How Do You Spell LADDER?

Pronunciation: [lˈadə] (IPA)

The word "ladder" is spelled with two "d's" due to the fact that the "r" sound at the end of the word is pronounced with a "flapped" "d" sound in many English dialects. In IPA phonetic transcription, the word is represented as /ˈlædər/, with the symbol /d/ indicating the "flapped" "d" sound. It is important to not confuse this sound with a standard /r/ sound, as this would change the meaning of the word entirely.

LADDER Meaning and Definition

A ladder is a tool or device typically consisting of rungs or steps that are connected by sidewalls, allowing an individual to ascend or descend to reach higher or lower levels. This versatile equipment is essential in various aspects of everyday life, predominantly employed for climbing to heights that would otherwise be inaccessible. It typically serves as a convenient means of reaching elevated surfaces or areas such as roofs, buildings, shelves, or tree branches.

Ladders are constructed using a range of materials, including wood, aluminum, fiberglass, or steel, and are available in various designs and sizes to suit specific requirements. Some ladders are designed with a single piece, while others are foldable or extendable to provide greater height and convenient storage options.

These devices rely on rungs or steps, which are evenly spaced to ensure stability and provide secure footing while ascending or descending. The sidewalls, often referred to as stiles, assist in maintaining balance and safety for the user. Additionally, ladders may feature non-slip surfaces, handrails, and safety locks to enhance stability and protect against accidents or falls.

Ladders have been utilized for centuries and have evolved in design and functionality over time. They are widely employed across various industries, including construction, painting, firefighting, maintenance, and household chores. Their versatility extends their usefulness to both indoor and outdoor activities.

Overall, ladders are an invaluable tool for accessing higher areas safely, allowing individuals to perform tasks that would otherwise be impractical or hazardous. Their design and durability make them a fundamental element in various professions and a necessity for many day-to-day activities.

Top Common Misspellings for LADDER *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for LADDER

Etymology of LADDER

The word "ladder" originated from the Old English word "hlǣdder", which can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic word "hlaidrō". This word ultimately derives from the Proto-Indo-European root "*kleytro-", meaning "ladder" or "lattice". The term has undergone various changes throughout history: "hlǣdder" in Old English, "lader" in Middle English, and eventually "ladder" in Modern English.

Idioms with the word LADDER

  • be on the lowest/bottom rung of the ladder The idiom "be on the lowest/bottom rung of the ladder" refers to being in the lowest or least important position within a particular hierarchy or organization. It implies having little power, influence, or advancement opportunities. It is often used to describe someone at the beginning of their career or someone who is at the bottom of the social or professional ladder.
  • the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first/highest/next etc. rung on the ladder" refers to the initial, highest, or subsequent step in a series of achievements, advancements, or levels of progress towards a goal or success. It highlights the idea of starting at the bottom and gradually climbing upwards towards higher levels of attainment or accomplishment.
  • at the bottom of the ladder The idiom "at the bottom of the ladder" refers to someone being in the lowest position or level in a particular organization, hierarchy, or social structure. It implies that this person has little authority, influence, or power, and often indicates a lack of opportunities for advancement or promotion.
  • can't see a hole in a ladder The idiom "can't see a hole in a ladder" means being oblivious to an obvious problem or flaw. It implies a lack of awareness or perceptiveness towards something that should be easily noticeable.
  • He who would climb the ladder must begin at the bottom. The idiom "He who would climb the ladder must begin at the bottom" means that if someone wants to achieve success or reach a higher position or level in life, they must start from the lowest or most basic level and gradually work their way up. It emphasizes the importance of starting from the beginning and putting in the necessary effort and experience to progress towards one's goals.
  • the bottom of the ladder The idiom "the bottom of the ladder" refers to the lowest or least important position in a hierarchical structure or social order. It often signifies a starting point or a position with little power, influence, or status, suggesting the potential for upward mobility or advancement over time.
  • the first etc. rung on the ladder The idiom "the first rung on the ladder" refers to the initial step or level of progress in a particular field, career, or pursuit. It signifies the beginning or starting point of a process or the first stage of advancement towards a goal. It emphasizes the importance of taking that initial step in order to achieve further success or climb higher on the figurative ladder of achievement.
  • the top of the ladder The idiom "the top of the ladder" refers to reaching the highest position or level of success or achievement in a particular field or endeavor. It signifies the ultimate goal or pinnacle of one's career or aspirations.
  • at the top of the ladder The idiom "at the top of the ladder" refers to being in the highest position or achieving the highest level of success or status in a particular field or hierarchy. It implies reaching the peak of one's career or accomplishments.
  • bottom of the ladder The idiom "bottom of the ladder" refers to the lowest position or starting point in a hierarchy, organization, or social structure. It implies being at the least advanced or influential level in a particular field or endeavor. It symbolizes one's status or position when just beginning or having yet to progress in a given context.
  • climb the social ladder The idiom "climb the social ladder" refers to the act of advancing or moving up in social status or rank, typically by improving one's wealth, education, or social connections. It implies the desire to attain a higher level of standing within society, often with the aim of achieving more influence, prestige, or acceptance.
  • climb up the ladder The idiom "climb up the ladder" typically means to progress or advance in one's career or social status by taking on higher positions or achieving greater success. It refers to the idea of ascending step by step, similar to climbing a ladder, and attaining higher levels of achievement or recognition.
  • climb the ladder The idiom "climb the ladder" refers to advancing or progressing in one's career or social status, usually by means of hard work, determination, and promotion.
  • corporate ladder The idiom "corporate ladder" refers to the hierarchical structure within a company or organization, where employees progress or climb from lower-level positions to higher-level positions. It symbolizes the ambition and desire to achieve higher ranks, status, or positions in a professional setting.
  • the first/top rung on the ladder The idiom "the first/top rung on the ladder" refers to the initial or highest step in a process or hierarchy. It symbolizes the starting point or the lowest position in a field or organization, often used to describe someone who is just beginning their career or someone who has achieved an entry-level position.
  • kick (someone or something) down the ladder The idiom "kick (someone or something) down the ladder" refers to the act of deliberately hampering or hindering the progress or success of someone or something, often with the intent to surpass or overshadow them. It implies exerting harmful influence to cause someone to be demoted, lose opportunities, or face setbacks in their pursuits, ultimately removing them from a position of advantage or power.
  • kick someone down the ladder The idiom "kick someone down the ladder" refers to the act of deliberately demoting or hindering someone's progress, typically by using one's power or influence to undermine their position or chances of success. It implies unfairly treating or sabotaging someone in order to hinder their advancement or growth.
  • low man on the ladder The idiom "low man on the ladder" refers to a person in a low-ranking or less desirable position within a hierarchy or organization. It implies that the person has a lower status, less authority, and fewer opportunities for advancement compared to others. The phrase is often used to emphasize the disadvantages or challenges faced by individuals occupying such positions.
  • the lowest rung on the ladder The idiom "the lowest rung on the ladder" refers to the position of having the least authority, importance, or status within a hierarchy or organization. It signifies being at the bottom or least advanced level within a group or a career.
  • the lowest rung of the ladder The idiom "the lowest rung of the ladder" refers to the lowest position or status in a particular hierarchy, organization, or group. It symbolizes the starting point or the least prestigious level in a career, social, or personal advancement.
  • the social ladder The idiom "the social ladder" refers to the hierarchical ranking system in society based on social status or prestige. It describes the concept of moving up or down this ladder, with individuals striving to climb higher to improve their social standing.

Similar spelling words for LADDER

Plural form of LADDER is LADDERS

Conjugate verb Ladder

CONDITIONAL

I would ladder
you would ladder
he/she/it would ladder
we would ladder
they would ladder

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be laddering
you would be laddering
he/she/it would be laddering
we would be laddering
they would be laddering

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have ladder
you would have ladder
he/she/it would have ladder
we would have ladder
they would have ladder

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been laddering
you would have been laddering
he/she/it would have been laddering
we would have been laddering
they would have been laddering

FUTURE

I will ladder
you will ladder
he/she/it will ladder
we will ladder
they will ladder

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be laddering
you will be laddering
he/she/it will be laddering
we will be laddering
they will be laddering

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have laddered
you will have laddered
he/she/it will have laddered
we will have laddered
they will have laddered

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been laddering
you will have been laddering
he/she/it will have been laddering
we will have been laddering
they will have been laddering

IMPERATIVE

you ladder
we let´s ladder

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to ladder

PAST

I laddered
you laddered
he/she/it laddered
we laddered
they laddered

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was laddering
you were laddering
he/she/it was laddering
we were laddering
they were laddering

PAST PARTICIPLE

laddered

PAST PERFECT

I had laddered
you had laddered
he/she/it had laddered
we had laddered
they had laddered

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been laddering
you had been laddering
he/she/it had been laddering
we had been laddering
they had been laddering

PRESENT

I ladder
you ladder
he/she/it ladders
we ladder
they ladder

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am laddering
you are laddering
he/she/it is laddering
we are laddering
they are laddering

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

laddering

PRESENT PERFECT

I have laddered
you have laddered
he/she/it has laddered
we have laddered
they have laddered

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been laddering
you have been laddering
he/she/it has been laddering
we have been laddering
they have been laddering
I would have laddered
we would have laddered
you would have laddered
he/she/it would have laddered
they would have laddered

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