take action in a situation where their expertise or assistance is needed.
  • in the strict sense The idiom "in the strict sense" refers to a precise or narrow interpretation or understanding of a concept, emphasizing its most literal or limited meaning. It implies a departure from any broad or metaphorical interpretation and instead focuses on a very specific definition or understanding of something.
  • in a sense In a sense, an idiom used to indicate that something is partially or somewhat true, but not completely or exactly true. It suggests a certain level of justification or validity, often used to qualify or modify a statement.
  • but not in the biblical sense The idiom "but not in the biblical sense" is used humorously or sarcastically to emphasize that the interpretation or understanding of something is purely figurative or metaphorical rather than in a literal or sexual manner. It suggests that the intended meaning is different from a literal interpretation often associated with sexual connotations found in biblical texts.
  • attire sm in sth The idiom "attire someone in something" means to dress or clothe someone in a particular type of clothing or attire.
  • drip in
  • serve in The idiom "serve in" typically refers to someone actively performing a duty or serving in a particular role or position, often within a military or official context. It implies being engaged in a particular capacity or fulfilling responsibilities associated with a specific position.
  • put sth in (to) service The idiom "put something in (or into) service" means to start using or making use of something for a specific purpose or function. It implies the act of employing or implementing something in a practical way to serve its intended function.
  • in service The idiom "in service" refers to something that is currently operational or functioning as intended. It often refers to machines, vehicles, or equipment that are available for use and are actively fulfilling their intended purpose or serving their designated role. It can also describe individuals who are employed or actively working in their profession or occupation.
  • in session The idiom "in session" refers to a meeting, conference, or period of time during which a group or organization formally convenes to conduct business, discussions, or activities. It is commonly used to indicate that a particular event or process is currently taking place or that a governmental or legislative body is actively conducting its official duties.
  • set in ways The idiom "set in ways" refers to someone who is resistant to change and prefers to stick to their established habits or routines. It describes a person who has become accustomed to doing things in a particular manner and is unwilling or reluctant to adapt or try something new.
  • set in train The idiom "set in train" means to initiate or start a process or series of events. It refers to taking the necessary steps to begin a particular course of action or project.
  • set in stone The idiom "set in stone" means that something is fixed or unchangeable, often referring to a decision, plan, or rule that cannot be altered or amended.
  • set in motion The idiom "set in motion" means to initiate or start something, to get a process or action underway, or to cause something to begin functioning or operating.
  • set in concrete The idiom "set in concrete" refers to something that is fixed, unchangeable, or immovable. It suggests that a decision, plan, or belief has been finalized and cannot be altered or reconsidered. The phrase originates from the idea that concrete hardens and becomes solid once it has been poured and allowed to set.
  • set in a type face The phrase "set in a type face" typically refers to the act of choosing a particular font or style for a written text or document. It originates from the printing industry, where individual metal or wooden types were arranged and set in a specific font for creating printed material. In a broader sense, it can also be used to indicate a specific presentation or aesthetic style for any form of written or displayed content.
  • set in a place The idiom "set in a place" typically refers to placing or fixing something in a specific location or position. It implies the act of physically settling or situating an object or item in a particular place.
  • set in The idiom "set in" refers to a change or a process that begins or establishes itself, typically with a gradual or irreversible nature. It can be used to describe a phase or condition that has become firmly established and is likely to endure or continue.
  • set house in order The idiom "set house in order" means to organize or arrange one's affairs or responsibilities in a proper and efficient manner. It refers to tidying up or resolving any issues or chaos in one's personal or professional life. It can also be used to suggest preparing for the future or making necessary adjustments to improve a situation.
  • set foot in The idiom "set foot in" means to enter or visit a place, often implying that the person has been avoiding or is reluctant to go there. It can also suggest taking the first step towards a new experience or situation.
  • put in motion The idiom "put in motion" refers to starting or initiating a process or action. It means to begin a course of action, start a project, or set something in progress.
  • put down in black and white The idiom "put down in black and white" means to record or document something in writing, usually in a clear and formal manner. It implies converting spoken words or ideas into written form to provide clarity, accuracy, and prevention of misunderstanding.
  • be set in concrete The idiom "be set in concrete" means that something is fixed, unchangeable, or firmly established. It implies that a decision, rule, belief, or plan is inflexible and cannot be altered or modified. It suggests that the situation or idea is rigid and resistant to any modifications or adjustments.
  • be carved in stone The idiom "be carved in stone" means that something is firmly fixed, unchangeable, or definitive. It refers to a decision, plan, or rule that cannot be altered or modified. It implies a sense of permanence and a lack of flexibility.
  • There wasn't a dry eye in the house. The idiom "There wasn't a dry eye in the house" means that everyone present in a particular place or gathering was moved to tears or deeply emotionally affected by something. It suggests that an event or situation caused such a strong emotional response that no one could remain unaffected or hold back their tears.
  • Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry. The idiom "Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry" is believed to have originated during the English Civil War and was attributed to the Irish military leader Sir Thomas More. It means to have faith in a higher power but also to be prepared and take necessary precautions in one's actions or endeavors. The phrase emphasizes the importance of having a balanced approach, combining trust in divine providence with practicality and readiness.
  • set sm up (in business) The idiom "set someone up (in business)" means to provide someone with the necessary resources, support, or financial backing to start and establish their own business venture. It can involve acquiring premises, equipment, funding, or any other necessities to assist someone in launching and developing their business.
  • settle in The idiom "settle in" means to become familiar and comfortable in a new environment or situation, typically after a period of adjustment or transition. It refers to the process of adapting to a new place, job, or routine and feeling at ease or established in that setting.
  • in seventh heaven The idiom "in seventh heaven" means to be extremely happy or joyful.
  • several irons in the fire The idiom "several irons in the fire" refers to being involved in multiple projects or activities simultaneously, with the intention of increasing the chances of success or achieving multiple goals at once. It implies that a person is actively engaged in various tasks, endeavors, or opportunities, keeping numerous options open.
  • put sb/sth in the shade The idiom "put sb/sth in the shade" means to surpass or outshine someone or something in terms of skill, achievement, or appearance. It implies that the person or thing being compared appears inferior or less remarkable when compared to another.
  • in the shadow of sth The idiom "in the shadow of something" means to be in the presence of, or to live under the influence or effect of, something larger, more significant, or dominating. It conveys the idea of being overshadowed or unnoticed due to the prominence or importance of something else.
  • in the shadow of sb The idiom "in the shadow of sb" refers to being overlooked, marginalized, or overshadowed by someone else who is more prominent, successful, or influential. It implies being in a position of lesser importance or visibility compared to another person.
  • in/under sth's shadow The idiom "in/under something's shadow" refers to being overshadowed or dominated by someone or something else, typically resulting in a lack of recognition, accomplishment, or influence. It suggests being in a position where one's own achievements or qualities are consistently overlooked or diminished in comparison to something or someone more prominent or powerful.
  • in sb's shadow The idiom "in someone's shadow" refers to being constantly overshadowed or outshined by another person who is more successful, popular, or accomplished. It implies that the individual living in the shadow of someone else is unable to establish their own identity, receive recognition, or shine independently.
  • shake in boots The idiom "shake in boots" refers to feeling extremely scared, nervous, or filled with anxiety. It describes a state of fear or apprehension that is so intense that it causes one's legs to tremble or shake as if they were wearing boots.
  • in two shakes The idiom "in two shakes" means to do something very quickly or in a short amount of time. It implies that the action will be completed soon, often emphasizing efficiency or speed.
  • be shaking in boots The idiom "be shaking in boots" means to be extremely scared, nervous, or frightened. It is often used to describe a state of intense fear or anxiety. The phrase "shaking in boots" symbolizes trembling or shaking due to fear, as if someone's fear is so overwhelming that it affects their entire body, including their legs and feet.
  • a needle in a haystack The idiom "a needle in a haystack" is used to describe something that is extremely difficult or nearly impossible to find or locate due to its similarity or insignificance compared to the surrounding things or information.
  • be like looking for a needle in a haystack The idiom "be like looking for a needle in a haystack" is used to describe a situation that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to find or accomplish due to the overwhelming amount of similar or irrelevant things surrounding it. It refers to the task or search being compared to finding a small object such as a needle in a large stack of hay, which would require extensive time, effort, and luck.
  • like looking for a needle in a haystack The idiom "like looking for a needle in a haystack" is used to describe a situation or task that is extremely difficult or impossible to accomplish due to the overwhelming amount of irrelevant or unimportant information or options. It signifies the challenges of finding something small or specific in a large and cluttered environment where it is hard to locate or distinguish the desired item.
  • in (a) shambles The idiom "in (a) shambles" refers to a situation or condition that is completely disorganized, chaotic, or falling apart. It signifies a state of disorder, confusion, or ruin.
  • hide one's face in shame The idiom "hide one's face in shame" means to feel deeply embarrassed or remorseful about something one has done, to the extent that they wish to conceal their face or identity out of shame or disgrace.
  • in condition The idiom "in condition" typically refers to something being in a good or satisfactory state or condition, usually pertaining to physical objects or entities. It implies that something is well-maintained, properly functioning, or organized appropriately.
  • in bad shape The idiom "in bad shape" means to be in a poor or deteriorated physical or emotional condition.
  • in awe (of sb/sth) The idiom "in awe (of sb/sth)" is used to describe a feeling of profound respect, admiration, or wonder towards someone or something. It conveys a sense of being deeply impressed, often to the point of being overwhelmed or speechless.
  • stand in awe (of sm or sth) The idiom "stand in awe (of someone or something)" means to be profoundly impressed, amazed, or filled with admiration for someone or something. It suggests a sense of great respect, wonder, or reverence towards the subject.
  • in awe (of sm or sth) The idiom "in awe (of someone or something)" means to have a deep sense of admiration, respect, or reverential fear towards someone or something. It is often used to describe intense feelings of wonder or amazement that leave a person speechless or deeply impacted.
  • put sm in an awkward position The idiom "put someone in an awkward position" refers to a situation where someone is made to feel uncomfortable, embarrassed, or unsure of how to respond. It means to place a person in a difficult or challenging circumstance that may compromise their reputation, relationships, or personal integrity. It can be used both literally and figuratively.
  • place sm in an awkward position The idiom "place someone in an awkward position" means to put someone in a difficult or uncomfortable situation where they are unsure how to respond or act. It usually refers to a circumstance that creates social, professional, or personal discomfort for the individual involved.
  • wolf in sheep's clothing The idiom "wolf in sheep's clothing" refers to a person or thing that appears harmless, gentle, or innocent on the surface but has malicious intentions or ulterior motives. It implies that something or someone may conceal their true nature or true intentions behind a deceptive façade.
  • three sheets in the wind The idiom "three sheets in the wind" refers to someone who is heavily intoxicated or drunk. It is often used to describe someone who is stumbling, slurring their words, or acting incoherently due to excessive alcohol consumption. The idiom originates from sailing terminology, where a "sheet" is a rope that controls the sails of a ship. If three sheets (ropes) are loose or not secured, the sails will flap haphazardly in the wind, causing the ship to lose control and become unsteady, much like a person who is excessively drunk.
  • four sheets in the wind The idiom "four sheets in the wind" typically refers to someone who is very drunk or intoxicated. It originates from sailing terminology, where a sheet refers to a rope or line that controls the trim or angle of a sail. If a boat has four sheets released or untethered, it becomes difficult to control and may sway unpredictably, resembling the unsteady behavior of a heavily intoxicated person.
  • both sheets in the wind The idiom "both sheets in the wind" typically refers to someone who is completely drunk or intoxicated. It implies that the person has lost control and is no longer able to function properly due to excessive alcohol consumption.
  • in a nut shell The idiom "in a nut shell" means to summarize or express something concisely and succinctly. It implies that the information provided is the essential or most important aspects of a larger topic or idea, similar to fitting a whole nut into a small shell.
  • when your ship comes in The idiom "when your ship comes in" refers to a time of prosperity, success, or good fortune in one's life. It suggests a moment when all of one's hard work or efforts pay off, resulting in a significant opportunity, windfall, or positive change. It implies the arrival of a favorable circumstance or situation that can lead to a better future.
  • be like ships that pass in the night The idiom "be like ships that pass in the night" is used to describe a brief or fleeting encounter or relationship, in which two people cross paths briefly and then continue on separate paths without truly connecting or forming a meaningful bond. It conveys a sense of missed opportunity or an ephemeral connection between individuals.
  • when one's ship comes in The idiom "when one's ship comes in" means a time of great success, wealth, or prosperity that is anticipated or hoped for in the future. It refers to the metaphorical arrival of a ship loaded with valuable cargo, which will bring financial or personal fulfillment to an individual.
  • ships that pass in the night The idiom "ships that pass in the night" refers to two people who have a brief encounter or connection, but then go their separate ways without forming a lasting relationship or fully understanding each other. It often implies missed opportunities or the ephemeral nature of connections.
  • be a pain in the arse/backside The idiom "be a pain in the arse/backside" refers to someone or something that causes frustration, annoyance, or inconvenience. It suggests that the person or thing is difficult to deal with, often causing trouble or additional work.
  • dub sth in The idiom "dub sth in" refers to the act of adding or replacing the audio in a film or video production with synchronized sound, typically done in post-production. It involves recording or mixing voices, dialogue, sound effects, or music to enhance the audio quality or make modifications to the original soundtrack.
  • put yourself in sb's place The idiom "put yourself in someone's place" means to imagine being in someone else's situation, experiencing their feelings, thoughts, and circumstances, in order to gain a better understanding and empathy towards them. It encourages one to empathize and see things from another person's perspective.
  • put you in your place The idiom "put you in your place" means to assert dominance or to remind someone of their lower status or position, typically through words or actions. It involves someone trying to humiliate or remind another person of their limitations, usually when they have acted in a way that shows arrogance, insolence, or disrespect.
  • in sb's shoes The idiom "in someone's shoes" refers to the act of imagining oneself in another person's situation or circumstances, usually to gain a better understanding or empathy towards them. It signifies putting oneself in the position or perspective of another individual.
  • be shaking in your boots/shoes The idiom "be shaking in your boots/shoes" means to be extremely fearful or anxious about something. It describes a state of extreme nervousness or apprehension.
  • wouldn't want to be in sm's shoes The idiom "wouldn't want to be in someone's shoes" is used to express sympathy for someone in a difficult or uncomfortable situation, indicating that the speaker would not like to be in that person's position. It implies that the situation is unfavorable or unpleasant, and the speaker is grateful to not be experiencing it themselves.
  • put (oneself) in (sm else's) place The idiom "put oneself in someone else's place" means to imagine oneself in someone else's situation or circumstances in order to better understand their point of view or feelings. It involves empathizing with others and considering how one would feel or act if they were in the same position. It is often used to encourage understanding, empathy, and compassion towards others.
  • in sm else's shoes The idiom "in someone else's shoes" means to imagine or attempt to understand a situation or someone's perspective by mentally placing oneself in their position or circumstances. It implies empathetic thinking and considering things from a different point of view.
  • not be backward in coming forward The idiom "not be backward in coming forward" means that someone is not shy or hesitant to express their opinions, desires, or needs. They are proactive in voicing their thoughts and making themselves known in a given situation.
  • in one's (own) backyard The idiom "in one's (own) backyard" refers to something that is happening or exists very close to someone, typically in their immediate surroundings or directly within their jurisdiction, sphere of influence, or responsibility. It can also imply that someone is unaware or neglectful of something that is occurring in their own proximity while focusing on issues elsewhere.
  • shoot oneself in the foot The idiom "shoot oneself in the foot" means to inadvertently or foolishly do something that harms one's own interests or defeats one's own purpose. It refers to a metaphorical act of self-sabotage or self-destructive behavior that prevents success or creates unnecessary problems.
  • shoot in the foot The idiom "shoot in the foot" is used to describe a situation in which someone unknowingly or unintentionally sabotages their own efforts or causes harm to themselves, usually through their own actions or decisions. It refers to an act that initially seems beneficial but ultimately proves to be counterproductive or damaging.
  • shoot down in flames The idiom "shoot down in flames" means to completely reject or defeat an idea, proposal, or argument in a forceful, decisive, and often harsh manner. It implies that the opposing party or individual is not only defeated but also publicly humiliated or embarrassed in the process.
  • like shooting fish in a barrel The idiom "like shooting fish in a barrel" refers to a task or situation that is extremely easy or effortless. It implies that the task is as simple as shooting fish that are confined in a barrel, where they have no means of escape and are easily targeted.
  • leave a bad taste in mouth The idiom "leave a bad taste in the mouth" refers to a negative or unpleasant feeling or impression that someone or something has left behind. It is often used to describe a negative experience, disappointment, or a lingering sense of dissatisfaction after encountering an unpleasant situation, person, or event.
  • in bad taste The idiom "in bad taste" refers to something that is deemed offensive, inappropriate, or vulgar, usually related to jokes, comments, or actions that are considered socially unacceptable or morally objectionable. It suggests that something is lacking in propriety or demonstrates a lack of sensitivity.
  • in bad sorts The idiom "in bad sorts" typically means that someone or something is in poor or disreputable condition, usually referring to a person's physical or emotional well-being. It suggests that the individual is not in a good state, experiencing difficulties or facing problems.
  • in bad faith The idiom "in bad faith" typically refers to a situation where someone acts dishonestly, insincerely, or deceitfully, showing a lack of genuine intention or honesty towards others involved in a particular matter or negotiation. It implies that the person is deliberately acting in a way that goes against common expectation or moral standards, with the intent to deceive or harm others.
  • in bad
  • in a bad way The idiom "in a bad way" refers to someone or something being in a poor or difficult condition, usually referring to physical or mental health, emotional state, or overall well-being. It suggests that the person or thing is struggling, distressed, or experiencing difficulties that may require assistance or intervention.
  • in a bad mood The idiom "in a bad mood" means to be in a negative or irritable emotional state, often resulting in exhibiting unhappy or grumpy behavior. It implies a temporary and unpleasant disposition that may be caused by various factors such as stress, fatigue, or personal issues.
  • be in bad odour with The idiom "be in bad odour with" means to be disliked, criticized, or have a bad reputation with someone or a group of people. It suggests that the individual or subject is not in favor or has fallen out of favor with others, resulting in negative perceptions or consequences.
  • be like a bull in a china shop The idiom "be like a bull in a china shop" refers to someone who is clumsy, loud, or destructive in their movements or actions, often causing damage or chaos in a delicate or controlled environment. It implies a lack of grace, finesse, or awareness in one's behavior.
  • in the bag The idiom "in the bag" means that something is certain or guaranteed to be achieved or obtained. It refers to a situation or task that is believed to be accomplished or attained easily and without doubt.
  • half in the bag The idiom "half in the bag" refers to someone being intoxicated or drunk. It suggests that the person has consumed enough alcohol to be noticeably under the influence, but not yet fully intoxicated.
  • in the short term The idiom "in the short term" refers to a specific period of time that is relatively near in the future, typically referring to a period of days, weeks, or months. It implies a focused perspective on immediate results or outcomes, rather than considering the long-term implications or consequences.
  • in the long term The idiom "in the long term" refers to a period of time that is distant or extended, usually referring to future outcomes, consequences, or trends. It suggests looking beyond immediate or short-term gains or losses and considering the potential effects and circumstances that may arise over an extended duration.
  • in short supply The idiom "in short supply" means that there is not enough of something available or that it is lacking in quantity. It implies scarcity or a limited amount of a particular item, resource, or condition.
  • in short order The definition of the idiom "in short order" is to complete or finish something quickly, promptly, or without delay.
  • shot in the dark The idiom "shot in the dark" refers to a wild or random guess or attempt, often made without any knowledge or evidence to support it. It implies taking a chance or trying something uncertain or speculative, without much hope of success.
  • should have stood in bed The idiom "should have stood in bed" is a humorous expression used to convey the feeling that anything one does or attempts to do turns out badly or is met with a series of misfortunes. It implies that the person would have been better off remaining in bed rather than facing the unfortunate events that have occurred.
  • hang in the balance The idiom "hang in the balance" means to be in a state of uncertainty or in a condition where the outcome is undetermined. It implies that a decision or a situation is at a critical stage and could go either way.
  • be/hang in the balance The idiom "be/hang in the balance" means that a situation is uncertain or undecided, with both possible outcomes having an equal chance of happening. It implies that the final result or decision will heavily impact the course or outcome of a situation.
  • show in true colours The idiom "show in true colors" means to reveal one's true nature, intentions, or character, typically after previously concealing or pretending to be something different. It implies that the person or thing being observed is no longer hiding their true self and their true nature is being displayed or exposed.
  • the ball is in court The idiom "the ball is in court" means that it is someone's turn or responsibility to take action or make a decision about a particular matter or situation. It refers to a situation where the next move or decision lies with a specific person or group, and they have the control or power to determine the outcome.
  • have the ball in court The idiom "have the ball in court" means to have the authority or power to make a decision or take action in a particular situation. It refers to being in a position where one has control or influence over the outcome or proceedings.
  • shroud sm or sth in sth The idiom "shroud someone or something in something" means to cover or cloak someone or something in a particular substance, quality, or atmosphere, often suggesting a sense of secrecy, mystery, or concealment. It implies that the true nature or appearance of the person or thing is hidden or obscured.
  • in the ballpark The idiom "in the ballpark" means to be close to an accurate or reasonable estimate or amount. It suggests being in the same general range or vicinity, without being precise or exact.
  • call in sick The idiom "call in sick" means to notify one's employer or supervisor that they will not be able to attend work due to illness or not feeling well.
  • sick in bed The idiom "sick in bed" typically refers to being ill or unwell to the extent that one is confined to a bed and unable to engage in normal activities. It implies a significant level of physical illness that prevents the person from carrying out their usual daily tasks.
  • bang in The idiom "bang in" typically means to put something firmly and securely in a particular place or position. It can also refer to doing something quickly and efficiently.
  • thorn in side The idiom "thorn in the side" refers to a persistent annoyance or problem that causes continuous irritation or difficulty. It is often used to describe a person, situation, or thing that constantly disrupts or hinders someone's progress or peace of mind.
  • be a thorn in flesh The idiom "be a thorn in flesh" refers to a person or thing that is a constant source of annoyance, irritation, or trouble for someone. It is often used to describe someone who persistently causes discomfort or difficulty for another person.
  • a thorn in side The idiom "a thorn in one's side" refers to a person, situation, or problem that causes persistent annoyance, frustration, or difficulty for someone. It implies an ongoing source of discomfort or constant irritation.
  • Stuff a sock in it! The idiom "Stuff a sock in it!" is an informal and somewhat rude way of telling someone to be quiet or stop talking. It implies the need for the person to literally put a sock in their mouth to prevent them from speaking.
  • socked in The idiom "socked in" refers to a situation where an area or object is completely surrounded or fogged in, making visibility difficult or impossible. It is commonly used to describe being caught or trapped, especially due to adverse weather conditions such as heavy fog or snowstorms.
  • sock sm or sth in The idiom "sock something in" or "sock someone in" means to hit or strike someone or something forcefully. It implies delivering a powerful blow, usually with a clenched fist or closed hand. The phrase is often used figuratively to express doing something vigorously or with great force.
  • no end in sight The idiom "no end in sight" means that there is no foreseeable conclusion or resolution to a situation. It suggests that the situation is likely to continue indefinitely or with no clear end point.
  • keep in sight The idiom "keep in sight" means to maintain visual contact or awareness of something or someone. It refers to the act of monitoring or not losing track of something or someone's position, typically to ensure they remain within view or within one's attention.
  • in sights
  • in sight The idiom "in sight" refers to something that is visible or can be seen by someone. It implies that the object or person is within one's range of vision or perception.
  • heave in sight The idiom "heave in sight" means that something or someone is finally coming into view or becoming visible after a long period of anticipation, or after a long journey or distance. It suggests the moment when the object or person is seen and recognized after being expected or awaited.
  • have in sights The idiom "have in sights" refers to being aware of or having a specific target or goal in mind, often with a determined or focused intention to achieve it. It can also imply keeping a person or thing under close observation or scrutiny.
  • sign in The idiom "sign in" usually refers to the act of registering or providing one's name and other necessary information, often in a formal or official context, such as when entering a building, event, or online platform. It indicates the process of recording one's presence or participation.
  • dollar signs in sb's eyes The idiom "dollar signs in someone's eyes" is used to describe a person's intense greed or desire for money or material wealth. It suggests that the person is solely focused on financial gain and is willing to prioritize it above all else.
  • sign sth in The idiom "sign sth in" typically refers to the act of officially authorizing or approving something, often by affixing a signature to a document or agreement. It can signify the formal acceptance or endorsement of a particular action, decision, or contract.
  • sign sm in The idiom "sign sm in" typically means to record or acknowledge someone's attendance by signing a document or register, allowing them to enter a particular place or event. It can also suggest facilitating someone's entry into a group, organization, or social gathering.
  • not for all the tea in China The idiom "not for all the tea in China" means that there is nothing in the world or no amount of wealth or reward that could persuade someone to do or give up something. It emphasizes the refusal or unwillingness to do something, even if offered a significant or seemingly irresistible compensation.
  • in the bargain The idiom "in the bargain" means as an additional benefit or advantage. It refers to receiving or obtaining something in addition to what was already expected or desired.
  • barge in The idiom "barge in" means to enter a room or situation abruptly and without permission, often disrupting or interrupting the existing activity or conversation. It implies a lack of consideration for others' privacy or personal space.
  • barge in (to sm place) The idiom "barge in (to sm place)" refers to entering a location abruptly or rudely, usually without permission or forewarning. It implies a lack of consideration for others' privacy or personal space.
  • Were you born in a barn? The idiom "Were you born in a barn?" is a rhetorical question used to express surprise or frustration at someone's lack of manners or awareness of their surroundings. It implies that the person being addressed has behaved or left a door open in a manner usually associated with someone who was raised in a barn, which is typically seen as a place devoid of proper etiquette or social graces.
  • raised in a barn The idiom "raised in a barn" is often used to express that someone has a lack of manners or social graces. It suggests that the person in question is behaving in a rude or uncivilized manner, as if they were not properly taught or raised with basic courtesy and etiquette, as one might expect from someone who grew up in a barn instead of a more refined or formal environment.
  • be born with a silver spoon in your mouth The idiom "be born with a silver spoon in your mouth" refers to being born into a wealthy or privileged family, where one enjoys advantages and opportunities that others do not have access to. It implies that from birth, an individual has inherited wealth and a life of comfort and luxury.
  • born with a silver spoon in one's mouth The idiom "born with a silver spoon in one's mouth" refers to someone who is born into a wealthy or privileged family, often characterized by inheriting or having access to great wealth and advantages from birth. It implies that the person has had a luxurious and comfortable upbringing, with many opportunities and resources readily available to them.
  • barrel in (to sm place) The idiom "barrel in (to a place)" refers to entering a location in an impulsive, forceful, or hasty manner, often without considering the consequences or without permission. It implies acting boldly or aggressively, disregarding social norms or protocols. This phrase typically suggests a lack of tact or subtlety when entering a situation or place.
  • put nose in The idiom "put nose in" typically means to interfere in someone else's business or to involve oneself in a situation without being invited or welcomed. It implies being nosy or prying into matters that do not concern oneself.
  • poke nose in The phrase "poke nose in" is an idiom that means to interfere, meddle, or intrude into someone else's business or affairs without being invited or welcome. It is often used to refer to someone who is excessively curious or nosy, constantly prying into matters that do not concern them.
  • nose in The idiom "nose in" typically refers to someone who is excessively curious, intrusive, or meddlesome. It means to involve oneself in the affairs or business of others without invitation or permission, often in an intrusive or unwelcome manner.
  • have nose in a book The idiom "have one's nose in a book" refers to someone who is deeply engrossed in reading or utterly absorbed in a book, often implying that the person is focused on reading to the exclusion of their surroundings or other activities. It highlights a person's intense interest in reading and their tendency to be absorbed in their literary world.
  • bash sth in The idiom "bash something in" means to forcefully hit or strike something, often causing damage or destruction, typically by using one's hands or a blunt object. It can also be used figuratively to describe a forceful or aggressive criticism or attack on someone or something.
  • bask in sth The idiom "bask in sth" means to take great pleasure or satisfaction from something, usually a positive situation or accomplishment. It refers to enjoying and reveling in a particular experience or feeling.
  • put all one's eggs in one basket The idiom "put all one's eggs in one basket" means to rely solely on one thing or option, without having any backup or alternative plans. It signifies the act of concentrating all resources, efforts, or expectations into a single venture or possibility, which can be risky and leaves no room for compensation if it fails or goes wrong.
  • couldn't hit a bull in the ass with a bass fiddle The idiom "couldn't hit a bull in the ass with a bass fiddle" is an exaggerated way of saying that someone has very poor aim or lacks basic coordination. It suggests that the person is so inept that they couldn't even hit a large target like a bull, using an instrument as big as a bass fiddle, which is difficult to miss. It emphasizes someone's inability or incompetence in a humorous or sarcastic manner.
  • sink in The idiom "sink in" means to fully understand or comprehend something, often after it has taken some time to process or accept. It refers to a situation or information gradually becoming clear or making an impact on someone's mind or emotions.
  • sink sth in (to) sm or sth The idiom "sink sth in(to) sm or sth" means to fully absorb or comprehend something, usually knowledge or information, to the point that it becomes deeply ingrained or understood. Example: After reading the novel, the profound message of the story finally sank in, leading to a newfound understanding of the author's intentions.
  • bathe sm or sth in sth The idiom "bathe someone or something in something" means to cover or immerse someone or something completely in a particular substance or quality. It implies the act of saturating or enveloping someone or something entirely.
  • have bats in one's belfry The idiom "have bats in one's belfry" is used to describe someone who is perceived as being eccentric, crazy, or mentally unstable. It suggests that the person's mind or thoughts are illogical or confused, similar to the way bats flying around in a belfry (the bell tower of a church) would create disorder and chaos.
  • in one's spare time The idiom "in one's spare time" refers to the moments or periods of free or unoccupied time that a person has in their schedule, which they can use to engage in activities or pursue interests outside of their regular work or responsibilities.
  • a skeleton in the/sb's closet The idiom "a skeleton in the/somebody's closet" refers to a secret or embarrassing fact about a person or an organization that, if revealed, could be damaging or cause shame or embarrassment. It implies that there is something hidden or unknown about someone's past that they would prefer not to be made public.
  • a skeleton in the/your cupboard The idiom "a skeleton in the/your cupboard" refers to a well-kept secret or a hidden embarrassment that someone wants to keep hidden from others. It represents undisclosed information or a confidential issue that could potentially damage a person's reputation or relationships if revealed.
  • skeleton(s) in the closet The idiom "skeleton(s) in the closet" refers to hidden or secret issues, embarrassing facts, or damaging information about a person or organization that, if revealed, could have a negative impact on their reputation or standing. It implies that these hidden things could potentially harm or cause trouble for the individual or group involved.
  • be broad in the beam The idiom "be broad in the beam" refers to someone or something that is wide or broad in the hips or buttocks. It is often used to describe individuals who have a wide or large physique, particularly in the lower body area.
  • sketch sth in The idiom "sketch something in" refers to making a rough or preliminary outline, plan, or draft of something, often related to artwork or design. It implies quickly and loosely drawing or outlining the basic features or structure of something before further refinement or detail is added. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the initial conceptualization or depiction of an idea or a plan before fully fleshing it out.
  • keep in mind The idiom "keep in mind" means to remember, be aware of, or retain information for future reference or consideration. It implies that the person should hold a particular thought or idea in their thoughts, so as not to forget or overlook it.
  • bear in mind that The idiom "bear in mind that" means to remember or keep something in one's thoughts or consideration while thinking about or making decisions.
  • bear in mind The idiom "bear in mind" means to remember or to keep something in one's thoughts or consideration. It suggests being aware of and not forgetting a particular piece of information or a point of view.
  • bear/keep sth in mind The idiom "bear/keep something in mind" means to remember or consider something, often important or relevant information, when making decisions or forming opinions. It implies that the mentioned information should be taken into account or kept actively present in one's thoughts and not forgotten.
  • be (in) the nature of the beast The idiom "be (in) the nature of the beast" means that certain characteristics or behaviors are inherent or typical of a particular person, situation, or thing. It implies that these qualities cannot be easily changed or avoided, as they are inherent or an intrinsic part of the subject being referred to.
  • in bed with The idiomatic expression "in bed with" typically means being involved in a close or secretive relationship, often of a compromising or improper nature, with someone or something. It signifies a partnership or collaboration that may not be openly disclosed or is morally questionable. However, it is important to note that it can also be used metaphorically to imply a strong alliance or association with no negative connotations. The exact meaning of the phrase usually depends on its context.
  • couldn't lie straight in bed The idiom "couldn't lie straight in bed" is often used to describe someone who is considered to be so dishonest or untrustworthy that even in a situation as simple as lying in bed, they are perceived to be unable to be truthful. It conveys the idea that the person's propensity to lie is so inherent and constant that they cannot even physically remain straight.
  • slam the door in sm's face The idiom "slam the door in someone's face" refers to the abrupt rejection or dismissal of someone, often in a rude or disrespectful manner. It implies that someone is being shut out, ignored, or denied access to a particular opportunity or conversation. It can be used figuratively to describe a sudden and harsh rejection.
  • a slap in the face The idiom "a slap in the face" refers to an action or event that is disrespectful, demeaning, or hurtful, often unexpected, that undermines or challenges someone's beliefs, desires, or self-esteem. It can be both a literal action of physically slapping someone's face or a metaphorical description of a figurative action or situation that causes a similar emotional response.
  • slap in the face The idiom "slap in the face" refers to a figurative expression used to describe an action or statement that is unexpected, insulting, or offensive to someone, often causing hurt, disappointment, or humiliation. It conveys the idea of a physical act of slapping someone's face as a metaphorical representation of an emotional blow or a gesture of disrespect.
  • slap sm in sth The idiom "slap someone in something" typically means to involve or immerse someone in a particular situation or activity abruptly or forcefully. It suggests surprising or placing someone unexpectedly in a certain context or setting.
  • put a bee in sm's bonnet (about sm or sth) The idiom "put a bee in someone's bonnet (about someone or something)" means to suggest an idea or cause someone to become obsessed or preoccupied with a particular topic, person, or issue. It can imply that the person has a strong interest, concern, or desire to take action related to that topic or person.
  • bee in one's bonnet The idiom "bee in one's bonnet" refers to someone having an obsessive or fixated idea or preoccupation with something. It implies that the person cannot stop thinking or talking about a particular topic or notion, similar to a buzzing bee persistently bothering someone inside their bonnet (a traditional hat).
  • a fly in the ointment The idiom "a fly in the ointment" refers to a small but significant issue or problem that spoils an otherwise pleasant or satisfactory situation. It represents an unexpected or undesirable factor that hinders or detracts from an overall positive experience or outcome.
  • sleep in The idiom "sleep in" refers to the act of intentionally sleeping later than usual, typically past the normal waking time or the regular time for a particular activity or obligation.
  • could in sleep
  • cry in one's beer The idiom "cry in one's beer" refers to the act of expressing sadness, disappointment, or regret over a particular situation while seeking solace or consolation, often as a form of self-pity. It conveys a sense of wallowing in one's sorrows while seeking temporary relief from emotional distress.
  • slice in(to sth) The idiom "slice in (to something)" refers to the act of interrupting or entering a conversation or situation abruptly or unexpectedly. It implies that someone inserts themselves into a conversation or activity without any prior invitation or appropriate timing.
  • not in the slightest The idiom "not in the slightest" means to have absolutely no degree or amount of something. It indicates a complete absence or lack of a particular quality, characteristic, or effect.
  • in behalf of sm The idiom "in behalf of someone" means to act or speak on someone else's behalf or to support their interests or cause. It implies taking action or making a statement with the intention of representing or advocating for someone.
  • have one's ass in a sling The idiom "have one's ass in a sling" is a colloquial and vulgar expression that refers to a situation where someone is in trouble, facing difficulties, or feeling extremely anxious or worried about something. It implies a state of vulnerability, predicament, or potential negative consequences.
  • slink in(to sth) The idiom "slink in(to sth)" means to enter a place or situation in a sly, sneaky, or inconspicuous manner, often with the intention of not being noticed or attracting attention. It can also imply a sense of guilt or shame, as if the person is trying to avoid being seen or caught.
  • slip in The idiom "slip in" typically means to insert or include something discreetly or casually into a conversation, situation, or event. It implies the act of incorporating or adding something seamlessly without drawing much attention to it.
  • lag behind in The idiom "lag behind in" means to fall behind or to be slower in progress or development compared to others or a particular benchmark or expectation. It implies a delay or a failure to keep up with others.
  • behind in The idiom "behind in" means to be in a state of delay or inability to keep up with the expected progress or required tasks. It implies falling behind schedule or being unable to meet deadlines or commitments.
  • slip in(to sth) The idiom "slip in(to sth)" means to enter or move quietly and inconspicuously into a place or situation, often without being noticed or attracting attention. It can also refer to gradually or unintentionally becoming involved in something, such as a conversation or an activity.
  • slip sth in (to) sth The idiom "slip something in (to) something" typically means to include or insert something discreetly or unnoticed into a particular place or situation. It can refer to physical objects being sneaked into a specific location, or it can also refer to incorporating ideas, remarks, or actions subtly or without drawing much attention.
  • believe in The idiom "believe in" means to have faith, confidence, or trust in something or someone. It implies holding a strong conviction or belief that the thing or person exists, is true, or possesses certain qualities.
  • believe in sm or sth The idiom "believe in someone or something" refers to having faith or confidence in the existence, abilities, or potential of a person, idea, or concept. It implies having trust or conviction in someone or something, even in the absence of tangible evidence.
  • slouch down (in sth) The idiom "slouch down (in sth)" refers to the act of sitting or leaning in a lazy, relaxed, or casual manner within a specified seating or resting area. It suggests the individual's lack of proper posture, as they slump or slump further into the seat or surface they are occupying. The phrase implies a comfortable and nonchalant demeanor, often associated with a lack of interest or effort.
  • fire in your/the belly The idiom "fire in your/the belly" refers to a strong sense of determination, passion, and drive. It suggests having a deep motivation or enthusiasm for something, typically related to achieving goals or pursuing success.
  • A growing youth has a wolf in his belly. The idiom "A growing youth has a wolf in his belly" refers to the idea that young people have a strong appetite or hunger due to their rapid growth and development. It implies that youngsters often have a voracious appetite, similar to a wolf's, as they require a significant amount of food to fuel their growth.
  • slump down in(to) sth The idiom "slump down in(to) sth" refers to the act of sitting, lying, or falling heavily into a chair, sofa, or similar piece of furniture in a way that shows exhaustion, tiredness, or a lack of energy or motivation. It often implies a state of physical or emotional collapse, indicating a temporary loss of vitality or enthusiasm.
  • take one's belt in (a notch) The idiom "take one's belt in (a notch)" means to make a conscious effort to reduce spending or consumption, typically due to financial constraints or the need for discipline. It refers to the act of tightening a belt by pulling it one notch tighter, which symbolizes a more frugal approach or a greater level of self-restraint.
  • smack in the face The idiom "smack in the face" is used to describe a surprising, unexpected, or shocking event or revelation that confronts a person directly and forcefully, much like being physically struck in the face. It implies the immediate impact and inability to avoid or ignore the situation at hand.
  • smack (dab) in the middle The idiom "smack (dab) in the middle" means exactly at the center or middle of something, often referring to a physical location or a specific point in time. It implies being in the most prominent or conspicuous position, surrounded by everything or everyone else.
  • a big fish in a small pond The idiom "a big fish in a small pond" refers to a person who is successful, influential, or important within a limited or restricted environment or group, but may not have the same level of recognition or significance in a larger or more competitive context. It implies that in a smaller or less significant setting, an individual's abilities or accomplishments may be more noticeable or impressive compared to their performance on a broader scale.
  • engage in small talk The idiom "engaging in small talk" refers to having casual and light conversation with someone, typically on topics that are not deeply personal or important. It involves engaging in polite and superficial discussions about weather, hobbies, current events, or other non-controversial subjects. The purpose of small talk is usually to be social, establish rapport, and fill conversational gaps in social situations.
  • big frog in a small pond The idiom "big frog in a small pond" refers to a person who holds a position of importance or superiority in a small or limited environment. It implies that this individual might appear impressive or influential, but only because they are surrounded by people of lesser ability or competence.
  • best things come in small packages, good things come in small packages The idiomatic expression "best things come in small packages" or "good things come in small packages" suggests that something does not have to be large or extensive to be valuable, impressive, or meaningful. It implies that the quality or significance of something is not determined by its size or appearance but rather by its substance or essence. In other words, great things or positive aspects can be found even in something small or seemingly insignificant.
  • bend in The idiom "bend in" typically refers to a situation where someone compromises or yields their position or opinion in order to accommodate the desires or needs of others. It implies a willingness to be flexible, adapt, or give in.
  • smash sth in The idiom "smash sth in" means to forcefully and vigorously break or destroy something. It can be used both in the literal sense, as in physically shattering an object, or figuratively, to describe demolishing or ruining a plan, project, or expectation.
  • smash sm's face in The idiom "smash someone's face in" typically refers to physically assaulting or violently attacking someone, usually resulting in severe injury to their face. It is a figurative expression used to convey extreme aggression or anger towards someone. Note that it is important to understand that this idiom is not to be taken literally or condone any form of violence.
  • go up in smoke The idiom "go up in smoke" means that something fails or is destroyed, often unexpectedly, with little or no results or benefits. It implies that something anticipated or hoped for is now lost or wasted.
  • Put that in your pipe and smoke it! The idiom "Put that in your pipe and smoke it!" is a colloquial expression that is typically used to emphasize one's point or opinion, often in a confrontational or defiant manner. It suggests that the person being addressed should consider and accept the information, idea, or statement being presented, even if it contradicts their beliefs or desires. It implies a sense of finality, as if there is no room for further discussion or argument.
  • paper over the cracks (in sth) The idiom "paper over the cracks (in sth)" means to attempt to hide or temporarily fix a problem, flaw, or disagreement without addressing the underlying issues. It refers to using superficial or temporary solutions to make something appear better or functioning smoothly, despite the existence of unresolved or deeper problems.
  • suck sth in The idiomatic phrase "suck sth in" typically means to draw or inhale something forcefully into one's mouth or lungs. It can be used literally, referring to inhaling a substance such as smoke or food, or figuratively, suggesting being completely engrossed or captivated by something.
  • suck sm in The idiom "suck someone in" typically means to persuade or entice someone into doing something, often through manipulation or charm. It suggests that the person is drawn or lured into a situation or activity, often against their better judgment.
  • a snake in the grass The idiom "a snake in the grass" refers to a person or thing that appears harmless or friendly, but is deceitful, treacherous, or dangerous. It suggests someone or something that behaves in a misleading or untrustworthy manner, often with malicious intent, and may catch others off guard or cause harm unexpectedly.
  • snake in the grass The idiom "snake in the grass" refers to a deceitful or treacherous person who hides his true intentions or character, often pretending to be harmless or friendly but actually harboring ill intentions or scheming behind the scenes.
  • in the best of health The idiom "in the best of health" refers to being in excellent physical or mental condition, complete with good overall well-being and vitality.
  • in Sunday best The idiom "in Sunday best" refers to the practice of dressing in one's finest or most formal attire. It implies that a person is wearing their best clothes, typically reserved for special occasions or for attending religious services on Sundays. It signifies elegance, formality, and a desire to present oneself in an immaculate manner.
  • First in, best dressed "First in, best dressed" is an idiomatic expression that means the first person to arrive or take action in a particular situation will have an advantage or be more likely to succeed than others who come later. It suggests that being prompt or taking early action provides an advantage over those who delay or arrive late.
  • even in the best of times The idiom "even in the best of times" is used to express that a particular situation is difficult or challenging, even when everything else seems to be going well. It implies that even during the most favorable circumstances or periods, there are still problems or hardships that exist.
  • bring out the best in The idiom "bring out the best in" refers to the act of inspiring or eliciting someone's finest qualities, talents, or abilities. It means to positively influence or encourage someone to perform at their highest potential, often resulting in improved behavior, performance, or overall excellence.
  • best things in life are free The idiom "best things in life are free" means that the most valuable or fulfilling experiences or aspects of life cannot be bought with money or material possessions. It emphasizes the idea that true happiness and contentment often come from simple pleasures or intangible elements, such as love, friendship, laughter, and experiences that do not require financial transactions.
  • sneak in(to sm place) The idiom "sneak in(to sm place)" means to enter or gain access to a place discreetly and secretly, usually without being noticed or detected. It implies doing something covertly or illicitly.
  • in a snit The idiom "in a snit" refers to when someone is in a state of anger, frustration, or annoyance, typically characterized by being sullen, agitated, or easily irritated. It often implies that the person is exhibiting an overreaction or disproportionate response to a particular situation.
  • in front of sb The idiom "in front of somebody" refers to being present or situated directly ahead of someone, typically within their view or in a position where they can observe one's actions or behavior. It can also indicate being in a position of being judged or evaluated by someone.
  • snowed in The idiom "snowed in" refers to being unable to leave a specific location or being trapped indoors due to heavy snowfall.
  • snow sm or sth in The idiom "snow (someone or something) in" means to become stranded or trapped due to heavy snowfall, preventing movement or escape. It can refer to individuals being trapped in a location or vehicles being stuck on a snow-covered road.
  • not have a snowball's chance in hell and not a hope in hell The idiom "not have a snowball's chance in hell" and "not a hope in hell" both have similar meanings and are used interchangeably to describe situations where someone or something has no chance of succeeding or being successful. It emphasizes the impossibility or extreme unlikelihood of a given outcome, often in a figurative or hyperbolic sense. It suggests that the chances of success are as unlikely as a snowball's ability to survive in hell, or that there is no hope whatsoever.
  • soak in(to sth) The idiom "soak in(to sth)" means to absorb or comprehend something gradually or fully, usually referring to information, knowledge, or a new experience. It implies taking the time to understand and internalize something deeply.
  • soak sth in sth The idiom "soak something in something" typically means to immerse or submerge an object in a liquid for a period of time, allowing it to absorb or be saturated with that liquid. It can also be used metaphorically to describe deeply absorbing or absorbing something fully, whether it is information, knowledge, or an experience.
  • play in the big leagues The idiom "play in the big leagues" refers to participating or competing at the highest level or in a major professional field or industry. It implies reaching a significant level of success or recognition in a particular area.
  • in a big way The idiom "in a big way" means doing something to a large or significant extent or scale. It refers to a grand or notable manner of doing or achieving something.
  • biggest frog in the puddle The idiom "biggest frog in the puddle" refers to a person who presents themselves as the most important or powerful within a limited or insignificant context. It implies being the most prominent or influential individual in a minor or unimpressive situation.
  • big in The idiom "big in" refers to something or someone being popular or influential within a particular context or domain. It suggests a significant presence, success, or prominence in that specific area.
  • have a soft spot (in one's heart) for sm or an animal The idiom "have a soft spot (in one's heart) for someone or an animal" means to have a strong affection, fondness, or a special liking for a person or an animal. It implies feeling a deep emotional connection or empathy towards them, often resulting in a lenient or forgiving attitude towards their flaws or actions.
  • in a bind The idiom "in a bind" means to be in a difficult or challenging situation where one has limited options or is facing a problem that is hard to solve. It often refers to being stuck or trapped in a dilemma without an easy way out.
  • bind sm or sth up (in sth) The idiom "bind sm or sth up (in sth)" means to wrap or secure something or someone in a particular material or object, typically to protect, support, or immobilize them. It can also refer to the act of applying bandages or dressings to a wound or injury.
  • take solace (in sth) The idiom "take solace (in sth)" means to find comfort or consolation in something, usually during a difficult or distressing situation. It refers to finding solace or relief from emotional distress by focusing on or deriving comfort from a particular thing or circumstance.
  • a bird in the hand The idiom "a bird in the hand" means having something tangible or certain that is already in one's possession, as opposed to having something of greater value but uncertain or not yet acquired. This idiom emphasizes the importance of valuing and appreciating what one already has rather than risking it for something potentially better but uncertain.
  • bird in the hand is worth two in the bush The idiom "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush" means that it is more valuable to have a sure and certain advantage or possession than to risk losing it by pursuing something else that might be more desirable but is uncertain or unpredictable. In other words, it is better to hold onto something you already have than to give it up in the hope of getting something better.
  • put in sm place
  • out in the cold The idiom "out in the cold" refers to being excluded, ignored, or left uninformed about something or excluded from a group or activity. It can suggest feelings of isolation, being left out, or being neglected.
  • keep in sm place
  • in sm transaction for
  • in sm neck of the woods The idiom "in sm neck of the woods" refers to a particular geographical area or region where someone lives or is currently located. It implies a local or nearby location, typically indicating the speaker's familiarity with the area being discussed.
  • in a body The idiom "in a body" refers to a group of people or objects collectively acting or moving as a single entity.
  • crowd in sm place The idiom "crowd in sm place" refers to the act of having a large number of people gather or congregate in a limited or confined space. It implies a situation where the space becomes filled to capacity, with little room for movement or personal space due to the overwhelming number of individuals present.
  • clap in sm place
  • bring in sm place The idiom "bring in someone or something some place" generally means to introduce or bring someone or something to a particular location or venue. It signifies physically bringing or inviting someone or something into a specific area or setting.
  • block in sm place The idiom "block in sm place" typically refers to a situation where someone or something is obstructing or blocking the way in a specific location or area. It implies that movement or progress is hindered or prevented due to this obstacle.
  • Drop in smtime. The idiomatic expression "Drop in sometime" typically means to pay a casual, unplanned visit to someone at their home or workplace. It suggests a friendly gesture of spontaneously dropping by without prior notice or invitation.
  • take the bit in teeth The idiom "take the bit in teeth" typically means to take control or take the initiative, especially in a determined or forceful manner. It is derived from horse riding, where the bit is the metal mouthpiece attached to the bridle of a horse, and taking the bit in the teeth refers to a horse grabbing the bit with its teeth and disregarding the rider's commands, symbolizing the act of taking control.
  • in a little bit The idiom "in a little bit" is commonly used to indicate a short period of time, usually referring to a brief delay or a short wait. It suggests that something will happen or be done within a short timeframe, without specifying an exact duration.
  • in the black The idiom "in the black" refers to a financial situation where a person or organization has a profitable and positive balance, meaning that they have more assets or income than liabilities or expenses. It comes from the practice of recording profits in black ink in financial statements, while losses are recorded in red.
  • in black and white The idiom "in black and white" means something that is presented or written down in a clear and easily understandable way, typically in written or printed form. It refers to information that is unambiguous, straightforward, and lacking any room for interpretation or confusion.
  • put sth down in black and white The idiom "put something down in black and white" means to write or document something clearly and explicitly, typically in writing. It suggests forming a detailed and precise record that leaves no room for confusion or ambiguity.
  • in the soup The idiom "in the soup" typically means being in a difficult or troublesome situation. It implies being caught in a predicament or facing some sort of trouble or adversity.
  • Fill in the blanks. The idiom "Fill in the blanks" means to provide or complete missing information or details in a situation. It implies that there are certain gaps or uncertainties that need to be filled or clarified. It can be used in various contexts, such as completing a form, providing additional information in a conversation, or solving a puzzle or problem.
  • eyes like two burnt holes in a blanket
  • blend in (to sth) The idiom "blend in (to sth)" means to assimilate or integrate oneself into a particular environment or social group, by behaving and appearing in a way that is similar to others in that setting, to the point of not standing out or attracting attention.
  • a blessing in disguise The idiom "a blessing in disguise" refers to a situation that may initially seem unfortunate or negative but ultimately has a positive outcome or unexpected benefits. It suggests that something that appears to be a setback or misfortune later turns out to be advantageous or fortunate in some way.
  • be a blessing in disguise The idiom "be a blessing in disguise" refers to a situation that initially seems unfortunate or challenging but eventually turns out to have positive or favorable outcomes. It implies that although the situation may have appeared negative at first, it actually leads to some unforeseen benefits or opportunities.
  • blessing in disguise The idiom "blessing in disguise" refers to a situation that initially appears difficult, challenging, or unfortunate, but eventually turns out to be advantageous, beneficial, or fortunate.
  • Men are blind in their own cause. The idiom "Men are blind in their own cause" means that people tend to be biased or lack objectivity when it comes to defending or advocating for their own interests or beliefs. It suggests that individuals may overlook flaws or fail to see the bigger picture when it comes to evaluating their own actions or positions.
  • block (sm or sth) in sm place The idiom "block (someone or something) in (somewhere) place" means to prevent or hinder the movement or progress of someone or something within a specific area or location. It implies that the person or thing is trapped or confined, making it difficult to escape or make any forward movement.
  • be spitting in/into the wind The idiom "be spitting in/into the wind" means to engage in a futile or useless effort. It suggests that your actions or attempts will have no effect or will only negatively impact yourself, similar to spitting into the wind which will result in the spit blowing back in your face.
  • spit sth in (to) sth The idiom "spit sth in (to) sth" typically means forcefully inserting or introducing something into another thing or place, often in a quick or hasty manner. It conveys the idea of forcefully or unexpectedly adding something into a particular situation or setting.
  • be in full flow/spate The idiom "be in full flow/spate" means that something or someone is in a state of high activity, intensity, or abundant occurrence. It implies a situation where something is happening or progressing at its maximum level or capacity.
  • in the blood The idiom "in the blood" means that a certain characteristic or quality is inherent or hereditary to someone. It suggests that the trait or behavior is deeply ingrained in their nature or lineage.
  • in blood The idiom "in blood" typically refers to something that is inherent or ingrained in a person's nature or character as a result of their familial or genetic background. It suggests that a certain trait, behavior, or skill is so deeply rooted that it is an essential part of who they are, passed down through generations.
  • be in the/ blood The idiom "be in the blood" or "be in the family's blood" typically refers to a characteristic, trait, skill, or profession that is inherent or deeply ingrained in a person or family due to genetic or cultural factors. It suggests that a particular quality or inclination runs in a person's family and is passed down through generations. It implies that individuals are naturally predisposed to a certain behavior, talent, or occupation because it is a part of their family heritage or lineage.
  • speak with a plum in mouth The idiom "speak with a plum in mouth" refers to a way of speaking that is characterized by a highly refined, posh, or aristocratic manner. It alludes to someone enunciating their words meticulously, often with an exaggerated emphasis on proper pronunciation, which can give the impression of speaking with a plum or some other object in their mouth.
  • speak of the devil (and in he walks),
  • take the spear (in one's chest) The idiom "take the spear (in one's chest)" typically refers to the act of accepting blame, criticism, or responsibility for something, especially in a selfless or sacrificing manner. It portrays the idea of willingly enduring a challenging or painful situation for the greater good or to protect others.
  • specialize in sth The idiom "specialize in sth" means to focus, concentrate, or pursue in-depth knowledge and expertise in a particular area or subject. It refers to a person or entity's ability to excel or have advanced skills in a specific field or specialization.
  • in blossom The idiom "in blossom" refers to the state in which flowers are blooming or opening up, typically describing the period during which a plant or tree is adorned with its colorful, fragrant blossoms. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a person or something that is flourishing or displaying its full potential.
  • blow up in face The idiom "blow up in your face" means that a situation or plan unexpectedly goes wrong and has negative consequences for the person involved. It suggests that someone's actions backfire on them, causing them difficulties or embarrassment.
  • blow in The idiom "blow in" typically refers to someone who arrives or shows up unexpectedly or without warning. It can also imply a transient or temporary nature, as if the person or thing will soon leave.
  • blow a hole in The idiom "blow a hole in" refers to causing significant damage or disruption to something, usually by means of an explosive or forceful action. It implies creating a noticeable gap or significant impact that can have far-reaching consequences.
  • speculate in sth The idiom "speculate in sth" refers to engaging in a financial activity with the intention of making a profit, but with a considerable amount of risk. It typically involves investing in stocks, commodities, or other assets with an expectation of their value changing in the future, allowing the individual to sell at a higher price for a profit. However, since speculation inherently involves uncertainty and potential losses, it is often seen as a more speculative and risky form of investment compared to traditional, conservative approaches.
  • until are blue in the face The idiom "until you're blue in the face" refers to repeatedly doing or saying something for an extended period of time, despite it being ineffective or not making any difference. It suggests that no matter how much effort, persuasion, or argument is put into something, it will not change the outcome or opinion of others.
  • talk until one is blue in the face The idiom "talk until one is blue in the face" means to talk or argue persistently and to the point of exhaustion or frustration, without making any progress or convincing anyone. It implies that no matter how much someone speaks or argues, their efforts are in vain and have little effect on the situation or the people involved.
  • blue in the face The idiom "blue in the face" means to do or say something to the point of exhaustion or frustration without achieving the desired result. It suggests that one has put forth a great deal of effort or argument, but it has been in vain.
  • have sm in one's spell To "have someone in one's spell" means to have control or influence over them in a way that they are completely captivated, enchanted, or utterly under their power or charm. It implies that the person is under the spellcaster's control, often to the point of being willing to do whatever they want or being unable to resist their influence.
  • spend time in sth The idiom "spend time in sth" means to dedicate or use a certain amount of time engaging in or participating in a particular activity, place, or situation. It implies investing one's time in specific endeavors or being involved in a specific environment for a period.
  • not have a type of bone in your body The idiom "not have a type of bone in your body" means to completely lack a particular quality or attribute. It suggests that someone lacks a specific characteristic so profoundly that it is as if they do not possess that trait within their physical being.
  • spin in sb's grave The idiom "spin in someone's grave" refers to the expression of extreme shock, outrage, or disappointment that a deceased person would experience if they were aware of a particular action, event, or situation happening after their death. It implies that the action or situation is so contradictory or against the deceased person's beliefs, values, or interests that it would cause their body to rotate in the grave in a figurative sense.
  • be in a spin The idiom "be in a spin" means to feel confused, overwhelmed, or disoriented due to a stressful or chaotic situation. It implies a state of mental or emotional agitation where one's thoughts and emotions are in turmoil, making it difficult to think or act clearly.
  • turn (over) in one's grave The idiom "turn (over) in one's grave" is used to describe the extreme outrage, shock, or disappointment someone would experience if they were alive to witness a certain event or outcome. It implies that the person's actions, beliefs, or values have been betrayed or disregarded.
  • in good spirits The idiom "in good spirits" means to be happy, cheerful, or in a positive state of mind.
  • in spite of sth The idiom "in spite of something" means to do or achieve something despite a particular obstacle, difficulty, or unfavorable circumstance. It suggests that a person's determination, resilience, or strength surpasses any negative factors influencing their situation.
  • in spite of sm or sth The idiom "in spite of someone or something" refers to doing or achieving something despite the hindrance, opposition, or negative influence of a specific person or thing. It emphasizes the determination to proceed or succeed despite obstacles or unfavorable circumstances.
  • splice sth (in)to sth The idiom "splice sth (in)to sth" means to carefully insert or incorporate something into something else. It is often used to describe the act of inserting or adding an additional element seamlessly into an existing situation or context. The term "splice" comes from the process of joining two pieces of rope or film together by intertwining the ends, creating a smooth and continuous connection.
  • split in sth The idiom "split in something" means to divide or separate a particular thing or resource among multiple people or groups. It refers to the act of sharing or distributing something, usually evenly or proportionally, to ensure each party involved receives a fair or appropriate portion.
  • There's many a true word spoken in jest. The idiom "There's many a true word spoken in jest" means that some truthful and serious statements or opinions are often disguised or hidden within joking or humorous remarks. It suggests that people sometimes use humor as a way to convey their true thoughts or feelings without being completely direct or serious about it.
  • not have a bone in body The idiom "not have a bone in the body" means that someone is very flexible, open-minded, and willing to change their opinions or beliefs. It suggests that the person is not rigid or stubborn and is adaptable to new ideas or circumstances.
  • I feel it in my bones The idiom "I feel it in my bones" means to have a strong intuition or a deep sense of something without any logical explanation. It refers to a deeply ingrained or instinctual feeling that something is true or will happen, often associated with a gut instinct or an uncanny certainty.
  • he doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind etc. bone in his body The idiom "he doesn't have a jealous, mean, unkind, etc. bone in his body" is used to describe someone who is exceptionally kind, generous, and lacking in negative qualities or emotions. It emphasizes that the person is genuinely good-natured and lacks any hint of negative traits.
  • feel in bones The idiom "feel in bones" means to have a strong and intuitive sense or feeling about something, often with a deep conviction or certainty. It implies a gut instinct or a strong intuition that is hard to explain or rationalize but is deeply ingrained.
  • throw in the towel The idiom "throw in the towel" means to give up or surrender in a difficult situation. It refers to the action of literally throwing a towel into a boxing ring to signal conceding defeat.
  • throw in the sponge/towel The idiom "throw in the sponge/towel" means to give up, surrender, or admit defeat, especially after a long and difficult struggle. It originates from the sport of boxing, where a cornerman throws in a sponge or towel to signal the fighter's surrender and end the match. This idiom is commonly used in various contexts to convey the idea of accepting failure or abandoning a challenging endeavor.
  • use every trick in the book The idiom "use every trick in the book" means to employ or utilize all available methods, strategies, or tactics to achieve a certain goal, especially when facing difficulty or opposition. It implies using all known or permissible means to gain an advantage or overcome a challenge.
  • Not in my book The idiom "Not in my book" means that something is not acceptable or not believed to be true according to one's own standards or beliefs. It indicates a disagreement or refusal to support or agree with a particular idea, opinion, or behavior.
  • in book
  • have name inscribed in the book of life The idiom "have name inscribed in the book of life" typically refers to being recognized or recorded as a righteous or virtuous individual. It originates from religious traditions where it symbolizes being chosen for eternal salvation or being granted a place in heaven. It is often used metaphorically to imply being highly regarded or remembered for one's good deeds, actions, or character.
  • be in good books The idiom "be in someone's good books" means to be in favor or have a positive standing with someone. It implies that the person holds a favorable opinion of you and is likely to treat you well or grant you certain advantages. This idiom is often used to describe a situation where someone has gained someone else's approval, trust, or affection.
  • in a tight spot The idiom "in a tight spot" means to be in a difficult, challenging, or uncomfortable situation where one is facing a problem or dilemma with limited options or resources available to resolve it.
  • be in the spotlight The idiom "be in the spotlight" means to be the center of attention or focus in a particular situation or event. It refers to being in a position where all eyes are on you, usually accompanied by scrutiny, observation, or admiration.
  • in the spotlight The idiom "in the spotlight" refers to a person or thing that is receiving a lot of attention or focus, often in a public or prominent position. It implies being the center of attention, scrutiny, or observation.
  • be quaking in your boots The idiom "be quaking in your boots" means to be extremely fearful, anxious, or intimidated about something; to be terrified or very worried.
  • sb's heart is in their boots The idiom "sb's heart is in their boots" typically means that someone feels extremely afraid, dejected, or disheartened. It signifies a deep sense of fear or despair that is often noticeable through a person's body language or behavior.
  • shake in one's boots The idiom "shake in one's boots" means to feel extremely scared or fearful, usually in the face of a threat or a challenging situation. It implies a loss of confidence and a sense of vulnerability, as if one's legs were trembling uncontrollably, similar to someone shaking in their actual boots.
  • die in one's boots The idiom "die in one's boots" refers to dying while actively engaged in one's work or chosen occupation. It implies passing away while still giving one's best effort or remaining determined until the very end, without surrendering or giving up. It emphasizes the idea of facing death or any challenge with unwavering commitment and resilience.
  • Hope springs eternal (in the human breast). The idiom "Hope springs eternal (in the human breast)" means that people always have a sense of hope, no matter the circumstances or difficulties they face. It implies that hope is an inherent and persistent quality in human nature, leading individuals to believe that positive outcomes and better times are possible, even in the face of challenges and adversity.
  • in the bosom of sb/sth The idiom "in the bosom of sb/sth" typically means within the close, nurturing, or protective environment of someone or something. It conveys a sense of being embraced, enveloped, or deeply involved in a particular entity or situation. It often suggests a feeling of comfort, security, or belonging.
  • in the bosom of sb The idiom "in the bosom of sb" refers to being within the close, intimate, or protected circle of someone. It suggests being in a position of trust, familiarity, and comfort within a personal relationship or group.
  • have/keep a foot in both camps The idiom "have/keep a foot in both camps" means to maintain a connection or allegiance with two contrasting or opposing groups, organizations, or viewpoints simultaneously. It suggests being able to navigate and have influence in both situations, often by staying neutral or benefiting from the advantages of both sides.
  • dive in with both feet The idiom "dive in with both feet" means to fully commit oneself to a task or situation without hesitation or reservation. It suggests taking a bold and spirited approach, engaging wholeheartedly without holding back.
  • can't find one's butt with both hands (in broad daylight) The idiom "can't find one's butt with both hands (in broad daylight)" is a humorous way to describe someone who is extremely clueless or incompetent. It implies that even in the most obvious or straightforward situations, the person is still unable to figure out or accomplish the simplest tasks.
  • You cannot put new wine in old bottles. The idiom "You cannot put new wine in old bottles" means that it is not possible to introduce or implement new ideas or concepts in an existing framework or structure that is outdated or ill-suited for them. It implies that new ideas or changes require a fresh and receptive mindset or platform to be successful.
  • a square peg (in a round hole) The idiom "a square peg in a round hole" refers to someone who does not fit well in a particular situation or role. It describes a person who is mismatched or incompatible with their surroundings, often implying that they are unsuited for the task or position they are in.
  • March comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lamb,
  • squash sth in The idiom "squash sth in" means to fit, squeeze, or insert something into a small or limited space. It can refer to physical objects being compressed or crowded into a tight area, or to fitting activities or tasks into a busy or packed schedule.
  • bound up in sth The idiom "bound up in something" means to be deeply involved or engrossed in a particular activity, subject, or emotion. It suggests a strong connection or attachment to something, often to the point where it becomes a central focus or source of one's identity.
  • squirm in(to sth) The idiom "squirm into (something)" refers to the feeling of discomfort, embarrassment, or awkwardness experienced by a person when entering or being involved in a particular situation or place. It implies a sense of unease or uneasiness, often due to feeling out of place or unwelcome.
  • get one's bowels in an uproar The idiom "get one's bowels in an uproar" is an expression that means to become excessively upset, anxious, or agitated about a particular situation or issue. It typically conveys a sense of intense emotional distress or turmoil. This idiom metaphorically refers to the feeling of profound disturbance in one's digestive system, particularly the bowels, which can occur when someone is extremely worried or anxious.
  • go home in a box The idiom "go home in a box" is a menacing and informal phrase that refers to dying or being killed, particularly in a violent or tragic manner. It implies that someone will not return alive or intact from a situation or confrontation.
  • boxed in The idiom "boxed in" means to be trapped or confined in a tight or restricted space or situation, with limited options or opportunities to escape or maneuver. It can also refer to a feeling of being trapped or restricted mentally or emotionally.
  • box sm in The phrase "box someone or something in" typically means to confine or restrict someone or something within a limited space or place, making it difficult for them to move or escape. It can also imply trapping or enclosing someone or something in a particular situation or condition, limiting their freedom or options.
  • box sm or sth in The idiom "box sm or sth in" means to confine or enclose someone or something within a limited or restricted space or situation. It refers to the act of placing something or someone in an enclosed space, usually without much room for movement or freedom.
  • stab sm in the back The idiom "stab someone in the back" means to betray or deceive someone, typically after gaining their trust. It refers to the act of doing harm or causing damage to someone, often in a treacherous or unexpected manner, especially when they are not aware of it.
  • stab sm in sth The idiom "stab someone in something" refers to the act of betraying or hurting someone, often metaphorically, by challenging, criticizing, or opposing them in a particular situation or aspect of their life. It suggests that someone is intentionally causing harm or being disloyal.
  • in a stage whisper The phrase "in a stage whisper" refers to speaking quietly or discreetly, but intentionally loud enough to be overheard by others nearby. It often implies a somewhat melodramatic or exaggerated manner of speaking, reminiscent of how actors on a stage might deliver lines to communicate a secret or express something with emphasis.
  • stagger in(to sm place) The idiom "stagger in (to some place)" means to enter a location in a disoriented or unsteady manner, often due to intoxication, fatigue, or physical exhaustion. It implies that the person is struggling to maintain balance or control while walking.
  • have a stake in sth The idiom "have a stake in something" means to have a personal interest, involvement, or investment in a particular situation or outcome. It implies having a tangible or emotional connection to the subject matter and typically implies a potential gain or loss based on the outcome.
  • get your brain in gear The idiom "get your brain in gear" means to start thinking clearly, concentrate fully, or become mentally prepared for a task or situation. It implies the need to become more focused, aware, or engaged in order to effectively comprehend or handle a situation.
  • stalk in(to sm place) The idiom "stalk in(to sm place)" means to enter a place or location in a stealthy or intimidating manner, typically with a purpose of causing fear or apprehension. It implies moving with a deliberate, slow, and somewhat aggressive manner, like a predator approaching its prey.
  • stampede in(to sm place) The idiom "stampede into (some place)" refers to a situation in which a large group of people or animals rush or charge into a place in a chaotic or uncontrolled manner. It implies a sense of urgency, disorder, and overwhelming force. The word "stampede" typically conveys the idea of panic, excitement, or a sudden surge of energy driving a collective movement.
  • stand up in court The idiom "stand up in court" refers to the legality, credibility, or viability of evidence, an argument, or a claim that is strong enough and is supported by substantial proof to be effectively presented and accepted in a court of law. It implies that the evidence or argument is convincing, reliable, and capable of withstanding scrutiny or cross-examination during legal proceedings.
  • stand in good stead The idiom "stand in good stead" means to be helpful or advantageous in a particular situation, or to be of great value and benefit in the future. It implies that something or someone will provide support, assistance, or an advantage when needed.
  • stand in awe The idiom "stand in awe" means to be amazed, impressed, or filled with a sense of wonder or admiration for someone or something. It reflects a feeling of deep respect or reverence towards an extraordinary person, event, or circumstance.
  • stand in The idiom "stand in" refers to a person who temporarily takes someone else's place or role, typically to perform a specific task or responsibility. It can also refer to something used as a substitute or placeholder for another thing.
  • kneedeep in The idiom "kneedeep in" refers to being very involved or overwhelmed by a situation or a particular activity. It implies that one is fully immersed or surrounded by something, often to an extent that it becomes challenging to manage or escape from.
  • in way
  • swim in sth The idiom "swim in something" usually means to have an abundant or excessive amount of something or to be surrounded or overwhelmed by a particular thing or situation. It implies being immersed or engulfed in a particular state, often to an extent that might feel overwhelming or excessive.
  • be in the swim (of things) The idiom "be in the swim (of things)" means to be actively and fully involved or engaged in a particular situation, event, or group. It implies being well-informed, aware, and up-to-date with the latest developments or trends in a specific area.
  • stars in your eyes The idiom "stars in your eyes" is used to describe someone who has an intense and unrealistic optimism or enthusiasm about something or someone. It refers to having an exaggerated, dreamy, or idealistic view that often lacks a sense of practicality or realism.
  • It's written in the stars. The idiom "It's written in the stars" typically means that something is predestined or inevitable. It suggests that events or outcomes are predetermined and cannot be changed or avoided.
  • star in sth The idiom "star in sth" refers to someone being the main or prominent participant or performer in a particular activity, typically in the entertainment industry. It means to have a leading role or to be the featured individual in a specific project or event.
  • stare you in the face The idiom "stare you in the face" means that something is very obvious or clearly apparent, to the point that it is impossible to ignore or overlook it. It refers to a situation, fact, or truth that is right in front of someone, demanding their attention and recognition.
  • stare sth in the face The idiom "stare something in the face" means to confront a difficult or challenging situation directly and without fear. It implies facing or acknowledging something unpleasant or threatening, without avoiding or backing down from it.
  • look sb in the face To "look someone in the face" means to confront or be honest with someone directly and boldly, without any sign of guilt or shame. It implies openly acknowledging or accepting responsibility for one's actions or opinions, without trying to hide or avoid them. It can also suggest challenging or questioning someone with confidence and directness.
  • be staring sb in the face The idiom "be staring somebody in the face" means that something is extremely obvious or evident, often referring to a problem, solution, or truth that is clearly visible or easily understood. It implies that the person should have been able to recognize or acknowledge the obvious without difficulty.
  • stare sm in the face The idiom "stare someone/something in the face" means to confront or face a particular situation or problem directly, often emphasizing the difficulty or challenge associated with it. It implies looking something directly in the eye without avoiding or shying away from it.
  • look sm in the face The idiom "look someone in the face" means to confront or face someone directly and confidently, often in a challenging or assertive manner. It implies that one is not afraid to confront others or assert their position in a direct manner.
  • start in on The definition of the idiom "start in on" is to begin doing or speaking about something, typically in a critical or harmful manner. It refers to the act of initiating or engaging in something, often with an aggressive or confrontational approach.
  • start in The idiom "start in" can have a few different meanings depending on the context. Here are two possible definitions: 1. To begin doing a specific task or activity eagerly and with enthusiasm. Example: "She couldn't wait to start in on her new project." 2. To join a competition, contest, or race at the beginning or from the starting point. Example: "He decided to start in the marathon to have an equal chance with other participants." It's important to note that the precise meaning of "start in" may change based on the context it is used in.
  • in fits and starts The idiom "in fits and starts" means to proceed or perform irregularly or intermittently, with bursts of activity followed by periods of inactivity or stagnation. It refers to a non-continuous, inconsistent, or sporadic progress or behavior.
  • break out in tears and break in tears The idiom "break out in tears" means to suddenly start crying or weeping uncontrollably. It typically refers to a sudden and intense emotional reaction that leads to tears. On the other hand, "break in tears" does not seem to be a commonly used idiom. However, it could possibly be a mistaken phrase meant to convey the same meaning as "break out in tears."
  • break out in a rash The idiom "break out in a rash" refers to the sudden development of a skin condition, usually characterized by redness, itching, and irritation. It is often used metaphorically to describe a negative physical or emotional reaction to something, typically indicating extreme discomfort or discontent.
  • break out in a cold sweat The idiom "break out in a cold sweat" refers to experiencing sudden and extreme anxiety, fear, or nervousness that causes the body to perspire heavily, often resulting in a cold and clammy feeling.
  • stash sth in sth The idiom "stash sth in sth" means to hide or store something discreetly or secretly in a particular place. It implies keeping something out of sight or securing it in a designated location for safekeeping, often with the intention of preserving its confidentiality, protecting it from theft, or avoiding detection.
  • lie in state The idiom "lie in state" refers to the practice of laying a deceased person's body in a public place, usually a government building or a place of importance, for mourners to pay their respects. It typically involves the body being displayed in a casket or coffin, and is often accompanied by formal ceremonies and public viewing. This idiom is commonly used to describe the ceremonial honor given to important figures, such as heads of state or other prominent individuals, after their death.
  • in flux The idiom "in flux" refers to a state of constant change or transition. It signifies a situation or condition that is in a state of uncertainty, instability, or fluctuation.
  • break out (in pimples) The idiom "break out (in pimples)" refers to the sudden appearance or eruption of multiple pimples or acne on the skin, particularly on the face. It is often used metaphorically to describe the occurrence of numerous problems, difficulties, or challenges simultaneously.
  • (all) in one breath The idiom "(all) in one breath" means doing or saying something quickly and without pausing. It implies performing an action swiftly or expressing something in a concise manner without taking breaks or interruptions.
  • breathe in The idiom "breathe in" means to inhale or take a deep breath. It can also be used figuratively to suggest the act of absorbing, taking in information or experiences, or embracing something with enthusiasm.
  • breathe sth in The idiom "breathe sth in" refers to the act of inhaling or taking in something, typically air, deeply and fully into one's lungs.
  • stave sth in The idiom "stave sth in" means to completely smash or break something inwardly, typically by striking it with force.
  • stay in The idiom "stay in" typically means to remain at one's current location or to not leave a particular place.
  • in the fast lane The idiom "in the fast lane" means to live or behave in a way that is fast-paced, competitive, or ambitious. It often refers to a lifestyle characterized by a high level of activity, success, or excitement.
  • in the dark The idiom "in the dark" means to be unaware or uninformed about something, to not have knowledge or understanding about a particular situation or topic.
  • in the boondocks The idiom "in the boondocks" refers to a remote or rural location, often far away from urban or developed areas. It implies being isolated or situated in a place that is difficult to access or removed from city life.
  • in the back of mind The idiom "in the back of mind" means that something is not at the forefront of a person's thoughts or conscious awareness, but it is still present in their subconscious or underlying thoughts. It refers to a persistent or lingering thought or concern that remains in one's mind, even if it is not actively thought about or discussed.
  • in limbo The idiom "in limbo" means to be in a state of uncertainty, temporary suspension, or unresolved situation, where one is awaiting a decision or unable to proceed forward.
  • breeze in (to sm place) The idiom "breeze in (to sm place)" means to enter or arrive at a place in a casual, relaxed, or nonchalant manner, often without any difficulty or obstacle. It implies moving or entering effortlessly as if blown by the wind, indicating a sense of ease and confidence in one's arrival.
  • in sb's/sth's stead The idiom "in sb's/sth's stead" means to act as a substitute for someone or something, especially in their absence or place. It refers to taking on a role or responsibility that originally belonged to someone or something else.
  • stand sm in good stead The idiom "stand someone in good stead" means that something or someone will be beneficial or advantageous to someone in the future. It suggests that a particular quality, skill, experience, or possession will provide an individual with an advantage or help them succeed in a given situation.
  • steam in (sth) The idiom "steam in (sth)" typically means to engage in an activity or task with great energy, enthusiasm, or determination. It refers to approaching something with full force or intensity, similar to a train gathering steam and accelerating rapidly.
  • in brief The idiom "in brief" refers to providing a concise and succinct summary or overview of a topic or situation. It implies a brief and to-the-point explanation without delving into excessive details or elaboration.
  • steep sth in sth The idiom "steep sth in sth" typically means to immerse or soak something in a liquid or substance for a period of time in order to infuse or saturate it with flavor, color, or some other quality. It can be used both in a literal sense, such as steeping tea leaves in hot water to make tea, and in a figurative sense, such as steeping oneself in knowledge or steeping a story in suspense.
  • steep sm in sth The idiom "steep someone in something" typically means to completely immerse or involve someone deeply in a particular situation, subject, or experience. It refers to the act of extensively educating or familiarizing someone with a specific topic or area.
  • put the roses in cheeks The idiom "put the roses in cheeks" typically means to create a bright and rosy flush on someone's face, usually by making them blush or feel embarrassed.
  • out in the open The idiom "out in the open" refers to something that is visible, known, or easily accessible by others. It suggests that there is no secrecy or concealment involved, as it is openly displayed or revealed.
  • come in from the cold The idiom "come in from the cold" refers to the act of seeking refuge or finding a place of acceptance and support after being exposed to difficulty, exclusion, or isolation. It means moving from a challenging or unwelcome situation into a more comforting or welcoming one.
  • bring out in droves The idiom "bring out in droves" means to attract or gather a large number of people or things. It suggests that something or someone is causing such strong interest, enthusiasm, or response that a large crowd or overwhelming amount of people or things are drawn or assembled.
  • bring in The idiom "bring in" means to introduce or attract something or someone into a particular environment or situation, often for a specific purpose or outcome. It can also refer to the act of earning or generating a certain amount of money or revenue.
  • bring a verdict in The idiom "bring a verdict in" refers to the act of making a decision or reaching a conclusion, typically in a legal or formal context, after considering all the evidence and arguments presented. It implies giving a definitive ruling or judgment on a matter.
  • bring in sth The idiom "bring in something" typically refers to introducing, adding, or incorporating something new or different into a situation, conversation, or organization. It can involve bringing forth new ideas, concepts, perspectives, solutions, products, or individuals for various purposes.
  • bring sm in (on sth) The idiom "bring someone in (on something)" typically means to involve or include someone in a particular situation, event, or discussion. It refers to the action of bringing someone into the loop, sharing information, or seeking their participation or input regarding a specific matter.
  • bring sth out (in sm) The idiom "bring something out (in someone)" refers to the act of causing someone to exhibit or display a certain emotion or characteristic. It suggests that a particular emotion, behavior, or quality is triggered or emphasized due to a specific circumstance or interaction.
  • in step with The idiom "in step with" means to be in agreement or conforming to someone or something, usually in terms of ideas, actions, or values. It suggests being aligned or synchronized with a particular person, group, or situation.
  • in step The idiom "in step" often refers to being in harmony or agreement with something or someone, typically used to describe a synchronized or coordinated effort towards a common goal. It indicates that individuals or groups are working together smoothly and in alignment, both in terms of timing and progress.
  • wear the britches (in the family) The idiom "wear the britches (in the family)" refers to a person, usually a male, who holds the dominant or authoritative role within their family or household. It implies that this individual has the final say in decision-making and holds the most power or control. They are often the one responsible for making important choices and setting rules or guidelines for the rest of the family members to follow.
  • put the fear of God in The idiom "put the fear of God in" means to intimidate or scare someone severely, often through intense or forceful actions or words, in order to make them behave differently or comply with certain expectations. It implies instilling a deep sense of awe, dread, or respect, similar to the fear one might have towards a deity.
  • be in the lap of the gods The idiom "be in the lap of the gods" means to be in a situation where the outcome is uncertain and dependent on luck or fate rather than one's own control or effort. It implies that one's fate or success is beyond their influence and is instead determined by external forces.
  • in broad strokes The idiom "in broad strokes" means to describe or summarize something in a general or generalized manner, without including many specific details.
  • plant sth in sth The idiom "plant something in something" generally means to secretly place or hide something, typically for a deceitful or malicious purpose. It can also refer to intentionally locating something in a specific location, particularly when talking about gardening or landscaping.
  • stew in your own juice/juices The idiom "stew in your own juice/juices" means to suffer the consequences of one's actions, often by being left alone or abandoned to deal with the problems or difficulties one has created for oneself. It implies that someone is left to reflect, contemplate, and endure the negative outcomes resulting from their own decisions or behavior, without receiving support or assistance from others.
  • be in a stew The idiom "be in a stew" typically means to be extremely worried, upset, or anxious about something. It implies a state of mental turmoil or distress.
  • stew in one's own juice The idiom "stew in one's own juice" means to suffer the consequences or unpleasant consequences of one's own actions or decisions without any external intervention or assistance. It implies being left to deal with the fallout or problems caused by one's own mistakes or wrongdoing. It suggests a sense of being trapped or confined in the negative situation, unable to escape or find resolution.
  • sticks in the/ mind The idiom "sticks in the mind" refers to something that is memorable and remains in one's memory for a long time. It describes an experience, information, or an image that is difficult to forget or shake off.
  • stick in mind The idiom "stick in mind" means that something is memorable and remains easily recalled or remembered for a long time.
  • stick in gullet The idiom "stick in one's gullet" refers to something that is difficult to accept or swallow, often in terms of an uncomfortable truth, criticism, or a situation that is hard to digest emotionally or mentally. It implies a feeling of being overwhelmed or choked by something unpleasant or distressing.
  • stick in craw The idiom "stick in craw" is an expression used to describe something that is difficult to accept or tolerate, causing strong feelings of annoyance, frustration, or resentment. It refers to something that figuratively gets stuck in the throat, making it hard to swallow or digest.
  • stick in The idiom "stick in" refers to the act of inserting or placing something firmly into a particular position or place. It can also mean to firmly embed or fix something in a certain location or situation.
  • put the knife in The idiom "put the knife in" refers to an action or behavior that causes harm, betrayal, or betrayal to someone, usually by intentionally worsening a situation or causing emotional pain. It implies a deliberate act of inflicting harm or causing additional damage to an already difficult or sensitive situation.
  • put oar in The idiom "put oar in" means to interfere or interrupt a conversation or discussion without being invited or without having relevant knowledge or expertise. It refers to a person involuntarily inserting themselves into a matter that does not concern them, potentially causing disruption or annoyance.
  • put in in two penn'orth The idiom "put in two penn'orth" means to offer one's opinion or contribute one's thoughts on a particular matter, often if unsolicited. It implies that someone is giving their input or perspective, even if it may not be highly valuable or well-received. The phrase originates from the British slang term "penn'orth," which is a contraction of "pennyworth" meaning a small amount or value of something. Therefore, "putting in two penn'orth" suggests contributing a small or insignificant amount of one's thoughts or opinions.
  • put foot in mouth The idiom "put foot in mouth" means that someone has said or done something embarrassing, tactless, or inappropriate, usually unintentionally. It refers to a situation where a person metaphorically puts their own foot into their mouth, symbolizing their regrettable comment or action.
  • in a cleft stick The idiom "in a cleft stick" means to be caught or trapped in a difficult, delicate, or challenging situation where there are no easy or favorable choices or options available. It implies being in a predicament or dilemma with limited or undesirable alternatives.
  • hide head in the sand The idiom "hide head in the sand" refers to a phrase used to describe someone who avoids or ignores an unpleasant or difficult situation, often pretending that it doesn't exist. It is derived from the supposed behavior of ostriches, which were believed to bury their heads in the sand when facing danger, although this is not actually true. Therefore, this idiom implies a level of avoidance or denial in facing reality.
  • have words stick in throat The idiom "have words stick in throat" means to struggle or find it difficult to express oneself verbally, usually due to extreme emotions such as anger, frustration, or fear. It implies a temporary inability to vocalize thoughts or feelings.
  • have stick in craw The idiom "have a stick in one's craw" means to feel deeply resentful or indignant about something, especially when unable to express or resolve the negative feelings. It suggests a persistent, gnawing feeling of dissatisfaction or annoyance.
  • stick in sth The idiom "stick in something" typically means to insert or place an object firmly into something else. It can also mean to continue doing or dealing with something, often in a determined or persistent manner.
  • play in The idiom "play in" generally refers to participating in a competition or event with the intention to win or succeed. It is often used in sports, games, or other competitive environments where individuals or teams actively engage to achieve a positive outcome.
  • play a part in The idiom "play a part in" means to have a role or contribute to something, typically referring to one's involvement or influence in a situation, event, or outcome.
  • in play The idiom "in play" refers to something that is currently active, operational, or participating in a particular situation or event. It often implies that something or someone is involved and having an impact or influence on the outcome or proceedings at hand.
  • a sting in the tail The idiom "a sting in the tail" refers to an unexpected or unpleasant surprise or downside that occurs at the end of a situation, event, or story, despite prior positive or favorable circumstances. It implies that there is an unpleasant consequence or twist that follows even when the situation seemed to be going well.
  • stir sm (in)to sth The idiom "stir someone (in)to something" means to incite or provoke someone to engage in a particular action or emotion. It implies causing someone to become active, stimulated, or involved in a certain situation, often by appealing to their emotions or stirring up their passion for a cause or belief.
  • have sb in stitches The idiom "have sb in stitches" means to cause someone to laugh uncontrollably or be in fits of laughter.
  • keep sm in stitches The idiom "keep someone in stitches" means to make someone laugh uncontrollably or constantly. It refers to a situation where something or someone is incredibly amusing or entertaining, causing someone to laugh continuously or burst into fits of laughter.
  • take no stock in sth The idiom "take no stock in something" means to not believe, trust, or have confidence in something. It implies disregarding or not placing any value or importance on a particular idea, opinion, or information.
  • stock in trade The idiom "stock in trade" refers to the tools, skills, goods, or resources that are essential or characteristic to a particular person, profession, or business, and are consistently used or relied upon. It can also refer to the most typical or notable features of a person, profession, or business.
  • in stock The idiom "in stock" refers to a retail or business situation where a particular item or inventory is available and ready to be sold or used. It means that the product is currently present and accessible in the store or warehouse, allowing customers or users to purchase or acquire it without delays or waiting periods.
  • have (sth) in stock The idiom "have (sth) in stock" means to have a supply or inventory of something available for purchase or use. It implies that the item in question is readily available and ready to be sold or utilized.
  • carve in stone To "carve in stone" means to make something permanent and unchangeable, usually referring to a decision or plan. It implies that the decision or plan is final and cannot be altered or reversed. This idiom comes from the literal act of carving words or designs into stone, which is a permanent and enduring medium.
  • a drop in the bucket The idiom "a drop in the bucket" refers to a small or insignificant amount in comparison to what is needed or desired. It implies that the contribution or effort being made is not significant enough to have a meaningful impact or make a noticeable difference.
  • go to hell in a bucket
  • drop in the bucket The idiom "drop in the bucket" refers to a small or insignificant amount in relation to a larger whole or problem. It implies that the contribution or action being referred to has little effect or impact compared to the overall scale or magnitude of the situation.
  • buckle sm in The idiom "buckle someone in" means to secure someone or help them fasten a seatbelt or harness in a vehicle, typically for safety reasons.
  • stop one dead in tracks The idiom "stop one dead in their tracks" means to halt someone or something suddenly, causing them to come to an abrupt stop or pause, often due to shock, surprise, or intense impact. It signifies a complete cessation of movement or progress, compelling a person or situation to halt immediately and take notice.
  • stop in tracks The idiom "stop in tracks" means to come to an abrupt halt or pause suddenly, usually due to shock, surprise, or being caught off guard. It refers to an interruption or cessation of movement or activity.
  • stop dead in tracks The idiom "stop dead in tracks" means to come to an abrupt halt or stop suddenly, often due to being surprised, startled, or stunned by something.
  • in storage The idiom "in storage" refers to the act of keeping something, usually an item or object, in a designated place or facility for safekeeping or temporary preservation. It implies that the item is not currently being used or displayed and is being stored away until it is needed or wanted again.
  • in cold storage The idiom "in cold storage" refers to something that is put aside or postponed, typically for a long period of time. It can be used to describe objects, plans, or ideas that are temporarily abandoned or kept on hold until they are needed or relevant again.
  • in store (for sb/sth) The idiom "in store (for sb/sth)" means that there is something planned or awaiting someone or something in the future. It refers to the notion that there is something prepared or reserved to happen, often implying a potential surprise or outcome yet to be revealed or experienced.
  • be like a kid in a candy store The idiom "be like a kid in a candy store" means to be extremely excited, enthusiastic, and overwhelmed when presented with a wide range of options or opportunities, just like a child would be when entering a store filled with candies and treats.
  • store sth in sth The idiom "store something in something" means to place or keep something in a particular location or container for future use or safekeeping. It can refer to physical objects being stored in a specific place like a cabinet, drawer, or storage area, or it can also denote figurative concepts or information being stored in one's memory or mind.
  • have sth in store (for sm) The idiom "have something in store (for someone)" means to have something planned or prepared to happen to someone in the future, usually something unexpected or significant. It conveys the idea that there are potential surprises or outcomes that someone will experience or encounter.
  • build in sth The idiom "build in something" typically means to incorporate or include something as a permanent or integral part of something else. It implies adding a feature or element during the construction or creation of something, making it an inherent and essential part of the final product or design.
  • be in the eye of the storm The idiom "be in the eye of the storm" means to be at the center of chaos or turmoil while remaining calm and composed. It refers to a person or situation that is surrounded by difficulties or conflicts, yet manages to maintain a state of tranquility and control.
  • a storm in a teacup The idiom "a storm in a teacup" refers to a situation or event that is exaggerated or blown out of proportion, often resulting in unnecessary or excessive drama or commotion. It implies that the issue or conflict is minor or insignificant, similar to the idea of a small storm occurring in a teacup, which would have no real impact or consequence.
  • storm in (to sm place) The idiom "storm in (to sm place)" refers to entering a place in a forceful and disruptive manner. It implies entering a location with great energy or intensity, often with strong emotions or opinions.
  • in bulk The idiom "in bulk" refers to purchasing or doing something in large quantities or in a large amount. It suggests buying or performing something in a way that saves time, money, or effort by procuring or completing a large quantity all at once.
  • in dire straits The idiom "in dire straits" means to be in a highly difficult or desperate situation, typically referring to a severe financial or personal crisis. It conveys a sense of being in urgent need or extreme trouble with limited options for resolution or escape.
  • be in dire straits The idiom "be in dire straits" means to be in a state of extreme difficulty or crisis. It refers to being in a desperate or challenging situation where finding a solution or resolution seems highly unlikely.
  • strap sm or sth in(to) sth The idiom "strap someone or something in(to) something" means to secure or fasten someone or something tightly into a seat or vehicle using straps or seatbelts to ensure their safety. It is commonly used when referring to the act of buckling up a passenger or securing an object firmly in place.
  • bundle sm up (in sth) The idiom "bundle (someone) up (in something)" means to wrap or dress someone in warm clothing or blankets, usually in preparation for going outside in cold weather. It is often used in reference to protecting someone from the cold by putting on multiple layers of clothing or providing extra insulation.
  • a straw in the wind The idiom "a straw in the wind" refers to a small and possibly insignificant or subtle indication or sign that suggests or foreshadows a larger trend, outcome, or change. It signifies a subtle hint or preliminary indication of something, often used in the context of predicting future events or trends based on small or preliminary signs.
  • bung sth in The idiom "bung sth in" means to hastily or carelessly place or throw something into a particular location or container without much thought or concern for organization or precision. It implies a lack of carefulness or attention to detail when dealing with the object or its placement.
  • stray in(to sth) The idiom "stray into (something)" means to unintentionally enter or become involved in a situation or topic that was not originally intended or planned. It implies going off course or deviating from one's intended path.
  • stream in(to sth) The idiom "stream in (to something)" refers to a large number of people or things entering a place or space continuously and in an orderly or flowing manner. It suggests a steady and constant influx or arrival of individuals or objects.
  • change horses in midstream The idiom "change horses in midstream" means to make a different choice or decision in the middle of a task or project. It refers to the act of switching or replacing something crucial while already in the midst of doing it. This idiom is often used to caution against changing plans or strategies during the course of an ongoing endeavor as it may lead to confusion, disorganization, or failure.
  • the man/woman/person in the street The idiom "the man/woman/person in the street" refers to an ordinary, average person, typically referring to the general public or common individuals who may not have specialized knowledge or expertise. It represents the perspective or opinion of the average citizen on a particular matter.
  • be in Queer Street The idiom "be in Queer Street" means to be in a precarious or difficult financial situation. It implies being in economic trouble, often due to financial mismanagement, debt, or a lack of money.
  • man in the street The idiom "man in the street" refers to an ordinary or average person, often used to represent the general public or the common perspective of everyday individuals. It usually indicates the views, opinions, or experiences of the majority rather than those of experts or authorities.
  • bury oneself in sth The idiom "bury oneself in something" means to immerse oneself or become completely engrossed in a particular activity, task, or subject. It suggests dedicating a significant amount of time, effort, or focus to that specific thing, often to the point of neglecting other aspects of life.
  • bury sm or sth in sth The idiom "bury someone or something in something" means to overwhelm or conceal someone or something with an excessive amount of something else. It often implies that the person or thing being overwhelmed is unable to escape or be noticed due to the overwhelming amount of something else.
  • burn in effigy The idiom "burn in effigy" refers to the act of publicly burning a representation or image of someone, usually made of straw or some other material, in order to express extreme contempt, anger, or protest towards that person. It is a symbolic act meant to display strong disapproval or condemnation of the individual being depicted.
  • burn in The idiom "burn in" typically refers to the process of testing, conditioning, or calibrating a new electronic device or component to ensure its functionality and reliability. It involves subjecting the device to stress, such as prolonged periods of operation at high temperatures, in order to identify potential defects or weaknesses that may arise during normal use.
  • burn bridges in front of
  • take sth in (one's) stride The idiom "take something in one's stride" means to handle or deal with something in a calm and unbothered manner, without becoming overly upset, stressed, or affected by it. It implies the ability to handle unexpected or challenging situations with ease and a positive attitude.
  • stride in(to sm place) The idiom "stride into (someone's) place" means to confidently or assertively enter a particular situation or role, often with the intention of taking over or assuming control.
  • burst in The idiom "burst in" refers to the act of entering a room or location abruptly and energetically. It often implies that the person is interrupting and disrupting an ongoing activity or conversation.
  • strip sth in The idiom "strip something in" typically refers to the act of removing unnecessary or extraneous elements from a particular situation, object, or concept, in order to simplify or streamline it. It implies getting rid of unnecessary details, complexities, or embellishments, allowing the essence or core of something to be more easily understood or appreciated.
  • bushel and a peck (and sm in a gourd) The idiom "bushel and a peck (and sm in a gourd)" is typically used to express an intense or large amount of love or affection for someone. It is often used to convey strong feelings, similar to saying "I love you a lot" or "I love you very much." The phrase originates from the measurements of a bushel (a unit of volume) and a peck (a smaller unit). The addition of "and sm in a gourd" suggests an even greater amount of love, as if the speaker is saying they love the person beyond measure.
  • is in business The idiom "is in business" typically means that someone is actively involved in a particular venture, enterprise, or profession. It implies that the person is pursuing their chosen occupation or activity professionally or commercially.
  • in the business of The idiom "in the business of" typically means engaged in or involved in a particular activity or occupation. It refers to someone or a company being actively dedicated to a specific area or industry, indicating their primary focus or expertise. It emphasizes a person's or organization's occupation or profession.
  • in business The idiom "in business" generally refers to being actively involved or engaged in a particular trade, profession, or commercial activity. It implies that someone is operating within the realm of commerce, conducting business transactions, or pursuing entrepreneurial endeavors. It can also indicate that an individual is focused on making profits or achieving success within their chosen field. Essentially, when someone is "in business," they are actively participating in commercial activities to accomplish their objectives.
  • strut in (to sm place) The idiom "strut in (to sm place)" means to enter a location with an air of confidence, pride, or arrogance. It implies walking with a stylish, self-assured, or haughty demeanor.
  • butt in The idiom "butt in" means to interrupt or intrude into a conversation or situation without being invited or welcomed. It refers to someone who interferes or inserts themselves into a discussion or activity that does not involve them.
  • a kick in the butt The idiom "a kick in the butt" refers to the act of giving someone a motivator or a figurative push to get them moving, taking action, or making progress. It usually implies a sense of urgency or a need to initiate change or improvement.
  • pain in the ass The idiom "pain in the ass" is an informal expression used to describe someone or something that is extremely bothersome, irritating, or difficult to deal with. It signifies a source of frustration or annoyance.
  • kick in the (seat of the) pants The idiom "kick in the (seat of the) pants" refers to a figurative motivation or encouragement given to someone, usually in the form of a strong push or forceful reminder. It implies a sudden jolt or push that helps someone get back on track, take action, or achieve something they have been procrastinating or lacking the motivation to do.
  • butt in (on sm or sth) The idiom "butt in (on someone or something)" means to interrupt or intrude upon a conversation, situation, or activity without being invited or welcomed. It implies interfering or involving oneself in matters that do not concern them. Additionally, in a more literal sense, "butt in" can refer to physically inserting oneself into a space or position that is already occupied by someone else.
  • look as if butter wouldn't melt in one's mouth The idiom "look as if butter wouldn't melt in one's mouth" refers to someone who appears innocent, sweet, or demure, despite potentially hiding deceitful intentions, mischief, or a mischievous nature. It emphasizes the contrast between a person's innocent outward appearance and their true character or behavior.
  • butter wouldn't melt (in sm's mouth) The idiom "butter wouldn't melt (in someone's mouth)" is used to describe someone who appears innocent and sweet, despite potentially having a mischievous or deceptive nature. It implies that the person is able to maintain a calm and innocent demeanor even in situations that might cause others to react differently.
  • stuck in traffic The idiom "stuck in traffic" means to be trapped or unable to move due to congested or slow-moving vehicles on the road. It refers to the frustrating experience of being caught in a traffic jam or gridlock.
  • buy way in The idiom "buy way in" refers to the act of using money or influence to gain entry or access to a certain place, organization, or social group, often without earning or deserving it. It implies that individuals are using financial power or connections to bypass merit-based requirements or qualifications.
  • buy in The idiom "buy in" means to fully support or accept a particular idea, plan, or proposal. It suggests the willingness to believe in or invest in something, often implying active participation or agreement.
  • buy a pig in a poke The idiom "buy a pig in a poke" means to make a purchase or accept something without fully inspecting or understanding its true nature or value. It refers to blindly accepting something based on appearance or limited information, often with the risk of being deceived or disappointed.
  • in a stupor The idiom "in a stupor" refers to a state of mental or physical dullness, confusion, or haze, often caused by exhaustion, alcohol or drug consumption, or a lack of awareness. It signifies a condition where a person is unable to think clearly or function properly.
  • buzz in (to sm place) The idiom "buzz in (to sm place)" refers to the action of gaining access or entry to a particular place by pressing a buzzer or signaling to someone inside to let you in. It can also be used figuratively to indicate the act of entering a conversation or discussion, often in an assertive or noticeable manner.
  • in style The idiom "in style" means to be fashionable or trendy, typically referring to something that is currently popular or highly regarded in terms of fashion, design, or overall appeal. It implies that something is in line with the latest trends and is seen as modern or desirable.
  • in sm's prayers The idiom "in someone's prayers" refers to the act of praying for someone or something. It signifies offering thoughts, wishes, or supplications to a higher power, seeking guidance, protection, or resolution for the person or situation in question.
  • cage sm or sth up (in sth) The idiom "cage (someone or something) up (in something)" means to confine or restrict someone or something within a specific space or area, often in a way that limits their freedom or movement. It implies restricting someone's actions or opportunities for personal growth or development. The term "cage" suggests a sense of being trapped or contained, similar to an animal kept in a cage.
  • cage sm or sth in The idiom "cage someone or something in" means to confine or restrict someone or something within a limited space or area, as if they were enclosed in a cage. It implies a sense of confinement or constraint.
  • in cahoots (with sb) The idiom "in cahoots (with sb)" means to be in a secret and often dishonest collaboration or partnership with someone, usually for a nefarious purpose or to deceive others. It implies a close and conspiratorial relationship between two or more individuals.
  • be in cahoots The idiom "be in cahoots" means to be involved in a secretive or dishonest partnership or collaboration with someone, typically to engage in unethical or illegal activities. It implies a level of close cooperation between individuals who have ulterior motives or are conspiring to achieve a shared goal.
  • in cahoots (with sm) The idiom "in cahoots with someone" means to be secretly working together or conspiring with someone. It implies a close collaboration or partnership for a particular purpose, often implying dishonest or unscrupulous actions.
  • submerge sm or sth in sth The idiom "submerge someone or something in something" means to completely immerse or submerse someone or something in a liquid or substance, so that it is fully covered or surrounded by it.
  • put in layaway The idiom "put in layaway" refers to the act of reserving or setting aside an item for future purchase by making partial payments. It involves depositing the item with a retailer, who will keep it until the full amount is paid, allowing the customer to claim it later.
  • call in chips The idiom "call in chips" typically refers to the act of using one's influence, resources, or favors in order to gain an advantage or achieve a desired outcome. It originates from poker, where players can exchange their poker chips for cash at the end of a game. Similarly, "calling in chips" figuratively means cashing in on one's accumulated favors or assets to accomplish a goal or secure a benefit.
  • call in The idiom "call in" can have multiple interpretations depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. Request someone's presence or participation: To invite or summon someone to a particular location or for a specific purpose. Example: "They called in the experts to resolve the complex issue." 2. Seek professional assistance: To contact or consult a professional or an expert for advice, guidance, or services. Example: "She called in a plumber to fix the leaky faucet." 3. Report absence from work: To notify an employer or supervisor that one will not be able to come to work due to illness or any other valid reason. Example: "He had to call in sick today as he has a high fever." 4.
  • succeed in sth The idiom "succeed in something" means to achieve a desired outcome or goal or to do something effectively and achieve the desired result. It refers to the accomplishment of a specific task or objective, often involving overcoming difficulties or challenges in order to attain success.
  • the men in grey suits The idiom "the men in grey suits" refers to a group of powerful, influential, and often anonymous individuals who hold significant authority and make important decisions behind the scenes, typically in the realms of business, politics, or bureaucracy. These individuals are commonly associated with conservative or traditional views and are perceived as wielding great power and shaping outcomes.
  • in summary The idiom "in summary" means to provide a concise or brief overview of the main points or ideas previously discussed. It implies a concluding statement that captures the key information or highlights of a particular subject or topic.
  • in sum The idiom "in sum" means to summarize or give a brief overview of something. It is often used to introduce or conclude a summary or overview of a topic or argument.
  • Could I come in? The idiom "Could I come in?" usually refers to politely asking for permission or entry into a particular place or situation. It's commonly used when someone wants to enter a room, join a conversation, or be part of an activity.
  • hat in hand The idiom "hat in hand" generally refers to a humble and apologetic demeanor, usually when seeking forgiveness, assistance, or favor from someone. It often implies a person's willingness to admit their mistake or accept their lower position in a situation, reflecting a humbling or submissive stance.
  • come/go cap in hand The idiom "come/go cap in hand" refers to a situation where someone humbly and often reluctantly asks for help, usually financial assistance or a favor, from another person or organization. It conveys the sense of desperation or a position of dependence on the other person's goodwill. The phrase "cap in hand" originally alludes to the act of removing one's hat as a sign of respect or deference when asking for something.
  • a feather in sb's cap The idiom "a feather in someone's cap" means an achievement, honor, or accomplishment that brings pride, esteem, or added value to someone's reputation or career. It is often used to describe something that enhances someone's success or standing.
  • feather in one's cap The idiom "feather in one's cap" refers to a noteworthy achievement or accomplishment that brings pride, honor, or recognition to someone. It originated from the practice of placing a feather in the cap as a symbol of an accomplishment or success.
  • (with) hat in hand The idiom "(with) hat in hand" refers to a person approaching someone in a humble, apologetic, or subservient manner, typically seeking forgiveness, assistance, favors, or mercy. It conveys the image of a person holding their hat in their hand, a traditional sign of deference or respect.
  • in contact (with sm or sth) The idiom "in contact (with sm or sth)" refers to the act of being in communication or having regular interaction with someone or something. It suggests that there is a connection or ongoing relationship present.
  • come in(to) contact The idiom "come in(to) contact" means to encounter or meet someone or something physically, socially, or emotionally. It refers to the act of making contact or having communication with someone or something.
  • surge in(to sth) The idiom "surge into (something)" typically refers to a sudden and forceful movement or increase, often used to describe a sudden burst of energy, growth, or excitement. It suggests the concept of rapidly entering or taking over a particular place or state.
  • in surgery The idiom "in surgery" refers to the state of being actively involved or occupied in a task or undertaking. It is often used to describe someone who is deeply engrossed or immersed in their work or project, similar to a surgeon who is fully focused and concentrated during an operation.
  • surpass sm or sth in sth The idiom "surpass someone or something in something" means to exceed or go beyond someone or something in a particular aspect or quality, usually demonstrating a higher level of achievement, performance, or excellence. It indicates being superior to someone or something in a specific area or skill.
  • keep sm in (a state of) suspense The idiom "keep someone in suspense" refers to intentionally delaying the revelation of information, leaving someone uncertain or anxious about what is going to happen or be disclosed. It implies keeping someone in a state of curiosity and anticipation.
  • sustain sm in sth The idiom "sustain someone in something" means to support, uphold, or maintain someone within a particular situation or condition. It often refers to providing the necessary resources, assistance, or encouragement to help someone continue or endure in a specific endeavor, such as a job, position, or lifestyle.
  • swarm in(to sth) The idiom "swarm in (to sth)" is used to describe a situation where a large number of people or things enter or arrive at a place in a very rapid or overwhelming manner. It implies a sense of movement or action reminiscent of a swarm of bees or insects descending upon something.
  • swathe sm or sth in sth The idiom "swathe someone or something in something" means to envelop or surround someone or something completely with something (typically fabric or cloth). It implies the act of wrapping or covering someone or something with a particular material or substance. It can also be used figuratively to describe an overwhelming or excessive amount of something surrounding or overwhelming a person, situation, or object.
  • swear sb in The idiom "swear sb in" refers to the process of officially inducting or administering an oath to someone, particularly in a formal or legal context. It usually involves a ceremony or procedure in which a person takes an oath or makes a solemn promise to fulfill certain duties or responsibilities. This idiom is often used when referring to the induction of individuals into public office or positions of authority, where they are required to take an oath to uphold the law and carry out their duties faithfully.
  • swear sm in (as sth) The idiom "swear someone in (as something)" means to administer an official oath or affirmation to someone, formally or legally appointing them to a particular position or role. It often involves making a solemn promise or commitment to fulfill the duties and responsibilities associated with the designated position.
  • in a cold sweat The idiom "in a cold sweat" refers to a state of extreme fear, anxiety, or nervousness that causes one's body to become cold and sweaty. It describes a heightened emotional and physiological response to a situation or thought.
  • sweep in(to sm place) The idiom "sweep in (to some place)" means to enter a room or a location in a dramatic or swift manner, usually creating a noticeable impact or drawing attention to oneself. It implies making a grand or stylish entrance.
  • swept up (in sth) The idiom "swept up (in sth)" refers to becoming fully and completely engaged or immersed in a particular activity, event, or emotion, often to the point of being carried away or overwhelmed by it. It implies being caught up or irresistibly drawn into something.
  • in full swing The idiom "in full swing" refers to a situation or activity that is happening or progressing at its maximum level or with great energy and intensity. It implies that something is functioning or occurring at its peak or in a state of full activity.
  • be in full swing The idiom "be in full swing" means to be operating or functioning at the peak of its activity or intensity. It suggests that something is at its most lively, vigorous, or productive state.
  • get in(to) the swing of things The idiom "get in(to) the swing of things" means to become involved in and adjust to a new situation or activity. It refers to getting accustomed to the rhythm, pace, and requirements of a task or situation, often after a period of being unfamiliar or out of practice.
  • not have a care in the world The idiom "not have a care in the world" means to be completely carefree or unconcerned about anything. It describes a state of mind where someone does not have any worries, anxieties, or responsibilities weighing on them.
  • in the care of The idiom "in the care of" refers to a situation where someone or something is entrusted to the responsibility, guardianship, or protection of another person or organization. It implies that the person or organization has the duty to take care of and ensure the well-being or safety of the individual or item.
  • in care of The idiom "in care of" is used when giving someone's address, indicating that the intended recipient of the mail or communication is staying temporarily at someone else's address.
  • have a care in the world The idiom "have a care in the world" means to feel carefree or not to have any worries or concerns. It implies being completely relaxed or lacking any burden.
  • switch sth (from sth) (in)to sth The idiom "switch something (from something) (into) something" means to change or convert something from one form or condition to another. It implies a transformation or transition from one state to another.
  • in one fell swoop The idiom "in one fell swoop" means to accomplish something quickly or all at once, usually with a single action or decision. It refers to completing multiple tasks or resolving multiple issues simultaneously or in a very short span of time.
  • draw in horns and pull in horns The idiom "draw in horns" or "pull in horns" means to restrain oneself, limit one's actions, or adopt a more cautious or reserved approach. It is often used when a person or a group decides to back down, give up their aggressive stance, or refrain from engaging in a conflict. The expression refers to the behavior of animals, such as bulls or rams, that retract or pull back their horns when they feel threatened or want to avoid confrontation.
  • draw in horns The idiom "draw in horns" refers to the act of restraining oneself, holding back one's aggression or assertiveness, and approaching a situation or conflict with caution or moderation. It implies that someone is choosing not to engage in a confrontation or is showing a reduced level of aggression or assertiveness.
  • tie in with The idiom "tie in with" means to connect or relate something to something else, or to make something fit or harmonize with another thing or idea. It implies finding a connection or association between different elements or concepts.
  • tie in knots The idiom "tie in knots" refers to becoming extremely worried, anxious, or stressed about something. It suggests a state of mental or emotional turmoil, as if one's thoughts or emotions are tangled and difficult to untangle, much like a physical knot.
  • tie in a knot The idiom "tie in a knot" means to twist or loop something, usually a string, rope, or fabric, into a knot by interlacing it with itself. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a difficult or complex situation or problem that is challenging to resolve or untangle.
  • tie in The idiom "tie in" typically refers to connecting or linking something together in a logical or cohesive manner. It can also mean integrating or relating different elements, ideas, or concepts to create a unified whole.
  • be carved/set in stone The idiom "be carved/set in stone" typically means that something is fixed, permanent, and cannot be changed. It refers to the notion of engraving or carving information onto stone, which is not easily altered or erased. Therefore, when something is "carved/set in stone," it implies that it is firm and unchangeable.
  • carve sth in stone The idiom "carve something in stone" means to make something permanent, fixed, or unchangeable. It implies the idea of engraving or etching instructions, plans, or decisions onto stone, which is difficult to alter once it is done. It signifies a firm commitment or decision that cannot be easily reversed or modified.
  • just in case The idiom "just in case" refers to taking precautionary or preparatory measures for possible future events or situations, to be ready or prepared if needed.
  • in the case of The definition of the idiom "in the case of" is indicating or referring to someone or something specific; considering a particular situation or circumstance.
  • in case of The idiom "in case of" refers to a situation where a particular event, circumstance, or possibility may occur or be encountered. It is often used to indicate precautionary measures that should be taken in anticipation of such an event or to specify actions to be undertaken if the event or circumstance does occur.
  • in case The idiom "in case" means to do something as a precautionary measure or as a safeguard against a possible future event or circumstance. It implies taking action or making preparations in anticipation of a particular scenario or potential outcome to avoid unwanted consequences.
  • case in point The idiom "case in point" refers to a specific example or instance that serves as a clear and relevant evidence to support an argument, claim, or point being discussed. It highlights a specific situation that exemplifies or proves a broader statement or principle.
  • a case in point The idiom "a case in point" refers to a specific example that serves as evidence or confirmation of a broader statement or claim being made.
  • cash in (on sth) The idiom "cash in (on sth)" means to take advantage of or profit from a situation, often in a selfish or opportunistic manner. It refers to exploiting an opportunity to make money or gain an advantage.
  • call/cash in your chips The idiom "call/cash in your chips" refers to the act of ending a particular venture or activity, typically in the context of gambling or business, by converting your assets or investments into cash. It signifies the decision to withdraw or give up, often due to recognizing a lack of success or wanting to minimize risk.
  • cash sth in (for sth) The idiom "cash something in (for something)" means to convert or exchange something, usually an asset or a valuable item, into money or a different form of value. It can also refer to redeeming a ticket, coupon, or any form of convertible item for goods or services. Essentially, it implies the act of obtaining tangible or equivalent value for something that was previously held as an asset or incentive.
  • cash sth in The idiom "cash something in" refers to converting or exchanging something, usually a valuable asset or investment, into cash or money. It often implies that someone is choosing to sell or liquidate an item, property, or financial instrument in order to receive immediate funds. This idiom can be used in various contexts such as selling stocks or bonds, redeeming a financial instrument before its maturity, or even selling a physical object for money.
  • cash (one's chips) in The idiom "cash (one's chips) in" typically refers to the act of converting one's assets or investments into cash. It is often used in the context of selling or liquidating something, such as stocks, property, or other investments, and receiving money in return. The phrase can also suggest the act of redeeming or converting a previously earned reward or benefit into its cash equivalent.
  • throw in lot with To "throw in lot with" means to join or align oneself with a particular person, group, or cause, often by contributing one's resources, support, or efforts to their pursuits or goals. It implies a commitment or allegiance to a common purpose or shared endeavor.
  • cast lot in The idiom "cast lot in" refers to making a decision or determining an outcome by drawing lots or using chance, usually in a situation where multiple options or individuals are involved. It can also imply leaving something to fate or destiny rather than making a deliberate choice.
  • Look what the cat's dragged in! The idiom "Look what the cat's dragged in!" is an expression used to express surprise or disapproval at someone's unexpected or unwelcome arrival. It implies that the person who arrived is undesirable or has caused trouble.
  • Look what the cat dragged in! The idiom "Look what the cat dragged in!" is an exclamation used to express surprise or disdain upon seeing someone who is unexpected, unwelcome, or disheveled. It's often used humorously or as a playful tease to suggest that the person looks untidy or unkempt, similar to something a cat might bring in from the outside.
  • look like the cat dragged in The idiom "look like the cat dragged in" is used to describe someone's appearance when they look disheveled, unkempt, or exhausted. It implies that the person looks as if they have been through a rough or challenging experience.
  • look like sth the cat brought in The idiom "look like something the cat brought in" is used to describe someone's appearance or condition when they look disheveled, messy, or untidy. It implies that the person looks unkempt or in a state of disarray, similar to how a cat might bring in something dirty or messy from outside.
  • have a cat in hell's chance The idiom "have a cat in hell's chance" is used to describe a situation where someone has very little or no chance of succeeding or achieving something. It implies that the chances are extremely slim or close to impossible, just like a cat surviving in the fiery environment of hell.
  • cat in gloves catches no mice The idiom "cat in gloves catches no mice" means that being excessively cautious or overly polite can prevent one from achieving their goals or being successful. It suggests that sometimes one needs to be bold, assertive, or take risks in order to accomplish something.
  • All cats are gray in the dark The idiom "All cats are gray in the dark" means that in certain situations, it is difficult to discern or distinguish between different options or choices because the conditions or circumstances are unfavorable or uncertain. It suggests that when lacking clear information or when faced with limited options, things become indistinguishable or less important.
  • get ass in gear The idiom "get ass in gear" is a colloquial expression that means to start working or move quickly and efficiently. It is often used to urge someone to become more active, motivated, or productive in order to complete a task or achieve a goal.
  • have a few/a lot etc. irons in the fire The idiom "have a few/a lot etc. irons in the fire" means to have multiple projects, plans, or opportunities underway or in progress simultaneously. It implies that a person is actively involved in several things at once, increasing their chances of success or achievement.
  • catch up in The idiom "catch up in" typically refers to getting involved or entangled in a particular situation or activity, often unintentionally or unexpectedly. It means being drawn into something or becoming engrossed in it to the point where it consumes one's attention or becomes difficult to break away from.
  • catch in The idiom "catch in" generally means to surprise or unexpectedly find someone engaged in some activity, usually something they shouldn't be doing. It often implies catching someone doing something secretive, deceitful, or forbidden, causing them to feel embarrassed, guilty, or caught in the act.
  • take part (in sth) The idiom "take part (in sth)" means to actively participate or engage in something. It refers to getting involved or joining in an activity, event, or project.
  • take pride (in sb/sth) The idiom "take pride (in sb/sth)" means to feel a sense of satisfaction, accomplishment, or pleasure regarding someone or something. It entails having a deep admiration and appreciation for someone or something, often associated with a personal investment or association with the subject.
  • tale never loses in the telling The phrase "tale never loses in the telling" means that a story or narrative tends to become more interesting, exciting, or exaggerated as it is retold or passed down from person to person. It suggests that each time the story is recounted, new details, exaggerations, or embellishments are added, enhancing its entertainment value.
  • talk in circles The idiom "talk in circles" means to speak or communicate in a way that is confusing, repetitive, or lacking clear direction. It implies that the person or conversation is going around in circles without making any progress or providing meaningful information.
  • in high cotton The idiom "in high cotton" means to be in a prosperous or advantageous situation; to be experiencing success, power, wealth, or privilege. It often refers to a state of elevated social or economic status.
  • cave in (to sb/sth) The idiom "cave in (to sb/sth)" means to surrender or yield to someone or something, usually after a period of resistance or opposition. It implies giving in to pressure, persuasion, or demands, often against one's better judgment or initial stance.
  • cave in (to sm or sth) The idiom "cave in (to someone or something)" means to yield or surrender to pressure, demands, or persuasion from someone or something. It implies a loss of resolve or resistance and often conveys a sense of giving in reluctantly or begrudgingly.
  • cave in The idiom "cave in" refers to the act of yielding or giving in to pressure, demands, or arguments. It signifies surrendering or giving up one's resistance or position.
  • in tandem (with sb/sth) The idiom "in tandem (with sb/sth)" refers to two or more things or people working together in a coordinated and synchronized manner. It implies that they are connected or functioning in a harmonious and mutually supportive way towards a common goal or objective.
  • pay sb back in their own coin The idiom "pay someone back in their own coin" means to retaliate or seek revenge on someone by treating them in the same negative or hurtful manner that they treated you. It implies responding to someone's actions with similar actions, usually negative or unpleasant, as a form of retribution or justice.
  • record sth in sth The idiom "record sth in sth" means to document or write down information or data in a specific format or medium, such as a document, logbook, or database. It implies the act of keeping a formal record or registering details for future reference or documentation purposes.
  • Won't you come in?
  • when ship comes in The idiom "when ship comes in" is used to express a time when someone becomes wealthy, successful, or experiences good fortune. It refers to a moment when a person's long-awaited hopes, dreams, or plans come to fruition, bringing them prosperity or happiness. It implies that the person's life will significantly improve once their "ship" arrives, which symbolizes a positive change or an opportunity that brings wealth or success.
  • out in large numbers The idiom "out in large numbers" means that a significant or considerable amount of people or things are present or participating in a specific activity or event. It suggests a substantial turnout or a significant quantity.
  • out in force The idiom "out in force" means to be present or visible in large numbers or with strong representation, usually referring to a group of people or a particular thing.
  • not know enough to come in out of the rain The idiom "not know enough to come in out of the rain" is used to describe someone who is lacking in common sense or basic intelligence. It suggests that the person is so clueless or naive that they cannot even make simple, obvious decisions for their own well-being or safety, like seeking shelter from rain.
  • move up in the world The idiom "move up in the world" means to improve one's social, economic, or professional status. It refers to advancing or progressing to a higher position, rank, or level in society or in one's career. It often implies achieving success, wealth, or higher social standing.
  • It'll all come out in the wash The idiom "It'll all come out in the wash" means that eventually, all the facts or details about a situation will be revealed or become known, often implying that the truth or the right outcome will prevail. It suggests that any uncertainties or hidden elements will be resolved or clarified over time. It is similar to saying "the truth will come out" or "everything will be revealed eventually."
  • in power The idiom "in power" refers to the position or state of having authority, control, or influence over a group, organization, or country. It typically implies being in a position of leadership, where one has the ability to make decisions and execute actions.
  • in on The idiom "in on" commonly means to be involved in or have knowledge of a certain situation or secret. It implies being privy to information or participating in a specific activity.
  • in focus The idiom "in focus" refers to something that is clear, well-defined, and easily seen or understood. It can be used both in a literal sense, describing a clear and sharp image or object, as well as in a figurative sense, describing a clear understanding or focus on a specific issue or topic.
  • come out in the wash "Come out in the wash" is an idiom that means that things will eventually be resolved or sorted out over time. It suggests that even though a situation may be confusing or problematic at the moment, it will ultimately be clarified or resolved when more information or time becomes available.
  • come out in the open with The idiom "come out in the open with" means to reveal or share something openly and honestly, especially something that has been hidden or kept secret. It refers to the act of being transparent and forthright about a particular issue, idea, or truth which was previously unknown or concealed.
  • come out in the open The idiom "come out in the open" means to make something known or reveal something that was previously hidden or secret. It refers to bringing something into the public sphere or exposing it openly.
  • come out in The idiom "come out in" typically refers to a sudden appearance or outbreak of a physical condition or symptom on the body, often in the form of a rash or spots. It can also refer to the appearance of emotions or certain characteristics in a person's behavior or personality.
  • Come on in, the water's fine! The idiom "Come on in, the water's fine!" is an expression used to encourage someone to participate in or join a particular activity or situation because it is enjoyable, safe, or successful. It is often used to persuade someone to take a risk or venture into something new with the assurance that there are no negative consequences. The phrase originated from the idea of inviting someone to swim in water that is warm and pleasant.
  • come in out of the rain The idiom "come in out of the rain" means to seek shelter or refuge from unfavorable or difficult situations. It is often used figuratively to encourage someone to escape from an unpleasant or challenging environment and find safety or comfort.
  • come in heat
  • come in handy The idiom "come in handy" means to be useful or helpful in a particular situation or when needed. It refers to something that proves to be convenient or beneficial at a given time.
  • come in for The idiom "come in for" means to receive or experience something, typically negative, such as criticism, blame, punishment, or ridicule.
  • come in contact The idiom "come in contact" refers to encountering or interacting with someone or something physically, emotionally, or intellectually. It implies a direct or indirect connection with a person, an object, a place, or an idea.
  • Come in and make yourself at home The idiom "Come in and make yourself at home" means to invite someone to feel comfortable and relaxed in a particular place, to behave as if they were in their own home.
  • come in a certain position The idiom "come in a certain position" typically means to achieve a particular rank, status, or standing in a group or organization. It implies that someone has reached a desired or expected level of importance or influence within a particular context.
  • come in The idiom "come in" typically means to enter a place or to be admitted into a particular space or location. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to joining a conversation, discussion, or a particular situation.
  • come down in the world The idiom "come down in the world" means to experience a decline in social status, wealth, or overall success. It refers to a situation where an individual or a group of individuals loses their previous higher position or standing in society, often due to unfortunate circumstances or poor decisions. It implies a downward trajectory in terms of social standing or personal achievements.
  • come cap in hand The idiom "come cap in hand" refers to someone approaching someone else in a humble and submissive manner, often to ask for help, forgiveness, or assistance. It implies that the person arriving with their cap in hand is seeking favor or support from someone more powerful or influential.
  • put your two cents in The idiom "put your two cents in" means to offer or express one's opinion or viewpoint on a matter, often in an unsolicited or casual manner. It implies sharing one's thoughts or advice, even though it may not be particularly valuable or influential.
  • put your two cents (worth) in The idiom "put your two cents (worth) in" means to give or offer one's opinion or viewpoint, especially when it may not be necessary or solicited. It suggests offering a small contribution or perspective on a particular matter.
  • put one's oar in The idiom "put one's oar in" means to interfere or meddle in a situation without being asked or without having sufficient knowledge or understanding of the matter. It refers to the act of offering unwanted or unnecessary advice or opinions in a discussion or decision-making process.
  • leave a bad taste in your mouth The idiomatic expression "leave a bad taste in your mouth" means to leave a lingering negative feeling or impression after experiencing something. It is often used to describe a situation, event, or encounter that was unpleasant, disappointing, or morally objectionable, which leaves the individual feeling displeased, uncomfortable, or dissatisfied.
  • leave a bad taste in sm's mouth The idiom "leave a bad taste in someone's mouth" means to create a negative or unpleasant impression on someone. It refers to an experience or situation that leaves someone with an unfavorable or bitter feeling. It can be used when discussing anything that causes a sense of disappointment, disgust, dissatisfaction, or discomfort.
  • in tatters The idiom "in tatters" refers to something that is severely damaged, ruined, or destroyed. It suggests that the object or situation described is in a state of disarray, disintegration, or complete disrepair.
  • in good company The idiom "in good company" means being in the company of respectable, accomplished, or esteemed individuals or entities. It suggests that one is among others who are esteemed or recognized for their achievements or qualities.
  • compete in sth The idiom "compete in something" means to participate or engage in a competition or contest, usually against others who also seek to achieve a similar goal. It implies striving to outperform or surpass competitors in order to attain success, recognition, or a desired outcome.
  • tempest in a teacup The idiom "tempest in a teacup" means making a big fuss or commotion over a trivial or insignificant matter. It implies an overreaction or disproportionate response to a minor issue, similar to a storm or tempest occurring within the small confines of a teacup.
  • a tempest in a teapot The idiom "a tempest in a teapot" means a situation or event that is exaggerated or blown out of proportion, and is of little actual importance or consequence. It implies that the issue at hand is relatively insignificant compared to the level of attention or agitation it is receiving.
  • It'll end in tears The idiom "It'll end in tears" is used to indicate that a course of action, decision, or situation is likely to result in negative or unfortunate consequences. It suggests that the situation will not end well and that there will be emotional distress or disappointment involved.
  • in tears The idiom "in tears" means to be crying or deeply emotional, often due to sadness, frustration, or overwhelming joy.
  • in the first place and in the first instance The idiom "in the first place" or "in the first instance" is used to refer to the initial or original situation or circumstance. It emphasizes the beginning or starting point of a discussion, argument, or action.
  • in the first place The idiom "in the first place" is used to refer to something that was initially stated, mentioned, or done, highlighting its importance or relevance. It indicates going back to the beginning or original point of discussion or consideration.
  • kick in the pants The idiom "kick in the pants" refers to an action, event, or circumstance that provides motivation, encouragement, or a wake-up call to someone who is not feeling motivated or is being complacent. It is usually used to describe something or someone that inspires or invigorates another person to take action or make a change.
  • in the teeth of The idiom "in the teeth of" refers to a situation where one confronts or faces difficulties, challenges, or opposition head-on, without flinching or backing down. It implies a fearless and determined approach in the face of adversity.
  • fly in the face of The idiom "fly in the face of" means to directly oppose or contradict something, especially when it goes against common sense or established beliefs. It often refers to an action or behavior that defies expectations or conventional wisdom.
  • cut teeth in The idiom "cut teeth in" typically refers to gaining initial experience or learning something fundamental in a particular field or area. It originates from the literal act of a baby growing their first set of teeth, which represents a crucial developmental phase. In the context of the idiom, it implies that an individual has acquired essential skills or knowledge through their early experiences or initial practice in a specific domain.
  • a kick in the teeth The idiom "a kick in the teeth" refers to a situation where someone experiences a major disappointment, setback, or betrayal, often unexpectedly. It conveys a sense of being deeply hurt, let down, or mistreated, similar to the feeling one might have after being kicked in the teeth forcefully.
  • telephone sth in (to sm) The idiom "telephone something in (to someone)" means to do something with little effort, care, or enthusiasm. It implies that the action was done hastily or without much thought or attention to detail. It originates from the notion of making a phone call quickly and without much effort or preparation.
  • in good conscience The idiom "in good conscience" refers to a situation or decision made while adhering to one's moral or ethical principles. It implies that one can justify their actions or beliefs without any guilt or reservation.
  • in (all) good conscience The idiom "in (all) good conscience" is used to express that someone cannot morally or ethically do something because it conflicts with their principles or values. It implies that one feels a sense of guilt or disapproval when considering the action in question.
  • in consequence (of sth) The idiom "in consequence (of sth)" means as a result or as a direct outcome of something. It indicates that an event, action, or situation occurred due to a specific cause or reason.
  • not have a chance in hell The idiom "not have a chance in hell" means that something or someone has no possibility or likelihood of succeeding or achieving a desired outcome. It emphasizes a very remote or unrealistic chance of success.
  • have a snowball's chance in hell The idiom "have a snowball's chance in hell" is used to describe a situation or possibility that is highly unlikely or improbable. It implies that the chances of success or favorable outcome are close to impossible, similar to a snowball surviving in the extreme heat of Hell.
  • have a chance in hell The idiom "have a chance in hell" is used to express extreme improbability or the lack of any realistic possibility for something to occur. It suggests that the likelihood of success or achievement is almost non-existent, comparing it to the slim chances one might have in the fiery and inhospitable realm of hell.
  • channel sth in The idiom "channel something in" refers to the act of directing or focusing a particular quality, emotion, energy, or talent towards a specific purpose or goal. It involves harnessing and utilizing something, typically inner resources or abilities, in a controlled and productive manner.
  • in character The idiom "in character" refers to someone behaving or acting in a way that is consistent with their usual personality, role, or behavior. It implies that the person is displaying their true nature or remaining true to a particular role or persona.
  • in charge (of sth) The idiom "in charge (of something)" refers to a situation where someone is given responsibility, authority, or control over a particular task, project, organization, or group of people. It suggests that the person has the power or the role to make decisions, give directions, and oversee the overall management or operations of the specified entity.
  • in charge (of sm or sth) The idiom "in charge (of sm or sth)" refers to a person having authority, responsibility, or control over someone or something. It implies that the individual is the leader, manager, or supervisor in a given situation or organization.
  • charge in (to sm place) The idiom "charge in (to sm place)" means to enter a place or situation with great energy, enthusiasm, or confidence. It often implies acting impulsively or forcefully, without considering the consequences or potential obstacles.
  • in terms of sth The idiom "in terms of something" refers to expressing or discussing something in relation to a particular aspect or perspective. It is often used to provide a framework or context for understanding or evaluating a subject.
  • in no uncertain terms The idiom "in no uncertain terms" means to express something very clearly and without any ambiguity or doubt. It emphasizes that the message is being conveyed in a direct and assertive manner.
  • in the long/medium/short term The idiom "in the long/medium/short term" refers to a specific period of time within which events, consequences, or effects are expected or anticipated to occur. The duration of each term can be subjective and can vary depending on the context in which it is used. - In the long term: Generally refers to an extended period of time, often years or decades, during which actions, decisions, or changes may yield significant results or consequences. - In the medium term: Typically signifies a time frame of a few months to a few years, where actions, decisions, or changes may start to show visible outcomes or consequences. - In the short term: Implies a relatively brief period, often a few days to several months, in
  • a contradiction in terms The idiom "a contradiction in terms" refers to a phrase or expression that combines or suggests conflicting ideas, concepts, or qualities, making it logically or linguistically incorrect. It implies that the words used together contradict each other, representing an incompatible or nonsensical combination.
  • in glowing terms The idiom "in glowing terms" means to speak or write about something in a highly positive, enthusiastic, and admiring manner. It implies using words and expressions that convey a strong sense of praise, admiration, or adulation.
  • contradiction in terms The idiom "contradiction in terms" refers to a phrase or a combination of words that inherently contradicts or conflicts with each other in meaning or logic. It is often used to describe a statement or a concept that cannot logically or practically exist due to its contradictory elements.
  • chase sm (or an animal) in(to) sm place The idiom "chase someone (or an animal) into some place" means to pursue or force someone or something to enter a specific location or area, typically in a persistent or determined manner.
  • look in The idiom "look in" or "have a look in" means to investigate or search within a particular place or source for something, usually in a casual or informal manner. It suggests taking a quick glance or inspection to find or discover something specific.
  • keep in check The idiom "keep in check" means to control, restrain, or prevent something or someone from getting out of control or exceeding limits. It implies the act of monitoring or managing a particular situation, behavior, or condition to maintain stability or prevent negative consequences.
  • in check The idiom "in check" typically means to be under control or restrained, usually in a negative or harmful situation. It refers to keeping someone or something in a manageable or limited state, preventing them from causing trouble or becoming uncontrollable.
  • hold in check The idiom "hold in check" means to control or restrain someone or something, often to prevent them from causing harm or becoming excessive. It implies keeping someone's actions, behavior, emotions, or desires under control in order to maintain order or balance.
  • check in The idiom "check in" typically means to register one's arrival at a particular place, such as a hotel, airport, or event. It involves providing necessary details or documentation to confirm one's presence and possibly receive further instructions or assistance.
  • test sm in sth The idiom "test someone in something" typically means to evaluate or assess someone's knowledge, skills, or abilities in a particular area or subject. It refers to the act of examining someone's aptitude or proficiency by giving them a task, challenge, or examination related to that specific field of expertise.
  • (with) tongue in cheek The idiom "(with) tongue in cheek" means to speak or write something in a lighthearted or joking manner, often with a hint of sarcasm or irony. It suggests that the statement should not be taken seriously, and the speaker is not being completely sincere or genuine.
  • It'll be a cold day in hell The idiom "It'll be a cold day in hell" is used to express extreme skepticism or doubt about the possibility of something ever happening. It implies that the scenario or event being discussed is highly unlikely, to the point that even a place as inherently hot as hell freezing over would happen sooner.
  • go to hell in a handbasket The idiom "go to hell in a handbasket" means to undergo a rapid decline or deterioration in a situation that is heading towards disaster or failure. It implies that things are worsening quickly and are beyond redemption.
  • run around like a chicken with its head cut off and run (around) in circles The idiom "run around like a chicken with its head cut off" means to behave in a frenzied, chaotic, or aimless manner, often due to feeling stressed, panicked, or disorganized. It suggests a lack of control or direction in one's actions and highlights a state of confusion or agitation. Similarly, the idiom "run (around) in circles" conveys a similar meaning of engaging in pointless or repetitive activities without making any progress or achieving a desired outcome. It implies a cycle of futile actions or efforts, often resulting in frustration or a sense of being stuck. Both idioms emphasize the idea of ineffective or purposeless behavior.
  • be like a child in a sweetshop The idiom "be like a child in a sweetshop" refers to a person being extremely excited, overwhelmed, or filled with joy about a particular situation or opportunity, similar to the way a child would feel upon entering a sweetshop (candy store) with a wide variety of treats to choose from. It implies a sense of pure delight or eagerness.
  • in theory The idiom "in theory" refers to a situation or concept that is considered to be possible or logical according to established principles or rules, but may not always work or be practical in reality. It suggests that something sounds good in concept, but may be challenging to execute or may not yield the expected results when put into action.
  • chime in The idiom "chime in" means to join or contribute to a conversation or discussion, usually by speaking up or giving one's opinion or input.
  • chime in (with sth) The idiom "chime in (with sth)" means to join or interject into a conversation or discussion, typically by expressing one's thoughts or opinions on a particular topic. It implies contributing or adding to the ongoing conversation.
  • be up to your ears/eyeballs/eyes in sth The idiom "be up to your ears/eyeballs/eyes in something" means to be extremely busy or overwhelmed with a particular task, duty, or responsibility. It implies that the person is fully occupied or involved to the point where they are completely surrounded by or immersed in the given situation or work.
  • couch sth in sth The idiom "couch something in something" means to express or communicate something in a particular way, usually with specific wording or language, in order to make it more acceptable, understandable, or persuasive to others. It implies choosing specific words or phrases to convey a certain message or idea in a deliberate manner.
  • count me in The expression "count me in" is an idiomatic phrase used to express one's willingness or eagerness to participate or be included in something. It can be used to show agreement with a proposed plan, invitation, or activity.
  • count in The idiom "count in" typically means to include or incorporate someone or something as part of a group, plan, decision, or calculation. It implies that the person or thing has been taken into account or considered. It can also refer to assigning importance to someone or something.
  • Close only counts in horseshoes "Close only counts in horseshoes" is an idiom expressing that being almost successful or close to achieving a goal is not good enough; only achieving the goal fully or completely matters. It emphasizes the importance of actually reaching the intended outcome rather than coming close but falling short.
  • in the thick of it The idiom "in the thick of it" means to be deeply involved or immersed in a difficult or challenging situation. It is often used to describe being in the middle of a complicated task, a chaotic event, or a demanding situation that requires one's full attention and engagement.
  • be in the thick of sth The idiom "be in the thick of something" means to be fully involved or deeply immersed in a particular situation or activity. It implies being in the midst of an intense or active part of something, typically referring to a challenging or demanding situation. It suggests being heavily engaged or directly experiencing the effects, difficulties, or excitement of a particular event or endeavor.
  • be in fighting trim The idiom "be in fighting trim" means to be physically and mentally prepared or in optimal condition for a challenging or competitive situation, often referring to being ready for a fight or a difficult task. It implies being well-prepared, confident, and in one's best form to handle any obstacles or confrontations.
  • chip in (sth) The idiom "chip in (sth)" means to contribute or give money, effort, or assistance towards a collective goal or task, typically with a group of people. It implies joining others in pooling resources or sharing responsibilities to achieve a common objective.
  • be in the chips The idiom "be in the chips" means to have a lot of money or be wealthy. It suggests that someone is financially secure or successful.
  • in the chips The idiom "in the chips" means to be wealthy, prosperous, or financially successful.
  • chip in (with sth) (on sth) (for sm) The idiom "chip in (with sth) (on sth) (for sm)" means to contribute or donate something, typically money, effort, or resources, towards a particular cause or goal. It implies the act of collaborating and collectively pooling resources to achieve a shared objective or help someone in need.
  • chip in The idiom "chip in" means to contribute or donate something, typically money, towards a common goal or expense, especially when many other people are also making contributions. It implies a collective effort or sharing of resources to achieve a shared objective.
  • the in thing The idiom "the in thing" refers to something that is currently fashionable, popular, or trendy. It describes an activity, object, or trend that is widely embraced or sought after by a particular group of people at a given time.
  • in the swim of things The idiom "in the swim of things" means to be actively involved or engaged in the current situations, events, or activities happening around you.
  • in the grand scheme of things "In the grand scheme of things" is an idiom that means considering or understanding the overall or big picture perspective of a situation or event. It emphasizes the idea that something is relatively insignificant or unimportant when viewed in the context of larger or more significant issues or goals.
  • get in the swing of things The idiom "get in the swing of things" means to become accustomed to or comfortable with a new situation, activity, or routine. It implies getting into a rhythm or flow of performing tasks or engaging in an endeavor successfully.
  • in due course The idiom "in due course" means at the appropriate or expected time; when it is suitable or natural for something to happen.
  • take a course (in sth) The idiom "take a course (in sth)" typically refers to the act of enrolling and participating in a formal or structured program of study to acquire knowledge and skills in a specific subject or field.
  • crash course (in sth) The idiom "crash course (in sth)" refers to an intensive and brief period of learning or instruction in a particular subject or skill. It implies a fast-paced and condensed educational experience or training that aims to provide a basic understanding or mastery of the topic within a short period of time.
  • the ball is in your court The idiom "the ball is in your court" means that it is now someone's responsibility or turn to take action or make a decision in a particular situation. It suggests that the person has control or power in determining the next move or course of action.
  • get/have your day in court The idiom "get/have your day in court" refers to the opportunity for an individual to present their case, arguments, or evidence before a court of law. It implies that someone will have a fair and formal chance to argue their side of a legal matter and seek justice in the legal system.
  • the ball is in sm's court The idiom "the ball is in sm's court" means that it is someone else's responsibility or turn to take an action or make a decision in a particular situation. It implies that the person being referred to has the initiative or control, and it is now up to them to act or respond.
  • have the ball in one's court To have the ball in one's court means to have the responsibility or the power to take the next action or make a decision in a particular situation.
  • chisel in (on sm or sth) The idiom "chisel in (on someone or something)" is used to describe the act of intruding or interrupting in a situation where one is not welcomed or invited. It typically implies interfering in someone's conversation, plans, or business dealings without permission or invitation.
  • cover sm in sth The idiom "cover someone in something" typically means to completely drench or saturate someone with an amount of something, often a substance or material. It can also be used metaphoricall
  • a thorn in sb's/sth's side The idiom "a thorn in someone's or something's side" refers to a person or thing that causes continuous irritation, annoyance, or difficulty. It typically describes someone or something that poses a persistent and bothersome problem or obstacle.
  • be a thorn in sb's flesh/side The idiom "be a thorn in someone's flesh/side" refers to being a continuous source of annoyance, irritation, or trouble to someone. It means to be a persistent problem or difficulty that causes frustration or discomfort.
  • crawl in To "crawl in" is an idiomatic expression that means to retreat or withdraw from a situation or to seek solace and comfort in a private or secluded place. It refers to the act of physically or metaphorically moving into a cocoon-like state for relaxation, reflection, or escape from the outside world.
  • lost in thought The idiom "lost in thought" refers to a state where someone is deeply engrossed in one's own thoughts, oblivious to their surroundings or what is happening around them. It implies a state of deep contemplation, often leading to absent-mindedness or daydreaming.
  • one in a thousand The idiom "one in a thousand" refers to someone or something that is exceptionally rare, unique, or outstanding. It implies that the person, object, or situation being described is distinctive and stands out from the rest due to its exceptional quality or rarity.
  • Not in a thousand years! and Never in a thousand years! The idiom "Not in a thousand years!" and "Never in a thousand years!" are expressions used to convey a strong assertion of disbelief or refusal regarding the possibility of a particular event or outcome happening. It emphasizes that the mentioned scenario is highly unlikely, if not completely impossible, to occur within an extended period of time.
  • in chorus The idiom "in chorus" means to speak or sing in unison, or to have a group of people collectively express the same opinion, sentiment, or response. It suggests a unified and synchronized action or expression.
  • creep in (to sth) The idiom "creep in (to sth)" means to enter or infiltrate something gradually, often unnoticed or without detection. It refers to the gradual and stealthy intrusion of a person, idea, influence, or a certain behavior into a particular situation or setting.
  • cry in beer The idiom "cry in beer" refers to a feeling of deep sadness or disappointment while drinking or drowning one's sorrows in alcohol. It suggests a sense of despair or frustration that leads to seeking solace in alcoholic beverages.
  • a lump in your throat The idiom "a lump in your throat" is used to describe an intense emotional feeling, usually arising from sadness, nostalgia, or the inability to express one's emotions. It refers to the physical sensation of tightness or discomfort in the throat, often accompanied by difficulty swallowing or speaking due to the overwhelming emotions experienced.
  • stick in your gullet/throat The idiom "stick in your gullet/throat" refers to a situation or statement that is difficult, uncomfortable, or impossible to swallow or accept. It implies that something is causing a strong emotional or physical reaction, making it hard to process or digest.
  • have one's words stick in one's throat The idiom "have one's words stick in one's throat" means to be unable to speak or articulate something because of extreme shock, embarrassment, or disbelief. It implies a feeling of being overwhelmed or rendered speechless due to a situation or revelation.
  • be in the throes of sth/doing sth The idiom "be in the throes of something/doing something" means to be deeply involved or immersed in a certain state, activity, or situation, usually a difficult or intense one. It implies being in the midst of or experiencing something challenging, powerful, or chaotic.
  • throng in(to sth) The idiom "throng in(to sth)" is used to describe a large number of people or objects that enter or gather in a place simultaneously or eagerly. It implies a crowded and bustling scenario where there is an overwhelming presence or movement of individuals or things.
  • cruise around in sth The idiom "cruise around in something" refers to the act of leisurely driving, sailing, or roaming around in a vehicle or vessel, typically for enjoyment or recreation. It implies traveling with no specific destination or purpose, often to relax, explore, or have a casual experience.
  • poke a hole in The idiom "poke a hole in" means to find a flaw or weakness in someone's argument, theory, or plan. It refers to the act of exposing a substantial problem or error that greatly impacts the viability or credibility of something. It suggests that the flaw is made visible or evident, just like puncturing or creating a hole in an object.
  • throw in with The idiom "throw in with" means to join or align oneself with a group or cause, often for shared interests or common goals. It implies making a commitment or showing support towards a particular party, either by providing help, cooperating, or advocating for their beliefs or actions.
  • throw in the sponge The idiom "throw in the sponge" means to give up or surrender, usually in a challenging or difficult situation. It is derived from boxing, where a cornerman throws a sponge into the ring as a sign of surrender or defeat, indicating that the fighter will no longer continue.
  • throw in hand
  • throw in face
  • throw in at the deep end The idiom "throw in at the deep end" refers to throwing someone into a difficult or challenging situation without any preparation or guidance. It is often used to describe being thrown into a task or responsibility that one is unprepared for, forcing them to quickly adapt and learn on their own.
  • throw in The idiom "throw in" means to add something extra to an offer or deal, often as a bonus or an incentive. It can also refer to giving up or surrendering.
  • throw hands up in horror The idiom "throw hands up in horror" is often used to express a strong and exaggerated reaction of dismay or shock. It originates from the physical action of throwing one's hands up in the air as a sign of disbelief or fright. It conveys a sense of complete surprise or outrage in response to something shocking or disturbing.
  • throw back in face The idiom "throw back in face" means to remind someone of a past mistake or failure in a way that is intended to embarrass or humiliate them. It involves using someone's previous actions against them in an argument or as a means of belittling them.
  • throw a monkey wrench in the works The idiom "throw a monkey wrench in the works" means to create a problem or obstacle that disrupts a plan or process, causing delays or difficulties. It refers to the action of literally throwing a tool, specifically a wrench, into a machine, which would cause it to stop working properly. Therefore, using this idiom implies intentionally or unintentionally causing a disruption or hindrance in a situation.
  • put a spanner in the works The idiom "put a spanner in the works" means to cause disruption or hinder progress in a planned activity, project, or process. It refers to an unexpected obstacle or problem that causes a delay or prevents the smooth execution of something. The term "spanner" refers to a tool used to tighten or loosen bolts, but in this context, it symbolizes an interference that interrupts the normal functioning of a system or plan.
  • in the drink The idiom "in the drink" typically refers to someone or something being in a body of water, usually unintentionally or unexpectedly. It can be used metaphorically to indicate a situation or object being submerged, lost, or ruined.
  • put in/stick in your two penn'orth The idiom "put in/stick in your two penn'orth" means to offer your opinion or contribute your thoughts, even if it may not be particularly valuable or relevant to the discussion. It implies that you feel the need to express your viewpoint, regardless of its significance. The phrase is derived from the British slang term "two penn'orth," which refers to two pence worth or a small amount of value.
  • chuck it in The idiom "chuck it in" means to give up or abandon something, often referring to a task, activity, or project. It implies a lack of interest, motivation, or willingness to continue or complete something.
  • crowd in(to) sm place The idiom "crowd in(to) a small place" refers to a situation where a large number of people or objects are tightly packed or squeezed into a limited or confined space. It implies a lack of sufficient space for all the people or objects, resulting in discomfort, congestion, or a feeling of being cramped.
  • crowd in (on sm or sth) The idiom "crowd in (on someone or something)" refers to a situation where many people gather around or encroach upon someone or something, usually causing difficulty or making it crowded. It implies that there is limited space, resources, or attention, and the excessive presence of others creates a sense of congestion or intrusion.
  • crowd sm or sth in(to) sth The idiom "crowd someone or something into something" means to forcefully or overcrowd someone or something into a limited space or area. It often implies pushing or squeezing in to an extent that could be uncomfortable or impractical.
  • be in your cups The idiom "be in your cups" means to be under the influence of alcohol, typically to the point of being drunk or intoxicated. It implies that someone has consumed enough alcoholic beverages to impair their judgment or behavior.
  • in one's cups The idiom "in one's cups" refers to being intoxicated or drunk, usually after consuming alcoholic beverages.
  • go around/round in circles The idiom "go around/round in circles" means to keep discussing or doing something without making any progress or coming to a resolution. It implies that one is repeating the same arguments or actions without achieving a desired outcome. It can also indicate getting caught in a never-ending loop of confusion or being unable to make a decision.
  • go (a)round in circles The idiom "go (a)round in circles" means to engage in pointless or unproductive discussions or activities where no progress is made. It refers to a situation where people or things keep coming back to the same point or topic without any advancement or resolution.
  • have your fingers/hand in the till The idiom "have your fingers/hand in the till" means to embezzle or steal money, especially by someone who has unauthorized access to the funds. It refers to a person secretly using their position or authority to improperly take money for personal gain.
  • have one's hand in the till The idiom "have one's hand in the till" means to be stealing or embezzling money, especially from the funds of an organization or company that one is responsible for. It refers to the act of illicitly taking money from the cash register or other sources of income.
  • waste no time in The idiom "waste no time in" means to act or proceed immediately without delay or hesitation.
  • time in The idiomatic phrase "time in" typically refers to the act of officially clocking in or recording one's presence at work, school, or any specific event at a specified time. It implies the commencement of one's duty, activity, or attendance.
  • spend time in The idiom "spend time in" means to occupy oneself or be present in a particular place or situation for a period of time. It can refer to spending time in any location, such as a specific city, country, or even a particular room or establishment. Additionally, it can also imply being involved or engaged in a specific activity, task, or experience.
  • put an amount of time in on The idiom "put an amount of time in on" means to spend a specific duration of time or make an effort to work on or devote to a task, project, or activity. It implies investing time and effort to complete or make progress on something.
  • lost in the mists of time The idiom "lost in the mists of time" refers to something that has disappeared or been forgotten due to the passage of a significant amount of time. It implies that the details, origins, or knowledge related to a particular event, person, or thing have become obscured or indistinct, making it difficult or impossible to ascertain the truth or accurately recall the past.
  • legend in own time The idiom "legend in own time" refers to a person who is highly celebrated, revered, or acknowledged for their exceptional skills, achievements, or contributions while they are still alive. This phrase implies that their remarkable status and reputation are recognized and praised by others during their lifetime.
  • just in time The idiom "just in time" refers to something happening or being done at the last possible moment, often to avoid a negative outcome or to maximize efficiency. It suggests that something or someone arrives or is available exactly when needed, without any excess or wasted time. The concept is often associated with supply chain management or production processes, where materials or products are delivered or produced in a timely manner to minimize inventory and costs.
  • invest time in The idiom "invest time in" means to allocate or dedicate one's time and effort towards a particular activity or endeavor with the intention of achieving a desired outcome or result. It implies a level of commitment and devotion to something by giving it the necessary time and attention it requires.
  • in time The idiom "in time" means within the specified or appropriate duration, at a later point, or eventually.
  • in the wrong place at the wrong time The idiom "in the wrong place at the wrong time" is used to describe a situation where someone happens to be in an unfortunate or dangerous position or moment, usually resulting in negative consequences or outcomes. It implies that the person's presence or timing was unlucky or ill-fated in that particular situation.
  • in spare time The idiom "in spare time" refers to the time available or left over after completing necessary tasks or responsibilities. It represents the moments when a person is not busy with work, duties, or obligations and can engage in activities of personal interest or relaxation.
  • in nothing flat The idiom "in nothing flat" means to accomplish or complete something very quickly or in a very short amount of time. It implies that the action happens almost instantly or without any delay.
  • in no time The idiom "in no time" means to do something very quickly, without wasting any time or effort.
  • in next to no time The idiom "in next to no time" means to do something very quickly, almost instantly, or in a very short amount of time.
  • in less than no time The idiom "in less than no time" means to do something very quickly or in a very short amount of time. It suggests that the action or event takes place so rapidly that it feels like it happens even before any time has passed.
  • in due time The idiom "in due time" commonly refers to the idea that something will happen or be accomplished at the appropriate or expected time. It implies that one must exercise patience and allow things to unfold naturally or as scheduled.
  • haven't seen you in a long time The idiom "haven't seen you in a long time" is used to express the fact that it has been a significant period since the person last encountered or had contact with the individual they are addressing. It is typically used to imply the mutual absence or lack of communication between the two parties.
  • A stitch in time The idiom "A stitch in time" means taking immediate action or making a small effort to fix a problem or prevent it from becoming worse in the future. It emphasizes the importance of promptly addressing issues before they escalate or lead to more significant consequences.
  • in tune with the times The idiom "in tune with the times" refers to being updated, aware of, or in agreement with the current trends, attitudes, or demands of contemporary society or a specific period. It suggests being well-adapted and responsive to the prevailing cultural, social, or technological changes and developments.
  • in times past The idiom "in times past" refers to a period of time that occurred or existed before the present moment. It suggests nostalgia or reminiscing about the past, often implying that the past was better or different from the current situation.
  • keep a civil tongue (in one's head) The idiom "keep a civil tongue (in one's head)" means to speak politely and refrain from using rude or offensive language. It suggests maintaining a respectful and courteous manner of communication.
  • clap sm in(to) sm place The idiom "clap someone/something in(to) some place" typically means to put or place someone or something forcefully or abruptly into a specific location. It often implies a quick and forceful action, usually without much regard for gentleness or caution.
  • in a class by itself The idiom "in a class by itself" means that something or someone is unique, exceptional, or unparalleled in comparison to others of the same kind or category. The phrase suggests that the subject stands out and is incomparable to others due to its exceptional qualities or characteristics.
  • pop in The idiom "pop in" means to make a brief and unexpected visit or stop by someone's place without a prior arrangement.
  • in token of sth The idiom "in token of something" means to show or express something as a sign, symbol, or gesture of a specific sentiment or occasion. It can be a way of indicating appreciation, gratitude, respect, or recognition.
  • in the clear The idiom "in the clear" means to be free from danger, trouble, or uncertainty. It suggests a state of being safe, secure, and without any obstacles or difficulties.
  • keep a civil tongue in head The idiom "keep a civil tongue in one's head" means to speak politely and respectfully, maintaining a calm and courteous manner of communication.
  • don't have a pot to piss in (or a window to throw it out of) The idiom "don't have a pot to piss in (or a window to throw it out of)" is a colloquial expression used to describe extreme poverty or financial destitution. It implies that someone lacks basic resources or possessions, to the point where they don't even have a basic pot for personal needs or a window to dispose of waste. This idiom highlights a state of absolute lack and suggests the person's desperate circumstances.
  • tool around (in sth) The idiom "tool around (in sth)" means to casually or aimlessly drive, ride, or move around in a vehicle or some form of transportation without a particular purpose or destination. It often implies a relaxed or leisurely manner of travel.
  • pound sm's head in The idiom "pound someone's head in" typically means to physically or figuratively attack or overwhelm someone with force or aggression. It suggests a violent or forceful action that can cause severe damage or defeat.
  • pour in The idiom "pour in" typically means that a large quantity of something is coming or arriving quickly and all at once.
  • long in the tooth The idiom "long in the tooth" is used to describe someone or something as being old or aging. It originated from the practice of determining a horse's age by examining changes in the length of its teeth over time.
  • in practice The idiom "in practice" refers to the actual implementation, execution, or real-life application of something, especially when it differs from the intended or theoretical approach. It indicates the way things work or are done in reality, as opposed to how they are supposed to be done in theory.
  • in top form The idiom "in top form" refers to someone or something being in excellent physical or mental condition, typically performing at the highest level of ability or capacity. It implies that a person or thing is functioning at their very best and is at the peak of their performance or capabilities.
  • clock in The idiom "clock in" means to record or officially register one's arrival or beginning of work, typically by punching a time clock or using a digital system. It is commonly used to refer to the act of formally starting one's work shift or entering work premises.
  • clock sm in The idiom "clock sm in" refers to completing or finishing something within a very tight or limited timeframe, typically just before a deadline. It implies accomplishing a task or meeting a requirement at the last possible moment.
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