How Do You Spell IT?

Pronunciation: [ˈɪt] (IPA)

The word "It" is a two-letter word that is commonly used in English sentences. The spelling of this word is straightforward: it is spelled with the letters "I" and "T". In IPA phonetic transcription, the word is represented as /ɪt/. The first sound /ɪ/ is the short vowel sound for "i", while the second sound /t/ is the voiceless alveolar plosive sound for "t". This simple word may seem insignificant, but it serves an essential function in sentence construction by indicating the subject or object of a sentence.

IT Meaning and Definition

It is a pronoun used to refer to an inanimate object, a animal or an abstract concept that has been previously mentioned or is easily identified by the context. It is a neutral pronoun, which means it does not refer to a specific gender.

In addition to referring to objects and animals, it can also be used to represent a situation, an event, or a state of affairs. It often functions as a subject or object in a sentence, or as a placeholder for a noun.

The use of "it" as a pronoun is integral in maintaining clarity and coherence in both written and spoken language. It helps avoid repetition and provides a concise way to refer to the subject or object of a sentence.

"It" is a versatile word that can be used in various ways. For example, in the sentence "It is raining," the word "it" is used to refer to the weather conditions. Similarly, in the sentence "I saw a bird, and it was singing," "it" is the pronoun that represents the bird mentioned earlier.

Overall, "it" is a pronoun that allows individuals to refer back to a previously mentioned or easily identifiable object, animal, concept, situation, event, or state of affairs in a concise and gender-neutral manner.

Top Common Misspellings for IT *

  • iit 10.03367%
  • ot 7.6767676%
  • iot 3.6363636%
  • itt 3.4343434%
  • eit 2.9629629%
  • itr 2.9629629%
  • ity 2.8282828%
  • lt 2.6936026%
  • iti 2.020202%
  • iy 1.8181818%
  • oit 1.6835016%
  • iut 1.5488215%
  • uit 1.2794612%
  • ist 1.1447811%
  • irt 0.9427609%
  • int 0.8080808%
  • iyt 0.6734006%
  • ith 0.4713804%
  • git 0.4713804%
  • ita 0.4713804%
  • ilt 0.4040404%
  • itw 0.3367003%
  • itl 0.3367003%
  • ito 0.3367003%
  • iw 0.3367003%
  • itg 0.2693602%
  • ict 0.2693602%
  • ait 0.2020202%
  • ift 0.2020202%
  • itd 0.1346801%
  • itn 0.1346801%
  • iat 0.1346801%
  • itv 0.1346801%
  • ioit 0.1346801%
  • ipt 0.1346801%
  • ite 0.06734%
  • st 0.06734%
  • jt 0.06734%
  • itm 0.06734%

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for IT

Etymology of IT

The word "it" originates from Middle English, where it was spelled as "hit". It later evolved from the Old English word "hit" or "hitt", which meant "that" or "this". It can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic word "hit" and the Proto-Indo-European root "ḱi", both of which had similar meanings. Over time, the spelling and pronunciation of "hit" changed, eventually becoming "it" in Modern English.

Idioms with the word IT

  • rub sb's nose in it The idiom "rub sb's nose in it" means to intentionally remind or emphasize someone's mistake, humiliation, or failure in order to make them feel even worse about it. It often involves continuously reminding someone of their past errors or making them feel guilty for their actions.
  • make it a rule The idiom "make it a rule" means to establish a specific guideline or principle that should be followed consistently in a particular situation or context. It suggests implementing a firm policy or protocol to regulate behavior or actions.
  • make a run for it The idiom "make a run for it" means to sprint or flee from a place or situation quickly, often in an attempt to escape or avoid capture or trouble.
  • play (it) safe The idiom "play (it) safe" means to take cautious and conservative actions in order to avoid risk, harm, or potential negative consequences. It refers to making choices or decisions that prioritize safety and minimize chances of failure or danger.
  • you said it! The idiom "you said it!" is used to express complete agreement or affirmation with something that has been previously stated. It emphasizes strong agreement and conveys that the speaker fully agrees with and supports the statement made by someone else.
  • it all amounts/comes to the same thing The idiom "it all amounts/comes to the same thing" means that different actions or choices may lead to the same outcome or result. It suggests that despite the appearance of variety or divergence, ultimately, the final result or consequence remains unchanged.
  • does what it says on the tin The idiom "does what it says on the tin" means that something performs or functions exactly as its name or description implies, without any hidden or unexpected elements. It is commonly used to convey that a product or service delivers exactly what it promises, leaving no room for doubt or disappointment.
  • it goes without saying The idiom "it goes without saying" means that something is very obvious or self-evident, and therefore does not need to be explicitly mentioned or stated.
  • it says a lot for sb/sth The idiom "it says a lot for sb/sth" means that something or someone's actions or characteristics reveal important information or reflect positively on their qualities or abilities. It implies that the subject has provided evidence or shown attributes that are highly commendable or noteworthy.
  • suffice (it) to say The definition of the idiom "suffice (it) to say" is: to indicate that the statement or information following is enough or adequate, implying that further details are unnecessary or redundant.
  • suck it and see The idiom "suck it and see" means to try something out or experiment with an idea to see if it will be successful or satisfactory, without having any prior knowledge or certainty about its outcome. It implies taking a risk or giving something a chance before making a judgment or decision.
  • believe sth when you see it The idiom "believe something when you see it" means that one will only accept or trust information or claims after witnessing evidence or proof firsthand. It implies a skeptical or cautious approach towards accepting something as true or real without tangible verification.
  • it remains to be seen The idiom "it remains to be seen" is used to express uncertainty or ambiguity about a particular outcome or outcome. It implies that the answer or resolution to a situation or question is still unknown and cannot be determined or predicted at the present moment.
  • pile it high and sell it cheap The idiom "pile it high and sell it cheap" refers to a business strategy of offering a large quantity of goods or products at low prices in order to attract customers and generate high sales volumes. This phrase suggests the emphasis on quantity and affordability over quality or exclusivity.
  • if the shoe fits (wear it), at if the cap fits, wear it The idiom "if the shoe fits (wear it), or if the cap fits, wear it" means that if something said or implied applies to you, then you should accept it or acknowledge it, even if it might be uncomfortable or critical. It suggests taking ownership or accepting responsibility for a particular description or characterization that may be directed at oneself.
  • the long and the short of it The idiom "the long and the short of it" means to convey the essential and concise information or the main point of something. It is often used to summarize or conclude a discussion, story, or explanation by providing a clear and straightforward account of the most important details.
  • shove it The idiom "shove it" is an informal expression that means to forcefully reject or disregard something or someone in a dismissive and sometimes angry manner. It is often used as a rude or vulgar way to express frustration, dissatisfaction, or defiance.
  • that's about the size of it The idiom "that's about the size of it" means that something is described or explained accurately and concisely. It indicates that the previous statement or description provided is the most appropriate or complete understanding of a situation or issue.
  • any way you slice it The idiom "any way you slice it" means that no matter how a situation is examined or viewed, the outcome or conclusion remains the same. It emphasizes that there are no alternate perspectives or interpretations that can change the final result.
  • no matter how you slice it, at any way you slice it The idiom "no matter how you slice it" or "at any way you slice it" means that regardless of how a situation is analyzed or viewed, the outcome or conclusion remains the same. It implies that no matter how you try to interpret or break down a particular issue or topic, the result will be consistent and unchanged.
  • put/stick that in your pipe and smoke it! The idiom "put/stick that in your pipe and smoke it!" is a strong and confrontational expression that is used to assertively inform someone to accept or acknowledge a fact or a piece of information, often in a boastful or mocking manner. It implies that the person being addressed should think about the information or opinion given and accept it as true, regardless of their own beliefs or preferences. This idiom is typically used to emphasize a point or to triumphantly establish one's superiority in an argument or disagreement.
  • be past it The idiom "be past it" is used to describe someone or something as being too old or no longer capable of performing a certain task or function. It suggests that the person or thing has reached a stage where their skills, abilities, or relevance are diminished or outdated.
  • snap to it The idiom "snap to it" means to start working quickly and energetically, without any delay or hesitation.
  • snap it up, at snap to it To "snap it up" or "snap to it" is an idiomatic expression urging someone to act quickly or complete a task promptly and efficiently. It conveys a sense of urgency or impatience, typically used to encourage someone to speed up or be more energetic in their actions.
  • put a sock in it! The idiom "put a sock in it!" is used as a direct and sometimes rude way to tell someone to be quiet or stop talking. It is an expression that is typically used when someone's voice or words are irritating, unnecessary, or disruptive.
  • do you want to make sth/anything of it? The idiom "do you want to make something/anything of it?" typically means asking if someone is interested in turning a situation or suggestion into something more significant or meaningful, seeking their opinion or involvement. It may imply going beyond a casual remark or lighthearted comment and exploring deeper implications or consequences.
  • it takes all sorts (to make a world) The idiom "it takes all sorts (to make a world)" means that there is a variety of people in the world, with different opinions, characteristics, and behaviors, and this diversity is necessary or essential for the functioning and richness of society or the world. It emphasizes the idea that everyone is unique and contributes in their own way to the overall makeup of society.
  • grin and bear it The idiom "grin and bear it" means to endure a difficult or unpleasant situation with a smile or without complaining. It refers to the act of putting on a brave face and accepting the circumstances, despite the discomfort or adversity.
  • beat it! The idiom "beat it!" is a phrase used to tell someone to leave or go away, generally in an abrupt or forceful manner.
  • it beats me The idiom "it beats me" is a colloquial expression indicating that one does not know or understand something. It implies that the situation or question is perplexing or beyond one's comprehension.
  • what beats me, at it beats me The idiom "what beats me, beats me" is an expression used when someone is unable to understand or figure out something. It is often used to convey confusion, bewilderment, or a lack of comprehension about a particular situation or problem.
  • you've made your bed and now you must lie in it The idiom "you've made your bed and now you must lie in it" means that someone has done something to create a difficult or unfavorable situation for themselves, and they must now accept the consequences of their actions without complaining or seeking help. It emphasizes personal responsibility for the outcomes of one's choices or actions.
  • it stands to reason The idiom "it stands to reason" means that something is logical, reasonable, or evident based on the available facts or circumstances. It implies that a particular conclusion is justified or can be easily understood without further explanation.
  • step on it The idiom "step on it" means to do something more quickly, to accelerate the pace, or to hurry up. It is often used as an urgent request or command to prompt someone to move or act faster.
  • stick with it The idiom "stick with it" means to persevere or continue doing something despite difficulties, challenges, or setbacks. It refers to the act of staying committed, focused, and determined to achieve a goal or see a task through to completion, even when faced with obstacles or temptations to quit.
  • before you know it The idiom "before you know it" means that something will happen quickly or unexpectedly, without giving you much time to react or realize it. It implies that time passes by swiftly and you may not even be aware of it.
  • that's my story and I'm sticking to it The idiom "that's my story and I'm sticking to it" is typically used to affirm one's unwavering belief, explanation, or justification for a particular situation or action. It implies that regardless of any doubts or opposing opinions, the speaker stands firmly by their version of events.
  • be stretching it The idiom "be stretching it" means to exaggerate or push the limits of what is believable, acceptable, or possible. It suggests that someone is overreaching in their claims, statements, or actions.
  • strike it lucky The idiom "strike it lucky" means to unexpectedly or successfully find or achieve something valuable, desirable, or fortunate, often through luck or chance.
  • strike it rich The idiom "strike it rich" means to suddenly become very wealthy or successful, often by luck or unexpected fortune.
  • strike lucky, at strike it lucky The idiom "strike lucky" or "strike it lucky" means to unexpectedly and fortuitously experience success, good fortune, or a positive outcome in a particular situation or endeavor. It conveys the idea of stumbling upon or achieving something desirable and advantageous through luck or chance rather than deliberate effort or planning.
  • stuff it, them, you, etc. The idiom "stuff it, them, you, etc." is an expression used to convey a dismissive or defiant response, often with a hint of irritation or anger. It essentially means to tell someone or something to go away, to disregard their opinions or demands, or to be quiet. It is an abrupt way of expressing that one is unwilling to listen or comply.
  • as if it is going out of style The idiom "as if it is going out of style" means doing something excessively, quickly, or in large quantities. It implies that the action is being done to such an extent that it may not be sustainable or fashionable in the future.
  • such as it is The idiom "such as it is" is used to indicate that something is not ideal or impressive, but it is the only or existing option available. Example sentence: "I managed to fix the old car, such as it is, and it should get us to the next town."
  • sweat it out To "sweat it out" is an idiom that means to endure a difficult or uncomfortable situation with hard work, perseverance, or patience until a desired outcome is achieved or a problem is resolved. It implies a determination to persist through tough circumstances, often accompanied by physical or mental exertion.
  • swing for it The idiom "swing for it" means to take a risk or make an all-out effort to achieve something, often in a determined and vigorous manner. It is derived from the action of swinging a bat or club with full force in an attempt to hit a ball, suggesting giving your best and aiming for success without holding back.
  • get into the swing of it/things The idiom "get into the swing of it/things" means to become accustomed to or familiar with a particular activity, task, or routine, especially after an initial period of adjustment or unfamiliarity. It suggests that a person has found their rhythm, adapted to the situation, and is now performing the activity with ease and enthusiasm.
  • can take it or leave it The idiom "can take it or leave it" means that someone doesn't have a strong preference or desire for something. They are indifferent and would be equally content whether they have it or not.
  • I take it The phrase "I take it" is an idiom that can be used to indicate an assumption or inference about something. It implies that the speaker understands or assumes a particular situation or statement to be true based on the information presented.
  • take sth as it comes The idiom "take something as it comes" means to deal with a situation or event calmly and without excessive planning or worry, accepting it as it unfolds naturally, without trying to control or change it. It suggests being flexible and adaptable, embracing uncertainty and unexpected circumstances.
  • take it from me The idiom "take it from me" means to trust or believe in what the speaker is saying based on their personal experience or knowledge of the subject. It is used to emphasize that the advice or information being given is reliable and should be taken seriously.
  • can take it, at I take it The idiom "can take it, I take it" can be used to express one's ability to endure or handle a difficult or challenging situation. It indicates that the person is strong, resilient, and capable of withstanding adversity without complaint.
  • take it/things easy The idiom "take it/things easy" means to relax, remain calm, and avoid unnecessary stress or exertion. It suggests that one should handle a situation or go about their activities in a calm and leisurely manner, without rushing or becoming overly worried.
  • take my word for it, at take it from me The idiom "take my word for it" or "take it from me" means to trust and believe what someone is saying without requiring any further evidence or proof. It implies that the speaker is confident in their knowledge or personal experience regarding a particular subject, and they assure the listener that they can rely on their statement as being true or accurate.
  • take sb's word for it, at take sb at their word The idiom "take someone's word for it" or "take someone at their word" means to believe what someone says without requiring any further proof or confirmation. It implies placing trust or confidence in the honesty or credibility of the person. It is often used to emphasize that one accepts someone's statement or promise as true without question.
  • take it on the chin The idiom "take it on the chin" means to accept criticism, defeat, or adversity bravely or stoically, without complaint or bitterness. It refers to facing hardships or setbacks with resilience and a strong determination to overcome them.
  • take it into your head to do sth The idiom "take it into your head to do something" means to suddenly or spontaneously decide to do something, often without any particular reason or prior planning. It implies a strong determination or compulsion to undertake an action, which may seem sudden or unexpected to others.
  • tell that/it to the Marines! The idiom "tell that/it to the Marines!" is an expression used to express disbelief or skepticism towards a statement or claim. It suggests that the speaker believes the information shared is unbelievable or unlikely to be true. The phrase originates from a belief that Marines are gullible and easily deceived, hence proposing that they would be the ones who might believe such an improbable story.
  • put it there! The idiom "put it there!" is an informal expression used to request a handshake or physical greeting. It is often used after an introduction or agreement as a friendly way of sealing the deal or establishing a connection.
  • there's no help for it The idiom "there's no help for it" means that a situation is unavoidable or inevitable, and there is no way to resolve or change it. It implies that there is no alternative or remedy available to fix the problem or issue at hand.
  • there's a lot of it about The idiom "there's a lot of it about" means that a particular behavior, attitude, or situation is commonly or frequently observed or noticed.
  • lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overdo something, especially when trying to make something seem more emotional, dramatic, or impressive than it actually is. It refers to emphasizing or embellishing a statement, story, or performance in an excessively noticeable or conspicuous way.
  • it takes a thief to catch a thief The idiom "it takes a thief to catch a thief" means that sometimes the best person to catch or understand the methods of a criminal is another criminal. In other words, someone who has engaged in dishonest or illegal activities is often more capable of recognizing and apprehending another person involved in similar actions. This phrase suggests that a person with similar experience and knowledge is needed to outsmart or expose a fellow offender.
  • have a thin time (of it) The idiom "have a thin time (of it)" means to experience a difficult or challenging period or situation. It implies that someone is facing hardships, struggles, or adversity in their life, often referring to a specific period of time. It can also suggest a lack of resources, opportunities, or support during that time.
  • if it/a thing is worth doing, it's worth doing well The idiom "if it/a thing is worth doing, it's worth doing well" implies that if a task or activity is worth undertaking, then it should be pursued with dedication, effort, and excellence. It signifies the importance of investing time, energy, and skill in order to achieve the best possible outcome or result. It emphasizes the idea that undertaking any worthwhile endeavor requires putting in one's best effort and not settling for mediocrity.
  • let things lie, at let it lie The idiom "let things lie" or "let it lie" means to leave a situation or problem unresolved or undisturbed, not taking any action or retaliating. It suggests allowing a matter to rest or settle without further interference or involvement. It signifies a decision to refrain from getting involved or pursuing an issue, often to avoid unnecessary conflict or to maintain peace.
  • cut it/things fine The idiom "cut it/things fine" means to do something narrowly or with very little margin for error or time. It refers to performing a task or completing a situation with minimal room for mistakes or delays.
  • who would have thought it? The idiom "who would have thought it?" is typically used as an exclamation to express surprise or astonishment at an unexpected turn of events or outcome. It conveys a sense of disbelief or wonderment about a situation that was not anticipated or predicted.
  • don't bet on it The idiom "don't bet on it" is a way of expressing doubt or skepticism regarding the likelihood of something happening. It suggests that the outcome or result being discussed is highly uncertain and not worthy of placing a bet or wager on it.
  • I wouldn't bet on it, at don't bet on it The idiom "I wouldn't bet on it" or "don't bet on it" is used to express doubt or skepticism about something. It implies that the speaker does not believe that a particular event or outcome will occur, and advises against making a wager or trusting in its likelihood.
  • jump to it The idiom "jump to it" means to start a task or activity immediately, without delay, hesitation, or procrastination. It suggests taking prompt and decisive action.
  • to cap it all The idiom "to cap it all" is used to emphasize the final or worst part of a series of events or situations. It signifies the last point that makes a situation even more extreme or problematic.
  • to top it all The idiom "to top it all" means that something is added or done to make a situation even more remarkable, extraordinary, or extreme than it already was. It is used to emphasize the outrageousness or exceptional nature of something.
  • to crown it all The idiom "to crown it all" means to emphasize or highlight the final or ultimate point or event that concludes a series of actions or circumstances. It signifies that something unexpected, significant, or extraordinary has happened to top off or complete a set of circumstances, which might already be notable or surprising.
  • to put it mildly The idiom "to put it mildly" is used when a statement or description is intentionally downplayed or toned down to avoid exaggeration or offense. It implies that the actual situation or fact is much stronger, intense, or extreme than what was stated.
  • be nothing to it The idiom "be nothing to it" means that something is very easy or effortless to accomplish. It implies that the task at hand requires little skill, effort, or difficulty.
  • to top it all off, at to top it all The idiom "to top it all off" or "to top it all" is used to emphasize that something mentioned is the final or most significant factor in a series of related events or situations. It means to add a concluding remark or action that makes a situation even more remarkable, surprising, or infuriating.
  • make it up to sb The idiom "make it up to someone" refers to the act of compensating or recompensing someone for a wrongdoing or a previous mistake, usually by doing something kind or generous to make amends and restore their trust or happiness.
  • owe it to yourself The idiom "owe it to yourself" means to have a responsibility or obligation to do something that will benefit oneself or improve one's well-being. It suggests that an individual deserves or has earned the opportunity to engage in a particular action or pursue a certain goal for their own personal growth or satisfaction.
  • make it (to the top) The idiom "make it (to the top)" generally refers to achieving success or reaching a high position or level of accomplishment in one's field or endeavor. It signifies the attainment of one's goals, often after overcoming various challenges or obstacles. It implies succeeding against all odds and emerging victorious or being recognized for one's abilities, skills, or achievements.
  • had it coming (to you) The idiom "had it coming (to you)" means that someone deserved the negative consequences or punishment they received due to their own actions or behavior. It implies that the person had been behaving in a way that invited or provoked the negative outcome.
  • it takes two to tango The idiom "it takes two to tango" means that a conflict or a situation typically involves two people or parties who are both contributing to the problem, taking responsibility, or are equally involved in a situation or relationship. It suggests that a problem cannot occur or be sustained without the active participation or involvement of multiple parties.
  • what's it worth (to you)? The idiom "what's it worth (to you)?" is commonly used to question the value or importance someone places on something. It is often asked when negotiating, haggling, or discussing the price or worth of an item, service, or favor. The phrase implies that the individual is asking for an understanding of the other person's estimation of the value or desire they have for the subject in question.
  • have (got) to hand it to sb The idiom "have (got) to hand it to sb" means to acknowledge or give credit to someone for their skills, achievements, or success, often in a begrudging or admiring manner. It implies recognizing and appreciating someone's abilities, efforts, or accomplishments.
  • put it down to experience "Put it down to experience" is an idiomatic expression meaning to consider a negative or disappointing situation as a valuable learning experience rather than dwelling on the negative emotions it may have caused. It suggests accepting the outcome as a lesson that will contribute to personal growth and future decision-making.
  • break it/the news to sb The idiom "break it/the news to someone" means to inform or communicate something that is typically unpleasant, difficult, or surprising to someone in a gentle, considerate, or tactful manner. It often implies the act of helping someone accept or deal with the news.
  • it makes me (want to) puke The idiom "it makes me (want to) puke" is an informal expression used to convey extreme disgust or distaste towards something or someone. It implies that the object or situation in question is so repulsive or objectionable that it elicits a feeling of nausea or makes someone feel physically ill.
  • it never hurts to do sth The idiom "it never hurts to do something" means that taking a particular action or precautionary measure does not cause any harm or negative consequences, and may in fact be beneficial or advantageous. It implies that there is no downside to carrying out the action, regardless of the outcome.
  • know what it is (like) to The idiom "know what it is (like) to" is used to express that someone has personal experience and understanding of a specific situation or feeling. It implies that the person has gone through a similar experience and can empathize or relate to others facing a similar circumstance.
  • have had it (up to here) with To have had it (up to here) with something means to have reached the point of extreme frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a particular situation, person, or thing. It implies that one's patience or tolerance has been completely exhausted.
  • if/when it comes to the crunch The idiom "if/when it comes to the crunch" means when there is a critical or difficult situation and important decisions or actions need to be made. It refers to the moment when pressure is high and difficult choices must be taken.
  • it wouldn't hurt you to do sth The idiom "it wouldn't hurt you to do sth" means that doing a particular thing or taking a certain action would not cause harm or damage to someone. It suggests that the person should consider doing it as it would not have negative consequences and could potentially be beneficial.
  • find it in your heart to do sth The idiom "find it in your heart to do something" means to have the compassion, empathy, or willingness to do something, especially something difficult or challenging, that might require forgiveness, understanding, or kindness. It implies the act of looking deep within oneself and discovering the capacity to do the said action despite any reservations or initial hesitations.
  • not put it past sb (to do sth) The idiom "not put it past someone (to do something)" means to believe that someone is capable of doing something, often implying that the action might be surprising or unexpected. It is used to express skepticism or suspicion towards someone's potential behavior or actions, suggesting that they may be capable of acting in a particular way, regardless of whether it seems out of character or unlikely.
  • I'll/we'll cross that bridge when I/we come/get to it The idiom "I'll/we'll cross that bridge when I/we come/get to it" means that a person will deal with a problem or challenge only when it arises, rather than worrying about it in advance or wasting time on speculative solutions. It suggests focusing on the present situation and delaying a decision or action until it is absolutely necessary.
  • get it together The idiom "get it together" means to take control, gather or organize oneself, and become more focused, responsible, efficient, or emotionally stable in order to achieve a desired outcome. It implies the need for someone to improve their current state of disarray or confusion and become more composed or organized.
  • be asking for it/trouble The idiom "be asking for it/trouble" refers to someone intentionally or foolishly doing something that is likely to result in negative consequences or problems. It implies that the person's actions or behavior are inviting or provoking trouble or difficulties.
  • make it big To "make it big" is an idiomatic expression that means achieving significant success or attaining great fame, often in one's professional or creative pursuits. It implies becoming very successful on a large scale, surpassing others in the same field or industry.
  • try it on The idiom "try it on" means to attempt or experiment with something new or unfamiliar, typically in order to determine if it suits one's needs, preferences, or requirements. It can refer to trying on clothes or accessories to see how they fit or look, as well as to figuratively trying out new ideas, suggestions, or approaches to see if they are effective or suitable.
  • (there's) no two ways about it. The idiom "(there's) no two ways about it" means that there is no other possible interpretation or alternative viewpoint regarding a particular situation or statement. It emphasizes the certainty and lack of ambiguity in a given matter.
  • mix it up, at mix it The idiom "mix it up" means to engage in a lively or heated argument, altercation, or confrontation with someone. It implies a situation where there is a disagreement or conflict that leads to a verbal or physical confrontation. "Mix it" can be used as a shorter form of the idiom, conveying a similar meaning.
  • keep it up The idiom "keep it up" means to continue doing something at the same level of effort, enthusiasm, and quality as before. It is often used to encourage someone to persist or sustain their current actions or behavior.
  • live it up The idiom "live it up" means to enjoy oneself to the fullest extent, often by engaging in exciting or indulgent activities. It suggests living life with great enthusiasm, taking advantage of enjoyable experiences, and making the most out of the present moment.
  • whoop it up The idiom "whoop it up" means to celebrate or enjoy oneself loudly and enthusiastically, often in a wild or exuberant manner. It involves showing excitement or enthusiasm, usually through loud cheering, shouting, dancing, singing, and having a great time at a gathering, event, or party.
  • break it up! The idiom "break it up!" is an expression used to command or request that a fight or conflict between two or more individuals be stopped or interrupted immediately. It is often used by authorities, bystanders, or individuals trying to prevent a physical altercation from escalating further.
  • be nothing/not much/very little in it The idiom "be nothing/not much/very little in it" is typically used to indicate that there is very little difference or distinction between two options or choices. It suggests that the options are almost identical in terms of quality, value, significance, or outcome.
  • not a bit of it The idiom "not a bit of it" means to strongly disagree or to deny something completely. It is often used to express disbelief or to contradict a previously mentioned statement or assumption.
  • wait for it The idiom "wait for it" means to wait patiently or anticipate something, typically an upcoming event, action, or reveal that is expected to be particularly noteworthy, dramatic, or surprising. It implies that something significant is about to occur and builds suspense or excitement in the process of waiting.
  • walk it
  • what more do you want jam on it? The idiom "what more do you want, jam on it?" is a colloquial expression used to convey a feeling of frustration or exasperation towards someone who is being demanding or unreasonable. It implies that the person already has something good or desirable and yet is still asking for more, similar to someone who has a slice of bread with jam on it but still demands additional toppings or enhancements.
  • watch it The idiom "watch it" is an expression used as a warning to be cautious or careful about something that could potentially be dangerous or problematic. It carries the implication that one should pay attention and take immediate action to avoid negative consequences.
  • have it both ways The idiom "have it both ways" means to try and benefit from two contradicting or mutually exclusive options or situations simultaneously, without facing any negative consequences. It implies attempting to enjoy the advantages or privileges of two conflicting choices without having to make a decision or commitment.
  • wouldn't have it any other way The idiom "wouldn't have it any other way" means that one is completely satisfied or content with the current situation or outcome and would not change it in any manner. It implies that the existing circumstances are exactly as desired or preferred.
  • if the cap fits, wear it The idiom "if the cap fits, wear it" means that if a description or criticism applies to someone, they should accept it or take it to heart. It suggests that if something said about a person accurately describes their behavior or characteristics, they should acknowledge it rather than deny or avoid it.
  • make a day/night/evening/weekend of it The idiom "make a day/night/evening/weekend of it" means to fully enjoy and take advantage of a particular period of time by engaging in pleasurable or special activities. It suggests making the most out of the given duration and creating memorable experiences.
  • when it rains, it pours, at it never rains but it pours The idiom "when it rains, it pours" or "it never rains but it pours" means that when something unfortunate or challenging happens, it often gets compounded with additional problems or difficulties. It suggests that negative events tend to occur all at once or in rapid succession, making the situation more overwhelming.
  • hit sb where it hurts The idiom "hit someone where it hurts" refers to deliberately targeting someone's weaknesses or vulnerabilities in order to cause them significant emotional, psychological, or physical harm. It suggests striking at the core of what deeply affects or troubles someone, aiming to inflict maximum damage or discomfort.
  • make sth/it worth your while The idiom "make something/it worth your while" means to do something or to make an effort, as long as it brings enough benefit, satisfaction, or reward in return. It implies that one is motivated by the potential value or advantages of the action or situation.
  • give it a whirl To "give it a whirl" means to try something out or give it a try, even if unsure about the outcome or success. It typically refers to attempting a new activity, task, or idea with an open mind and without being overly concerned about potential failure.
  • will never hear the end of it The idiom "will never hear the end of it" means that one will continue to be reminded or teased about a certain situation or mistake for a long time.
  • word has it The idiom "word has it" is often used to indicate that something is being rumored or widely talked about, implying that the information may or may not be confirmed or accurate. It suggests that there is a prevailing belief or understanding among people.
  • nice work if you can get it The idiom "nice work if you can get it" is used to describe a job or situation that is particularly desirable or enjoyable, often due to its ease, high pay, or favorable conditions. It implies that obtaining such work is not easily attainable for everyone and may require certain qualifications, luck, or connections.
  • as luck would have it The idiom "as luck would have it" means that something happened by chance or happened in an unexpected or fortunate way.
  • be up against it The idiom "be up against it" means to face a difficult or challenging situation, often with limited resources or options. It refers to being in a tough spot or dealing with adversity where success may be difficult to achieve.
  • blow (it)! The idiom "blow (it)!" typically means to make a serious mistake or to fail at something, often due to poor judgment or decision-making. It can also refer to wasting an opportunity or not capitalizing on a favorable situation.
  • blow your chance, at blow it The idiom "blow your chance" or "blow it" means to squander or waste a golden opportunity or a favorable situation due to one's own mistakes, poor choices, or incompetence. It implies that someone had a moment to succeed or make a favorable impression, but they failed to do so and missed out on potential benefits or advancements.
  • take each day as it comes/take it one day at a time The idiom "take each day as it comes" or "take it one day at a time" means to focus on managing and dealing with events or problems on a daily basis, without worrying too much about the future or making long-term plans. It emphasizes living in the present moment, tackling each day's challenges as they arise, and not getting overwhelmed by the uncertainties of the future.
  • it is/was nothing The idiom "it is/was nothing" is used to downplay one's achievement, effort, or assistance, suggesting that it was not important or significant. It is often said in response to expressions of gratitude or appreciation.
  • can't cut it The idiom "can't cut it" refers to someone or something not being capable or competent enough to fulfill certain requirements or meet the desired standards. It suggests that the person or thing is unable to handle a particular task, situation, or expectation effectively.
  • it can't be helped The idiom "it can't be helped" means that a situation or problem is beyond one's control or cannot be changed, therefore it is useless to worry or complain about it. It implies acceptance of the circumstances as they are, without any possibility of altering or improving them.
  • can't cut the mustard, at can't cut it The idiom "can't cut the mustard" or "can't cut it" means to be unable to meet the required standards or to perform a task adequately. It suggests that someone or something lacks the necessary skills, abilities, or qualifications to succeed or live up to expectations.
  • feel it in your bones To "feel it in your bones" means to have a strong intuitive sense or deep conviction about something, often without any tangible evidence or logical reasoning. It refers to a strong gut feeling or a deep instinctive knowledge that is difficult to explain or disregard. This idiom implies a deep understanding or certainty about a situation or future event, as if one can sense it at a fundamental level within their being.
  • easy does it!, at gently does it! The idiom "easy does it" is used to advise someone to proceed or act in a calm, careful, or cautious manner. It suggests taking things slowly and not rushing or overexerting oneself. It can also be used to caution against becoming too excited or too intense about something.
  • that does it! The idiom "that does it!" is an exclamation used to convey a final decision, determination, or reaching a breaking point after a series of events or situations. It signifies that a person has reached their limit, and they are done with a particular situation, often implying that they will take action or make a change as a result.
  • easy does it! The idiom "easy does it!" is an exclamation used to advise someone to proceed slowly, calmly, or with caution in order to avoid overexertion, excessive force, or creating unnecessary complications or problems. It suggests taking a measured and controlled approach to a task or situation rather than rushing or being overly aggressive.
  • gently does it! The idiom "gently does it" means to proceed, act, or handle something in a careful and cautious manner, avoiding excessive force, speed, or aggression. It suggests taking things slowly and with delicacy to avoid any potential problems, damages, or mistakes.
  • put a brave face on it, at put on a brave face The idiom "put a brave face on it" or "put on a brave face" means to conceal one's true feelings or fears and act in a courageous or confident manner, especially in a challenging or difficult situation. It involves presenting a strong or positive outward appearance despite feeling scared, worried, or uncertain on the inside. It often signifies making an effort to mask vulnerability or maintain composure in the face of adversity.
  • go for it The idiom "go for it" is an expression that encourages someone to pursue or embrace an opportunity, take a risk, or make an attempt without hesitation or fear of failure. It implies a sense of determination, enthusiasm, and willingness to seize whatever chance or challenge is presented.
  • you got it The idiom "you got it" means that one fully understands or agrees with something. It is often used to confirm that a person will comply with a request or that they have achieved success in a task.
  • have got it bad The idiom "have got it bad" is used to describe a situation where someone is deeply infatuated, obsessed, or suffering emotionally because of a strong desire or attraction to something or someone. It often implies that their feelings are intense and overpowering, possibly to an unhealthy or excessive degree.
  • got it in one! The idiom "got it in one!" means that someone has correctly guessed or understood something immediately, without any mistakes or need for further explanation. It implies that the person's response or comprehension was absolutely spot-on.
  • have (got) it made The idiom "have (got) it made" means to be in a highly favorable or successful position or situation. It implies that someone has achieved great success, wealth, or advantage and does not have to face difficulties or hardships. It can also suggest that the person in question has accomplished their goals or desires effortlessly.
  • if it ain't broke, don't fix it The idiom "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" means that if something is functioning well or successfully, there is no need to make any changes or improvements to it. It suggests that altering or tinkering with something that is already effective may actually cause it to become worse or less functional. Thus, it encourages leaving things as they are when they are working properly.
  • sb has bought it The idiom "someone has bought it" generally implies that someone has been killed or died.
  • wouldn't know sth if you fell over one/it The idiom "wouldn't know something if you fell over one/it" is used to describe someone who is completely oblivious or clueless about a certain thing or situation. It implies that even if the person were to encounter or stumble upon the thing they are ignorant about, they still wouldn't recognize or understand it.
  • wouldn't know sth if it hit you in the face, at wouldn't know sth if you fell over one/it The idiom "wouldn't know something if it hit you in the face" means that someone is very oblivious or ignorant about a particular thing, even if it is extremely obvious or apparent. It implies that the person is so unaware that they wouldn't recognize the thing even if it had a direct impact or was right in front of them. A similar variation of the idiom is "wouldn't know something if you fell over one/it," which suggests that the person would still remain clueless about something even if they stumbled or had a physical encounter with it.
  • as it is The idiom "as it is" means in its current state or condition, without any changes or improvements. It is often used to emphasize that something is already difficult or problematic and should not be made worse.
  • cop it The idiom "cop it" means to face or endure punishment or criticism, often in an undeserved or unexpected manner.
  • do it The idiom "do it" means to take action or accomplish a task without hesitation or delay. It implies a sense of urgency and resolve in getting something done.
  • hop it The idiom "hop it" is a colloquial expression that means to leave quickly or go away from a place. It is often used in an imperative or commanding tone, suggesting that the person should exit the area promptly and without delay.
  • mix it The idiom "mix it" typically means getting involved in a confrontation, fight, or argument. It implies engaging in a conflict or becoming a part of a contentious situation.
  • zip it The idiom "zip it" is an expression used to instruct someone to be quiet, stop talking, or refrain from divulging certain information. It is often used with a hand gesture of zipping one's lips closed, implying the need to keep quiet.
  • floor it, at put your foot down The idiom "floor it" or "put your foot down" means to accelerate a vehicle to its maximum speed or to accelerate quickly and aggressively.
  • cool it The idiom "cool it" means to calm down or relax in a tense or heated situation. It advises someone to maintain composure, control their emotions, or reduce their level of excitement.
  • push it, at push your luck The idiom "push it" or "push your luck" is used to indicate that someone is taking a risk or testing their limits, often by behaving in a way that is daring or provocative. It implies that the person is venturing into a territory where negative consequences could arise if they continue to push the boundaries. It suggests a warning to be cautious and not overstep reasonable limits or engage in excessively risky behavior.
  • hold it! The idiom "hold it!" is an expression used to tell someone to stop or pause what they are doing. It is often used to interrupt someone in the middle of an action or to request them to wait temporarily.
  • snuff it The idiom "snuff it" is a colloquial term derived from the slang usage of the word "snuff," which originally referred to putting out a candle or light by pinching or extinguishing it. In contemporary usage, "snuff it" is primarily used as a euphemism meaning to die or pass away. It can also imply the act of ceasing to exist or come to an end.
  • hoof it The idiom "hoof it" refers to walking or traveling on foot, usually over a long distance or without any transportation assistance.
  • lose it The idiom "lose it" refers to the act of losing control or composure, typically in a state of anger, frustration, or mental breakdown. It suggests a lack of emotional restraint or the inability to handle a situation calmly.
  • move it! The idiom "move it!" is an informal expression used to urge someone to move quickly or with increased speed. It is often used in a commanding or impatient tone to convey a sense of urgency or to prompt someone to act more rapidly.
  • forget it The idiom "forget it" is used to dismiss or reject someone's suggestion, request, or idea. It suggests that the speaker is not interested in further pursuing or considering the matter being discussed. It can also be used to indicate that something should not be worried about or is not worth pursuing any longer.
  • button it The idiomatic phrase "button it" means to be quiet, stop talking, or cease speaking. It is often used as an admonition or a command for someone to stop talking or to not speak at all.
  • that's it The idiom "that's it" is used to signal the end of something or the achievement of what was desired or expected. It can also indicate conviction or agreement with a final decision or statement.
  • it figures The idiom "it figures" is typically used in conversation to express resignation or acceptance of a situation that is not surprising or unexpected. It implies that the outcome or behavior being discussed was predictable based on previous knowledge or experience.
  • get it on The idiom "get it on" typically refers to engaging in sexual activity or intimacy. It can also mean to initiate or start something, often in a passionate or energetic manner.
  • out of it The idiom "out of it" typically means to be in a state of confusion, disorientation, or unawareness of one's surroundings or current situation. It can also refer to feeling detached, unengaged, or mentally absent.
  • end it all The idiom "end it all" refers to the act of committing suicide or intentionally ending one's own life.
  • as it comes The idiom "as it comes" typically means to accept or deal with something without trying to control or change it, and to handle situations or events in a spontaneous or impromptu manner.
  • as it were The idiom "as it were" is used to indicate that what is being said or described is not to be taken literally or precisely, but rather figuratively or in a somewhat indirect manner. It implies that the speaker is trying to emphasize or explain something using an analogy or a less exact wording.
  • pile it on The idiom "pile it on" means to add or apply something excessively or disproportionately, usually referring to criticism, pressure, or work. It can also be used to describe overwhelming someone with excessive praise or flattery.
  • go it alone The idiom "go it alone" means to do something without the help or support of others, to tackle a task or accomplish a goal independently.
  • hard at it The idiom "hard at it" means to be working diligently or exerting great effort on a task or activity. It is often used to describe someone who is fully engaged and putting in their maximum effort.
  • have it off The idiom "have it off" typically refers to engaging in sexual activity or having a sexual encounter with someone.
  • slug it out The idiom "slug it out" means to engage in a prolonged and intense dispute or battle with someone, often through physical or verbal confrontation. It implies a grueling and determined effort to overcome an opponent or to resolve a conflict.
  • let it lie The idiom "let it lie" means to leave a situation or topic alone, without further discussing or addressing it. It suggests refraining from taking any action or prolonging a matter, allowing it to remain untouched or undisturbed.
  • you name it "You name it" is an idiom used to suggest or imply that there is a wide range or limitless options available for something. It can be used when asking or inviting someone to provide examples or suggestions without any limitations or restrictions.
  • it never rains but it pours The idiom "it never rains but it pours" means that when things go wrong, they tend to go wrong in succession or in overwhelming quantities. It suggests that when a negative event or problem occurs, it is often followed by additional ones, making the situation even more difficult or challenging.
  • play it by ear To "play it by ear" means to handle a situation or make decisions based on the circumstances as they arise, rather than following a predetermined plan. It involves acting spontaneously or improvising according to the current conditions or information available.
  • by the look of it, at by the look(s) of things The idiom "by the look of it" or "by the look(s) of things" is used to express an assumption or judgment based on one's observation or initial impression of a situation, person, or thing. It implies making an assessment or conclusion based on visual information or appearances.
  • what of it? "What of it?" is an idiom used to express indifference or dismissiveness about a particular matter. It implies that the speaker considers the subject insignificant or unimportant and is not interested in discussing it further.
  • have your cake and eat it The idiom "have your cake and eat it too" means to enjoy two contradictory options or outcomes simultaneously, often implying a desire for conflicting or unrealistic outcomes. It reflects a situation where someone wants the benefits or advantages of two opposing choices without having to make a compromise or give up anything.
  • call it a day The idiom "call it a day" means to decide to stop working or to bring an end to a task or activity, often due to being satisfied with the progress made or feeling that further effort would not be productive. It can also imply the need to rest or preserve energy for another time.
  • call it quits The idiom "call it quits" means to decide to stop or cease doing something, often referring to ending a particular activity, relationship, or endeavor. It suggests a resolution to conclude a task or situation permanently or to accept a stalemate or impasse.
  • (you can) depend on/upon it The idiom "(you can) depend on/upon it" means that something is reliable or trustworthy, and you can be assured that it will happen or be true. It conveys a sense of certainty and assurance in the statement or promise being made.
  • let's face it 1 The idiom "let's face it" means to accept or acknowledge an unpleasant or difficult reality, often used when stating an uncomfortable truth or addressing a controversial topic.
  • let's face it 2 The idiom "let's face it" is typically used to introduce or acknowledge a difficult or unpleasant truth or reality that cannot be avoided or denied. It suggests a resignation or acceptance of the situation being discussed.
  • that's done it! The idiom "that's done it!" is typically used to express frustration or annoyance when something unexpected or unwanted has happened, indicating that a threshold has been crossed or a limit has been exceeded. It signifies that the situation has worsened or become more difficult as a result of someone's actions or an event that has taken place.
  • don't mention it! The idiom "don't mention it!" is a phrase used to downplay or dismiss someone's gratitude for a favor or help that was given. It suggests that the act was not a burden or inconvenience and that there is no need for the person to express thanks or feel indebted.
  • isn't it/aren't they just? The idiom "isn't it/aren't they just?" is an expression used to convey agreement or emphasize the accuracy of a statement that has been made. It can indicate that the speaker completely agrees with the previous remark and believes it accurately captures the situation or behavior being discussed.
  • and don't you forget it The idiom "and don't you forget it" is a remark made to emphasize a point and ensure that the listener remembers or acknowledges the information shared. It implies that the speaker expects the statement to be remembered and taken seriously.
  • your heart isn't in it The idiom "your heart isn't in it" means that someone lacks enthusiasm, passion, or interest in something. It implies that the person is not emotionally invested or committed to the task or activity at hand.
  • that figures, at it figures The idiom "that figures" or "it figures" is used to express resignation or acceptance of a situation or outcome that is not surprising. It implies that the person speaking or the listener expected or suspected the outcome. It can also convey a sense of cynicism or a lack of surprise in response to something that is predictable or typical.
  • leave it at that The idiom "leave it at that" means to end a conversation, discussion, or situation without further elaboration, explanation, or action. It implies that there is no need to go any further or to continue addressing the matter.
  • be that as it may The phrase "be that as it may" is an idiomatic expression used to acknowledge or concede a point despite any objections or conflicting opinions. It means that regardless of the current circumstances or arguments presented, the fact or situation remains the same. It is often used to indicate that although there might be disagreement or uncertainty, the speaker will proceed with their point or argument anyway.
  • that's more like it! The idiom "that's more like it!" is an expression used to convey approval or satisfaction when someone or something meets expectations or improves from a previous state or performance. It often implies a sense of relief or appreciation that the desired outcome has been achieved.
  • screw it/you/them! The idiom "screw it/you/them!" is an expression used to convey a feeling of frustration, defeat, or disregard towards a situation, person, or group. It implies a decision to abandon or disregard something or someone, often out of exasperation or resignation. It can also convey a sense of defiance or rebellion.
  • it isn't over until the fat lady sings The idiom "it isn't over until the fat lady sings" means that you should not assume the outcome of a situation until it has definitively concluded, even if it seems likely or inevitable. The phrase often implies that there is still a chance for a turnaround or a change in the expected outcome. The "fat lady" is a figurative representation of the final act or conclusion of an event, specifically referring to a female opera singer who traditionally performs the final aria or song in operas.
  • out with it! The idiom "out with it!" is a phrase used to urge someone to say or reveal something they have been hesitant or reluctant to share. It is often used when someone is withholding information or keeping a secret, and the speaker demands that they disclose it immediately.
  • make it with sb The idiom "make it with someone" is usually used informally to mean having a romantic or sexual relationship with someone. It implies a level of intimacy or connection beyond just friendship.
  • have it in you The idiom "have it in you" means to possess the necessary abilities, skills, or qualities to accomplish something or exhibit a particular behavior. It suggests that someone has the capability or capacity to do or be something despite initial doubt, hesitation, or uncertainty.
  • put yourself about, at put it about The idiom "put yourself about" or "put it about" refers to the act of engaging in various social activities, often of a promiscuous or widely spread nature. It typically implies being involved with or seen by multiple people, often with a sense of casualness or informality. Alternatively, it can also refer to actively spreading rumors or gossip. Overall, the idiom suggests a level of social openness or indulgence.
  • put a figure on it The idiom "put a figure on it" means to assign a specific numerical value or provide a specific estimate for something that was previously uncertain or unclear. It is often used when discussing financial matters, budgeting, or quantifying a particular situation.
  • knock it off The definition of the idiom "knock it off" is to stop doing something or to cease a particular behavior or action. It is often used to request someone to end an annoying or disruptive activity.
  • and be done with it, at and have done with it The idiom "and be done with it" or "and have done with it" is typically used to express a desire to finish or conclude something quickly, or to make a final decision without further delay or discussion. It suggests a sense of impatience or an eagerness to move on from a particular situation or task.
  • have it out with sb The idiom "have it out with someone" means to confront or have a frank and honest conversation with someone about an issue or disagreement, typically in order to resolve it or get clarification. It implies expressing one's feelings or concerns directly and openly, often aiming to reach a resolution or understanding.
  • and have done with it The idiom "and have done with it" means to quickly and decisively finish or conclude a task or situation without any further delay or discussion. It implies a desire to put an end to something, often indicating impatience or frustration.
  • lay it on with a trowel, at lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on with a trowel" or "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, typically for dramatic effect or to emphasize a point. It implies that someone is presenting information, compliments, or flattery in an excessively embellished and insincere manner. It suggests an over-the-top expression that may seem exaggerated or unbelievable.
  • make a clean breast of it The idiom "make a clean breast of it" means to confess or make a full disclosure about something, especially a wrongdoing or a secret that has been kept hidden. It implies admitting or revealing the truth openly and honestly, without holding anything back.
  • come off it! The idiom "come off it!" is an expression used to admonish someone for being unrealistic, insincere, or dishonest. It can be used to dismiss someone's argument or to tell them not to deceive or fool others.
  • play it cool The idiom "play it cool" means to remain calm, composed, and collected, especially in a situation where one might be tempted to show excitement, nervousness, or anxiety. It involves maintaining a relaxed and nonchalant demeanor to avoid attracting attention or revealing one's true emotions.
  • put it about The idiom "put it about" refers to spreading rumors, gossip, or information widely among people. It implies the act of sharing or disseminating information, often with the intention of gaining attention, creating interest, or influencing others' opinions.
  • make no mistake about it The idiom "make no mistake about it" means to be absolutely clear and certain about something, emphasizing that there should be no misunderstanding or doubt regarding the statement or situation at hand. It is used to assert that the following statement or action is without question or ambiguity.
  • let it all hang out The idiom "let it all hang out" means to completely express oneself freely and openly without holding back any emotions, thoughts, or behaviors. It suggests being authentic and uninhibited, revealing one's true self without any reservations or restrictions.
  • as far as it goes The idiom "as far as it goes" means to the extent or limit of something, implying that although a statement or action may be true or valid, it has certain limitations or does not fully encompass the entirety of the subject matter. It suggests that there is more to be considered or additional factors that need to be taken into account beyond what has been previously stated or done.
  • consider it done The idiom "consider it done" means that something will be taken care of or completed promptly and efficiently. It indicates a high level of assurance and commitment to fulfilling a task or request.
  • it doesn't take a rocket scientist, at it's not rocket science
  • drop it/the subject The idiom "drop it/the subject" means to stop discussing or pursuing a particular topic or issue. It suggests that it is better to let go of that specific matter to avoid further argument or controversy. It implies a request for the conversation to be changed or for the topic to be abandoned altogether.
  • like it or lump it The expression "like it or lump it" is an idiomatic phrase that conveys the message that one must accept a situation or outcome whether they like it or not. It implies that there are no alternative options or choices available, leaving the person with no other option but to accept the circumstances as they are.
  • on the face of it The idiom "on the face of it" means that when something is initially considered or observed, it appears a certain way or suggests a particular conclusion. However, upon further examination or analysis, the situation or outcome might be different or more complex than it initially seemed.
  • fight it out The idiom "fight it out" means to resolve a conflict or disagreement through direct confrontation or competition. It suggests that the parties involved should engage in a physical or verbal struggle in order to determine a winner or reach a resolution. This phrase emphasizes the idea of facing the issue head-on and not shying away from confrontation in order to put an end to the dispute.
  • put .your foot in it The idiom "put your foot in it" means to say or do something unintentionally embarrassing, tactless, or offensive, usually by mistake or without thinking. It refers to making a blunder or committing a social faux pas.
  • put your foot in your mouth, at put .your foot in it The idiom "put your foot in your mouth" or "put your foot in it" is used to describe a situation where someone says or does something inadvertently embarrassing, rude, or tactless, usually by accident or without thinking. It refers to making a verbal blunder that leads to an awkward or uncomfortable situation, often resulting in regret or embarrassment for the person speaking.
  • get it in the neck The idiom "get it in the neck" means to receive punishment, reprimand, or blame for something, often in an unfair or undeserved manner. It suggests facing the consequences or negative repercussions of a situation.
  • give it a rest The idiom "give it a rest" means to stop or cease doing something, usually because it is annoying, repetitive, or a waste of time. It is often used in a situation where there is a request or demand to stop a particular action or behavior.
  • not know the half of it The idiom "not know the half of it" is used to express that someone is only partially aware of a situation or problem, suggesting that there is much more to it than what they currently understand or believe. It implies that the information or knowledge they possess is incomplete.
  • have not heard the half of it, at not know the half of it The idiom "have not heard the half of it" or "not know the half of it" is used to convey that someone is unaware of the full extent or magnitude of a situation, event, or story. It suggests that the information or knowledge they possess is limited or incomplete.
  • be/go at it hammer and tongs The idiom "be/go at it hammer and tongs" means to engage in a heated or vigorous dispute or battle, putting forth aggressive and forceful efforts to achieve something or confront a problem. It often describes a situation where individuals or groups are fiercely involved in a conflict or argument. The phrase implies a high level of intensity, determination, and relentless pursuit of one's objectives.
  • have it in for sb The idiom "have it in for someone" means to harbor strong negative feelings or hostility toward a specific person, typically seeking to harm, criticize, or sabotage them in some way. It signifies having a grudge or vendetta against someone.
  • not have any of it The idiom "not have any of it" means refusing to accept or tolerate something. It implies a complete rejection or refusal to comply with a particular idea, suggestion, or behavior.
  • have it away, at have it off The idiom "have it away" or "have it off" is a colloquial expression that is used to refer to engaging in sexual activity or having sex with someone. It implies a casual or immediate sexual encounter.
  • let sb have it The idiom "let sb have it" means to harshly scold, criticize, or speak angrily to someone. It suggests expressing one's anger, frustration, or disapproval towards another person without reservation or holding back any strong emotions. It can also be used to describe physically attacking someone or giving them a beating.
  • have it on the highest authority The idiom "have it on the highest authority" means to have information or knowledge that is considered to be extremely reliable, credible, or authoritative. It implies that the information has been confirmed or obtained from a trustworthy and influential source.
  • on your own head be it The idiom "on your own head be it" is an expression used to indicate that the responsibility and consequences of an action someone has taken rests solely on that person. It serves as a warning or disclaimer that if someone proceeds with a particular decision or course of action, they will have to face the resulting outcomes or consequences without any assistance or support.
  • the idea of it!, at what an idea! The idiom "the idea of it!" or "at what an idea!" is an expression used to convey surprise, disbelief, or astonishment at a specific suggestion or thought. It is typically used in response to an unexpected or unusual idea that is being proposed or discussed. The phrase highlights the speaker's reaction to the notion while emphasizing its unexpected or innovative nature.
  • keep (sb) at it The idiom "keep (sb) at it" means to encourage or motivate someone to continue putting effort into doing something or to persevere in a task or activity despite difficulties or challenges. It suggests providing support, encouragement, or instructions to ensure the person keeps working diligently towards their goal.
  • let it be known The idiom "let it be known" means to publicly or formally announce or make something known or to ensure that information is widely and formally disseminated. It implies the intention to communicate important information, facts, or intentions to others in a clear and deliberate manner.
  • leave it out! The idiom "leave it out!" is an informal expression or exclamation used to encourage someone to stop doing or saying something. It is often used to express annoyance, frustration, or disapproval towards a particular action or behavior.
  • be losing it The idiom "be losing it" is used to describe a person who is becoming mentally unstable or irrational. It suggests that the person is failing to maintain their composure or sanity.
  • for the hell of it The idiom "for the hell of it" means doing something just for the sake of doing it without any particular reason or purpose. It implies engaging in an activity purely out of enjoyment, curiosity, or personal amusement, without any expected outcome or significant motivation.
  • make it snappy The idiom "make it snappy" means to do something quickly and efficiently, often used as an imperative command to urge someone to hurry up or do something in a timely manner.
  • be rolling in it The idiom "be rolling in it" means to have a large amount of money or wealth. It implies that someone is extremely wealthy or financially prosperous.
  • be nothing for it
  • rolling in money, at be rolling in it The idiom "rolling in money" or "rolling in it" is an expression used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy or has a large amount of money. It conveys the notion of abundance and the ability to enjoy a luxurious lifestyle without any financial constraints.
  • spit it out! The idiom "spit it out!" is an expression used to encourage someone to speak up or to tell something directly and quickly without hesitation. It is often used when someone is struggling to communicate their thoughts or feelings effectively, urging them to be more straightforward and stop beating around the bush.
  • It would take an act of Congress to do The idiom "It would take an act of Congress to do" means that a task or action is extremely difficult or requires an excessive amount of effort to accomplish. It suggests that achieving the task would require a complex bureaucratic process or extensive deliberation, similar to the long and complicated process involved in passing an act of Congress in the United States.
  • It is a poor heart that never rejoices. The idiom "It is a poor heart that never rejoices" means that one should not be so unhappy or negative that they cannot find joy even in small or simple pleasures. It suggests that it is important to be optimistic and appreciate the positive aspects of life.
  • It isn't worth the trouble. The expression "It isn't worth the trouble" means that the effort or difficulties involved in pursuing or obtaining something are too great or not justified by the potential benefit or outcome. It suggests that the potential rewards or advantages do not outweigh the problems or difficulties involved.
  • It isn't worth it. The idiom "It isn't worth it" means that something is not deserving of the effort, time, or cost that it requires. It implies that the potential benefits or rewards do not outweigh the disadvantages or drawbacks associated with the action or situation in question.
  • It is easy to be wise after the event The idiom "It is easy to be wise after the event" means that it is much easier to understand or judge something after it has happened than it is to predict or evaluate it beforehand. It implies that hindsight often provides a clearer understanding or perspective on a situation.
  • Don't make me say it again! The idiom "Don't make me say it again!" is an expression used to convey frustration or annoyance when someone is being asked to repeat or reiterate something that has already been stated. It implies that the speaker believes the information or instruction should have been understood or remembered the first time it was said, and they are exasperated at having to repeat themselves.
  • at it again The idiom "at it again" refers to someone engaging in a familiar or recurrent behavior, often in a negative or troublesome manner. It implies that the person has resumed or continues their actions, often despite previous warnings, attempts to stop, or negative consequences.
  • to put it another way The idiom "to put it another way" means to express or explain something in a different manner or using different words in order to make it easier to understand or clarify a point.
  • That ain't the way I heard it. "That ain't the way I heard it" is an idiom used to express disagreement or disbelief about something that has been said, suggesting that the information or account provided is incorrect or inaccurate according to the speaker's own sources or understanding. It indicates that the speaker has a different version or perspective of the story or the facts in question.
  • It ain't fittin'. The idiom "It ain't fittin'" means that something is not appropriate, suitable, or proper for a given situation or context. It implies that an action, behavior, or circumstance does not conform to acceptable standards or expectations. The phrase is often used in colloquial or regional dialects, particularly in the Southern United States.
  • If it ain't chickens, it's feathers.
  • Ain't it the truth? The idiom "Ain't it the truth?" is an informal expression used to confirm or agree with a statement or observation that is considered entirely accurate or undeniable. It implies a sense of resignation or acknowledgment of the truthfulness of a statement.
  • It is better to be born lucky than rich. The idiom "It is better to be born lucky than rich" means that having good fortune or luck in one's life is more valuable and advantageous than being born into a wealthy family or having material wealth. It suggests that luck or fortunate circumstances can bring more opportunities, happiness, and success than simply having financial resources.
  • when it comes right down to it The idiom "when it comes right down to it" means the moment of truth or the critical point at which one must make a final decision or take definitive action. It refers to the situation when all other factors are considered or when all options have been explored, and one must confront the ultimate reality or truth of a matter.
  • I'll get right on it The idiom "I'll get right on it" means that a person will immediately start working on or addressing a task or request. It conveys a sense of urgency and commitment to completing the task promptly.
  • Blow it out your ear! The idiom "Blow it out your ear!" is an expression used to dismiss or reject someone's idea, suggestion, or request in a rude or disdainful manner. It is a vulgar way of telling someone to disregard their statement or proposal.
  • have a ring to it The idiom "have a ring to it" means that something sounds pleasing or memorable when spoken or heard. It implies that there is a certain quality or rhythm in the way a phrase or name sounds, making it interesting or catchy.
  • let it rip The idiom "let it rip" means to allow something to happen or progress without any restrictions, inhibitions, or reservations. It is often used to express the idea of releasing or expressing something freely and forcefully, without holding back.
  • let it/her rip The idiom "let it/her rip" means to allow something or someone to continue freely without restriction, inhibition, or interference. It is often used to encourage or give permission for someone to take action or express themselves without holding back.
  • put it on the line The idiom "put it on the line" means taking a risk or being willing to face the consequences of one's actions or opinions. It implies being open, honest, and straightforward in expressing one's views or taking decisive action, even if it involves potential challenges or negative outcomes.
  • lay it on the line To "lay it on the line" means to speak honestly and directly, without holding back or sugarcoating the truth. It implies being straightforward and upfront about one's thoughts, feelings, or intentions, often in a clear and assertive manner. This idiom is often used when someone wants to express themselves honestly, without any ambiguity or deception.
  • almost lost it The idiom "almost lost it" means to come very close to losing control of one's emotions or temper. It refers to a situation where someone is on the brink of losing their composure or becoming extremely angry, frustrated, or overwhelmed.
  • it doesn't take a rocket scientist to do sth The idiom "it doesn't take a rocket scientist to do something" means that a particular task or action is relatively simple, straightforward, or does not require a high level of intelligence or expertise. It implies that anyone can easily understand or accomplish it without needing exceptional skills or knowledge.
  • it doesn't take a rocket scientist The idiom "it doesn't take a rocket scientist" is used to indicate that a particular task or concept is not complex or difficult to understand. It implies that the task or concept is relatively simple and does not require exceptional intelligence or expertise.
  • love it! The idiom "love it!" is an expression used to convey enthusiasm, enjoyment, or approval for something. It indicates that the person really likes or appreciates the subject or situation being discussed or experienced.
  • roll with it The idiom "roll with it" means to adapt to and accept a situation, even if it is unexpected or challenging, without becoming overly upset, stressed, or resistant. It suggests going with the flow and being flexible in the face of difficulties or changes, rather than resisting or struggling against them.
  • If you've got it, flaunt it! The idiom "If you've got it, flaunt it!" means that if one possesses a quality, ability, or possession that makes them impressive or attractive, they should confidently and proudly showcase it to others. It suggests that individuals should not be shy or humble about their talents, but rather, they should confidently display them.
  • have what it takes The idiom "have what it takes" means to possess the necessary qualities, skills, abilities, or attributes required to succeed or excel in a particular situation, task, or role. It typically refers to someone's ability to meet the challenges or demands of a specific endeavor or goal.
  • have it made in the shade The idiom "have it made in the shade" means to have achieved great success or to be in a comfortable and advantageous position. It implies being well-off, having everything in your favor, or having a simple and worry-free life.
  • have it made The idiom "have it made" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position in life, particularly in terms of having achieved success, wealth, or comfort. It implies that a person has reached a point where they have accomplished their goals or desires, and their future seems secure and easy.
  • have it all together The idiom "have it all together" refers to a person who is well-organized, capable, and in control of every aspect of their life. It implies that this individual manages their personal and professional responsibilities effectively, appears composed and confident, and handles difficult situations with ease.
  • got it bad The idiom "got it bad" means experiencing strong and intense feelings, often love or desire, to an extreme degree. It implies being deeply infatuated or obsessed with someone or something in a way that may seem excessive or irrational.
  • Give it all you've got! The idiom "Give it all you've got!" means to put in maximum effort, energy, and dedication in order to achieve a desired outcome or succeed at a task. It encourages individuals to give their utmost and use all their skills, abilities, and resources to accomplish a goal.
  • Don't let it go any further,
  • make it hot for To "make it hot for" someone means to make their life difficult or unpleasant, often by causing trouble or creating challenging situations for them. It implies creating obstacles or hardships that make it difficult for the person to succeed or achieve their goals.
  • rough it The idiom "rough it" means to live or experience a way of life that lacks comfort or conveniences. It often refers to camping or being in a natural or rustic environment without modern amenities. It can also be used more broadly to describe a situation where one goes without certain luxuries or faces challenges and hardships.
  • rub nose in it The idiom "rub nose in it" means to intentionally remind or show someone their mistake or failure in a way that embarrasses or humiliates them. It implies a desire to make someone feel regret or shame for their actions or shortcomings.
  • rub it in The idiomatic expression "rub it in" means to intentionally make someone feel worse or add insult to injury by constantly reminding them of a mistake, failure, or misfortune they have experienced. It involves emphasizing or dwelling on someone's disappointment or embarrassment, often in a taunting or gloating manner.
  • don't know whether to eat it or rub it on The idiom "don't know whether to eat it or rub it on" is used to express confusion or uncertainty about how to use or handle something. It implies that the person is uncertain if they should consume or apply a particular substance or item, metaphorically highlighting the dilemma of deciding the best course of action.
  • rumor has it that... The idiom "rumor has it that..." means that there is a widespread belief or hearsay about something, although it may not be confirmed or proven true.
  • run with it The idiom "run with it" means to take the initiative or responsibility for something without being instructed or guided, and to make the most of an opportunity or idea presented. It implies acting independently, confidently, and decisively, often involving taking the lead and embracing the challenge at hand.
  • run it down The idiom "run it down" typically means to provide a thorough and detailed explanation or exploration of a particular topic or issue. It implies delving into the details and giving a comprehensive account or analysis.
  • run for it The idiom "run for it" means to make a hasty and hurried escape or attempt to escape from a dangerous or challenging situation. It implies that one is running with urgency and speed to avoid consequences or difficulties.
  • ham it up The idiom "ham it up" means to exaggerate or overact in a dramatic or comedic manner, often to attract attention or to make something more entertaining or funny.
  • have it coming The idiom "have it coming" means to deserve the consequences or punishment for one's actions. It suggests that someone's behavior or actions have rightfully resulted in negative consequences or retribution.
  • It is better to wear out than to rust out. The idiom "It is better to wear out than to rust out" means that it is more beneficial and fulfilling to exhaust oneself, both physically and mentally, through constant activity, productivity, and engagement, rather than stagnating or becoming inactive, which leads to dullness, decline, and wasted potential.
  • (Go) tell it/that to the marines. The idiom "(Go) tell it/that to the marines" is used to express disbelief or skepticism towards a story or statement. It implies that the person being addressed does not believe the information being presented and suggests that it would be more appropriate to share it with someone who may be gullible or easily fooled, such as marines (historically known for their naiveté). It can also indicate that the information sounds like an unlikely or fabricated tale.
  • Tell it to the marines! The idiom "Tell it to the marines!" is an expression used to express skepticism or disbelief in what someone is saying. It implies that the person being addressed should try to convince someone else who might be more gullible, such as the often-credulous marines.
  • Think nothing of it The idiom "Think nothing of it" is used to express that something was not a big deal or was done willingly and without hesitation. It implies that the person who performed the action does not expect gratitude or recognition for their help or favor.
  • not give it another thought The idiom "not give it another thought" means to not think or worry about something any further. It suggests dismissing or abandoning a particular issue or concern without further consideration or concern.
  • Save it! The idiom "Save it!" is a colloquial expression that is used to tell someone to cease talking or stop making excuses. It conveys a sense of annoyance or disbelief and implies that the speaker is no longer interested in hearing what the other person has to say.
  • could fight a circlesaw (and it arunnin')
  • Don't say it! The idiom "Don't say it!" is an expression used to caution someone not to verbalize a particular thought, idea, or comment, often because it may be offensive, hurtful, embarrassing, or reveal a secret. It is typically employed to prevent potential negative consequences or to maintain harmony in a conversation or relationship.
  • (It) (just) goes without saying. The idiom "(It) (just) goes without saying" means that something is so obvious or well-known that it does not need to be explicitly stated or mentioned. It implies that the information or idea is universally understood or accepted without the need for further explanation.
  • He/She/They can whistle for it! The idiom "He/She/They can whistle for it!" is an expression used to convey that someone can wait a long time or is unlikely to receive what they are expecting, demanding, or hoping for. It often implies that the speaker feels no obligation or willingness to fulfill the requested or anticipated outcome. It can also signify the speaker's disregard or defiance towards the person making the request.
  • screw it The idiom "screw it" is an expression used to convey the sentiment of giving up or abandoning something due to frustration, disappointment, or indifference. It implies a disregard for further efforts, decisions, or concerns about a specific situation or task.
  • It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive. The idiom "It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive" means that the process or journey towards achieving a goal or destination can often be more enjoyable or fulfilling than actually reaching the end result. It emphasizes the importance of having hope, optimism, and enjoyment in the pursuit of goals or dreams rather than solely focusing on the final outcome.
  • You asked for it! The idiom "You asked for it!" is a phrase used to convey that someone is facing the consequences or results of their own actions or decisions. It implies that the person is entirely responsible for the situation they are currently in, as they knowingly or deliberately brought it upon themselves.
  • ask for it The idiom "ask for it" typically means to intentionally or recklessly bring about one's own trouble, punishment, or negative consequences by behaving in a provocative, foolish, or daring manner. It suggests that the person involved knowingly engaged in actions that would likely result in negative outcomes.
  • see it coming The idiom "see it coming" refers to the ability to anticipate or predict a certain event or outcome before it happens. It implies being aware of or having foreknowledge about a situation, allowing someone to prepare or react appropriately.
  • I'll believe it when I see it The idiom "I'll believe it when I see it" means that the speaker is skeptical about something until they witness it themselves or have concrete evidence of it happening. It expresses doubt or disbelief in a statement, condition, or promise until there is undeniable proof or evidence provided.
  • as I see it The idiom "as I see it" means to express one's personal opinion or viewpoint on a certain matter. It implies that the following statement is the speaker's subjective interpretation or understanding of the situation.
  • You just don't get it! The idiom "You just don't get it!" means that the person being referred to does not understand or comprehend something, often because they are unable or unwilling to perceive a particular concept, idea, or perspective. It indicates frustration or exasperation towards someone's lack of understanding.
  • You don't know the half of it The idiom "You don't know the half of it" means that someone lacks knowledge or understanding about a situation or topic. It implies that the person's comprehension is only a fraction of the overall reality or complexity of the matter.
  • it doesn't take a rocket scientist to The idiom "it doesn't take a rocket scientist to" is used to imply that something is not difficult to understand or figure out. It suggests that the task or concept is relatively simple and can be comprehended by anyone without advanced expertise or intelligence.
  • If you don't like it, lump it The idiom "If you don't like it, lump it" means that if someone is unsatisfied with a situation or decision, they have to accept it without complaint or resistance. It implies that there is no alternative or choice, and that disagreeing or objecting will not change the situation.
  • I don't believe it! The idiom "I don't believe it!" is an expression used to convey surprise, disbelief, or astonishment regarding something unexpected or unbelievable. It signifies a reaction of skepticism or shock towards a situation, information, or event.
  • Don't worry your head about it The idiom "Don't worry your head about it" means to advise someone not to be concerned or bothered about a particular situation or issue. It suggests that the person should avoid unnecessary stress or anxiety and leave the matter to someone else to handle or resolve.
  • Don't sweat it! The idiom "Don't sweat it!" means not to worry or become anxious or stressed about something, to not let a particular situation or issue bother oneself too much.
  • Don't spend it all in one place The phrase "Don't spend it all in one place" is an idiomatic expression commonly used to advise someone against using up or wasting all of their money or resources in a single location or on a single purchase. It implies that individuals should distribute their spending or investment wisely, rather than squandering everything in a single instance.
  • Don't knock it "Don't knock it" is an idiom that means not to criticize or belittle something, especially when one has not tried or experienced it before, as it may have unexpected or hidden value or qualities. It suggests keeping an open mind and giving something a fair chance before passing judgment.
  • Don't even think about it The idiom "Don't even think about it" is used to warn someone not to consider or contemplate a certain action or idea. It implies a strong disapproval or objection to the suggestion and emphasizes that it should not be entertained or pursued.
  • pile it/them high and sell it/them cheap The definition of the idiom "pile it/them high and sell it/them cheap" is to have a large quantity of a product available and sell it at a low price in order to attract customers or generate sales. This strategy focuses on quantity and affordability rather than emphasizing quality.
  • put mind to it The idiom "put mind to it" means to focus one's thoughts, energy, and determination on a particular task or goal. It implies a strong commitment and concentration in order to achieve something.
  • Charge it to the dust and let the rain settle it.
  • Keep a thing seven years and you'll (always) find a use for it. The idiom "Keep a thing seven years and you'll (always) find a use for it" means that if you hold onto something for a significant period of time, it will eventually become useful or serve a purpose. It emphasizes the idea that even if an item may not have an immediate value or function, its usefulness may arise in the future.
  • have it on good authority The idiom "have it on good authority" means to believe or trust something because it is coming from a reliable or trustworthy source. It implies that the information or news being received is credible and can be trusted without any doubt.
  • shake it The idiom "shake it" is typically used to encourage someone to relax, let go of their worries, and enjoy themselves without feeling self-conscious or restrained. It often implies the notion of letting loose, having fun, or dancing with abandon.
  • Let's shake on it The idiom "Let's shake on it" means to make an agreement or finalize a deal by shaking hands, symbolizing mutual understanding and commitment. It implies a mutual agreement and trust between individuals involved in a business or personal negotiation.
  • Cross the stream where it is shallowest. The idiom "Cross the stream where it is shallowest" means to choose the easiest or least risky approach or option when facing a problem or making a decision. It advises taking the path of least resistance in order to achieve a goal or overcome an obstacle.
  • shame of it (all) The idiom "shame of it (all)" refers to a feeling of disappointment, regret, or sorrow over a situation or circumstances that are disgraceful, unfortunate, or could have been better. It expresses a sense of sadness or frustration regarding something that is considered shameful or pitiable.
  • shank it The idiom "shank it" refers to making a poor or errant shot or kick in sports, particularly in golf or soccer (football). It typically implies that the ball or intended target was struck poorly, resulting in a weak or inaccurate shot.
  • You'll never get away with it The idiom "You'll never get away with it" implies that someone will not be able to avoid being held responsible or facing consequences for their actions or behavior.
  • Take it away! The idiom "Take it away!" is an expression used to encourage or prompt someone to begin or start a performance, speech, or presentation. It is often used in a context where a person wants someone else to take the lead or take control of the situation.
  • have it away The idiom "have it away" is British slang that can have multiple meanings depending on the context. It generally refers to someone successfully achieving or obtaining something they desire, often in a clever or cunning manner. It can also be used to describe someone having a romantic or sexual encounter, typically in a secretive or illicit way.
  • get away from it all The idiom "get away from it all" means to take a break or retreat from one's usual routine, surroundings, or responsibilities in order to relax or find peace. It refers to the act of temporarily escaping or distancing oneself from the pressures, stress, or demands of daily life.
  • away from it all The idiom "away from it all" means to be in a place or situation that is far from the stresses, worries, or responsibilities of daily life. It suggests a desire for solitude, tranquility, relaxation, or escape from the demands of work, family, or routine.
  • bach (or batch) (it) The idiom "bach (or batch) (it)" refers to being single or living alone without a romantic partner or spouse. It is commonly used when someone is temporarily or permanently residing in a place without a partner or family members.
  • If the shoe fits(, wear it). The idiom "If the shoe fits, wear it" means that if a statement or description applies to someone, they should accept it and acknowledge it as true, rather than becoming defensive or denying it. It implies that if the description or criticism resonates with someone, it is likely accurate.
  • duke it out The idiom "duke it out" means to engage in a determined and possibly heated physical or verbal confrontation or competition with someone. It implies fighting or competing fiercely until a resolution or winner is determined.
  • so bad one can taste it The idiom "so bad one can taste it" is used to describe something that is anticipated or desired to such an extent that the person can almost physically sense it. It implies a strong and intense longing or yearning for something.
  • Bag it! The idiom "Bag it!" typically means to give up, quit, or abandon something, often due to frustration, disappointment, or failure. It suggests that the speaker no longer wants to pursue or continue with a particular task, idea, or course of action.
  • long and the short of it The idiom "long and the short of it" means to sum up or provide a concise version of something, typically a complex or lengthy topic, by focusing on the most important points or the bottom line. It signifies expressing the main idea or essence without unnecessary details or elaboration.
  • give it best shot The idiom "give it your best shot" means to give something your maximum effort or try your hardest to accomplish a task or achieve a goal, even if the odds of success are uncertain.
  • give it a shot The idiom "give it a shot" means to try or make an attempt at something, especially when the outcome is uncertain or chances of success are low.
  • Shut up about it The idiom "shut up about it" is used to express frustration or annoyance towards someone who won't stop talking about a particular topic or issue. It implies a desire for the person to stop discussing or mentioning it altogether.
  • can take it to the bank The idiom "can take it to the bank" means that the statement or information being provided is highly credible, reliable, and trustworthy. It suggests that one can have full confidence and assurance in its accuracy or validity, similar to the level of trust one has in a bank.
  • Stuff a sock in it! The idiom "Stuff a sock in it!" is an informal and somewhat rude way of telling someone to be quiet or stop talking. It implies the need for the person to literally put a sock in their mouth to prevent them from speaking.
  • sock it to sm The idiom "sock it to someone" refers to delivering a forceful blow or impact, either physically or metaphorically, to someone or something. It suggests exerting significant pressure or intensity in order to overcome a challenge or make a strong impression.
  • It takes two to make a bargain. The idiom "It takes two to make a bargain" means that both parties involved in a negotiation or agreement are necessary for it to be successfully and mutually beneficial. It emphasizes that cooperation and collaboration are essential for reaching a satisfactory outcome in any deal or arrangement.
  • take each day as it comes The idiom "take each day as it comes" means to live in the present moment and deal with each day's challenges and circumstances as they arise, without worrying excessively about the future or dwelling on the past. It emphasizes the importance of embracing the present and not prematurely anticipating or overthinking what may or may not happen in the future.
  • It was fun while it lasted. The idiom "It was fun while it lasted" implies that an enjoyable situation or experience has come to an end, often unexpectedly or prematurely. It conveys a sense of nostalgia for the past and the acknowledgment that the enjoyment or happiness experienced was temporary.
  • Who was it?
  • like it was going out of style The idiom "like it was going out of style" is used to describe something that is being done or used excessively or with great enthusiasm. It implies that the activity or behavior is being done to such an extent that, if it were to suddenly lose popularity or become out of fashion, the person would still continue doing it. It emphasizes an overabundance or lack of restraint in the action or behavior being described.
  • knew it was coming The idiom "knew it was coming" means that someone had anticipated or expected something to happen or occur, usually because there were clear signs or indications leading up to it. It implies that the person was not surprised by the occurrence, as they had an understanding or a foresight regarding the situation.
  • If it was a snake it woulda bit you. The idiom "If it was a snake it woulda bit you" is used to express exasperation or mild frustration when someone fails to notice or find something that is extremely obvious or easily accessible. It implies that the object or solution being sought after is right in front of the person, just like a snake that could potentially bite them.
  • beat to it The idiom "beat to it" means to accomplish or do something before someone else or to react quickly to a situation to gain an advantage. It implies being faster, more efficient, or more proactive than others in completing a task or taking action.
  • skip it The idiom "skip it" means to disregard or ignore something, often because it is considered unimportant or not worth the effort. It can also indicate a desire to move on or avoid discussing a particular topic or situation.
  • As you make your bed, so you must lie on it The idiom "As you make your bed, so you must lie on it" means that one must face the consequences of their own actions or decisions. It suggests that once a choice is made or a situation is created, one is responsible for dealing with the outcomes, whether positive or negative.
  • sleep on it The idiom "sleep on it" means to postpone making a decision or taking action until the following day, after having had a night's sleep to think it over or consider it more thoroughly. This implies that a fresh perspective or clarity may be gained after a period of rest and reflection.
  • cross a bridge before one comes to it The idiom "cross a bridge before one comes to it" means worrying or thinking about problems or difficulties that may never happen or anticipating and preparing for a problem or situation in advance before it occurs. It implies unnecessarily burdening oneself with future concerns that may not actually materialize.
  • before know it The idiom "before you know it" means that something will happen quickly or unexpectedly, without realization or anticipation.
  • no matter how you slice it The idiom "no matter how you slice it" means that regardless of how you look at or analyze a situation, the result or outcome will remain the same. It suggests that there is a fixed or unchangeable reality that cannot be altered or influenced.
  • let it/things slide The idiom "let it/things slide" means to neglect or ignore a situation, problem, or responsibility, usually due to laziness, lack of interest, or a decision not to take action. It implies a conscious decision not to address or attend to something that may require attention or effort.
  • You better believe it! The idiom "You better believe it!" means that the statement or claim being made is entirely true and should be accepted or acknowledged without any doubt or skepticism.
  • believe it or not The idiom "believe it or not" is used to preface a statement, story, or fact that may sound surprising, extraordinary, or unbelievable, but is in fact true. It serves to capture the attention and add a sense of incredulity to the information being presented.
  • believe a word of it The idiom "believe a word of it" means to not trust or have faith in what someone is saying. It suggests doubting the veracity or truthfulness of their statement or claim.
  • take it slow The idiom "take it slow" means to proceed or progress at a leisurely or cautious pace, usually in regards to a situation, relationship, or task. It implies a deliberate and patient approach, emphasizing the importance of not rushing or making hasty decisions.
  • feel it beneath (one) (to do sth) The idiom "feel it beneath (one) (to do sth)" means to consider or believe that a certain action is beneath one's dignity, honor, or self-respect, and therefore, one refuses to engage in it. It indicates a strong sense of pride or superiority that prevents someone from stooping to a certain level of behavior or action.
  • Put that in your pipe and smoke it! The idiom "Put that in your pipe and smoke it!" is a colloquial expression that is typically used to emphasize one's point or opinion, often in a confrontational or defiant manner. It suggests that the person being addressed should consider and accept the information, idea, or statement being presented, even if it contradicts their beliefs or desires. It implies a sense of finality, as if there is no room for further discussion or argument.
  • snap it up The idiom "snap it up" means to quickly acquire or obtain something, usually in a competitive or limited situation. It implies acting promptly or decisively to secure an opportunity before someone else does.
  • wouldn't bet on it The idiom "wouldn't bet on it" means that you do not believe something is likely to happen or do not have confidence in a particular outcome. It suggests that you would not risk or wager money on the stated outcome because you don't consider it probable.
  • bet on it The expression "bet on it" means to have a strong belief in something, often with a sense of confidence or certainty. It is an assurance or promise that what is stated will definitely occur or happen. It is often used to emphasize one's conviction or determination regarding a particular outcome or course of action.
  • think better of it The expression "think better of it" means to change one's mind or reconsider a decision or course of action, usually because one realizes that it is unwise, inappropriate, or impractical.
  • It is better to give than to receive The idiom "It is better to give than to receive" means that it is more fulfilling and advantageous to give help, kindness, or gifts to others than to be on the receiving end. It emphasizes the idea that being generous and selfless brings greater joy and personal satisfaction than simply receiving assistance or material possessions.
  • Better keep still about it The idiom "Better keep still about it" means that it is advisable or preferred to remain silent or not share information about a specific matter or situation. It suggests that disclosing the information might lead to negative consequences or interfere with a particular plan or arrangement.
  • make it sm place
  • It will take sm doing The idiom "It will take some doing" means that a task or objective will require a significant amount of effort, time, or skill to accomplish. It implies that the task is challenging or complex and may involve overcoming obstacles or difficulties.
  • not be as black as you are/it is painted The idiom "not be as black as you are/it is painted" means that something or someone is not as negative or bad as they are portrayed to be. It suggests that the reality is less severe or unfavorable than what is described or believed. It implies that a situation, person, or thing is misunderstood or misrepresented, and under closer examination, it is found to be less negative, dishonest, or harmful than initially thought.
  • (I) won't breathe a word (of it). The idiom "(I) won't breathe a word (of it)" means that the speaker promises to keep a secret and not reveal any information or details about a particular matter or topic. It implies that the person will maintain complete silence on the subject, even under pressure or temptation to share the secret with others.
  • Damn it to blue blazes! The idiom "Damn it to blue blazes!" is an exclamation of frustration or anger, typically used to express annoyance or irritation with a situation or a person. It is considered a more colorful or emphatic way of saying "damn it!" or expressing extreme frustration. The phrase "blue blazes" is used as a substitute for a more vulgar term, adding a touch of emphasis or intensity to the phrase.
  • It blows my mind! The idiom "It blows my mind!" is an expression used to convey astonishment, extreme surprise, or a profound sense of wonder. It signifies that something is so incredible or unexpected that it overwhelms one's thoughts and surpasses their comprehension.
  • Blow on it! The idiom "Blow on it!" typically means to try to fix or solve a problem by using a quick, unconventional, or experimental approach, often without a clear plan or strategy. It implies taking a chance or attempting something despite the risk of failure, in the hope that it might produce a positive outcome. The expression draws from the action of blowing air onto a flame, which can either extinguish it or make it burn brighter.
  • Do I have to spell it out (for you)? The idiom "Do I have to spell it out (for you)?" is used to express frustration or annoyance with someone who fails to understand or comprehend something that is seemingly obvious. It implies that the information or idea being conveyed is extremely clear or self-explanatory and does not require further explanation or elaboration.
  • Make no bones about it The idiom "make no bones about it" means to be straightforward, clear, and direct about something, without any hesitation or reluctance to express one's opinion or state the truth.
  • I feel it in my bones The idiom "I feel it in my bones" means to have a strong intuition or a deep sense of something without any logical explanation. It refers to a deeply ingrained or instinctual feeling that something is true or will happen, often associated with a gut instinct or an uncanny certainty.
  • booze it up The idiom "booze it up" refers to the act of consuming alcohol excessively or indulging in heavy drinking.
  • lay it on thick The idiom "lay it on thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, often in a very dramatic or excessive manner. It refers to adding an excessive amount of praise, flattery, emotions, or intensity to a statement or situation.
  • (It) won't bother me any. The idiom "(It) won't bother me any" means that something will not cause any distress, annoyance, or concern to a person. It indicates that the situation or comment does not affect one's emotions or well-being and will not have any lasting impact.
  • (It) don't bother me none. The idiom "(It) don't bother me none" means that something does not cause any distress, annoyance, or concern to a person. It indicates that the person is not affected or bothered by a particular situation or circumstance.
  • (It) doesn't bother me any. The idiom "(It) doesn't bother me any" means that something does not cause any annoyance, irritation, or concern to a person. It implies that the individual is unaffected or unaffected by a particular situation, comment, or action.
  • (It) don't cut no ice (with sm). The idiom "(It) don't cut no ice (with someone)" means that something does not have any influence or effect on someone, failing to persuade or impress them. It implies that the particular thing being discussed lacks significance or is not considered important by the person.
  • not stand for it The idiom "not stand for it" means to refuse to tolerate or accept a certain behavior, action, or situation. It implies a strong reaction or resistance against something that is considered unacceptable or unjust.
  • as it stands The idiom "as it stands" is typically used to refer to the current or existing situation or state of something. It means that the information or circumstances being discussed are based on what is currently known or understood, without any assumptions or changes.
  • swim for it The idiom "swim for it" means to make a desperate attempt to escape or avoid a difficult or dangerous situation by taking action that seems risky or daring. It can also refer to taking a chance or risking it all in order to achieve a goal or overcome an obstacle.
  • cross that bridge when you come to it The idiom "cross that bridge when you come to it" means to deal with a problem or difficult situation only if and when it occurs, rather than wasting time worrying about it in advance. It suggests focusing on the present and taking one step at a time, rather than preoccupying oneself with potential future issues.
  • I'll/We'll cross that bridge when I/we come to it. The idiom "I'll/We'll cross that bridge when I/we come to it" means to deal with a particular problem or obstacle only when it arises, rather than worrying about or planning for it in advance. It emphasizes the idea of addressing difficulties as they occur rather than preemptively fretting over hypothetical future challenges.
  • cross that bridge when one comes to it The idiom "cross that bridge when one comes to it" means to deal with a problem or issue only when it actually happens, rather than worrying about it or making plans in advance. It suggests that it is unnecessary to concern oneself with potential problems or difficulties until they actually arise, and instead focus on the present moment.
  • worth of a thing is what it will bring The idiom "worth of a thing is what it will bring" means that the value or worth of something is determined by its market price or the amount of money it can be sold for. In essence, it implies that the value of an object is ultimately determined by what others are willing to pay for it.
  • bring it on The idiom "bring it on" is an expression used to convey eagerness, confidence, or defiance when faced with a challenge or threat. It signifies the individual's willingness and readiness to face and overcome any obstacle or opposition that comes their way.
  • If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent Him The idiom "If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent Him" means that belief in a higher power or deity is essential or beneficial for society, regardless of whether or not that higher power actually exists. The phrase expresses the idea that the concept of God fulfills certain psychological, moral, and social needs, providing comfort, guidance, and purpose to individuals and communities.
  • damn it The idiom "damn it" is an interjection used to express frustration, annoyance, or anger about something. Note that it includes a mild swear word and should be used cautiously in formal situations.
  • stick it to To "stick it to" someone means to defy or intentionally harm someone, especially by outsmarting or getting revenge on them. It is often used when one person seeks to cause someone else trouble or discomfort, usually as a form of payback or to assert their dominance or superiority.
  • stick it out The idiom "stick it out" means to persevere, endure, or continue with something difficult or unpleasant, often until its completion or resolution. It implies remaining steadfast, determined, and not giving up despite challenges or hardships.
  • way it plays The idiom "way it plays" refers to the manner in which a situation or event unfolds or develops. It implies the unfolding of events and the way things naturally progress or occur. It can also indicate the outcome or result of a particular situation or event.
  • play it for all it's worth The idiom "play it for all it's worth" means to take full advantage of a situation or opportunity by using all possible resources, skills, or efforts to benefit oneself. It implies making the most out of a particular circumstance, giving it the utmost importance or value.
  • What'll it be? The idiom "What'll it be?" is typically used as a casual way of asking someone what they would like or what their decision will be regarding a certain situation or choice. It can be used when asking someone what they would like to order at a restaurant or bar, or used more broadly to inquire about someone's decision or preference in any given context.
  • It is easier to tear down than to build up. The idiom "It is easier to tear down than to build up" means that destroying or criticizing something is often much simpler than creating or improving it. It implies that it takes less effort, time, or skill to criticize or dismantle something than to construct, develop, or repair it.
  • give it to straight The idiom "give it to straight" means to communicate or convey something honestly, directly, and without sugarcoating or any kind of deception. It implies being straightforward and telling the truth, even if the information might be difficult to hear.
  • Give it to me straight The idiom "Give it to me straight" means to request or ask for complete honesty, truth, or information without any sugarcoating or euphemism. It refers to wanting the unfiltered or direct truth, without any embellishments or softened versions of it.
  • take it to the street The idiom "take it to the street" means to protest or demonstrate publicly, usually by rallying or engaging in political activism in the public sphere. It often refers to a collective action taken by individuals or groups who want to express their dissatisfaction or seek support for a cause, thereby bringing attention to their concerns or demands.
  • it strikes me that The idiom "it strikes me that" is an expression used to convey an initial impression, realization, or sudden understanding of something. It indicates that a particular thought or idea has come to someone's mind.
  • make it business to The idiom "make it (one's) business to" means to prioritize or determine to do something. It implies a strong commitment or dedication towards accomplishing a specific task or goal.
  • You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink The idiom "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink" means that you can provide someone with an opportunity or the necessary resources, but you cannot force them to take advantage of it or do what is in their best interest. It emphasizes that while you may assist or guide someone, ultimately, it is their decision to act or make use of the provided options.
  • no ifs, ands, or buts and no buts about it The idiom "no ifs, ands, or buts and no buts about it" means there are no conditions, excuses, or arguments to be made regarding a particular situation or statement. It implies that there is no room for negotiation or disagreement, and that the matter is unquestionable or absolute.
  • It is not work that kills, but worry The idiom "It is not work that kills, but worry" is used to emphasize that excessive stress, anxiety, or constant worrying about something is more detrimental to one's well-being than the actual physical labor or task at hand. It suggests that mental strain and apprehension have a more negative impact on a person's health and happiness than the effort or exertion required for work.
  • The butler did it. The idiom "The butler did it" is a popular phrase referring to the common plot twist in a mystery story where the unexpected perpetrator of a crime is the butler. It is used humorously or sarcastically to imply that the obvious or assumed culprit is responsible for a wrongdoing or a complex situation.
  • have your cake and eat it too The idiom "have your cake and eat it too" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two conflicting or mutually exclusive things or situations at the same time. It refers to the desire to have it all, even when those desires contradict each other or are impossible to achieve simultaneously.
  • You cannot have your cake and eat it (too). The idiom "You cannot have your cake and eat it (too)" means that you cannot have or enjoy the benefits of two conflicting options or choices simultaneously. It implies that one must make a decision between two mutually exclusive things and cannot possess or experience both at the same time.
  • have one's cake and eat it too The idiom "have one's cake and eat it too" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two contradictory things or situations simultaneously, without realizing that they conflict with each other or are mutually exclusive. It suggests a desire for impossible outcomes or unrealistic expectations where one tries to have the best of both worlds.
  • Time to call it a night The idiom "Time to call it a night" means that it is time to end an activity, event, or social gathering and go home, typically because it is late in the evening or early morning. It implies a desire to bring an end to the current situation and rest or sleep.
  • Time to call it a day The idiom "Time to call it a day" means that it is time to end an activity or to stop working for the day. It suggests that one has reached the point where further effort or progress is unlikely or unnecessary, and it is appropriate to stop and rest.
  • Let's call it a day The idiom "Let's call it a day" means to stop working or to end an activity or task for the time being. It suggests that a sufficient amount of work has been done or that further progress is unlikely.
  • call it a night The idiom "call it a night" means to decide or announce that an activity or event is coming to an end, typically for the day or evening. It implies that it is time to stop whatever is being done and prepare to rest or go home.
  • (It) suits me (fine). The idiom "(It) suits me (fine)" means that something is satisfactory or acceptable to the speaker. It implies that the situation aligns with their preferences or needs. It can be used to express contentment or agreement.
  • camp it up The idiom "camp it up" refers to the act of intentionally exaggerating or overacting in a manner that is usually considered flamboyant, theatrical, or exaggeratedly feminine. It often involves adopting an overly theatrical style or behavior, typically associated with camp or exaggeratedly theatrical performances.
  • to cap/crown/top it all The idiom "to cap/crown/top it all" means to add something that is even more surprising, significant, or remarkable to an already impressive or overwhelming situation.
  • cop it sweet The idiom "cop it sweet" means to accept or endure the consequences or punishment without complaint or resistance. It implies acknowledging and dealing with a situation in a calm and stoic manner.
  • get it out of your system The idiom "get it out of your system" means to engage in a particular behavior or activity in order to satisfy a strong desire or urge, especially when it might be considered excessive or harmful. It is often used to suggest that someone should temporarily indulge or express themselves in a certain way in order to alleviate an intense emotion or compulsion.
  • Ignorance (of the law) is no excuse (for breaking it). The idiom "Ignorance (of the law) is no excuse (for breaking it)" means that not knowing or being unaware of a law does not provide a valid defense or justification for breaking that law. It implies that individuals are expected to be familiar with the laws governing their actions, and they are legally accountable for their actions whether or not they were aware of the law.
  • what it takes The idiom "what it takes" means having the necessary qualities, skills, abilities, or resources required to accomplish something successfully. It refers to possessing the necessary elements or traits to achieve a specific objective or goal.
  • have (got) what it takes The idiom "have (got) what it takes" means to possess the necessary qualities, skills, determination, or potential to succeed in a particular situation, task, or role. It implies someone has the required abilities, mindset, or attributes to achieve success or handle a challenging situation.
  • It takes two to make a quarrel. The idiom "It takes two to make a quarrel" means that conflicts or arguments typically require the active participation of more than one person. It suggests that both parties involved in a dispute contribute to its occurrence and continuation. The idiom emphasizes that blame or responsibility for a quarrel should not be assigned to only one person, as both individuals are involved in the conflict.
  • It takes money to make money. The idiom "It takes money to make money" means that in order to earn or profit, one must invest or spend money initially. Success or financial gain often requires an initial investment or expenditure in resources, capital, or opportunities.
  • It takes all kinds (to make a world). The idiom "It takes all kinds (to make a world)" implies that people vary greatly in their characteristics, opinions, or behavior, and that this diversity is necessary for the world to function harmoniously. It suggests that it is essential to embrace and accept individuals with different perspectives and qualities, as they contribute to the overall richness and completeness of life.
  • It takes (sm) getting used to. The idiom "It takes (someone) getting used to" means that something is not immediately comfortable, familiar, or enjoyable for someone, but over time they become accustomed to it. It implies that a person needs some time and practice to adjust to a new situation, experience, or change.
  • (It) takes one to know one. The idiom "(It) takes one to know one" means that to recognize a certain characteristic or behavior in someone else, typically negative, one must possess that same characteristic or behavior oneself. It suggests that the person making the judgment is highlighting their own similarity or experience in order to understand or identify with the other person.
  • catch to it
  • catch it The idiom "catch it" typically refers to getting into trouble or facing punishment for something done wrong or committing an offense. It can also imply receiving criticism, reprimand, or facing negative consequences for one's actions.
  • you'll catch it The idiom "you'll catch it" is an informal way of warning or threatening someone that they will face consequences or punishment for their actions or behavior. It suggests that the person will face criticism, reprimand, or punishment from others.
  • take it easy The definition of the idiom "take it easy" is to relax, not rush or stress, and proceed in a calm and leisurely manner. It implies taking a break, reducing efforts, or embracing a more carefree and laid-back attitude.
  • be coining it The idiom "be coining it" usually means to make a great deal of money or to be very successful financially. It implies that someone is accumulating a significant amount of wealth or profiting greatly from a venture or situation.
  • when it comes to the crunch The idiom "when it comes to the crunch" means when a difficult or crucial situation arises, usually requiring a decision or action. It refers to a time when circumstances demand someone to make a choice or face the consequences.
  • when it comes to The idiom "when it comes to" is used to introduce or focus on a specific topic or area that someone is knowledgeable or experienced about. It indicates that the following statement is regarding that particular subject or when discussing that specific topic. It emphasizes expertise or proficiency in a specific context.
  • take as it comes The idiom "take as it comes" means to deal with or accept a situation or event as it happens, without worrying about or trying to control the future outcomes. It signifies a flexible and adaptable approach to encountering various circumstances, accepting them as they unfold without making excessive plans or expectations. It involves being open-minded and ready to face whatever happens without resistance or undue concern.
  • if it comes to the crunch The idiom "if it comes to the crunch" is typically used to refer to a situation where a decision, action, or solution needs to be made, especially in a difficult or challenging circumstances. It suggests that when things become critical or reach a decisive point, individuals must act or make a choice.
  • I'll cross that bridge when I come to it The idiom "I'll cross that bridge when I come to it" means to defer or postpone dealing with a problem or issue until it becomes unavoidable or necessary. It suggests a willingness to focus on current problems rather than worrying prematurely about potential future difficulties.
  • cross that bridge when come to it The definition of the idiom "cross that bridge when come to it" is to deal with a problem or situation only when it actually happens and not worry about it in advance. It suggests that one should focus on the present and not spend unnecessary time and energy worrying about future problems that may never occur.
  • come to think of it The idiom "come to think of it" means to suddenly remember or consider something that was not initially thought about or mentioned. It is often used when discussing or reflecting on a topic, and a new thought or perspective arises.
  • Come and get it! The idiom "Come and get it!" often conveys an invitation or call to action, urging someone to approach or claim something that is being offered or made available. It is typically used to express enthusiasm, urgency, or a sense of encouragement for others to take advantage of an opportunity.
  • Tell me about it! The idiom "Tell me about it!" is a colloquial expression used to convey agreement or empathy with someone's statement, often to emphasize that the speaker has also experienced the same situation or feeling. It implies that the speaker fully understands or can relate to what has been said and may have even encountered a similar situation themselves.
  • Tell it like it is The idiom "Tell it like it is" means to speak honestly and directly, without sugarcoating or distorting the truth.
  • I wouldn't touch it with a tenfoot pole. The idiom "I wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole" means that one has a strong aversion or hesitation towards something, and would prefer not to be involved or associated with it. It implies a feeling of extreme caution or avoidance.
  • get it off your chest The idiom "get it off your chest" means to express or share one's thoughts, feelings, or grievances with someone else to relieve oneself of a burden or emotional weight. It refers to the act of venting or confessing something that has been bothering or preoccupying someone.
  • for the devil of it The idiom "for the devil of it" means doing something mischievous or troublesome purely for the sake of amusement or to annoy others. It refers to engaging in an action without a specific reason or justification, simply because one feels like doing so.
  • It is a wise child that knows its own father. The idiom "It is a wise child that knows its own father" means that it is commendable for a child to accurately identify and acknowledge who their biological father is. It implies that paternity should not be taken for granted, as it is important for a child to be aware of their true heritage and not be deceived or misled about their biological parentage. The idiom can also be interpreted more broadly, suggesting that it is wise for individuals to have a clear understanding of their origins and family background.
  • in the thick of it The idiom "in the thick of it" means to be deeply involved or immersed in a difficult or challenging situation. It is often used to describe being in the middle of a complicated task, a chaotic event, or a demanding situation that requires one's full attention and engagement.
  • let it slide The idiom "let it slide" means to intentionally overlook or ignore a mistake, offense, or slight without taking any action or expressing any dissatisfaction about it. It implies choosing not to react or respond to something that would typically bother or upset someone.
  • Keep a thing seven years and you'll find a use for it The idiom "Keep a thing seven years and you'll find a use for it" suggests that if you hold onto something for a long enough period, there will eventually be a situation or circumstance where it becomes valuable or useful. It implies that one should refrain from discarding or getting rid of items too hastily, as they may serve a purpose later on.
  • If you want a thing done well, do it yourself The idiom "If you want a thing done well, do it yourself" means that if you want something to be done to the highest standard or quality, you should undertake the task or responsibility yourself rather than relying on others. It implies that nobody will care for or complete a task with the same level of dedication and attention to detail as you would, hence emphasizing the importance of taking personal ownership and control in order to achieve the desired outcome.
  • get into the swing of it The idiom "get into the swing of it" means to become familiar, comfortable, or adept at a particular activity or routine. It suggests getting into a rhythm or flow, where one becomes more skillful, productive, or engaged in the task at hand.
  • cut it fine The idiom "cut it fine" means to complete something just in time or narrowly meet a deadline, often with little margin for error.
  • chuck it in The idiom "chuck it in" means to give up or abandon something, often referring to a task, activity, or project. It implies a lack of interest, motivation, or willingness to continue or complete something.
  • it is high time The idiom "it is high time" means that something should have happened or been done a long time ago and it is now urgent or overdue for it to occur.
  • have an easy time of it The idiom "have an easy time of it" means to experience something without difficulties or challenges. It refers to a situation where someone is not required to put in much effort, encounter obstacles, or face any significant problems in achieving their goal or completing a task.
  • Give it time The idiom "Give it time" means to be patient and allow for a period of waiting or adjustment before expecting results or seeing changes. It suggests that time is needed for things to develop, resolve, or improve naturally.
  • don't have a pot to piss in (or a window to throw it out of) The idiom "don't have a pot to piss in (or a window to throw it out of)" is a colloquial expression used to describe extreme poverty or financial destitution. It implies that someone lacks basic resources or possessions, to the point where they don't even have a basic pot for personal needs or a window to dispose of waste. This idiom highlights a state of absolute lack and suggests the person's desperate circumstances.
  • take it from the top The idiom "take it from the top" means to start something from the beginning or to start over from the first step. It is often used in contexts such as rehearsals or discussions where a restart or review is necessary.
  • tough it out The idiom "tough it out" means to endure or persevere through a difficult or challenging situation. It implies staying strong, resilient, and not giving up despite adversity or discomfort.
  • had it coming The idiom "had it coming" means that someone deserves the negative consequences or punishment they are experiencing because of their own actions or behavior. It suggests that the individual's actions have led to the current situation and that they should not be surprised or shocked by the outcome.
  • to whom it may concern The idiom "to whom it may concern" is used to address an unknown or unspecified audience or recipient. It is typically found at the beginning of formal letters or documents when the sender is uncertain about the specific person who will be reading or receiving the message. The phrase signifies that the matter being addressed is important and relevant to anyone who comes across it, without specifying a particular individual.
  • It is a long lane that has no turning. "It is a long lane that has no turning" is an idiom that means every difficult situation or challenging period will eventually come to an end. It implies that even when faced with hardship or obstacles, there will always be a change or opportunity for improvement. Thus, this expression emphasizes the belief that patience and perseverance will lead to better outcomes or brighter times ahead.
  • no two ways about it The idiom "no two ways about it" means that there is no doubt or alternative perspective on something. It emphasizes that there is only one clear or certain way to interpret or understand a situation.
  • Make it two The idiom "make it two" usually refers to a request for doubling the quantity, often in the context of ordering food or drinks. It means requesting two of something instead of just one.
  • It cuts two ways The idiom "it cuts two ways" means that a situation or an action can have both positive and negative consequences or effects. It suggests that something can have dual or contradictory outcomes depending on the perspective or circumstances.
  • It would take an act of Congress to do sth. The idiom "It would take an act of Congress to do something" means that the task or action being discussed is extremely difficult or unlikely to happen. It suggests that the process requires a great deal of effort, bureaucracy, or political maneuvering, akin to the formal legislative process required to pass a law in a system like that of the United States Congress.
  • I don't understand (it). The idiom "I don't understand (it)" refers to a situation when someone lacks comprehension or fails to grasp a particular concept, idea, or information. It expresses confusion or a lack of knowledge about something.
  • (I'm) glad to hear it. The idiom "(I'm) glad to hear it" is an expression used to convey happiness or relief upon hearing positive or favorable news or information. It signifies that the person speaking is pleased to learn about the situation being discussed.
  • rub sm's nose in it The idiom "rub someone's nose in it" means to purposely remind or point out someone's mistake, failure, or embarrassment in a way that can be seen as cruel or insensitive. It often involves excessively highlighting or dwelling on the person's misfortune or shortcomings, typically to make them feel worse or to assert one's superiority.
  • not all it is cracked up to be The idiom "not all it is cracked up to be" means that something or someone is not as good or impressive as it was believed or reputed to be. It implies that the actual experience or quality of something falls short of the expectations or hype surrounding it.
  • heart isn't in it The idiom "heart isn't in it" is used to describe a situation where someone lacks enthusiasm, interest, or genuine commitment towards a task, activity, or goal. It implies that the person is not emotionally or mentally involved or invested in what they are doing.
  • find it in heart The idiom "find it in heart" means to have the ability or willingness to forgive, have compassion, or show kindness toward someone or something despite personal feelings or disagreements. It refers to the capability of acting with understanding and empathy, putting aside negative emotions or prejudices.
  • it doesn't hurt to do sth The idiom "it doesn't hurt to do something" means that there is no harm or negative consequences in taking a particular action. It suggests that the action is worth considering and trying, even if there may not be any immediate benefit or necessity.
  • hit sb where it hurts (most) The idiom "hit someone where it hurts (most)" means to intentionally target someone's biggest vulnerability or weakness in order to cause them maximum pain or distress. It refers to the act of striking a person in the area or aspect that matters most to them, often to gain an advantage or to retaliate.
  • (It) doesn't hurt to ask. and (It) never hurts to ask. The idiom "(It) doesn't hurt to ask" or "(It) never hurts to ask" refers to the idea that there is no harm or risk in making a request or seeking information. It implies that it is worthwhile to ask a question or make a request, as the worst outcome would be a refusal or a negative response. This phrase encourages individuals to be proactive in seeking assistance or clarification without fear of negative consequences.
  • land so poor it wouldn't even raise a fuss
  • not cut it The idiom "not cut it" means not being satisfactory or not reaching the expected level of quality or standard. It implies that something or someone is unable to meet the requirements, expectations, or demands of a specific situation.
  • Cut it out! The idiom "Cut it out!" is an expression used to tell someone to stop doing something immediately, often used when the person's action is annoying, irritating, or unacceptable.
  • take it into head to The idiom "take it into head to" means to suddenly decide or be determined to do something, often without any prior planning or reason. It implies a stubborn or impulsive behavior where someone gets a strong idea in their mind and is unwilling to change or listen to reason.
  • take it into head The idiom "take it into head" typically means to develop an idea or notion in one's mind, firmly believing in it or becoming obsessed with it.
  • on head be it The idiom "on head be it" means taking full responsibility or bearing the consequences of one's actions or decisions. It implies that the individual is accepting the accountability or ownership of a certain matter, regardless of the outcome or potential negative consequences.
  • get it into head To "get it into head" means to fully understand or comprehend something, often a concept or idea, after prior resistance or difficulty in doing so. It implies that the person finally accepts or grasps the information or notion.
  • It has name on it The idiom "It has your name on it" means that something is specifically intended or predetermined for a particular person. It suggests that the person has an exclusive claim or ownership over something, emphasizing the connection between the person and the object.
  • make a day etc. of it The idiom "make a day of it" means to dedicate a whole day or a significant amount of time to an activity or event, usually with the intention of enjoying, celebrating or fully experiencing it. It implies that one is extending the duration or level of involvement beyond what is necessary or expected for that particular activity or event.
  • deem it (to be) necessary The idiom "deem it (to be) necessary" means to consider or judge something as being required or essential. It implies that one has the authority or power to make such a decision.
  • If it looks like a duck and walks etc. like a duck, it is a duck The idiom "If it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it is a duck" means that if something or someone displays all the characteristics or behaviors associated with a particular thing or category, then it can be assumed to belong to that thing or category. It implies that appearances and patterns of behavior can provide reliable indications of someone or something's true nature or identity.
  • want to make of it?
  • Do you want to make sth of it? The idiom "Do you want to make something of it?" is a rhetorical question used to challenge or confront someone who is questioning, challenging, or disagreeing with a statement or action. It conveys a sense of readiness or willingness to engage in a conflict or argument.
  • It won't wash! The idiom "It won't wash!" can be defined as a phrase used to express disbelief or rejection of someone's explanation, excuse, or argument. It implies that the explanation is inadequate, inconsistent, or unconvincing.
  • That's the way it goes The idiom "That's the way it goes" means accepting a situation or outcome, often in a resigned or philosophical manner, acknowledging that things don't always turn out the way we want or expect them to. It signifies the understanding that life is full of unpredictable events and inevitable disappointments, and that these occurrences are simply a part of the natural course of life.
  • Have it your way The definition of the idiom "Have it your way" is to allow someone to do something or to have things done according to their preference or choice. It implies giving someone full control or authority over a situation or decision.
  • make a day/night/weekend etc. of it The idiom "make a day/night/weekend etc. of it" means to fully enjoy and make the most out of a specific period of time, such as a day, night, weekend, etc. It suggests that one should fully immerse themselves in the experience and make it memorable by engaging in enjoyable activities and relishing the moment.
  • read it and weep The idiom "read it and weep" is often used to sarcastically express satisfaction or triumph over someone else's unfortunate or disappointing situation, particularly when the person is proven wrong or defeated. It implies that the person should examine or consider something closely and then react emotionally to its contents, usually with regret or dismay.
  • I've had it up to here The idiom "I've had it up to here" is used to convey a strong sense of frustration, annoyance, or exasperation with a person, situation, or a particular behavior. It implies that one's patience or tolerance has reached its limit or its breaking point. The phrase "up to here" typically refers to a point near or at the top of one's head, indicating that one's frustration has become overwhelming.
  • What difference does it make? The idiom "What difference does it make?" means asking about the importance or impact of a particular action or decision. It is often used to show indifference or a lack of concern, suggesting that the outcome or result is insignificant or inconsequential.
  • (It) makes no difference to me. The idiom "It makes no difference to me" is used to convey that a particular outcome, decision, or situation does not affect or matter to the speaker. It indicates that the individual is indifferent, unaffected, or unopposed to the circumstances being discussed.
  • give it a shot/whirl The idiom "give it a shot/whirl" means to try something or attempt a task or activity, even if unsure of the outcome or success. It signifies taking a chance or making an effort in order to see what happens.
  • Who needs it? The idiom "Who needs it?" is used rhetorically to question the necessity or relevance of something. It indicates a disregard or lack of interest in a particular thing, implying that it is not worth having or doing.
  • wing it The idiom "wing it" means to do something or handle a situation without any preparation or prior planning. It refers to making things up or improvising as one goes along, often relying on spontaneity and instinct.
  • Wipe it off! The idiom "Wipe it off!" is an exclamation that typically means to remove or eradicate a particular stain, mark, or problem. It is often used metaphorically to urge someone to eliminate or get rid of an undesirable situation, memory, or mistake.
  • take word for it The idiom "take (someone's) word for it" means to believe or trust what someone is saying without requiring further proof or evidence. It implies accepting information or assurance solely based on the credibility and trustworthiness of the person speaking.
  • Take my word for it The idiom "Take my word for it" means to trust or believe what someone is saying without any further evidence or proof.
  • Don't worry your (pretty little) head about it. The idiom "Don't worry your (pretty little) head about it" is a dismissive and condescending statement used to imply that the person being spoken to should not concern themselves or think too much about a particular issue or problem. It suggests that the person's thoughts or opinions are not important or relevant enough to be taken seriously, usually due to their perceived lack of understanding or intelligence.
  • Nothing so bad but (it) might have been worse. The idiom "Nothing so bad but (it) might have been worse" means that regardless of how terrible or unfavorable a situation may seem, there is always the possibility that it could have been even more negative or disastrous. It emphasizes the idea that one should consider themselves fortunate or find some comfort in the awareness that things could have turned out even more poorly.
  • worth it The idiom "worth it" means that something is deserving of the effort, time, or money invested in it because the outcome or the experience is valuable or rewarding. It is often used to justify undertaking a difficult or challenging task by acknowledging the benefits derived from it.
  • make it worth while The idiom "make it worth while" means to ensure that an action, effort, or endeavor is sufficiently rewarding or valuable to justify one's time, energy, or resources invested in it. It implies the need for meaningful or impactful results or outcomes in order to make the experience or involvement worthwhile.
  • no doubt about it The idiom "no doubt about it" means that there is absolutely no uncertainty or question regarding something. It indicates a high level of confidence in the stated fact or situation.
  • I doubt it. The idiom "I doubt it" is used as a response to express skepticism or disbelief about a statement or claim. It implies a lack of confidence or a disbelief in the truthfulness, possibility, or likelihood of something being true or happening.
  • (There is) no doubt about it. The idiom "(There is) no doubt about it" means that something is unquestionably true or certain. It expresses absolute certainty without any room for doubt or disbelief.
  • have sb's name written all over it The idiom "have sb's name written all over it" means that something is so perfectly suited to or characteristic of a particular person that it is as if their name is literally written on it. It suggests that the person's influence, preferences, or style are so evident in the situation or object that it couldn't belong to anyone else.
  • If anything can go wrong, it will The idiom "If anything can go wrong, it will" refers to Murphy's Law, which states that if something has the potential to go wrong, it is likely that it will indeed go wrong. This expression implies a pessimistic view that suggests that unforeseen mishaps and failures are likely to occur despite precautions taken.
  • get it wrong The idiom "get it wrong" refers to the act of making a mistake or inaccurately understanding or executing something. It indicates a failure or error in comprehending or completing a task, concept, or situation.
  • so it goes The idiom "so it goes" is a phrase used to express acceptance or resignation to a situation, often in the face of a tragedy or unfortunate event. It conveys the idea that events occur regardless of one's opinion or feelings, and that it is futile to resist or dwell upon them. It reflects a sense of inevitability and the recognition that life is filled with both positive and negative experiences.
  • How goes it? The idiom "How goes it?" is an informal and casual way to ask someone about their overall well-being, current situation, or progress in general. It is often used as a greeting or a simple inquiry into someone's state or progress.
  • to put too fine a point on it The idiom "to put too fine a point on it" means to be excessively specific, precise, or detailed when expressing something, often to the point of being blunt or insensitive. It implies that the speaker is being overly meticulous or pedantic in their explanation, perhaps disregarding the nuances or emotions involved.
  • not to put too fine a point on it The idiom "not to put too fine a point on it" means to state something directly or clearly without using excessive or unnecessary details. It suggests that the speaker wants to be precise or blunt in their statement without being overly graphic or elaborate.
  • lord it over sb The idiom "lord it over someone" means to act in a superior or domineering manner towards someone, exerting authority or control over them. It is often used to describe someone who likes to display their power or influence over others, making them feel subservient or inferior.
  • lord it over sm The idiom "lord it over someone" means to act as if one is superior or more powerful than another person and to show off one's authority or control. It refers to exerting dominance or domination over someone in a condescending or arrogant manner.
  • I need it yesterday. The idiom "I need it yesterday" is an expression used to emphasize extreme urgency in wanting or requiring something to be done or delivered as quickly as possible, often implying that it should have been done or provided even before the present moment. It often implies impatience or frustration with delays in receiving or completing the desired task or item.
  • It is the pace that kills. The idiom "It is the pace that kills" often means that rushing or going too fast can lead to mistakes, accidents, or negative consequences. It suggests that taking things slowly and methodically is often more effective or safer in achieving success or desired outcomes.
  • even if it kills me The idiom "even if it kills me" means that someone is determined to achieve or accomplish something regardless of any risks, difficulties, or obstacles, even if they have to face severe consequences or put their own life in danger.
  • if can help it The idiom "if can help it" means to avoid doing something if possible or if one has the ability to prevent it.
  • couldn't help it The idiom "couldn't help it" means that someone is unable to control or prevent themselves from doing something. It indicates that the person's actions or behavior are involuntary or instinctive, often due to strong emotions or desires.
  • can't help it The idiom "can't help it" is used to express a lack of control over a situation or action. It means that someone is unable to prevent or change a certain behavior, feeling, or reaction because it is natural, instinctive, or beyond their control.
  • If it looks like a duck and walks/quack/flies etc. like a duck, it is a duck. The idiom "If it looks like a duck and walks/quacks/flies, etc. like a duck, it is a duck" means that if something appears to be a certain way and behaves or possesses the characteristics associated with that thing, then it can be assumed or categorized as such without any doubt or need for further examination. It emphasizes the idea that appearances, actions, or observable qualities often provide accurate indications or evidence of something's true nature or identity.
  • It will be your ass! The idiom "It will be your ass!" is a colloquial expression used to indicate that someone will face severe consequences or punishment for their actions or decisions. It implies a serious, negative outcome for the person being addressed.
  • not hack it The idiom "not hack it" means to not be competent, skilled, or capable enough to successfully complete a task, meet requirements, or perform at a desired level. It implies that the person or thing in question falls short of expectations or fails to meet a certain standard.
  • can't hack it The idiom "can't hack it" means to be unable to cope with or succeed in a particular situation or task due to lack of ability, skill, or resilience. It often implies that the person is not able to meet the required standards or expectations.
  • forget (about) it The idiom "forget (about) it" is a phrase used to dismiss or disregard something, often indicating that it is not worth further consideration or attention. It suggests letting go of a topic, idea, or request because it is irrelevant, unimportant, or unrealistic. It can also convey a sense of giving up or accepting defeat.
  • It is never too late to learn. The idiom "It is never too late to learn" means that there is no age limit or deadline for acquiring new knowledge or skills. It emphasizes that one can always continue learning and improving, regardless of their stage in life.
  • take it as read The idiom "take it as read" means to accept or assume something as true or accurate without requiring any further evidence or proof. It is often used to indicate that the information or statement being referred to is widely known, well-established, or generally accepted as a fact.
  • it escapes me The idiom "it escapes me" refers to when someone cannot remember or understand something, it implies that one's memory or grasp of the concept is failing.
  • take it easy on The idiom "take it easy on" means to be gentle, lenient, or forgiving towards someone or something. It refers to treating someone or something with patience and understanding, avoiding harsh criticism, punishments, or excessive demands.
  • You cannot have your cake and eat it The idiom "You cannot have your cake and eat it too" means that one cannot simultaneously enjoy two conflicting things or options. It implies that there are often choices or trade-offs to be made, and one cannot have both options fully available. In other words, it emphasizes the concept of making a decision and accepting the consequences that come with it, as it is not always possible to have everything desired.
  • have cake and eat it too The phrase "have your cake and eat it too" means wanting the benefits or advantages of two conflicting options or outcomes without having to choose one over the other or experiencing any negative consequences. It refers to the desire to enjoy two things simultaneously that are mutually exclusive or contradictory.
  • have cake and eat it The idiom "have cake and eat it" means wanting to enjoy or benefit from two conflicting or mutually exclusive things simultaneously, without sacrificing or compromising either. It implies a desire for contradictory outcomes that are impossible to achieve together.
  • eat it up The idiom "eat it up" typically means to enthusiastically enjoy or appreciate something, often an idea, information, or entertainment content. It implies that the person is fully embracing or consuming the content mentally or emotionally.
  • Let me have it! The idiom "Let me have it!" typically means to give or unleash one's full force or passionate expression of something, often including criticism, anger, or an attack. It can also be used as a request to receive all the available information or details about something.
  • Let it go The idiom "Let it go" means to release control or attachment to something, to stop worrying or obsessing over a situation or person, and to move on or forgive. It suggests accepting and allowing things to happen without trying to control or change them.
  • Let it be The idiom "Let it be" means to leave a situation as it is, without trying to change or intervene in it. It often suggests acceptance of the current circumstances or a decision to not take any action. It can also be seen as a way to encourage patience or to let go of worries and allow things to unfold naturally.
  • let have it The idiom "let have it" means to attack or criticize someone verbally or physically, confront them openly, or express one's anger or frustration towards someone or something.
  • Let George do it The idiom "Let George do it" means to delegate a task or responsibility to someone else rather than taking it on oneself. It implies allowing someone else, often named George, to handle a situation or complete a task instead of doing it personally.
  • never hear the end of it The idiom "never hear the end of it" means that someone will continue to be reminded or teased about a particular event, mistake, or action for a long period of time. It implies that the person will face repeated comments or criticisms, and that the topic will be brought up regularly, causing annoyance or embarrassment.
  • end it The idiom "end it" typically means to bring something to a close or to bring an activity, relationship, or situation to an end.
  • park it (smw)
  • have a familiar ring (to it) The idiom "have a familiar ring (to it)" means that something sounds or seems familiar, similar to something previously heard or experienced. It suggests a sense of recognition or resonance with a particular idea, phrase, or situation.
  • mix it up The idiom "mix it up" means to engage in a conflict, argument, or fight with someone, often involving physical aggression or verbal confrontation. It can also refer to diversifying or changing things, such as varying routines, activities, or strategies.
  • mix it up (with sm) The idiom "mix it up with someone" means to engage in a conflict, argument, or physical altercation with someone. It suggests a situation where individuals confront each other, often resulting in heated exchanges or potentially violent encounters.
  • fake it The idiom "fake it" means to pretend or act as if something is true or real, usually to deceive or mislead others. It involves behaving in a way that suggests a certain quality, skill, or knowledge, even though one may not possess it.
  • no ifs, ands, or buts (about it) and no buts about it The idiom "no ifs, ands, or buts (about it) and no buts about it" means that there are no exceptions, excuses, or arguments to be made regarding a particular statement or decision. It emphasizes that something is definite, non-negotiable, and must be accepted without any further debate or questioning.
  • It (only) stands to reason. The idiom "It (only) stands to reason" means that something is logical, sensible, or obvious based on the facts or circumstances at hand. It implies that there is a clear and reasonable conclusion to be drawn from the given information.
  • pack it in The idiom "pack it in" typically means to give up, quit, or stop doing something, often in a context where one is tired, frustrated, or not achieving the desired result.
  • Don't even think about it (happening). The idiom "Don't even think about it (happening)" is used as a warning or a firm refusal to someone suggesting or considering a certain action or outcome. It implies that the suggested action or outcome is impossible, unacceptable, or unlikely to happen under any circumstances.
  • not put it past The idiom "not put it past" refers to the belief that someone is capable of doing something, often negative or unexpected, based on their previous behavior or character. It suggests that the person should not be underestimated or doubted in regards to a particular action or behavior.
  • I wouldn't put it past The idiom "I wouldn't put it past" means that someone believes it is possible for someone or something to do a particular action, even though it might seem surprising or unexpected. It implies that the person or thing in question is capable of behaving in that way, although it may be contrary to their usual behavior or expectations.
  • You'll get the hang of it The idiom "You'll get the hang of it" means that a person will eventually understand or become familiar with something through practice, experience, or repeated attempts. It suggests that with time and effort, the person will master or become proficient in a particular skill, task, or activity.
  • hang it up The idiom "hang it up" means to cease or give up a particular activity or endeavor. It can also refer to retiring or quitting a job or profession.
  • Hang it all! The idiom "Hang it all!" is an expression of frustration or annoyance, often used when facing an irritating situation or when something has not gone as planned. It is usually used to express a mild form of anger or exasperation.
  • wouldn't know if it hit in the face The idiom "wouldn't know if it hit in the face" means that a person is completely oblivious or unaware of something, even if it is obvious or directly affects them. It implies that the person lacks awareness, understanding, or simply fails to notice the impact or consequences of a situation, much like not realizing if something physically struck them in the face.
  • face it The idiom "face it" means to accept or confront a difficult or unpleasant truth or situation, often without trying to avoid or deny it.
  • it just so happens (that) The idiom "it just so happens (that)" is used to indicate a coincidence or unexpected occurrence. It refers to a situation where something is coincidentally or unexpectedly true or the case.
  • hit where it hurts The idiom "hit where it hurts" means to intentionally target or attack someone's weakest point or vulnerability, in order to cause them maximum pain, discomfort, or damage.
  • hit it off The idiom "hit it off" means to have a good rapport or an instant connection with someone upon meeting or getting to know them. It implies a positive and harmonious interaction between individuals.
  • it behooves one to do sth The idiom "it behooves one to do something" means that it is one's duty, responsibility, or obligation to do something. It implies that it is morally or socially expected of the person, and not doing it would be considered improper or inappropriate.
  • know the half of it The idiom "know the half of it" means that someone is only aware of a portion of the whole situation or story. It implies that there is more to be revealed or understood beyond what is currently known or disclosed.
  • glad to hear it The idiom "glad to hear it" is an expression used to convey one's happiness or satisfaction upon receiving positive or pleasing news. It indicates that the person is pleased by the information shared with them.
  • make it The idiom "make it" can have multiple definitions depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To succeed or achieve a goal: This definition is often used to indicate that someone has achieved or accomplished something, usually in a challenging or difficult situation. For example, if someone says, "I will work hard and make it in my career," it means they aim to achieve success in their professional life. 2. To arrive or attend an event: In this definition, "make it" refers to showing up or being present at a specific place at a given time. For instance, if someone says, "I hope you can make it to the party," it means they want you to attend the party and be physically present
  • far from it The idiom "far from it" means that something is not at all true or accurate, often used to contradict or emphasize the opposite of a statement.
  • far be it from me to The idiom "far be it from me to" is used to express humility or acknowledge one's own lack of authority or ability to do something. It indicates that someone does not want to interfere, oppose, or criticize someone else's actions or decisions because they feel it is not their place to do so. It implies that the person speaking recognizes that they are not in a position to judge or have the necessary knowledge or experience to make a valid comment.
  • far be it from me The idiom "far be it from me" means expressing humility or modesty by stating that one is in no position to make a judgment or interfere in a particular matter. It is often used to distance oneself from a suggested action, opinion, or responsibility.
  • feel it beneath
  • wouldn't know sth if it hit you in the face The idiom "wouldn't know something if it hit you in the face" means that someone is completely clueless or unaware of a particular thing, even if it was incredibly obvious or directly pointed out to them. It highlights the lack of awareness or understanding someone has regarding a specific topic or situation.
  • take it or leave it The idiom "take it or leave it" means that something is offered as it is, without the possibility of negotiation or change. It implies that the person has a choice to either accept the offer or reject it completely, with no room for compromise.
  • be minting it The idiom "be minting it" means to be earning or making a significant amount of money, often in a consistent or impressive manner. It suggests that someone is experiencing great financial success or prosperity.
  • make it hot for sm The idiom "make it hot for someone" refers to a situation where one intentionally causes trouble or makes things difficult for someone else. It means to create a challenging or uncomfortable environment that forces the person to face consequences or endure uncomfortable circumstances.
  • recognize sth for what it is The idiom "recognize sth for what it is" means to perceive or acknowledge something as it truly is, without any misconceptions or false interpretations. It refers to having a clear understanding and objective view of a situation, person, or thing. It involves recognizing the true nature, qualities, or characteristics of something without any biases, illusions, or preconceived notions.
  • take it like a man The idiom "take it like a man" refers to the expectation or encouragement for someone, particularly a male, to endure hardship, criticism, or pain without complaining or showing weakness. It implies that one should face challenges or adversity with strength, resilience, and dignity, typically associated with societal expectations of masculinity.
  • floor it The idiom "floor it" means to press the accelerator pedal of a vehicle fully to the floor in order to accelerate rapidly or drive at maximum speed.
  • put foot in it The idiom "put foot in it" means to say or do something that unintentionally offends, embarrasses, or upsets someone else. It refers to making a mistake or an inappropriate remark, often resulting in an awkward or uncomfortable situation.
  • full of it The idiom "full of it" means someone who is not being honest or truthful; someone who is exaggerating or making false claims. It refers to a person who is "full of" lies, nonsense, or empty talk.
  • take it to one's grave The idiom "take it to one's grave" means to keep a secret or confidential information hidden and not reveal it to anyone, even until one's death. It refers to a commitment to never disclose certain information, regardless of external pressure or circumstances.
  • Want to make sth of it? The idiom "Want to make something of it?" typically means to challenge or provoke someone to engage in a confrontation, argument, or competition. It implies a readiness to demonstrate one's skills, strength, or determination in a confrontational situation.
  • take it on the lam The idiom "take it on the lam" means to flee or escape from a particular situation, often to avoid arrest or punishment. It is commonly used when someone is running away or going into hiding to avoid being caught by law enforcement or other authorities.
  • for the fun of it The idiom "for the fun of it" means doing something without a specific reason or purpose, purely for enjoyment or amusement. It suggests engaging in an activity for the sheer pleasure it brings, rather than for any practical or necessary outcome.
  • hotfoot it The idiom "hotfoot it" means to move quickly or hurry, especially when running or walking briskly.
  • hotfoot it (off to) (smw) The idiom "hotfoot it (off to) (somewhere)" means to move quickly or hastily to a particular place. It implies a sense of urgency or a desire to get there as quickly as possible.
  • have a kick to it The idiom "have a kick to it" typically means that something has a strong or surprising impact or effect. It suggests that there is an element of excitement, energy, or intensity present in the situation or experience being described.
  • Put a lid on it! The idiom "Put a lid on it!" means to stop talking or to be quiet. It is often used as a command or an exclamation to tell someone to stop talking, usually when they are being loud, annoying, or sharing too much information.
  • hop to it The idiom "hop to it" means to start or continue a task quickly and energetically; to act promptly and without delay.
  • I have to hand it to The idiom "I have to hand it to" is typically used to acknowledge or recognize someone's achievements, efforts, or skills. It signifies giving someone credit or acknowledging their capabilities in a particular situation.
  • have to hand it to The idiom "have to hand it to" means acknowledging or giving credit or praise to someone for their accomplishments, skills, or achievements. It implies appreciating their abilities or recognizing their effort in a particular situation.
  • Hand it over The idiom "Hand it over" means to give or surrender something to someone, typically when they are in authority or demand it. It implies willingly transferring possession or control of an object or information to another person.
  • never had it so good The idiom "never had it so good" means that someone is experiencing a level of success or prosperity that is greater than they have ever experienced before. It implies a sense of contentment and satisfaction with one's current situation, usually referring to an overall improvement in living conditions or circumstances.
  • with everything (on it) The idiom "with everything (on it)" typically refers to a sandwich or a food item that is prepared or topped with all available ingredients or condiments. It means that the item is fully loaded with every possible component or topping it is commonly served with. It implies that the sandwich or food item contains a variety of ingredients, providing a complete or full experience.
  • take it for granted The definition of the idiom "take it for granted" is to not appreciate or value something or someone, assuming that they will always be there or that they will always provide a certain level of support or service. It implies a sense of entitlement or not recognizing the importance or the effort put into something.
  • Give it the gun. The idiom "Give it the gun" is used to encourage someone to make a strong, vigorous, or forceful effort to achieve a goal or complete a task. It implies putting maximum effort, energy, or power into an action, similar to the forceful firing of a gun.
  • not the half of it The idiom "not the half of it" is used to indicate that a situation or description is incomplete or insufficient. It suggests that there is more to the story or that the person speaking has only shared part of the truth.
  • hotfoot it out of (smw) The idiom "hotfoot it out of (smw)" means to quickly and hastily flee or leave a particular place. It implies a sense of urgency or a need to escape from a certain situation or environment as quickly as possible.
  • (just) for the heck of it The idiom "(just) for the heck of it" suggests doing something without a significant reason or purpose, simply for amusement, curiosity, or pleasure. It refers to engaging in an activity for the sake of experiencing it or out of a spontaneous urge, rather than with a specific intention or goal in mind.
  • (It) couldn't be better. The idiom "(It) couldn't be better" means that a situation or condition is already so ideal or perfect that it is impossible for it to improve any further. It expresses complete satisfaction and contentment with the current state of affairs.
  • (It) can't be helped. and (It) couldn't be helped. The idiom "(It) can't be helped" or "(It) couldn't be helped" is used to express resignation or acceptance in a situation where it is not possible to change or prevent something from happening. It acknowledges that there is no alternative or remedy, and it is futile to continue worrying or attempting to fix it.
  • (I) couldn't help it. The idiom "(I) couldn't help it" is used to express that someone is unable to control or prevent an action or behavior, often due to a strong involuntary impulse or external circumstances. It implies a lack of choice or ability to resist or avoid something.
  • hightail it out of (smw) The idiom "hightail it out of (smw)" means to quickly or urgently leave or flee from a place, often due to a sense of danger, discomfort, or the need for haste. It implies a swift and immediate departure.
  • (It) hasn't been easy. The idiom "(It) hasn't been easy" is used to convey that a particular task, situation, or journey has been difficult or challenging. It implies that there have been obstacles, problems, or hardships encountered along the way.
  • Lump it! The idiom "Lump it!" is typically used as an imperative phrase, meaning to accept or tolerate a situation or outcome, especially when it is undesirable or unpleasant. It implies that one should bear the situation without complaint or resistance.
  • If you don't like it, (you can) lump it. The idiom "If you don't like it, (you can) lump it" means that if someone is unhappy with a situation or decision, they have no choice but to accept it without complaint or protest. It suggests that there is no alternative or option to choose a more desirable outcome.
  • have had it with The idiom "have had it with" means to no longer have any patience, tolerance, or willingness to deal with someone or something. It is often used to express frustration, annoyance, or exhaustion.
  • have had it The idiom "have had it" refers to being at the point of exhaustion, frustration, or being completely fed up with a situation or someone's behavior. It indicates that one cannot tolerate or continue with a particular circumstance any longer.
  • have (just about) had it The idiom "have (just about) had it" means to be at the point of exhaustion, frustration, or being unable to tolerate something any longer. It implies that someone is reaching their limit or breaking point in a particular situation.
  • have had it (up to here) The idiom "have had it (up to here)" means to reach a point of complete frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with a situation or someone's actions. It implies that one can no longer tolerate or endure the circumstances any further.
  • hit it off (with sb) The idiom "hit it off (with someone)" means to have an immediate and positive connection or understanding with someone, often resulting in a friendly and harmonious relationship. It implies a natural compatibility and rapport between two individuals.
  • hit it off (with sm) The idiom "hit it off (with someone)" means that two people instantly and easily develop a positive and friendly connection or rapport with each other. It implies that they have similar interests, personalities, or senses of humor, resulting in a harmonious and enjoyable interaction.
  • (there's) nothing to it The idiom "(there's) nothing to it" is used to express that something is very easy or straightforward. It implies that there are no challenges or difficulties involved in accomplishing a task or achieving a goal.
  • it just so happens The idiom "it just so happens" is used to express a coincidence or happening that occurs by chance or luck. It implies that something is occurring without any deliberate intention or planning.
  • It is never too late to mend. The saying "It is never too late to mend" means that there is always an opportunity to correct past mistakes or improve oneself, regardless of how much time has passed. It emphasizes the belief that it is never too late to make positive changes or seek redemption in one's actions or behavior.
  • leave to it The idiom "leave to it" means to entrust a task or decision to someone else, allowing them to handle it independently and make their own judgment or take appropriate actions. It implies giving someone the authority and responsibility to handle a particular matter without interference.
  • leave it to The idiom "leave it to" means to entrust or rely on someone else to handle or deal with a task, situation, or responsibility, often implying confidence in their ability or expertise to do so.
  • I can take it or leave it The idiom "I can take it or leave it" means to express indifference or a lack of strong preference towards something. It implies that the person is flexible and does not feel strongly compelled to have or engage in a certain thing or activity.
  • you can't miss it The idiom "you can't miss it" means that something is incredibly easy to find, locate, or identify. It suggests that there are clear and obvious visual or audible cues that make it impossible to overlook or go unnoticed. It is often used when giving directions or pointing out something that stands out prominently from its surroundings.
  • have name written all over it The idiom "have name written all over it" means that something is clearly or obviously intended for a particular person or purpose. It suggests that the characteristics, qualities, or features of the thing are a perfect match or fit for a specific individual or situation.
  • have name on it The idiom "have name on it" means that something is specifically intended for or designed for a particular person or purpose. It suggests that there is a clear connection or relevance to that person or purpose. It implies that whatever is being referred to is meant for someone or something in particular and may not suit others.
  • Do I have to spell it out? The idiom "Do I have to spell it out?" means expressing frustration or exasperation at someone's failure to understand or comprehend something that should be obvious or straightforward.
  • make (it) good The idiom "make (it) good" typically means to resolve a situation, fulfill a promise, or deliver on one's commitments in a satisfactory or acceptable manner. It implies taking necessary actions to rectify or improve a situation, often with the aim of achieving a positive outcome or meeting expectations.
  • make it (until sth) The idiom "make it (until sth)" means to endure or last until a specific event or time. It indicates the ability to survive or persist until reaching a particular milestone, deadline, or goal.
  • more like it The idiom "more like it" is used to express approval or satisfaction with a statement or suggestion that is closer to one's expectations or preferences compared to a previous statement or suggestion. It indicates that the new statement is a better or more accurate representation of what one desires or expects.
  • Who needs it/them? The idiom "Who needs it/them?" is an expression used to convey a lack of interest, value, or necessity towards something or someone. It implies that the speaker considers the mentioned subject as unnecessary or not worth their attention or concern.
  • make a night of it The idiom "make a night of it" means to extend or prolong an event or activity into the night by engaging in various enjoyable or entertaining activities. It often implies a desire to fully embrace and relish the moment, rather than finishing or ending it quickly.
  • Nothing to it! The idiom "Nothing to it!" is used to express that something is very easy or simple to do, with minimal effort or difficulty required. It implies that the task at hand can be completed without any trouble or complications.
  • owe it to sb to do sth To owe it to someone to do something means to have a moral or ethical obligation or responsibility to do that particular action for the benefit of the person mentioned. It often implies a debt of gratitude or a sense of duty.
  • you owe it to yourself to do sth The idiom "you owe it to yourself to do something" means that it is important and beneficial for someone to do a particular action or task. It implies that fulfilling the action or task will bring personal benefit, self-improvement, or self-fulfillment. It highlights the idea that the individual has a responsibility or obligation to act in their own best interest.
  • overdo it The idiom "overdo it" means to do something excessively or to go beyond the necessary or acceptable limit. It refers to engaging in an activity, behavior, or action to an excessive extent, often resulting in negative consequences or exhaustion.
  • This is it The idiom "This is it" typically means that a particular moment or situation is the most significant, decisive, or final one. It suggests that something important or definitive is happening or about to happen.
  • take it upon yourself/itself to do sth To "take it upon yourself/itself to do something" means to assume or undertake a responsibility or task without being asked or assigned to do so. It involves taking the initiative to address a problem or complete a task, even if it is not necessarily your duty or obligation.
  • make it your business to do sth The idiom "make it your business to do sth" means to take personal responsibility or concern to ensure that something is done. It implies that a person is actively and consciously making an effort to accomplish or be involved in a particular task or activity.
  • make it one's business to (do sth) The idiom "make it one's business to (do sth)" means to take on the responsibility or show great dedication to a particular task or action, often without being asked or obligated to do so. It implies a personal commitment and an active involvement in handling a certain matter, typically out of a sense of duty or interest.
  • queen it The idiom "queen it" means to act or behave like a queen, typically referring to someone who displays confidence, authority, power, or superiority in a situation. It suggests taking on a regal, commanding manner or asserting dominance.
  • with it The idiom "with it" typically means to be aware, knowledgeable, or up-to-date, especially in regard to contemporary trends, culture, or technology. It refers to someone being fully engaged, informed, and in tune with the current state of things.
  • up against it The idiom "up against it" means to be facing a difficult or challenging situation or obstacle, often with limited options or resources. It implies being in a tough position and having to confront or deal with a problem that is not easily solvable.
  • for what it is worth The idiom "for what it is worth" means that the information or opinion being expressed may not be very valuable or significant, but the speaker wants to share it or offer it as advice. It suggests that the information may not have a significant impact or influence on the situation at hand, but it is being provided nonetheless.
  • give someone the worst of it To "give someone the worst of it" means to criticize, berate, or scold someone severely or harshly. It implies delivering a verbal assault or reprimand with full force, leaving the recipient feeling the impact of strong negative feedback or condemnation.
  • take someone's word for it The idiom "take someone's word for it" means to believe or trust what someone says without requiring any further evidence or proof. It implies accepting their statement as true based solely on their reputation, authority, or honesty.
  • put it on The idiom "put it on" typically means pretending or acting as if something is true, usually for the purpose of deceiving someone or creating a false impression.
  • put it over on To "put it over on" someone means to deceive or trick them, often by convincing them of something that is not true or manipulating situations in order to gain an advantage over them.
  • put to it The idiom "put to it" means to face a challenging or difficult situation that requires immediate action or decision-making. It implies being in a tight spot or a state of urgency where one needs to find a solution or resolve an issue promptly.
  • not put it past someone The idiom "not put it past someone" refers to a situation where one believes that a person is capable of doing something, typically underhanded or surprising, based on their past actions or character. It suggests that the person in question has a history of engaging in such behavior, and therefore, it is within the realm of possibility for them to repeat it.
  • have it in for The idiom "have it in for" means to have a strong and often unfair dislike or grudge against someone. It implies harboring ill feelings, animosity, or a desire to harm or undermine another person.
  • pour it on The idiom "pour it on" means to apply excess effort, enthusiasm, or intensity to something. It implies going all out and giving one's utmost in an endeavor, often to impress or achieve a desired outcome.
  • play it The idiom "play it" typically means to behave cautiously, reservedly, or in a restrained manner during a particular situation or interaction. It can imply avoiding risks, not taking a strong stance, or refraining from making bold moves.
  • buy it The idiom "buy it" typically means to believe or accept something, often without adequate questioning or proof. It implies that someone is easily convinced or gullible.
  • hurry it up The idiom "hurry it up" means to do something quickly or speed up the process of an activity or task. It is a phrase used to urge someone to move faster or complete their actions in a timely manner.
  • brazen it out To "brazen it out" means to face a difficult or embarrassing situation with boldness and confidence, often by maintaining a defiant or shameless attitude. It involves refusing to show any sign of guilt, shame, or fear when confronted with wrongdoing or criticism.
  • get it through one's head The idiom "get it through one's head" means to understand or comprehend something, often a concept or idea, especially after multiple explanations or attempts have been made.
  • take it into one's head The idiom "take it into one's head" means to suddenly or spontaneously become determined or motivated to do something without any apparent reason or prior planning. It refers to an individual's inclination or decision that arises from their own thoughts or ideas, often disregarding the opinions or suggestions of others.
  • have it good The idiom "have it good" means to be in a fortunate or advantageous situation, often implying that someone has a comfortable or easy life compared to others. It suggests that the person being described is content and satisfied with their circumstances.
  • have it out The idiom "have it out" means to confront or resolve a problem or issue directly, usually through a frank and intense discussion or argument. It implies a desire to settle matters or make things clear between two or more parties by openly discussing their disagreements or conflicting views.
  • owe it to oneself The idiom "owe it to oneself" means to have a responsibility or duty towards oneself. It suggests that taking certain actions or making certain decisions is important for self-improvement, self-care, or personal fulfillment. It signifies acknowledging the inherent value and worth of one's well-being and ensuring that it is prioritized.
  • as it so happens The idiom "as it so happens" means that something is occurring or unfolding in a way that is coincidental or unexpected, often used when providing surprising or fortuitous information or events.
  • hand it to The idiom "hand it to" means to give praise or credit to someone for something they have done or achieved. It acknowledges and recognizes someone's accomplishment or ability.
  • it looks like The idiom "it looks like" is typically used as an introductory phrase to convey an opinion or an interpretation based on appearances. It signifies making a judgment or assumption about something based on outward appearances or initial observations.
  • cut it The idiom "cut it" is typically used to express that something or someone is not satisfactory or up to a particular standard. It implies that the person or thing in question is not able to meet the expectations or demands placed on them. Essentially, it means that someone or something is not good enough or suitable for a particular situation.
  • let someone have it The idiom "let someone have it" means to vigorously confront, criticize, or attack someone, usually verbally or through harsh words or actions. It also implies expressing one's feelings, opinions, or objections strongly and without reservation.
  • step it The idiom "step it" means to increase one's pace or effort in order to accomplish something quickly or more efficiently. It often implies a sense of urgency to complete a task or reach a goal.
  • get into it The idiom "get into it" typically means to become engaged or involved in a particular activity, topic, or situation with enthusiasm or dedication. It implies a deep level of interest or commitment towards something.
  • get it The idiom "get it" is typically used to mean understanding or comprehending something, often in a sudden or intuitive way. It can also refer to someone realizing or acknowledging a particular situation or concept.
  • get (right) on it The idiom "get (right) on it" means to start working on a task or a problem immediately and with full dedication. It implies a sense of urgency and responsibility in tackling the assigned job without any delay.
  • give it to The idiom "give it to" typically means to criticize or reprimand someone strongly or forcefully. It can also refer to confronting someone with a problem or difficult situation.
  • dish it out The idiom "dish it out" means to distribute or deal with something, especially in the form of criticisms, insults, or punishment. It refers to the act of giving or serving something, particularly when it involves confrontational or negative actions.
  • dog it The idiom "dog it" typically means to perform a task or activity with little effort, enthusiasm, or dedication. It implies laziness, lack of commitment, or not giving one's best effort.
  • have got it easy The idiom "have got it easy" is used to describe someone who has a relatively effortless or comfortable situation, without facing many challenges or difficulties. It implies that the person has an advantageous or privileged position compared to others.
  • sleep it off The idiom "sleep it off" means to rest or sleep in order to recover or alleviate the negative effects of something, especially after excess drinking, drug use, or a difficult or stressful situation. It suggests that time and rest can help resolve or improve the situation.
  • snap out of it The idiom "snap out of it" means to quickly return to a more aware, alert, or rational state of mind after being unresponsive, lost in thought, or absorbed in a negative emotion or behavior. It is often used as a command or suggestion to someone to stop dwelling on their current state and to regain control or focus.
  • so be it The idiom "so be it" is a phrase used to indicate acceptance or agreement with a certain outcome or situation, even if it may not be the ideal or preferred outcome. It implies an acknowledgement and resignation to the existing circumstances, suggesting that no further action or discussion is necessary.
  • sock it to The idiom "sock it to" means to deliver a forceful blow or strike, either physically or metaphorically. It is often used to describe delivering a powerful, unexpected, or overwhelming attack, statement, or response.
  • stick it to someone The idiom "stick it to someone" means to take revenge on someone or to intentionally harm or mistreat someone as a form of retaliation or defiance. It implies getting back at someone for perceived wrongdoings or mistreatment.
  • stuff it The idiom "stuff it" typically means to tell someone to stop talking or to express dismissal, frustration, or anger towards someone. It can also be used to indicate that someone should keep their opinion or feelings to themselves.
  • such as it is (or was, etc.) The idiom "such as it is" (or was, etc.) is often used to convey the idea that something is not ideal or of high quality, but it is the only option available or the best that can be found under the circumstances. It suggests a sense of resignation or acceptance of a less than satisfactory situation.
  • suck it up The idiom "suck it up" means to endure or tolerate a difficult or unpleasant situation without complaining or showing weakness. It implies the need to be resilient, tough, or strong-willed in the face of adversity.
  • foot it The idiom "foot it" means to walk or travel on foot, usually implying a brisk or rapid pace.
  • put one's foot in it The idiom "put one's foot in it" means to say or do something that unintentionally offends, embarrasses, or causes trouble or confusion for oneself or others. It refers to a verbal or behavioral blunder or mistake, often resulting from speaking without thinking or having inadequate knowledge of a situation.
  • sweat it To "sweat it" is an idiom meaning to worry or feel anxious about something. It refers to being under pressure or experiencing nervousness towards a particular situation.
  • take it The idiom "take it" means to accept or handle a situation, often with resilience or composure. It implies dealing with a difficult or challenging circumstance without excessive complaint or resistance.
  • take it out of The idiom "take it out of" means to exhaust or drain someone physically, emotionally, or mentally. It implies that something, such as a challenging task or a difficult situation, has a severe impact on a person's energy or well-being.
  • take it out on The idiom "take it out on" means to direct anger or frustration toward someone or something that is unrelated to the source of those emotions. It often involves expressing negative feelings or treating someone unfairly or unkindly as a means of releasing pent-up emotions.
  • go it The idiom "go it" typically means to proceed or take action independently and without hesitation, often without the assistance or approval of others. It implies self-reliance and determination in pursuing a course of action.
  • hack it The idiom "hack it" generally means to cope with or manage a situation, task, or problem, often with difficulty. It implies pushing through challenges, finding creative or unconventional solutions, and ultimately succeeding despite obstacles.
  • get over it The idiom "get over it" means to accept and move on from a situation or emotional state, typically one that was difficult, upsetting, or disappointing. It implies that one should overcome any negative feelings or lingering effects and make a conscious effort to let go of the past.
  • have never had it so good The idiom "have never had it so good" means that someone is currently experiencing an exceptionally favorable or prosperous situation compared to their previous circumstances. It suggests that their current state is the most favorable and comfortable they have ever experienced.
  • if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it The idiom "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" means that if something is functioning well or working effectively, there is no need to make any changes or improvements to it. It implies that unnecessary changes might introduce new problems or disrupt the existing functionality. In essence, it advocates for leaving things as they are if they are already working satisfactorily.
  • made it The idiom "made it" generally refers to achieving success, reaching a desired goal, or attaining a position of accomplishment or recognition. It implies that someone has overcome challenges, worked hard, and achieved their desired outcome.
  • when it rains, it pours The idiom "when it rains, it pours" means that when something unfortunate or challenging happens, it is often followed by a series of additional difficulties or problems. It conveys the idea that multiple negative events can occur simultaneously or in quick succession, amplifying the overall impact of the adversity.
  • you can’t take it with you The idiom "you can't take it with you" means that when a person dies, they cannot bring their material possessions or wealth with them. It implies that at the end of life, material possessions and wealth are no longer significant or important. The idiom is often used to emphasize the importance of enjoying life and focusing on experiences and relationships rather than accumulating material wealth.
  • give/have it large The idiom "give/have it large" is typically used to describe someone who is boasting or showing off in an exaggerated or flamboyant manner. It implies that the person is making a grand display of themselves or their abilities, often trying to impress or intimidate others.
  • large it The idiom "large it" typically means to behave or act in an extravagant, self-assured, or flamboyant manner. It can also imply enjoying a lavish or opulent lifestyle.
  • large it up The idiom "large it up" typically means to behave or present oneself in a manner intended to appear impressive, extravagant, or grandiose. It often involves exaggerating one's importance, achievements, or lifestyle.
  • it will cost you The idiom "it will cost you" refers to a situation where one is informed about a significant expense or consequence associated with a particular action or decision. This phrase implies that undertaking or obtaining something will require a considerable sacrifice in terms of money, effort, time, or any other valuable aspect.
  • keep it real The idiom "keep it real" means to stay genuine, authentic, and true to oneself, without pretending or adopting a false persona. It emphasizes being honest, sincere, and down-to-earth in one's words, actions, and behavior.
  • somebody can take it or leave it The idiom "somebody can take it or leave it" means that someone is not particularly interested or enthusiastic about something; they have no strong preference for it and are indifferent to whether they engage with it or not.
  • leg it The idiom "leg it" means to run or move quickly, often with a sense of urgency or haste.
  • let somebody have it The idiom "let somebody have it" means to strongly or forcefully criticize, scold, or reprimand someone, typically in a direct and confrontational manner. It can also refer to physically attacking or assaulting someone.
  • let it go (at that) The idiom "let it go (at that)" means to decide not to pursue or continue an argument or discussion any further. It suggests accepting or settling for the current state or outcome instead of persisting with further disagreement or analysis.
  • dash it all! The idiom "dash it all!" is an exclamation of frustration or annoyance. It is used to convey one's disappointment with a situation or express mild anger or irritation. It is a British English expression that is often used to emphasize a feeling of exasperation or dissatisfaction.
  • it serves somebody right (for doing something) The idiom "it serves somebody right (for doing something)" is used to express satisfaction or pleasure in the misfortune or negative consequence that someone experiences as a result of their own actions. It implies that the person deserves the outcome due to their own behavior or choices.
  • lord it over somebody The idiom "lord it over somebody" means to assert one's authority or power over someone else in an arrogant or domineering manner. It implies a condescending attitude or behavior, often accompanied by a sense of superiority.
  • deal with it The idiom "deal with it" means to accept or handle a difficult or challenging situation without complaint or avoidance. It often implies that the person is expected to face the problem head-on, take responsibility, and find a solution or way to cope with it effectively. It can also signify a dismissive or unapologetic response to someone's complaint or request for assistance, implying that they should manage or handle the situation themselves.
  • rub somebody’s nose in it The idiom "rub somebody's nose in it" means to intentionally remind someone of a mistake, failure, or humiliation in order to make them feel embarrassed or ashamed. It refers to emphasizing or drawing attention to someone's misfortune or regretful situation.
  • make it with somebody The idiom "make it with somebody" typically means to have sexual intercourse or engage in a romantic or intimate relationship with someone.
  • it says a lot, very little, etc. for somebody/something The idiom "it says a lot, very little, etc. for somebody/something" means that a certain statement or behavior reveals or indicates important information about someone or something. It highlights the significance of the particular statement or action in providing insights into the character, qualities, or nature of the person or thing being referred to.
  • don’t mention it The idiom "don't mention it" is a phrase used to respond to someone who thanks or expresses gratitude for something that you have done. It is a polite way of saying that what you did was not a burden or inconvenience, and there is no need for the person to express gratitude. It communicates that the action was done willingly and that you do not expect anything in return.
  • have done with it The idiom "have done with it" means to finally complete or finish something, especially after a long or tedious process or discussion, in order to move on or avoid further delay or trouble. It suggests a desire to end a situation or task decisively and without hesitation.
  • have it in mind to do something The idiom "have it in mind to do something" means to have a plan or intention to do something in the future. It suggests that someone is considering or contemplating performing a specific action or undertaking a certain task.
  • shoot it out (with somebody) The idiom "shoot it out (with somebody)" refers to a situation where two or more individuals engage in a confrontation or conflict, typically involving intense arguing, debating, or conflicting actions. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation where individuals or parties are unwilling to compromise and instead resort to confrontational or aggressive measures to resolve the issue.
  • you can lead/take a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink The idiom "you can lead/take a horse to water, but you can't make it drink" means that you can try to provide someone with an opportunity or advice, but you cannot force them to take the desired action if they are unwilling. It implies that while you can offer guidance or assistance, ultimately, individuals have the freedom to make their own choices and might not always act in their best interest.
  • it goes to show The idiom "it goes to show" is used to introduce or emphasize that something demonstrates or proves a particular point or aspect. It highlights the significance or validity of a statement or situation based on evidence or examples provided.
  • drop somebody in it The idiom "drop somebody in it" means to put someone in a difficult or embarrassing situation by revealing their secrets or actions to others. It refers to the act of causing trouble or harm to someone by disclosing information that they would prefer to keep hidden or private.
  • mix it (with somebody) The idiom "mix it (with somebody)" generally means to engage in a confrontation or a fight with someone. It implies getting involved in a heated or intense interaction, usually a physical altercation or an argument. It signifies being ready to confront or challenge someone, typically in a confrontational or aggressive manner.
  • mix it up (with somebody) The idiom "mix it up (with somebody)" typically refers to engaging in a confrontation or argument with someone. It can also imply getting involved in a physical altercation or dispute with another person.
  • that’s about the size of it The idiom "that's about the size of it" means that something stated or described is accurate or correct. It signifies that the provided information or explanation is sufficient or comprehensive.
  • slog it out The idiom "slog it out" means to persevere through a difficult or challenging situation, often involving hard work, effort, or determination to achieve a desired outcome. It implies a sustained and relentless effort to overcome obstacles and reach a goal, often characterized by a long and arduous struggle.
  • slum it The idiom "slum it" means to temporarily live or stay in a place that is considered lower in standard or quality compared to one's usual lifestyle. It often implies willingly or knowingly immersing oneself in a less luxurious or comfortable environment for a specific purpose or experience.
  • not/never hear the end of it The idiom "not/never hear the end of it" means to continue to receive criticism, teasing, or reminders about a certain action or event for a long time. It implies that the person involved will face ongoing discussions or complaints concerning a particular matter, often unable to escape the consequences or comments related to it.
  • put an end to it all The idiom "put an end to it all" typically means to stop or finish something in a decisive or final manner, often implying a sense of closure or resolution.
  • sock it to somebody The idiom "sock it to somebody" means to deliver a forceful, aggressive, or impactful action or statement to someone, often intended to surprise or overwhelm them. It can also imply a sudden and forceful attack or confrontation.
  • stack it The idiom "stack it" typically refers to someone losing balance, falling, or experiencing a clumsy accident, especially while attempting to perform a physical activity or skill. It often implies a sudden and unexpected event resulting in a person stumbling or falling down.
  • you, he, she, etc. started it The idiom "you, he, she, etc. started it" means that someone initiated or caused a conflict, argument, or disagreement. It implies that the responsibility for the issue lies with the person who started it. It is often used in a playful or accusatory manner to pass the blame onto someone else.
  • that’s about it The idiom "that's about it" typically means that there is nothing more to add or say on a particular topic or situation. It implies that everything that needed to be said or done has been covered, and there is no further information or action to be taken.
  • as/so far as it goes The idiom "as/so far as it goes" means to acknowledge or accept something to a certain extent or within a limited scope. It implies that while a particular statement or action may be true or correct within its boundaries, there may be additional factors or considerations that need to be taken into account for a more comprehensive understanding.
  • far be it from me to do something (but…) The idiom "far be it from me to do something (but…)" is used when you want to express an opinion or suggestion but want to make it clear that you do not intend to impose your view on others or claim authority on the subject. It is often followed by a statement that contradicts or opposes the initial disclaimer.
  • play it straight The idiom "play it straight" means to behave honestly, sincerely, or in a sincere and genuine manner, without trying to deceive or manipulate others. It refers to being straightforward and not engaging in any form of deceit or trickery.
  • find it in your heart/yourself to do something The idiom "find it in your heart/yourself to do something" means to make a conscious effort to muster the compassion, forgiveness, or generosity needed to take a particular action or show kindness towards someone, especially when it may be difficult or unpleasant. It implies encouraging someone to dig deep within their emotions or conscience to find the ability to do something.
  • be in for it The idiom "be in for it" means to be in trouble or facing negative consequences as a result of one's actions or behavior. It suggests that someone is about to experience punishment, criticism, or a difficult situation due to something they have done or said.
  • be for it To be for something means to support or advocate for it. It can also imply a willingness to take action or express approval towards a particular idea, decision, or course of action.
  • pick up/take the ball and run with it The idiom "pick up/take the ball and run with it" means to accept a task or responsibility with enthusiasm and initiative, often taking the lead in furthering the progress or success of the project or idea. It implies being proactive and taking charge of a situation without waiting for others to do so.
  • something is what it is The idiom "something is what it is" means accepting or recognizing the reality or true nature of a situation, without trying to change, manipulate, or overanalyze it. It emphasizes the need to acknowledge and accept things as they are, without attempting to alter or distort them.
  • you’ve made your bed and you must lie in/on it The idiom "you've made your bed and you must lie in/on it" means that one must accept the consequences or face the results of their actions or decisions, even if they are unfavorable or have negative outcomes. It emphasizes taking responsibility for one's choices and not being able to escape the consequences that follow.
  • it behoves somebody to do something The idiom "it behoves somebody to do something" means that someone has a duty, responsibility, or obligation to do something. It implies that it is proper, appropriate, or morally right for the person in question to take a particular action or fulfill a certain task.
  • I wouldn’t bet on it The idiom "I wouldn't bet on it" means that the person does not have confidence or certainty in the outcome being discussed. It implies skepticism or doubt about a particular statement, prediction, or possibility. It suggests that the speaker believes the outcome is unlikely or improbable.
  • don’t bet on it The idiom "don't bet on it" means that something is unlikely or doubtful. It implies that the person should not have confidence in the outcome or believe that something will happen.
  • bluff it out The idiom "bluff it out" means to pretend confidence or bravado in a situation in which one may feel uncertain, scared, or lacking knowledge. It involves putting up a front or acting as if one knows what they are doing or saying, even if they do not.
  • make a bolt for it The idiom "make a bolt for it" is used to express the act of making a quick and sudden escape or getaway from a situation or place. It implies a sense of urgency and often refers to a situation where one is trying to evade or avoid something or someone.
  • bottle it The idiom "bottle it" typically means to suppress or restrain one's emotions or feelings, especially in a tense or difficult situation. It refers to the act of bottling up emotions like you would a liquid in a bottle, avoiding expression or release of those emotions outwardly.
  • make a break for something/for it The idiom "make a break for something/for it" refers to attempting to escape or reach something quickly and often unexpectedly, especially in a determined or daring manner. It implies taking a risk or making a sudden move to seize an opportunity or avoid a situation. It can be used both in literal and figurative senses, indicating a sudden decision to pursue a goal or escape from a difficult circumstance.
  • as chance would have it The idiom "as chance would have it" is used to describe a situation that occurs unexpectedly or by coincidence. It suggests that the outcome is due to luck or the workings of fate rather than deliberate planning or intention.
  • it’s chucking it down The idiom "it's chucking it down" typically means that it is raining heavily or pouring rain heavily.
  • be asking for it The idiom "be asking for it" refers to someone intentionally or knowingly provoking or inviting trouble, criticism, or unwanted consequences through their behavior, actions, or words.
  • be at it again The idiom "be at it again" refers to someone engaging in a familiar or habitual activity, often with negative connotations. It implies that the person is repeating a behavior or action, typically causing trouble or annoyance, despite previous warnings or consequences.
  • bring it The idiom "bring it" is used to challenge or provoke someone to do their best or to engage in a competition or confrontation. It implies a confident and assertive attitude, requesting the person to bring their best performance, skills, or effort to the task at hand.
  • (have) bought it The idiom "(have) bought it" refers to being in a situation where one is facing trouble, danger, or consequences due to one's actions or decisions. It implies that the person is in trouble and will have to face the negative outcome or consequences.
  • to cap/top it all The idiom "to cap/top it all" means to add something, often negative or surprising, to a list of already existing problems or events, making the situation even worse or more unexpected. It signifies the final and most notable addition to an already challenging or remarkable series of occurrences.
  • be coining it (in) The idiom "be coining it (in)" is typically used to describe someone or something that is earning or making a lot of money, often implying a sense of success or financial abundance. It suggests that the person or entity is profiting greatly or excessively from a particular venture or situation.
  • if it comes to that The idiom "if it comes to that" is used to express the possibility or likelihood of a particular situation or action happening, typically as a last resort or when all other options have been exhausted. It can also indicate a willingness to take a particular course of action if necessary.
  • when it comes to something/to doing something The idiom "when it comes to something/to doing something" means when the topic or action in question is being considered or discussed. It implies that the person being referred to has a significant amount of knowledge, expertise, or experience in that particular area.
  • make a day of it The idiom "make a day of it" means to plan or spend an entire day doing something enjoyable or engaging, typically involving various activities or excursions. It suggests dedicating a significant amount of time to an experience to fully enjoy and make the most out of it.
  • able to cut it The idiom "able to cut it" means having the necessary skills, abilities, or qualities to meet the demands or expectations of a particular task or situation. It refers to someone's ability to perform well or be successful in a given context.
  • able to do it The idiom "able to do it" refers to someone's capability or competence to successfully accomplish a task or objective. It indicates that the person possesses the necessary skills, resources, or qualities required for achieving a particular goal or completing a specific action.
  • (someone had) better keep quiet about it The idiom "(someone had) better keep quiet about it" means that someone should remain silent or not disclose a particular piece of information or secret. It emphasizes the importance of maintaining confidentiality or discretion in order to avoid potential consequences or complications.
  • (someone had) better keep still about it The idiom "(someone had) better keep still about it" means that someone should remain quiet or not reveal a piece of information, in order to prevent potential negative consequences or to maintain secrecy. It implies that speaking up or sharing the information could lead to undesirable outcomes.
  • about it The idiom "about it" typically refers to someone discussing, considering, or being concerned with a particular issue, topic, problem, or situation. It implies focusing on a specific matter and usually suggests that action or attention is being directed towards that matter.
  • if/when you think about it The idiom "if/when you think about it" refers to the act of taking a moment to consider or reflect upon a particular situation, idea, or fact. It implies that there might be an additional or deeper understanding of the matter at hand when given some thought or contemplation. It suggests that a closer examination or analysis can lead to a different viewpoint or perspective.
  • lark it up The idiom "lark it up" means to engage in or indulge in spontaneous fun or lively enjoyment, often in an exuberant or carefree manner. It suggests participating in playful activities for sheer enjoyment and without any specific purpose or consequences.
  • ace it The idiom "ace it" means to successfully complete or accomplish something with great skill, accuracy, or excellence. It implies achieving a high level of proficiency or mastery in a particular task or situation.
  • it pays to advertise The idiom "it pays to advertise" means that promoting, publicizing, or advertising a product, service, or oneself typically leads to positive outcomes, rewards, or benefits, such as increased sales, recognition, or opportunities.
  • Bend over, here it comes again The idiom "Bend over, here it comes again" is an informal expression that is often used sarcastically or humorously to refer to an impending or recurring difficult or unpleasant situation. It implies that one should brace or prepare themselves for the upcoming challenge or problem.
  • there's no law against it The idiom "there's no law against it" means that something is not illegal or prohibited. It suggests that although an action or behavior might not be morally acceptable or commonly done, there are no specific laws forbidding it.
  • If it ain’t broke, fix it till it is The idiom "If it ain't broke, fix it till it is" is a sarcastic and humorous way of saying that someone tends to unnecessarily tinker with or make changes to something that is functioning perfectly fine. It implies that someone is prone to making unnecessary alterations or modifications, potentially leading to a negative outcome.
  • if it ain't broke The idiom "if it ain't broke" means that if something is working well or functioning perfectly fine, there is no need to change or fix it.
  • it ain't over till/until it's over The idiom "it ain't over till/until it's over" means that a situation or competition is not concluded or determined until the final outcome is reached. It implies that one should not give up or make assumptions prematurely because anything can happen until the very end.
  • it ain't over till/until the fat lady sings The idiom "it ain't over till/until the fat lady sings" means that a situation is not yet finished or concluded until the final act or decisive moment occurs. It emphasizes the need to wait until everything is complete before making judgments or assumptions about the outcome. The phrase is often used to convey that even when something appears certain or nearing its end, there may still be unexpected twists or outcomes that can change the final result.
  • it ain't/it's not over till the fat lady sings The idiom "it ain't/it's not over till the fat lady sings" is used to convey that a situation or event is not yet concluded or final until a decisive action or outcome has taken place. It implies that one should not make assumptions or premature judgments before all possibilities have been exhausted or a clear resolution has been reached. The phrase is often used colloquially and metaphorically, alluding to the opera tradition where a heavyset female singer typically performs the final, climactic aria.
  • Say it ain't so, Joe The idiom "Say it ain't so, Joe" is a phrase often used to express disbelief or disappointment upon hearing something shocking or disappointing. It originated from a popular expression attributed to baseball player "Shoeless" Joe Jackson during the 1919 Black Sox scandal, where he was accused of colluding to lose the World Series. The phrase has since evolved to be used more broadly in situations where someone expresses skepticism or hope that a negative or distressing statement or situation is not true.
  • (one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it The idiom "(one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it" means that one has taken actions or made choices that have led to unfavorable consequences, and now one must accept the resulting outcomes or face the corresponding responsibilities. It suggests that individuals are solely accountable for dealing with the repercussions of their own decisions or actions.
  • and be done with it The idiom "and be done with it" means to conclude or finish something quickly, without further debating, considering, or delaying. It suggests reaching a final decision or taking action to resolve a matter promptly and efficiently, disregarding any unnecessary complications or additional discussion.
  • and there you have it The idiom "and there you have it" is used to indicate that something has been fully explained or presented, often concluding a statement or explanation. It conveys the idea that all the necessary information or elements have been provided, suggesting that no further elaboration is required.
  • be at it hammer and tongs The idiom "be at it hammer and tongs" means to engage in something energetically and with great determination or intensity. It commonly refers to working on a task, project, or problem with utmost effort and enthusiasm. The term "hammer and tongs" is derived from the image of someone working vigorously, resembling the forceful use of a hammer and tongs in metalworking.
  • been and gone and done it The idiom "been and gone and done it" is an informal expression used to convey that someone has completed an action or made a mistake that is irreversible or significant. It implies that the person has accomplished something or caused a situation that cannot be changed or undone.
  • it wouldn't do (someone) any harm (to do something) The idiom "it wouldn't do (someone) any harm (to do something)" means that doing a particular action or task would have no negative consequences or adverse effects on the person. It implies that the action is beneficial or advisable without any potential harm or risk involved.
  • not be having any of it The idiom "not be having any of it" means to refuse or reject something completely, to show strong disagreement or disapproval towards a particular situation, idea, or behavior. It implies a stubborn or determined refusal to accept or tolerate it.
  • not have it The idiom "not have it" refers to someone refusing to accept or tolerate a particular situation, opinion, behavior, or outcome. It implies a strong disagreement or objection towards something or someone and expressing a lack of willingness to comply or go along with it.
  • anything/nothing/something in it for somebody The idiom "anything/nothing/something in it for somebody" refers to the perceived benefits or advantages an individual may gain from a particular situation or endeavor. It implies that the person is looking for personal gain, reward, or advantage in a given situation rather than engaging solely for selfless reasons.
  • it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) barrel The idiom "it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) barrel" means that the negative influence or action of one person can have a detrimental effect on an entire group. Just as a rotting apple can contaminate the rest of the apples in a barrel, one individual's bad behavior can corrupt or ruin the reputation, morale, or integrity of the entire group or community. It emphasizes the importance of addressing and dealing with negative influences promptly before they spread and cause further damage.
  • it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bunch The idiom "it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bunch" means that the negative or harmful influence of one person can affect and ruin the entire group or population. It implies that the actions or behavior of a single individual can have a significant impact on the collective reputation or character of a larger group.
  • it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bushel The idiom "it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bushel" means that the presence of one negative or corrupt individual or thing can have a detrimental effect on a larger group or community. It suggests that the negative influence can easily spread and impact the entire group, causing the quality or reputation of the group to decline.
  • be at it The idiom "be at it" typically means to be engaged in or busy with a particular activity, task, or project. It implies being actively focused on something or working diligently towards a goal.
  • (one's) heart isn't in it The idiom "(one's) heart isn't in it" means that someone lacks enthusiasm, passion, or dedication for something they are doing or involved in. It implies that the person's interest or commitment is low, resulting in a lack of wholehearted involvement or effort.
  • as chance/luck would have it The idiom "as chance/luck would have it" is used to indicate that something happens by coincidence or by luck. It suggests that the outcome or occurrence was unexpected or unplanned.
  • as good as it gets The idiom "as good as it gets" is used to describe a situation when something is at its absolute best or optimal state, implying that it cannot be improved further. It suggests that the current condition or outcome is as favorable or perfect as it can possibly be, leaving no room for betterment.
  • as if (one's) life depends on it The definition of the idiom "as if (one's) life depends on it" means to put forth an extremely intense or desperate effort to achieve something. It conveys the sense of treating a situation or task as if one's entire existence or survival depends on it. It implies giving everything one has, exhibiting determination, and working with utmost urgency and dedication.
  • as it happens The idiom "as it happens" is commonly used to indicate that something is occurring or unfolding at a particular moment or time, often unexpectedly or coincidentally. It implies an immediate or real-time connection to an ongoing event or situation.
  • as it just so happens The idiom "as it just so happens" means that something is coincidentally or unexpectedly occurring or happening.
  • as luck may have it The idiom "as luck may have it" means that something occurred purely due to chance or coincidence. It implies that the outcome was not planned or expected but rather happened by luck or happenstance.
  • as we know it The idiom "as we know it" is used to emphasize a significant change or potential loss of something familiar or expected. It implies that the current situation or state of affairs could be drastically altered in a way that people might not recognize or be accustomed to.
  • be it as it may The idiom "be it as it may" is used to express acceptance or acknowledgement of a situation, even if one may disagree or have reservations about it. It suggests a willingness to go along with the circumstances, regardless of any personal opinions or preferences.
  • stick it The idiom "stick it" usually means to endure or persist through a difficult or challenging situation without giving up or complaining. It is commonly used to encourage someone to persevere despite obstacles, hardships, or adversity.
  • at it The idiom "at it" typically means someone is engaged in an activity or working on something persistently or continuously. It can imply someone is involved in doing something, often with great effort or determination.
  • back at it The idiom "back at it" means to resume or start again with determination and energy after a pause, setback, or break. It implies a return to a previous task, activity, or endeavor with a renewed focus and effort.
  • be hard at it The idiom "be hard at it" means to be engaged in a task or activity with great intensity, dedication, or effort. It implies working diligently and being fully focused on completing a task.
  • have it away with The idiom "have it away with" means to have a clandestine affair or engage in a secret romantic relationship, typically involving deception or infidelity. It can also refer to stealing or misappropriating something, especially in a secretive or sly manner.
  • have it off/away with somebody The idiom "have it off/away with somebody" is a colloquial expression, typically of British English, that means to engage in a secretive, usually sexual, relationship with someone. It implies a sense of surreptitiousness or illicitness.
  • there's no getting away from it The idiom "there's no getting away from it" means that it is impossible to avoid or ignore a particular fact, situation, or truth. It emphasizes the inevitability or inescapability of something.
  • the ayes have it The idiom "the ayes have it" is used to indicate that the majority of people in a vote or assembly have voted in favor of a particular proposal or motion. It suggests that the supporters or "ayes" of the proposal have a greater number than the opponents or "noes."
  • It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back The idiom "It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back" means that a seemingly small or insignificant event or problem becomes the final and decisive factor that causes someone to reach their breaking point or undergo a sudden and significant change or collapse. It refers to the idea that even a small additional burden or difficulty can have a disproportionately large effect when added to an existing burden or stress.
  • put one's back into it The definition of the idiom "put one's back into it" is to give maximum effort, apply one's full strength or energy to a task, or work diligently and with great determination.
  • make the best of it The idiom "make the best of it" means to accept and deal with a difficult or less than ideal situation in a positive manner, maximizing one's enjoyment or satisfaction in spite of the circumstances. It emphasizes making the most out of a given situation, despite any challenges or limitations, and finding the positives or opportunities within it.
  • so bad, stupid, etc. it isn't true The idiom "so bad, stupid, etc. it isn't true" is used to emphasize an extreme negative quality or characteristic of something or someone. It suggests that the described situation or behavior is so exaggeratedly bad, foolish, or incredulous that it seems too extreme or unbelievable to be real. It is often utilized humorously or sarcastically to convey a strong negative opinion.
  • brown bag it The idiom "brown bag it" means to bring one's own lunch or meal from home, typically packed in a brown paper bag, instead of buying food from a restaurant or cafeteria. It often implies bringing a homemade meal to save money or show frugality.
  • to barely make it The idiom "to barely make it" means to only succeed or achieve something by a very narrow margin or with great difficulty.
  • to barely make it on time The idiom "to barely make it on time" means to arrive at a destination or complete a task just before the designated time, often with very little margin or leeway. It suggests that the person involved almost failed to be punctual or meet the deadline due to various obstacles or delays.
  • cap it (all) off The idiom "cap it off" or "cap it all off" means to conclude or complete something in an impressive or exceptional way. It is often used to refer to giving a final touch or finishing touch to an event, speech, or overall experience to make it even better or more memorable.
  • cap it all The idiom "cap it all" is used to emphasize a final event or action that is particularly remarkable, surprising, or frustrating, often after a series of similar events. It implies that the concluding occurrence exceeds all previous ones in terms of significance or impact.
  • Fuck it all! The idiom "Fuck it all!" is an expression of frustration, defeat, or resignation. It signifies a strong feeling of giving up or feeling overwhelmed with a situation, and simply not caring anymore about the consequences, responsibilities, or opinions of others. It can be seen as a vulgar and forceful way of expressing a desire to abandon all concerns and let go of any remaining inhibitions.
  • get it all together The idiom "get it all together" means to organize or arrange things in a systematic or efficient manner, often referring to the ability to manage various aspects of one's life or responsibilities effectively. It implies achieving a sense of control, preparedness, or order.
  • have (one's) name written all over it The idiom "have (one's) name written all over it" is used to express that something is perfectly suited or tailored to a specific person. It suggests that the thing in question seems like it was specifically made or designed for that person.
  • have it The idiom "have it" means to possess or own something, or to gain control or authority over a situation. It can also refer to experiencing or enjoying something.
  • have somebody/something written all over it The idiom "have somebody/something written all over it" means that a person, thing, or situation clearly bears the distinct characteristics or qualities of someone or something in a highly recognizable manner. It suggests that the person or thing is a perfect match for a particular purpose or role, leaving no doubt or ambiguity about their suitability or involvement.
  • it always/never pays to do something The idiom "it always/never pays to do something" means that a specific action or behavior will either bring positive or negative consequences or results. It suggests that the outcome, usually in terms of benefits or disadvantages, justifies or disproves taking the action.
  • be in the thick of it The idiom "be in the thick of it" means to be deeply involved or fully immersed in a challenging or intense situation. It refers to being in the midst of an active or critical moment where one's attention, effort, or participation is required.
  • pick up the ball and run with it The idiom "pick up the ball and run with it" means to take responsibility or control of a situation or task that someone else has started or left unfinished and proceed with it energetically and effectively. It implies taking initiative and showing determination to accomplish the given task or continue the progress.
  • be bricking it The idiom "be bricking it" is an informal and slang expression typically used in British English. It means to be extremely nervous, scared, or anxious about something. The phrase "bricking it" is derived from the visual image of a person's fear making them feel as heavy, solid, and immovable as a brick.
  • beat (someone) to it The idiom "beat (someone) to it" means to accomplish or do something before someone else has the chance to do it. It implies acting quickly or being faster in completing a task or taking advantage of an opportunity.
  • it is easy to find a stick to beat a dog The idiom "it is easy to find a stick to beat a dog" means that it is simple to find fault or criticize someone, even if it is unjustified or exaggerated. It implies that people often look for or create reasons to criticize or blame others, regardless of the situation or their actual responsibility.
  • have made your bed and have to lie on it The idiom "have made your bed and have to lie on it" is used to convey the idea that if one has created a difficult or unfavorable situation for oneself, they must accept the consequences or face the difficulties resulting from their actions. It implies taking responsibility for one's choices, even if they have led to undesirable outcomes.
  • make one's bed and lie in it The idiom "make one's bed and lie in it" means to accept the consequences of one's actions or decisions, even if they are negative or unfavorable. It implies taking responsibility for the choices one has made and facing the resulting outcomes without complaining or seeking to avoid them.
  • you have made your bed and must lie in it The idiom "you have made your bed and must lie in it" means that you must accept the consequences of your actions, even if they are unpleasant or undesirable. It implies that you are responsible for the decisions you have made, and you must endure the results or outcomes, whether they are favorable or not. It emphasizes the notion of taking ownership and facing the circumstances arising from your choices.
  • you've made your bed, now lie on it The idiom "you've made your bed, now lie on it" means that you are responsible for dealing with the consequences of your actions or decisions. It implies that once you have made a choice or taken a certain course of action, you must accept and endure the outcomes, even if they are undesirable. In essence, it emphasizes taking responsibility for one's own decisions and not expecting to escape the consequences.
  • beeline it for (some place) The idiom "beeline it for (some place)" means to move quickly and directly towards a certain destination or objective, without any unnecessary detours or delays. It implies going straight towards something in the most efficient and direct manner possible.
  • be out of it The idiom "be out of it" typically means to be mentally or emotionally disconnected, disoriented, or unaware of one's surroundings or current situation. It can imply confusion, lack of focus, or being inattentive.
  • if it hadn't been for (someone or something) The idiom "if it hadn't been for (someone or something)" is used to express that a particular person or thing played a significant role or had a strong impact on a situation or outcome. It implies that if not for that person or thing, the situation would have been different or the expected result would not have been achieved. It highlights the importance or influence of a specific individual or factor in the circumstances being discussed.
  • cross a/that bridge before (one) comes to it The idiom "cross a/that bridge before (one) comes to it" means to worry or concern oneself with a future problem or situation prematurely, instead of focusing on the present. It suggests that it is unnecessary to anticipate or be overly anxious about something that may or may not happen in the future, as it may never actually occur or could be resolved when the time comes. The phrase encourages individuals to deal with issues as they arise, rather than unnecessarily dwelling on potential problems ahead of time.
  • wrap it before you tap it The phrase "wrap it before you tap it" is a colloquial and slang expression that advises individuals to use protection (condom) before engaging in sexual intercourse. It emphasizes the importance of practicing safe sex to prevent unwanted consequences such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or unplanned pregnancies.
  • it behooves one to do something The phrase "it behooves one to do something" is an idiomatic expression that means it is necessary, appropriate, or beneficial for someone to do something. It implies a strong sense of obligation or responsibility. It suggests that undertaking the mentioned action is not only socially or morally right, but also advantageous or beneficial to the individual.
  • I'll believe it/that when I see it The idiom "I'll believe it/that when I see it" means that one refuses to believe something unless they have personal evidence or proof of its validity or occurrence. It implies skepticism or doubt regarding the truth or likelihood of a claim until it can be observed firsthand.
  • not believe a word of it The idiom "not believe a word of it" means to have complete disbelief or skepticism towards something that has been said, suggesting that one does not believe any part of the statement or story.
  • you('d) better believe it The idiom "you('d) better believe it" means that the speaker is emphasizing the truth or certainty of what they just said. It implies that there is no doubt or room for disbelief in the statement being made.
  • you'd better believe it The idiom "you'd better believe it" means that something is definitely true or correct and should be accepted without doubt or hesitation. It implies strong affirmation or confirmation of a statement or claim.
  • feel it beneath (one) (to do something) The idiom "feel it beneath (one) (to do something)" means to consider something beneath one's dignity or pride to do a particular task or action. It implies that one perceives the task or action as demeaning or beneath their personal standards.
  • give it (one's) best shot The idiom "give it (one's) best shot" means to make the maximum effort or try one's hardest to accomplish a task or achieve a goal, regardless of the outcome or likelihood of success. It implies giving something the best possible attempt or giving it one's utmost dedication and effort.
  • give it your best shot The definition of the idiom "give it your best shot" is to try your hardest or make your most sincere effort to accomplish something.
  • I wouldn't bet on it The definition of the idiom "I wouldn't bet on it" is expressing doubt or skepticism regarding the likelihood or certainty of a particular outcome or event.
  • better get used to it The idiom "better get used to it" means that someone should start becoming accustomed to or accepting a certain situation, as it is likely to continue or be unchangeable. It implies that there is no point in resisting or complaining about the situation, and one should instead adapt to it.
  • keep it between the ditches The idiom "keep it between the ditches" is often used as a metaphorical expression to advise someone to stay on the right track or remain focused on their goals or responsibilities. It originated from the idea of driving a vehicle and staying within the designated lanes, or ditches, on the road. By keeping it "between the ditches," one is encouraged to stay within the boundaries or guidelines and avoid deviating or going astray.
  • it boggles the mind The idiom "it boggles the mind" is used to express surprise, astonishment, or disbelief at something that is difficult to comprehend or understand. It implies that the situation or information is so complex, confusing, or extraordinary that it is overwhelming to think about or comprehend.
  • it all boils down to The idiom "it all boils down to" means that the situation, issue, or matter can be simplified or understood by focusing on its most essential or fundamental elements. It implies that, after considering various factors or complexities, the ultimate or key point is a specific thing or idea.
  • feel it in (one's) bones The idiom "feel it in (one's) bones" means to have a strong intuitive or instinctive feeling about something, often without being able to explain it. It refers to having a deep, inner sense or conviction about a particular situation or outcome.
  • booze it The idiom "booze it" refers to the act of drinking alcohol, often excessively or without restraint. It implies indulging in alcoholic beverages for the purpose of getting drunk or enjoying a social gathering centered around drinking.
  • can't have it both ways The idiom "can't have it both ways" means that a person cannot have or enjoy two contradictory things or positions at the same time. It implies that one has to make a choice or decision, as it is impossible to simultaneously have conflicting options.
  • It cuts both ways The idiom "it cuts both ways" means that a particular situation or action has both positive and negative consequences, impacting multiple parties or having various effects, often in a fair or balanced manner. It implies that something can work in favor or against someone or something, and the outcome may not be entirely advantageous.
  • you, etc. can't have it both ways The idiom "you can't have it both ways" means that a person cannot expect or demand two contradictory things simultaneously. It implies that one must choose between two conflicting options or positions, and it is not possible or fair to enjoy the benefits of both.
  • (a)bout it The idiom "(a)bout it" is often used informally in casual conversation to mean being knowledgeable or well-informed about a particular subject or topic. It suggests having a good understanding or having done sufficient research on the matter at hand.
  • bout it The idiom "bout it" or "all about it" is a colloquial expression that means fully committed or completely dedicated to something, usually referring to a particular topic, task, or activity. It indicates a strong enthusiasm or passion for whatever is being discussed or done. Additionally, it can imply being knowledgeable or highly skilled in that area.
  • brave it out The idiom "brave it out" means to face a challenging or difficult situation with courage, determination, and tenacity, despite feeling scared, uncertain, or overwhelmed. It involves enduring hardships or adversity without giving up or showing weakness, often in order to maintain one's reputation, dignity, or honor.
  • break it down! The idiom "break it down!" typically means to simplify or explain something complex or difficult in a more straightforward or understandable manner. It encourages someone to provide a step-by-step analysis or explanation, often used when someone is struggling to comprehend a concept or task.
  • make a break for it The idiom "make a break for it" means to make a sudden, impulsive attempt to escape from a difficult or challenging situation, often by running away or departing swiftly. It usually implies a sense of urgency or desperation in trying to evade or elude something or someone.
  • make it or break it The idiom "make it or break it" refers to a critical moment or situation in which success or failure is imminent and may have a significant impact on the overall outcome or success of a particular endeavor. It implies that one's performance or decisions during this critical period will determine ultimate success or failure.
  • cross a bridge when one comes to it The idiom "cross a bridge when one comes to it" means to deal with a problem or challenge only when it occurs, rather than worrying about it in advance. It suggests not wasting time or energy on potential future difficulties and instead focusing on the present.
  • do it up brown The idiom "do it up brown" means to do something extremely well, thoroughly, or with great enthusiasm. It implies going above and beyond the expected or required effort, resulting in a highly satisfactory outcome or result.
  • make it (one's) business to (do something) The idiom "make it (one's) business to (do something)" means to take it upon oneself to ensure that something is done or to make a focused effort to accomplish a particular task or goal. It implies a sense of personal responsibility and commitment to the specified action.
  • make it one's business The idiom "make it one's business" means that someone takes a personal interest or concern in a particular matter or situation, even if it is not their direct responsibility or domain. It implies that the person feels a sense of duty or commitment to involving themselves and taking action.
  • you can dish it out, but you can't take it The idiom "you can dish it out, but you can't take it" means that someone can criticize or insult others confidently and frequently, but they cannot handle receiving criticism or negative comments themselves. They can easily give their opinions or judgments, but they become defensive, offended, or upset when others do the same to them.
  • you can take/lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink The idiom "you can take/lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink" refers to a situation where one can provide someone with the opportunity or resources to do something beneficial, but ultimately it is up to that person to take the initiative or make use of the opportunity. It emphasizes the inability to force someone to do something against their will or to make them take action if they are not interested or motivated.
  • get the worst of it The idiom "get the worst of it" means to come out on the losing end of a situation or conflict. It refers to experiencing a more negative outcome, being at a disadvantage, or suffering more damage or harm.
  • you can't have your cake and eat it The idiom "you can't have your cake and eat it" means that one cannot have or enjoy the benefits or advantages of something while still preserving it or using it as if nothing has changed. It expresses the idea that one must make a choice or decision and accept the consequences that come with it.
  • call it even The idiom "call it even" means to consider a situation resolved, often by agreeing that any debts or differences between two parties are canceled or balanced out. It suggests that both parties are equal in terms of any obligations or grievances they may have had.
  • take (something) as it comes The idiom "take (something) as it comes" means to deal with a situation or experience without making elaborate plans or expectations, accepting whatever happens naturally or spontaneously. It implies adopting a flexible and adaptable attitude towards life, without trying to control or resist unforeseen events or circumstances.
  • (one) can whistle for it The idiom "(one) can whistle for it" means that something desired or expected will not be received or obtained easily, or might not be obtained at all. It implies that there will be considerable effort or luck required to obtain the desired outcome and that it may not be granted despite one's efforts.
  • (you) can't take it with you (when you go) The idiom "(you) can't take it with you (when you go)" means that when a person dies, they cannot bring any of their possessions or wealth with them into the afterlife or the next world. It emphasizes the idea that material possessions hold no value or significance beyond one's lifetime. It is often used to discourage excessive attachment to wealth or material possessions and encourage prioritizing experiences, relationships, and intangible qualities in life.
  • can it The idiom "can it" is typically used to instruct or tell someone to stop talking or being noisy. It implies that the person should be silent or stop their current action. It is often used in a commanding or forceful manner.
  • can't take it with you The idiom "can't take it with you" means that one cannot bring their material possessions or wealth to the afterlife or beyond death. It implies that the accumulation of wealth or belongings holds no value or significance in the grander scheme of things, emphasizing the transient nature of material possessions. It suggests that one should prioritize experiences, relationships, and personal growth over the pursuit of material wealth.
  • if (one) can help it The idiom "if (one) can help it" means if it is possible for someone to avoid or prevent something from happening. It implies a strong desire or preference to avoid a particular situation or outcome.
  • not if I can help it The idiom "not if I can help it" is used to express one's determination or strong intention to prevent or avoid a particular situation or outcome. It signifies that the person will do everything in their power to prevent something from happening.
  • not if one can help it The idiom "not if one can help it" means doing everything possible to avoid a particular situation or outcome. It implies that someone is determined to prevent or avoid a certain thing from happening.
  • you can't take it with you The idiom "you can't take it with you" refers to the notion that when a person dies, they cannot bring any of their material possessions or wealth with them to the afterlife or beyond. This expression emphasizes the belief that material possessions are temporary and do not hold value in the bigger picture of life. It implies that focusing solely on accumulating wealth or possessions is ultimately futile.
  • you, etc. can whistle for it The idiom "you can whistle for it" or "he/she can whistle for it" is used to express that someone will be unlikely to receive what they are requesting or demanding. It implies that their desired outcome or favor will not be granted or given willingly.
  • to cap it all (off) The idiom "to cap it all (off)" means to finish or complete something in a way that is unexpected, unbearable, or makes a situation even worse than it already was. It is often used to emphasize the negative outcome or a final unfortunate event that concludes a series of already unpleasant circumstances.
  • to top/cap/crown it all The idiom "to top/cap/crown it all" is used to emphasize that something mentioned is the final or most significant event or action in a series of events or actions. It suggests that the additional information or occurrence is the last and often the most surprising or negative outcome in a given situation.
  • play it close to one's chest The idiom "play it close to one's chest" means to keep one's thoughts, intentions, or plans secret or hidden, not revealing them to others. It refers to a cautious and guarded approach to sharing information.
  • catch it in the neck The idiom "catch it in the neck" is typically used to describe someone who is facing severe criticism, punishment, or negative consequences for something they have done wrong. It implies that the person is in a difficult or unpleasant situation and has to bear the full brunt of the repercussions.
  • a bit out of it The idiom "a bit out of it" refers to being mentally or physically disoriented, confused, or lacking focus or awareness. It suggests a state of being not fully present or engaged in the current situation.
  • pour it on thick The idiom "pour it on thick" refers to the act of exaggerating or overemphasizing something, usually in a way that may seem insincere or excessive, in order to impress or persuade someone.
  • spread it on thick The idiom "spread it on thick" means to exaggerate or emphasize something greatly, often by using excessive praise, flattery, or embellishment. It conveys the idea of overdoing and making something seem more intense or impressive than it actually is.
  • go it blind The idiom "go it blind" means to proceed or engage in something without any prior knowledge, information, or preparation. It suggests acting or making decisions without sufficient understanding or insight, often taking a risk or chance.
  • Go blow it out your ear! The idiom "Go blow it out your ear!" is an impolite and dismissive expression used to convey frustration, annoyance, or strong disagreement towards someone. It essentially suggests that the speaker wants the person to go away or stop talking.
  • chalk it up The idiom "chalk it up" means to attribute or credit a particular outcome or success to a specific factor, often having the connotation of giving recognition for something. It can also imply considering a particular situation or experience as a learning opportunity or a lesson to be acknowledged and remembered.
  • chance it The idiom "chance it" means to take a risk or gamble, typically when the likelihood of success is uncertain. It refers to being willing to proceed with an action or decision despite the potential negative consequences or lack of guarantee for a positive outcome.
  • Cheese it the cops! The idiom "Cheese it the cops!" is an outdated slang phrase originating from the 1920s and used throughout the mid-20th century. It means to quickly and discreetly escape, run away, or hide when law enforcement or authorities are approaching or taking action. The phrase suggests the need to avoid getting caught or in trouble with the police.
  • chew it finer The idiom "chew it finer" means to carefully consider, analyze, or think about something in more detail or depth. It suggests the need to delve deeper into a matter, examine all its aspects, and gain a more comprehensive understanding before making a judgment or decision. It conveys the idea of taking your time and thoroughly processing information or ideas.
  • chuck it down The idiom "chuck it down" is used to describe heavy or torrential rain. It implies that the rain is falling with force or intensity.
  • be cutting it fine The idiom "be cutting it fine" means to be doing something at the very last moment or with very limited time remaining, often implying a risky or rushed situation.
  • cut it close The idiom "cut it close" refers to narrowly completing or accomplishing something just before a deadline or a certain limit, usually with little time or margin for error. It implies that the person or the situation was extremely close to not succeeding or falling short.
  • coin it (in) The idiom "coin it (in)" means to earn or make a substantial amount of money, typically by taking advantage of a profitable opportunity or venture. It implies a significant financial gain.
  • come it over The idiom "come it over" typically means to persuade or convince someone to believe or accept something through deceit or manipulation. It implies trying to mislead or trick someone into accepting a false idea or pretense.
  • come it strong To "come it strong" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who exhibits excessive or aggressive behavior, attitude, or performance in order to make a strong impression or impact on others. It implies the act of putting on a show or displaying a remarkable display of confidence, strength, or skill.
  • come out in the wash, it will The idiom "come out in the wash, it will" means that no matter how difficult or complicated a situation may seem, it will eventually be resolved or sorted out in due time. It implies that conflicts or issues will be resolved naturally or through a process, similar to how stains or dirt on clothes are eliminated during the washing process.
  • come to mention it The idiom "come to mention it" refers to someone recalling or bringing up a specific topic or point that they had not previously mentioned or thought about. It is often used to introduce a new piece of information or an idea in a conversation.
  • if/when it comes to the point The idiom "if/when it comes to the point" refers to the moment when a situation or decision reaches its critical or decisive moment. It implies that prior to this point, there may have been ambiguity or uncertainty, but now it is necessary to address the issue directly or make a conclusive decision.
  • it all comes out in the wash The idiom "it all comes out in the wash" means that over time, truth or justice will prevail, and any misunderstandings or secrets will be revealed and resolved. It implies that in the long run, everything will work out or be settled.
  • it will come out in the wash The definition of the idiom "it will come out in the wash" is that eventually, things will be resolved, problems will be solved, or the truth will be revealed over time. It suggests that even if there are uncertainties or difficulties at present, they will be resolved or clarified naturally over time.
  • have it coming to you The idiom "have it coming to you" means that someone deserves or will soon receive the consequences or punishment for their actions or behavior. It implies that the person's actions have led to an inevitable outcome, typically a negative one.
  • It would take an act of Congress to do something. The idiom "It would take an act of Congress to do something" is typically used to express that completing a task or achieving a result is extremely difficult or requires a great amount of effort. It implies that the process is bureaucratic, complex, and time-consuming, often likening it to the need for a law or legislation to be passed by the United States Congress, which is known for its lengthy procedures and decision-making.
  • Cough it up! The idiom "Cough it up!" means to demand or insist on getting something from someone, especially information or money, typically in a forceful or impatient manner. It implies urging someone to reveal or provide what they have been withholding or keeping secret.
  • you could cut it with a knife The idiom "you could cut it with a knife" is used to describe a tense or palpable atmosphere that is so thick or intense, it feels like it could be physically cut or sliced with a knife. It suggests a strong sense of tension, discomfort, or unease in a particular situation or environment.
  • lay (or put) it on the line To "lay (or put) it on the line" means to be open, honest, and straightforward about something, often expressing one's thoughts or feelings without reservation or fear of consequences. It involves being willing to take a risk by speaking openly and honestly, even if it might lead to conflict or difficult outcomes.
  • when (or if) it comes to the crunch The idiom "when (or if) it comes to the crunch" refers to a situation where a decision needs to be made or action needs to be taken. It is used to describe a point in time when a problem or a difficult choice cannot be avoided any longer and immediate action or resolution is required. The phrase implies that the situation has reached a decisive or critical moment where the consequences or outcomes are significant.
  • crush it The idiom "crush it" typically means to perform exceptionally well or achieve great success in a particular task or endeavor. It implies giving one's absolute best effort and surpassing expectations.
  • damn it (all) The idiom "damn it (all)" is an expression of frustration, irritation, or anger. It is often used to signify annoyance or disappointment with a situation or outcome.
  • make a day/night/week of it The idiom "make a day/night/week of it" means to extend or prolong an enjoyable experience or occasion, typically by adding additional activities or indulging oneself in various ways. It implies making the most of a particular day, night, or week by fully immersing oneself in the experience and taking advantage of the available time and opportunities. It may involve various forms of entertainment, relaxation, or leisure activities.
  • make a day/night/weekend of it The idiom "make a day/night/weekend of it" means to extend the duration or significance of an event or activity in order to fully enjoy it or make the most out of it. It suggests taking the opportunity to prolong the experience or celebration by dedicating additional time or effort to make it special and memorable.
  • save, keep, etc. it for a rainy day The idiom "save, keep, etc. it for a rainy day" means to set something aside or save it for a future time of need or difficulty. It suggests that one should save resources or possessions for a time when they may be more beneficial or useful in overcoming an unexpected problem or challenging situation.
  • you deal with it The idiom "you deal with it" is a direct and assertive statement used to indicate that the responsibility or resolution of a certain situation or problem is delegated or expected from someone else. It implies that the person being addressed should take charge, handle or manage the issue on their own without relying on assistance or intervention from others. It can convey a sense of autonomy, self-reliance, or personal accountability.
  • he who smelt it dealt it The idiom "he who smelt it dealt it" is a playful and humorous way of implying that the person who first detects or notices a particular undesirable smell (such as a fart) is often the one responsible for causing it. It is commonly used in situations where there is a smell, and people jokingly try to shift the blame onto others by suggesting that the person who mentioned or detected the smell is guilty of causing it.
  • like (one's) life depends on it The idiom "like (one's) life depends on it" means doing something with extreme urgency, intensity, or effort as if one's survival or well-being relies on it. It emphasizes the level of dedication and determination the person puts into a task, giving it their absolute best and not holding back.
  • if (one's) life depended on it The idiom "if (one's) life depended on it" is used to emphasize the urgency, intensity, or importance of an action or effort. It suggests that someone would do something to the best of their ability or with utmost determination, as if their survival or well-being were at stake. It conveys a sense of extreme necessity and commitment.
  • dig it The idiom "dig it" means to understand or appreciate something. It can also be used to express enthusiasm or enjoyment towards something.
  • dig it out The idiom "dig it out" typically means to excavate or remove something that is buried or hidden, either physically or metaphorically. It can refer to uncovering a physical object from the ground or digging through information, thoughts, or memories to retrieve or rediscover something.
  • rub someone's nose in it The idiom "rub someone's nose in it" means to intentionally remind someone of their mistakes, failures, or humiliation as a way of humiliating or mocking them further. It implies deliberately making someone feel worse about a situation or highlighting their defeat.
  • do it tough The idiom "do it tough" is commonly used to describe a situation where a person experiences or endures undesirable circumstances, challenges, or difficulties. It implies facing hardships or tough circumstances with resilience, determination, and perseverance.
  • do it with mirrors The idiom "do it with mirrors" typically means to achieve a result or perform an action through trickery, deception, or illusion rather than through genuine effort or skill. It implies that the accomplishment appears impressive or difficult, but is actually done using methods that are not transparent or easily understood.
  • does (exactly) what it says on the tin The idiom "does (exactly) what it says on the tin" means that something or someone performs exactly as promised or expected, without any hidden surprises or additional features. It implies that the product, person, or action delivers what was explicitly described or advertised, leaving no room for disappointment or deception. This idiom originates from the practice of labeling products with clear descriptions and instructions on their packaging, causing consumers to associate it with straightforwardness and transparency.
  • easy/gently/slowly does it The idiom "easy/gently/slowly does it" means to proceed or act with caution, carefulness, or moderation, instead of rushing or doing something quickly or forcefully. It emphasizes the importance of taking things slowly to ensure accuracy, avoid mistakes, or prevent accidents.
  • it does no harm (for someone) to do (something) The idiom "it does no harm (for someone) to do (something)" means that there is no negative consequence or risk in someone doing a particular action. It suggests that it may be beneficial or helpful for the person to engage in that activity, even if the outcome is uncertain or minimal.
  • it is a matter of (doing something) The idiom "it is a matter of (doing something)" means that something must be done, carried out, or accomplished as it is an important or necessary task or action. It implies that there is no choice or alternative but to proceed with the mentioned action.
  • It will take some doing The idiom "It will take some doing" is used to express that something will require a significant amount of effort, time, or difficulty to accomplish or achieve.
  • It don’t make me no nevermind The idiom "It don't make me no nevermind" is typically used to express indifference or lack of concern towards a particular situation or outcome. It conveys the message that the mentioned subject or issue does not affect, bother, or have any influence on the person's thoughts, feelings, or actions.
  • It don’t make no nevermind The idiom "It don't make no nevermind" is a colloquial expression that means something doesn't matter or have any significance. It implies that a decision, action, or situation is inconsequential and has no real impact or importance.
  • You don’t know the half of it The idiom "You don't know the half of it" is used to express that someone is unaware of the full extent or true nature of a situation. It implies that the person only knows a small portion or a limited perspective of something, and there is much more information or details that they are not aware of.
  • now (someone) has gone and done it The idiom "now (someone) has gone and done it" is used to express disappointment, frustration, or exasperation when someone has done something that is seen as foolish, reckless, or problematic, thereby causing an undesirable or negative outcome. It implies that the person's actions have resulted in a problematic situation, often implying that it could have been avoided if they hadn't done what they did.
  • drop it The idiom "drop it" typically means to cease talking about a topic or to let go of a particular issue or subject that is causing conflict or disagreement. It suggests that it is best to stop discussing or pursuing the matter further in order to avoid further complications or disagreements.
  • drop someone in it To "drop someone in it" is an idiomatic expression that means to get someone into trouble or a difficult situation by exposing their secrets or making a revelation that could potentially harm them. It involves inadvertently or intentionally revealing information that might have negative consequences for someone, leading to their embarrassment, punishment, or disadvantage.
  • let it drop The idiom "let it drop" means to stop discussing or pursuing a particular subject, issue, or argument. It suggests allowing the matter to fade away or be forgotten rather than continuing to address or emphasize it.
  • if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it is a duck The idiom "if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it is a duck" means that if something or someone appears, behaves, or possesses all the characteristics of a certain thing, then it should be identified or treated as such without further analysis or doubt. It implies that the most obvious or evident characteristics should be used to make a judgement or classification.
  • keep it down to a dull roar The idiom "keep it down to a dull roar" means to reduce noise or excitement to a more acceptable or manageable level. It suggests maintaining a calm and subdued atmosphere, especially in situations where there might be excessive noise, commotion, or enthusiasm.
  • Dump it The idiom "dump it" means to discard, get rid of, or dispose of something, usually quickly and without much thought or consideration. It can refer to physical objects, ideas, projects, or relationships that are deemed unimportant, useless, or burdensome.
  • have it easy The idiom "have it easy" means to experience little or no difficulty or hardship in a particular situation or in life overall. It typically implies that someone's circumstances are advantageous or that they face fewer challenges compared to others. It suggests that they are fortunate or have a relatively easy life.
  • eat it The idiom "eat it" typically means to accept or deal with something unpleasant, difficult, or challenging, often with resignation or humility. It can also imply taking responsibility for one's mistakes or failures.
  • the end of civilization as we know it The idiom "the end of civilization as we know it" refers to a situation or event that brings about significant and disastrous changes to society, causing it to be fundamentally different from the existing norm. It implies a complete upheaval and often suggests a breakdown of societal structures, values, or systems that have been in place for a long time. It is typically used figuratively to emphasize the magnitude and impact of a certain event or development.
  • the end of the world as we know it The idiom "the end of the world as we know it" refers to a situation or event that brings about significant and often dramatic changes or upheaval in one's life, society, or the world in general. It implies a radical transformation or the occurrence of something that completely alters the existing order or familiar circumstances.
  • throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick The idiom "throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick" means that if someone makes numerous accusations or allegations, even if most of them are false or baseless, there will likely be at least a few that are true or believable. This phrase suggests that persistent criticism or attacks can eventually lead to a damaging effect, even if only a fraction of the accusations turn out to be accurate.
  • it escapes (one) The idiom "it escapes (one)" means that someone fails to remember or forgets something, or fails to understand or grasp a concept or idea. It implies that the information or knowledge slips out of their mind or comprehension.
  • it isn't my, his, etc. thing The idiom "it isn't my, his, etc. thing" means that something is not a person's area of interest, expertise, or preference. It suggests that they are not inclined to engage in or have a natural aptitude for a particular activity, subject, or hobby.
  • what's it to you, him, her, etc.? The idiom "what's it to you, him, her, etc.?" is a rhetorical question used to express annoyance or to challenge someone who is being nosy, intrusive, or overly concerned about someone else's business. It implies that the person being questioned has no legitimate reason to be involved or is being overbearing in their curiosity.
  • it was ever thus The idiom "it was ever thus" means that a particular situation or condition has always been the same or unchanged throughout history. It implies that the circumstances being discussed are typical or unchanging, and have been so for a long time.
  • let's face it "Let's face it" is an idiom used when acknowledging a truth or reality, usually one that is difficult or uncomfortable to accept. It is often used to introduce a statement that may be unpopular or unpleasant but needs to be acknowledged.
  • wouldn't know (something) if it hit (one) in the face The idiom "wouldn't know (something) if it hit (one) in the face" is used to describe someone who is completely oblivious or unaware of a particular thing or situation even if it was obvious or apparent. The person is so unaware that they would not recognize or realize something even if it were instantly and obviously presented right in front of them.
  • on faith, take it The idiom "on faith, take it" means to believe or accept something without questioning or demanding further evidence or proof. It implies trusting the validity or truthfulness of a statement or information. It may be used in situations where there is no immediate possibility of verifying the accuracy, and one must rely on trust or belief instead.
  • far be it from The idiom "far be it from" is used to distance oneself or deny an association with a certain idea, action, or behavior, implying that it is completely opposite to one's beliefs or character.
  • far be it from me to (do something) The idiom "far be it from me to (do something)" is a phrase used to express humility or modesty when one wants to distance themselves from a particular action or opinion. It implies that the speaker does not feel entitled to or should not take part in the mentioned action or behavior. It suggests that the speaker has no intention or desire to perform the action being discussed.
  • far be it from one to The idiom "far be it from one to" is used to express strong disagreement or denial of a particular assertion or action being attributed to oneself. It implies that the suggested belief or behavior is completely contrary to one's character or principles.
  • it isn't over till the fat lady sings The idiom "it isn't over till the fat lady sings" means that a situation or event is not concluded or decided until it reaches its final and definitive outcome, often used to express that one should not make assumptions about the outcome prematurely. The phrase originally referred to the opera, where the final act typically included a powerful female singer (often portrayed as being overweight). Therefore, the idiom suggests that one should not assume the outcome until the final and decisive moments.
  • find it in (oneself) (to do something) The idiom "find it in (oneself) (to do something)" means to discover or summon the necessary courage, strength, or determination to do something difficult or challenging. It implies that the ability or motivation required is already present within oneself and needs to be recognized or tapped into.
  • find it in one's heart The idiom "find it in one's heart" means to have the capacity or willingness to show kindness, forgiveness, compassion, or understanding towards someone or something, especially in difficult or challenging situations. It suggests that the person must dig deep within themselves to summon the empathy or generosity required to act in a considerate or compassionate manner.
  • find it in your heart to do something The idiom "find it in your heart to do something" means to have the compassion, forgiveness, or generosity to do something, especially when it may be difficult or against one's initial inclination. It implies making an effort to overcome personal hesitations or negative emotions in order to act with kindness or understanding.
  • put too fine a point on it The idiom "put too fine a point on it" means to be excessively precise or detailed in explaining or emphasizing a matter, often to the point of being overly literal or pedantic. It implies that the speaker is overly focused on a minor or insignificant aspect of a situation, instead of understanding the broader context or meaning.
  • it will never fly The idiom "it will never fly" means that something is unlikely to be successful, acceptable, or feasible. It implies that an idea, plan, or proposal lacks the necessary elements or qualities to be effective or attain the desired outcome.
  • I wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole The idiom "I wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole" is a phrase used to convey extreme unwillingness or aversion towards a particular person, situation, or thing. It implies that the speaker wants no association or involvement with the mentioned subject.
  • be gagging for it The idiom "be gagging for it" typically refers to being extremely eager or desperate for something, often in a sexual context. It implies a strong desire or craving for a particular action or opportunity.
  • be in it for To be in it for something means to be motivated or interested in pursuing or gaining a particular outcome or benefit from a situation or activity. It implies that a person is engaged or committed to achieving a specific goal or purpose.
  • frig it The phrase "frig it" is a colloquial and potentially offensive variation of another phrase, which is used to express frustration, anger, or disregard towards something. It is often used as an alternative to a more vulgar expression that involves a similar meaning.
  • give it a burl The idiom "give it a burl" means to make an attempt or try something, often with eagerness or enthusiasm, even if one is uncertain about the outcome or lacks proficiency in that particular area. It can be used when encouraging someone to attempt something new or challenging, or when expressing one's own willingness to give something a try.
  • give it laldy "Give it laldy" is a colloquial Scottish expression that means to put great energy, enthusiasm, or effort into something. It is often used to encourage someone to do their best or to go all out in a particular activity or performance.
  • give it some welly The idiom "give it some welly" means to put in a lot of effort, energy, or power into doing something. It is often used to encourage someone to exert themselves, work harder, or go faster. The phrase comes from British slang, where "welly" is a colloquial term for power or force.
  • give it to (one) The idiom "give it to (one)" typically means to criticize or reprimand someone severely or blame them harshly for something. It implies delivering a direct, often harsh, assessment or feedback to someone.
  • get down to it The idiom "get down to it" means to start working on a task or activity without any further delay or distraction. It emphasizes the need to focus, become serious, and take action towards the completion of something.
  • got it The idiom "got it" typically means the person has understood or comprehended something that has been said or instructed to them. It signifies that they have grasped the information or concept being conveyed.
  • get (or catch) it in the neck The idiom "get (or catch) it in the neck" means to experience a severe punishment, criticism, or consequence for one's actions or decisions. It implies facing blame, trouble, or a negative outcome resulting from something one has done.
  • get it off The idiom "get it off" generally means to relieve oneself from a burden, to confess something, or to express one's thoughts or feelings openly. It can refer to sharing a secret, admitting a mistake, expressing pent-up emotions, or clearing one's conscience.
  • get (or have) the worst of it The idiom "get (or have) the worst of it" means to be at a disadvantage or to come out on the losing end of a situation or conflict. It refers to being in a position where one suffers more or is on the receiving end of more negative outcomes compared to others involved in the same situation.
  • get it up The idiom "get it up" typically refers to someone's ability to achieve and maintain an erection in a sexual context.
  • give it large The idiom "give it large" means to boast or speak in an exaggerated or overconfident manner, often to impress or intimidate others. It refers to someone talking in a way that makes them appear more impressive or important than they actually are.
  • give it some stick The idiom "give it some stick" means to put in a lot of effort or force into something; to exert yourself wholeheartedly.
  • give it to (one) straight The idiom "give it to (one) straight" means to be honest and direct when conveying information or delivering news without any sugarcoating or deception. It implies communicating without beating around the bush or using euphemisms.
  • give it to someone The idiom "give it to someone" generally means to confront or criticize someone harshly, usually in a direct and assertive manner. It implies expressing one's dissatisfaction, anger, or disagreement with someone over a certain issue.
  • give it up The idiom "give it up" typically means to surrender, quit, or concede in a particular situation or to stop trying to achieve or obtain something. It can also refer to expressing applause or admiration for someone's performance or achievement.
  • give it up (for somebody) The idiom "give it up (for somebody)" means to show admiration, applause, or recognition for someone, typically by clapping or cheering. It signifies showing appreciation or acknowledging someone's accomplishments or performance.
  • go (to) it The idiom "go (to) it" generally means to begin or start something enthusiastically or with determination, often without hesitating or seeking approval from others. It implies taking action or pursuing a goal with initiative and confidence. It can also imply taking on a challenge or difficult task without hesitation or fear.
  • go at it The idiom "go at it" is an expression commonly used to describe engaging in a vigorous or energetic activity, often involving physical or verbal confrontation, conflict, or competition. It can also refer to enthusiastically working or tackling a task with great effort or intensity.
  • go at it hammer and tongs The idiom "go at it hammer and tongs" means to engage in an activity or argument with great intensity, energy, and enthusiasm. It suggests that the person is wholeheartedly and vigorously pursuing or attempting something without holding back. The phrase often implies a competitive or aggressive nature in pursuing a goal or resolving a dispute.
  • (have) got it going on The idiom "(have) got it going on" typically refers to someone who possesses exceptional qualities or attributes that make them stand out or excel in a particular area. It suggests that the person is attractive, successful, confident, or highly skilled in whatever they are doing.
  • have it going on The idiom "have it going on" is used to describe someone who possesses qualities or characteristics that make them attractive, successful, or impressive. It implies that the person is confident, capable, and appealing in various aspects of their life, such as appearance, skills, or accomplishments.
  • like it is going out of fashion or style The idiom "like it is going out of fashion or style" means doing, consuming, or engaging in something excessively, to the extent that it surpasses the normal limits or expected behavior. It implies that the activity is done without restraint, as if there were no limits or consequences, often to the point of being wasteful or extravagant.
  • good-time it The idiom "good-time it" typically refers to engaging in enjoyable activities or having a great time, often implying a carefree and fun-filled experience. It means to make the most of a situation or to indulge in moments of pleasure and happiness without concern for the consequences or responsibilities. It suggests living in the present and embracing enjoyable experiences to the fullest extent.
  • make good weather of it The idiom "make good weather of it" means to handle or deal with a situation in a positive or optimistic way, often by making the best out of difficult or unfavorable circumstances. It implies that someone is able to manage a challenging or unpleasant situation gracefully or with a positive attitude.
  • never had it so good, one The idiom "never had it so good" means that someone is currently in a situation that is better or more favorable than any previous experience they have had. It signifies a state of comfort, prosperity, or success that surpasses any previous time in one's life.
  • get it over with The idiom "get it over with" means to complete or finish something quickly or without delay, especially when it is unpleasant, undesirable, or burdensome. It implies that the person wants to move past or be done with the task or situation as soon as possible.
  • have (got) to hand it to (someone) The idiom "have (got) to hand it to (someone)" means to acknowledge or give credit to someone for their impressive or praiseworthy qualities, achievements, or actions. It is typically used to express admiration or recognition for someone's abilities, skills, or accomplishments.
  • have got it in (one) The idiom "have got it in (one)" means to have successfully guessed or answered something correctly on the first attempt. It implies that the person has a keen understanding or intuition regarding the subject or situation at hand.
  • you name it, (one's) got it The idiom "you name it, (one's) got it" means that the person being referred to possesses or has access to a wide range of things or possessions. It suggests that they have a large variety of items or an extensive collection in a particular domain. It is often used to imply that the person has everything one could imagine or desire.
  • you name it, somebody's got it The definition of the idiom "you name it, somebody's got it" is that whatever specific item, category, or thing you can think of or mention, there is always someone who possesses it or who can provide it. It implies that there is a wide range of options available for selection or acquisition.
  • you've got to be in it to win it The idiom "you've got to be in it to win it" means that one must actively participate or take a chance in order to have a chance of succeeding or winning. It emphasizes the importance of getting involved or taking action rather than simply hoping for a positive outcome without any effort.
  • take it to grave The idiom "take it to the grave" means to keep a secret or important information confidential and not disclose it to anyone, even until one's death. This phrase implies a strong commitment to maintain confidentiality and suggests that the information is not to be shared under any circumstances.
  • grind it out The idiom "grind it out" means to persistently and diligently work on a task or pursue a goal, often in a laborious or tedious manner, despite challenges or setbacks. It conveys the idea of enduring and persevering through difficulty until the desired result is achieved.
  • gun it The idiom "gun it" is commonly used to mean to drive a vehicle at full speed or with maximum acceleration. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone taking action or making an effort with great intensity or immediacy.
  • gut it out The idiom "gut it out" means to persevere, endure, or tough it out through a difficult or challenging situation, despite feeling exhausted, stressed, or overwhelmed. It implies summoning inner strength, willpower, and determination to see something through, often when faced with adversity or discomfort.
  • have (one's) (name and) number on it The idiom "have (one's) (name and) number on it" is typically used to mean that something is perfectly suited or destined for a specific person. It implies that a particular thing has been reserved or intended specifically for an individual, suggesting that it is an ideal match or fit for their preferences or needs.
  • have (someone's) number on it The idiom "have (someone's) number on it" refers to a situation or outcome that is specially tailored or targeted for a particular person. It implies that whatever is being discussed, such as an event, task, or situation, is specifically meant for or designed to affect or involve that individual. It can also suggest that the person is likely to be the recipient of a negative outcome or unfavorable consequences.
  • have a time of it The idiom "have a time of it" means to have difficulty or face challenges while trying to accomplish something. It implies that the task or situation is a struggle or requires a lot of effort.
  • have had it with (someone or something) The idiom "have had it with (someone or something)" means to reach a point of extreme frustration, annoyance, or dissatisfaction with someone or something. It suggests that one can no longer tolerate or endure the situation and desires a change or resolution.
  • have it away (with someone) The idiom "have it away (with someone)" is a colloquial or slang expression that refers to engaging in a sexual or romantic relationship, often in a secretive or illicit manner. It implies a level of excitement, passion, or infidelity in the relationship.
  • have it in (one) The idiom "have it in (one)" is a colloquial expression that typically means to bear a grudge or to harbor resentment towards someone. It signifies a deep-seated negative feeling or intention towards an individual.
  • have it in for (someone) The idiom "have it in for (someone)" means to hold a strong and often negative bias or grudge against someone. It implies having a persistent desire to harm, oppose, or cause trouble for another person.
  • have it off (with someone) The idiom "have it off (with someone)" means to engage in sexual intercourse or have a physical relationship with someone. It refers to having a sexual encounter or a brief and possibly casual sexual relationship.
  • have it on (one's) toes The idiom "have it on (one's) toes" typically means to keep someone alert, attentive, or on guard by creating a sense of constant vigilance or readiness. It refers to the state of being physically or mentally prepared to respond quickly to unexpected situations or challenges.
  • have it out (with someone) The idiom "have it out (with someone)" means to confront or argue with someone about a disagreement, issue, or problem in order to resolve it or come to a resolution. It implies a direct and sometimes heated confrontation with the intention of reaching a resolution or understanding.
  • have it out for (someone) The idiom "have it out for (someone)" means to harbor negative feelings or animosity towards someone and to be determined to confront or harm them in some way. It implies a persistent and intentional desire to cause trouble or seek revenge against someone.
  • have jam on it The idiom "have jam on it" typically means to have an advantage, benefit, or something extra included. It suggests that there is a special or favorable addition to something.
  • have not heard the half of it The idiom "have not heard the half of it" means that the current information or story being told is incomplete, and there is much more to it that has not been shared yet. It suggests that what has been explained or heard so far is just a portion of the whole story, and the undisclosed information might reveal even more surprising or significant details.
  • half of it The idiom "half of it" is a phrase used to indicate that something is not fully known or understood. It suggests that there is more to a story, situation, or problem than what has been shared or discussed so far. It implies that there are additional details, complexities, or perspectives that need to be considered.
  • the half of it The idiom "the half of it" is often used to express that the information, situation, or story being referred to is only a portion or fragment of a larger whole. It signifies that there is more to the subject matter than has been mentioned or revealed. It implies that the current understanding or perspective is incomplete or insufficient to fully comprehend the situation or idea being discussed.
  • hand it to someone To "hand it to someone" means to give credit or acknowledgment to someone for their accomplishments, abilities, or actions, typically when they have done something impressive, skillful, or commendable. It is often used to express admiration or recognition for someone's achievements or efforts.
  • have to hand it to somebody The idiom "have to hand it to somebody" means acknowledging or giving credit to someone for their accomplishments, abilities, or achievements. It expresses admiration, recognition, or respect towards someone's skills or actions.
  • have to hand it to someone The idiom "have to hand it to someone" means to give credit or acknowledge someone's abilities, achievements, or contributions. It expresses admiration or recognition for someone's efforts or accomplishments.
  • it so happens that... The idiom "it so happens that..." is used to introduce a circumstance or situation that is coincidental or unexpected. It implies that something occurs by chance or is an unplanned occurrence.
  • it does no harm (for somebody) to do something The expression "it does no harm (for somebody) to do something" means that it is not detrimental or bad for someone to do a specific action. It suggests that there may be potential benefits or positive outcomes from performing the mentioned action, even if it is not necessarily crucial or mandatory. It implies that the action has little or no negative consequences and could potentially be beneficial in some way.
  • have (one's) name on it The idiom "have (one's) name on it" means that something is specifically meant or destined for a particular person. It implies that the person is associated with or meant to possess the mentioned thing, often in a prominent or significant way.
  • pull it out of the hat The idiom "pull it out of the hat" means to accomplish or produce something unexpected or impressive, often in a quick or skillful manner. It refers to the act of a magician pulling something surprising out of a hat, which represents the ability to achieve or create something remarkable seemingly out of nowhere.
  • have it away (on your toes) The idiom "have it away (on your toes)" is a British English slang phrase that means to leave or make a quick getaway, especially to escape from a situation, often with a sense of urgency or secrecy. It implies a hasty departure, typically in order to avoid trouble or attention.
  • have it away (or off) with The idiom "have it away (or off) with" typically means to have a clandestine romantic or sexual relationship with someone, especially if one or both parties are already committed to someone else.
  • have (got) it in for The idiom "have (got) it in for" means to harbor a strong and persistent animosity or dislike toward someone. It suggests that someone holds a grudge, has ill will, or a desire for revenge against another person.
  • have it (all) over someone or something (in something) The idiom "have it (all) over someone or something (in something)" means to surpass or excel at something compared to someone or something else. It implies being considerably more skilled, successful, or dominant in a particular area or activity.
  • (someone) started it The idiom "(someone) started it" is typically used to indicate that a conflict or disagreement is the fault or responsibility of a specific person. It implies that the person mentioned initiated the problematic situation or action, leading to a chain of events or negative outcomes. It can be used to assign blame or point out who is responsible for instigating a conflict, argument, or other undesirable situation.
  • whichever way you slice it The idiom "whichever way you slice it" means that regardless of how a situation or issue is considered or examined, the conclusion or outcome is the same. It emphasizes that all possibilities or perspectives lead to the same result, leaving no room for alternative interpretations or variations.
  • get/take it into your head that... The idiom "get/take it into your head that..." means to firmly believe or have an idea in mind, often without any logical reason or justification. It refers to someone holding onto a particular thought or notion, sometimes obsessively, regardless of whether others agree or if it is rational.
  • on (one's) (own) head be it The idiom "on (one's) (own) head be it" is a phrase used to emphasize that a person will be solely responsible for the consequences of their actions or decisions. It signifies that the person will bear the full accountability and must accept any negative outcomes that may arise as a result of their choices.
  • on somebody's head be it The idiom "on somebody's head be it" typically means that someone should take full responsibility or face the consequences for their actions or decisions. It implies that the person will bear the burden or blame for whatever outcome or repercussions occur.
  • on your head be it The idiom "on your head be it" is used to express that someone takes full responsibility or accepts the consequences for a decision, action, or outcome. It implies that any negative consequences or effects resulting from that decision or action will be borne solely by the person making it.
  • find it in (one's) heart to (do something) To "find it in one's heart to (do something)" means to have the ability or compassion to do something, especially when it requires forgiving, helping, or understanding someone or a difficult situation. It suggests the willingness to set aside any negative feelings or doubts and act with kindness or empathy.
  • heart not in it The idiom "heart not in it" refers to a situation where someone lacks enthusiasm, passion, or interest in what they are doing. It suggests that their emotional or mental investment is absent or minimal, leading to a lack of dedication or commitment.
  • not have one's heart in it The idiom "not have one's heart in it" means to not be fully committed or passionate about something, lacking enthusiasm or genuine interest in the task or activity at hand. It implies that the person's emotions and dedication are not genuinely invested in what they are doing, resulting in a lack of motivation, effort, or enjoyment.
  • the heart wants what it wants The idiom "the heart wants what it wants" is used to express the idea that one's feelings, desires, or attractions cannot always be rationalized or controlled. It implies that the emotions or affections one experiences are instinctual and cannot be easily influenced by logical reasoning or external factors.
  • your/somebody's heart is not in it The idiom "your/somebody's heart is not in it" means that a person lacks enthusiasm, passion, or genuine interest in what they are doing or pursuing. It suggests that they are not fully committed or emotionally invested in the task or goal at hand.
  • anything in it for (one) The idiom "anything in it for (one)" refers to questioning whether there are any personal benefits or advantages to be gained from a particular situation or action. It typically conveys the desire to know what one stands to gain or if there is any incentive involved in order to justify investment of time, effort, or resources.
  • take it from here The idiom "take it from here" means to continue or proceed with a task, conversation, or responsibility after someone else has completed their part or provided assistance, ending their involvement. It implies that the person being addressed should now take control or direction of what is to follow.
  • take it from here/there The idiom "take it from here/there" means to take control or responsibility for something that has already been started or initiated by someone else. It implies that the person will continue or carry on with the task or situation without further guidance or assistance.
  • take it on (oneself) to (do something) The idiom "take it on (oneself) to (do something)" means to voluntarily accept or assume responsibility for doing a task or fulfilling a duty without being asked or instructed to do so. It implies taking initiative and proactively taking charge of a situation or taking on a task without requiring others to do it.
  • take it upon (oneself) to (do something) The idiom "take it upon (oneself) to (do something)" means to voluntarily or willingly assume the responsibility or task to do something without being asked or told to do so. It implies being proactive and taking initiative to handle a certain matter or take action without being prompted or required to do so.
  • it is high time that The idiom "it is high time that" is used to express that something should have happened or should be done immediately because it has already been delayed or overdue for a long time.
  • hightail it out of (somewhere) The idiom "hightail it out of (somewhere)" means to leave or flee from a place quickly and in a hurry. It implies a sense of urgency or the need to escape swiftly.
  • hightail it The idiom "hightail it" means to quickly leave or flee from a place, often in a hurried or urgent manner.
  • hit (one) where it hurts (most) The idiom "hit (one) where it hurts (most)" means to target someone's most vulnerable or sensitive area or topic, typically in order to cause emotional distress or to have a strong negative impact. It refers to an act that strikes a person in their weakest point, eliciting a significant and often painful response.
  • hit it The idiom "hit it" is often used to encourage someone or a group of people to start or begin something, usually referring to a task, performance, or activity. It implies taking action, initiating, or starting with energy and enthusiasm.
  • hit it off with To "hit it off with" someone is an idiomatic expression that means to establish a positive and instant connection or compatibility with someone upon first meeting or interacting with them. It implies that the individuals involved easily get along and have a harmonious interaction or relationship.
  • hit it up (with someone) The idiom "hit it up (with someone)" typically means to start or initiate a conversation, interaction, or relationship with someone in a lively and engaging manner. It implies being friendly, sociable, and enthusiastic in one's approach to connect or engage with another person.
  • hit somebody where it hurts The idiom "hit somebody where it hurts" refers to intentionally targeting someone's emotional or vulnerable area in order to cause maximum harm or distress. It metaphorically suggests striking at a person's most sensitive or weak point, aiming to deliver a powerful and impactful blow.
  • hit it off (with someone) The idiom "hit it off (with someone)" means to immediately form a positive and friendly connection or rapport with someone upon first meeting. It implies that two individuals get along well and have an instant liking for each other, often leading to a harmonious and enjoyable interaction.
  • hook it The idiom "hook it" typically means to leave or depart quickly, especially in a situation where the person may be avoiding or escaping from something.
  • make it hot for (someone) The idiom "make it hot for someone" means to make someone's life difficult or to put them in a challenging or uncomfortable situation, often by subjecting them to intense pressure, criticism, or trouble.
  • make it hot for somebody To "make it hot for somebody" means to make their life or situation difficult, to create challenges or problems for them, or to cause them trouble or discomfort. It can also refer to applying pressure or creating a hostile or intense atmosphere for someone.
  • hotfoot it (off to) (somewhere) The idiom "hotfoot it (off to) (somewhere)" means to leave or move rapidly or quickly, often in a hurry or with great urgency. It implies a brisk or hurried pace in order to reach a destination promptly.
  • hotfoot it out of (somewhere) The idiom "hotfoot it out of (somewhere)" means to leave a place quickly or hastily, usually to escape from a situation or to avoid trouble or danger. It implies a sense of urgency and the need to move rapidly.
  • How’s it hanging? The idiom "How’s it hanging?" is a colloquial expression commonly used as a casual greeting or a way of asking someone how they are doing or feeling. It can also be interpreted as a lighthearted inquiry about a person's overall well-being or current situation.
  • tell it how it is The idiom "tell it how it is" means to express or communicate something truthfully and honestly without sugarcoating or embellishing it. It implies speaking straightforwardly and providing a realistic, unfiltered account or opinion.
  • tell it how/like it is The idiom "tell it like it is" means to express the truth or the facts of a situation without sugarcoating or holding back any information. It implies straightforwardness, honesty, and directness in presenting the reality or one's personal opinion.
  • How goes it (with you)? The idiom "How goes it (with you)?" is a casual way of asking someone about their well-being or current situation. It can be used to inquire about someone's overall state or to ask about specific aspects of their life.
  • hump it (to somewhere) The idiom "hump it (to somewhere)" refers to the act of making an arduous or strenuous effort to reach a particular destination or complete a task. It suggests that the journey or task requires significant physical or mental exertion.
  • hump it The idiom "hump it" is slang and has several possible definitions depending on the context: 1. To exert great effort or work hard to accomplish a task. 2. To carry a heavy load, often implying physical strenuousness. 3. To endure or overcome a difficult or challenging situation. 4. To travel a long distance, especially by foot or by a difficult route. Note that the meaning of this idiom can vary depending on the region or social group using it.
  • it doesn't hurt to (have or do something) The idiom "it doesn't hurt to (have or do something)" means that there is no harm or disadvantage in acquiring or engaging in a particular action or possession. It suggests that it may be beneficial or advantageous to do so, even if the immediate outcome is uncertain or inconsequential.
  • it won't hurt to (have or do something) The idiom "it won't hurt to (have or do something)" means that there is no harm or negative consequence in having or doing something. It suggests that taking a certain action or having a specific item or opportunity will not cause any negative effects or consequences, and may even be beneficial. It implies that the action or possession is low-risk and worth trying or obtaining.
  • it won't/wouldn't hurt somebody to do something The idiom "it won't/wouldn't hurt somebody to do something" means that doing a particular action or carrying out a certain task has no negative consequences or harm associated with it and could potentially be beneficial. It suggests that the action in question is not difficult or troublesome and may even be helpful or advantageous for the individual.
  • it wouldn't hurt to (have or do something) The idiom "it wouldn't hurt to (have or do something)" suggests that there is no harm or negative consequences in obtaining or taking a certain action. It indicates that the action or possession in question could be beneficial or useful, and taking it would not cause any harm.
  • if it comes to the point The idiom "if it comes to the point" typically means a situation or circumstance where a decision or action becomes necessary. It describes reaching a critical or pivotal moment when a specific action, outcome, or resolution becomes inevitable or unavoidable. It suggests that when other options have been exhausted or when all other possibilities have been considered, that particular course of action becomes necessary.
  • if it kills (one) The idiom "if it kills (one)" is used to express extreme determination in achieving a particular goal or completing a task, even if it requires a great amount of effort, hardship, or sacrifice. It implies a willingness to do whatever it takes, regardless of the consequences or challenges faced during the process.
  • if it kills you The idiom "if it kills you" means doing something regardless of how difficult or challenging it may be, even if it causes great physical or emotional strain. It implies a determination to do something or achieve a goal no matter the cost or potential harm.
  • if it wasn't/weren't for... The idiom "if it wasn't/weren't for..." is used to express gratitude or acknowledge someone or something responsible for a favorable outcome or preventing a negative situation from occurring. It emphasizes the importance or impact of a particular person or thing.
  • if it weren't for (someone or something) The idiom "if it weren't for (someone or something)" refers to acknowledging someone's or something's importance or contribution in a specific situation. It implies that without the mentioned person or thing, the outcome or situation would be significantly different or unfavorable.
  • if you think about it The definition of the idiom "if you think about it" is a phrase used to encourage or invite someone to consider a situation or idea more deeply or from a different perspective. It implies that upon further reflection, the person may realize or understand something that was initially overlooked or not readily apparent.
  • it isn't as if/as though The idiom "it isn't as if/as though" is used to express the idea that something is not true or does not apply, despite appearing or seeming that way. It is often used to rebut or counter a misconception or assumption.
  • it isn't as though The idiom "it isn't as though" is used to emphasize that a particular situation or outcome is not true or likely, emphasizing a contrast between reality and a hypothetical situation or expected result.
  • when it comes to the point The idiom "when it comes to the point" means when the discussion or conversation reaches a crucial or important stage, getting to the main issue or key aspect. It refers to the moment when all irrelevant or less significant information is set aside and the focus shifts to the most essential part or the heart of the matter.
  • when you think about it The idiom "when you think about it" is used to introduce an additional perspective or insight about a particular situation or topic after considering it more deeply. It implies that further consideration or reflection can lead to a different viewpoint or understanding.
  • anything in it The idiom "anything in it" typically refers to the potential gain or benefit one can achieve from a particular situation, venture, or opportunity. It suggests that there is something advantageous, valuable, or rewarding associated with the said subject.
  • put it in a nutshell The idiom "put it in a nutshell" means to summarize or explain something concisely and briefly.
  • return it with interest The idiom "return it with interest" typically means to respond or retaliate to someone's action or behavior in a manner that is even more intense, severe, or impactful. It suggests going beyond what was initially done or said to make a greater impact. It metaphorically refers to the concept of interest in finance, where borrowing money is repaid with an additional amount or percentage added.
  • so (something) it isn't true The idiom "so (something) it isn't true" is typically used to emphasize the extent or intensity of a particular quality, characteristic, or action. It implies that the described situation is extreme or exaggerated to the point that it may not seem believable or believable only in fiction. This idiom is often employed to convey a sense of astonishment, exaggeration, or incredulity.
  • (it) (really) doesn't matter to me The definition of the idiom "(it) (really) doesn't matter to me" is: To express indifference or lack of concern towards a particular situation, decision, or outcome. It implies that the speaker is unaffected by or not interested in the subject at hand.
  • as it turned out The idiom "as it turned out" means the actual or eventual outcome or result of a situation or event, often in contrast to what was originally expected or predicted. It implies that the final conclusion or resolution was different from what was initially assumed or believed.
  • batch it The idiom "batch it" typically means to work or complete tasks together in a collective or organized manner, rather than doing them individually and sporadically. It refers to the act of grouping similar or related tasks together to increase efficiency and productivity.
  • be chucking (it) down The idiom "be chucking (it) down" is a colloquial expression used predominantly in British English. It means that it is raining heavily or pouring down with rain. The phrase "chucking it down" implies that the rain is coming down forcefully, almost as if someone is throwing it down forcefully.
  • be tipping (it) down The idiom "be tipping (it) down" refers to heavy rainfall or pouring rain. It implies that rain is falling in great quantity or intensity.
  • be with it The definition of the idiom "be with it" refers to being current, knowledgeable, or in touch with the latest trends, styles, or developments in a particular field or area of interest. It suggests being aware of and able to adapt to new ideas, technologies, or cultural changes.
  • be worth it The idiom "be worth it" means that something is deserving of the effort, time, or cost involved because the benefits or results are valuable or satisfying. It suggests that the positive outcome or experience justifies any difficulties or investments required.
  • be/look past it The idiom "be/look past it" means to overlook or disregard something, often a flaw or mistake, and focus on the bigger picture or more important aspects. It implies disregarding something that may be distracting or negative in order to avoid being hindered or held back by it.
  • by the look(s) of it/things The idiom "by the look(s) of it/things" is used to express a judgment or conclusion based on appearances or initial observations. It implies making an assumption or forming an opinion about something or someone by simply observing their outward appearance or behavior, without having all the relevant information or deeper knowledge.
  • jack it in The idiom "jack it in" means to give up, quit, or abandon an activity, job, or endeavor. It implies stopping or walking away from something due to frustration, lack of interest, or dissatisfaction.
  • is it just me The idiom "is it just me?" is a rhetorical question used to express uncertainty or seek confirmation if others share the same opinion, experience, or perception as the speaker. It implies that the speaker is unsure if they are the only person who thinks or feels a certain way.
  • that's just it The idiom "that's just it" is typically used to express the idea of finally understanding or explaining a crucial point or situation. It implies that the person speaking has arrived at a clear understanding or has found the key element that has been missing before. It can also denote frustration or impatience in the process of trying to convey an important idea to someone who may not fully comprehend it.
  • keep at it The idiom "keep at it" means to persist or continue in doing something difficult or challenging, despite obstacles or setbacks. It suggests maintaining perseverance, determination, and not giving up until a desired outcome is achieved.
  • keep it down The idiom "keep it down" means to lower the volume, reduce the noise, or maintain a quiet and calm atmosphere. It serves as a request or instruction to be quieter or refrain from making too much noise.
  • keep it on the down-low The idiom "keep it on the down-low" means to keep something secret or confidential, typically referring to information or activities that should not be shared or made public. It implies a need for discretion and a desire to avoid drawing attention or causing unnecessary discussion.
  • kick it The idiom "kick it" typically means to relax, chill, or spend time doing nothing in particular. It can also refer to moving on or getting rid of something.
  • It takes all kinds The idiom "It takes all kinds" means that people have different personalities, preferences, or viewpoints, and that a diverse range of individuals is necessary or beneficial for a complete or successful outcome. It acknowledges that diversity and variety in people's qualities, abilities, and perspectives are essential for a balanced and well-functioning society or situation.
  • have it knocked The idiom "have it knocked" typically means to have something accomplished, resolved, or taken care of efficiently and effectively. It suggests that a task, problem, or situation will be successfully handled or dealt with.
  • know what it is to be (something) The idiom "know what it is to be (something)" means having personal experience or understanding of what it feels like to be in a particular situation or condition. It implies that one has first-hand knowledge of the challenges, emotions, or circumstances associated with a specific state or role.
  • know what it is to be/do something The idiom "know what it is to be/do something" means to have personal experience or understanding of a particular situation, condition, or emotion. It implies that one has firsthand knowledge or empathy towards a specific circumstance or action.
  • wouldn't you know it The idiom "wouldn't you know it" is used to express frustration or surprise when something expected or predicted happens. It typically implies that the speaker already knew or suspected that the outcome would occur, but they still find it irritating or ironic.
  • you know it The idiom "you know it" is an informal phrase used to assert or express certainty about something. It often implies that the speaker has complete confidence in the truth or correctness of a statement and that they expect the person they are speaking to also shares this knowledge or understanding.
  • make it known The idiom "make it known" means to inform or communicate something to others, ensuring that the information is widely understood or recognized. It involves making something public, revealing, or openly expressing a particular piece of information, event, or intention. It signifies the act of sharing or spreading knowledge or making a certain point known to a broader audience.
  • lay it on with a trowel The idiom "lay it on with a trowel" means to exaggerate or overstate something, often in a dramatic or excessive manner. It refers to the act of spreading or applying something thickly with a trowel, emphasizing the excessive or heavy-handed nature of the action.
  • have it large The idiom "have it large" means to enjoy oneself to the fullest, often by engaging in extravagant or excessive behavior, especially in terms of spending money or indulging in leisure activities. It implies a sense of living life to the fullest and embracing enjoyment and luxury without restraint or moderation.
  • It is never too late The idiom "It is never too late" means that there is no specific or fixed time limit for starting or achieving something. It suggests that one should not feel discouraged or limited by their age or circumstances and can still pursue goals or aspirations regardless of their current situation.
  • lay it on thick/with a trowel The idiom "lay it on thick/with a trowel" means to overemphasize or exaggerate something, often in a way that is insincere or not entirely truthful. It implies that the speaker is being excessively dramatic, sentimental, or flattering in order to manipulate or impress others.
  • let it lay The definition of the idiom "let it lay" is to allow a particular situation or issue to rest or remain unresolved, usually in order to avoid unnecessary confrontation or further complications. It implies refraining from taking any action or making any further comments regarding the matter.
  • you've made your bed, now lie in it The idiom "you've made your bed, now lie in it" is an expression used to convey the notion that once someone has made a decision or taken a certain course of action, they must accept the consequences or live with the outcomes of their choices. It implies that individuals are responsible for the circumstances they find themselves in and should not complain or seek to avoid the results of their own actions.
  • leave (someone) to it The idiom "leave (someone) to it" means to allow someone to handle or deal with a situation on their own, without offering assistance or interference. It implies that one trusts the person's capability and judgment to handle the task or situation independently.
  • leave it be The idiom "leave it be" means to not interfere with or attempt to change a situation or a person, and to let things remain as they are. It suggests accepting things as they are without further involvement or intervention.
  • leave somebody to it The idiom "leave somebody to it" means to allow someone to continue or proceed with a task or activity without interruption, interference, or assistance. It implies trusting that the person is competent enough to handle the situation on their own.
  • leaves of three, let it be The idiom "leaves of three, let it be" is a phrase used to warn about potential danger or poison ivy. It means that if plants have leaves arranged in groups of three, it is better to avoid them as they might be poisonous or harmful.
  • let (one) have it The idiom "let (one) have it" means to aggressively or fiercely attack, criticize, or confront someone with words or actions, typically with the intention of expressing anger or disapproval. It can also refer to giving someone a punishment or reprimand.
  • let it rest The idiom "let it rest" means to stop thinking or speaking about a particular issue or topic. It suggests allowing time to pass before addressing the matter again or deciding not to pursue it further, thereby bringing closure or avoiding unnecessary conflict.
  • Let it roll! The idiom "Let it roll!" means to allow things to happen or progress without interference or obstruction, often used in a context of casual resignation or acceptance of the course of events. It suggests a relaxed and nonchalant attitude towards a situation, encouraging someone to go with the flow.
  • let it slip The idiom "let it slip" means to unintentionally reveal or disclose information, often something that was meant to be kept a secret or withheld. It suggests that someone has allowed certain details to be revealed without intending to do so, usually because of forgetfulness or carelessness.
  • let it go (or pass) The idiom "let it go (or pass)" means to ignore or forgive something or someone's actions, to not hold a grudge or dwell on a certain matter, and to move on without further contesting or discussing it. It conveys the idea of releasing negativity or grievances and choosing not to react or dwell on something that might otherwise provoke a strong emotional response.
  • let someone have it (with both barrels) The idiom "let someone have it (with both barrels)" is used to describe an aggressive and forceful response towards someone or something, typically involving a verbal or physical attack. It implies giving a full and unreserved expression of one's thoughts, feelings, or actions, without holding back. The phrase often connotes a confrontational or intense reaction.
  • like it or not The idiom "like it or not" means that whether someone approves or not, something is true or will happen regardless of personal preferences or opinions. It implies that acceptance or agreement is not necessary for the situation to occur or be valid.
  • very little in it The idiom "very little in it" typically refers to a situation or comparison where there is only a slight difference or margin between two options or outcomes. It implies that the options being compared are almost identical or have a negligible distinction between them.

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