How Do You Spell LAY?

Pronunciation: [lˈe͡ɪ] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "lay" can be tricky, as it is sometimes confused with the word "lie." The pronunciation can also vary, depending on the context in which it is used. In IPA phonetic transcription, "lay" is pronounced as /leɪ/, with the "a" sound pronounced as in "face." This word is used as a verb, with a meaning of placing something down or putting something in a particular position. It is important to use the correct spelling and pronunciation when using this word in written and spoken language.

LAY Meaning and Definition

Lay is a verb that has multiple meanings and uses. It can refer to the act of placing something in a horizontal position or arranging it in a particular way. This can include the act of setting something down gently or positioning it for use or display. For example, "Please lay the book on the table" or "He laid the bricks to create a path."

In a different sense, lay can also refer to the act of causing or putting something or someone down, often in a forceful or violent manner. For instance, "The wrestler laid his opponent down on the mat."

Lay can also describe the process of producing or giving birth to offspring, particularly in animals. For example, "The hen lays eggs in the morning."

Furthermore, lay can function as a verb indicating the act of spreading or arranging something, such as a table or a foundation. It can also denote the act of preparing or setting up something for a future event or occasion. For instance, "She laid the table for dinner" or "He laid the groundwork for the project."

In addition, lay can function as a noun, referring to a song or poem of ancient origin or a non-clerical member of a religious community, such as a layperson.

Overall, the verb lay encompasses a wide range of actions, from positioning or arranging objects, giving birth to offspring, forcefully putting something down, spreading or arranging something, to preparing for future events.

Top Common Misspellings for LAY *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for LAY

Etymology of LAY

The word "lay" has its origins in Old English, with various forms and meanings. Here is a breakdown of its etymology:

1. Old English: The word "lecgan" was used to mean "to lay" or "to put". The past tense of this verb was "lagen", which later transformed into "lay" in Middle English.

2. Old Norse Influence: During the Viking Age, Old Norse had a significant influence on Old English. The Old Norse verb "leggja" had a similar meaning to "lecgan", and its past tense was "laidi". The influence of Old Norse contributed to the development of the word "lay" in Middle English.

3. Middle English: By the Middle English period, the word "lay" was established with various spellings such as "ley", "leye", or "lai".

Idioms with the word LAY

  • lay bare sth The idiom "lay bare something" means to reveal or expose something that was previously hidden or secret. It implies uncovering the truth or making something known in a straightforward and unreserved manner.
  • lay sb low The idiom "lay sb low" means to cause someone to become ill or incapacitated, typically with a serious or severe condition. It can also refer to causing someone's downfall or defeat.
  • lay the basis/foundations for sth The idiom "lay the basis/foundations for sth" refers to the act of establishing the fundamental principles, structure, or groundwork necessary for the development or success of something. It implies the act of setting up a strong or solid starting point upon which further progress or growth can be built.
  • clap/lay/set eyes on sb/sth The idiom "clap/lay/set eyes on sb/sth" means to see someone or something, often for the first time, or after a long period of anticipation or desire. It implies a sense of curiosity, excitement, or surprise upon encountering the person or object.
  • put/lay sth on/to one side The idiom "put/lay something on/to one side" means to set something aside or keep something separate, usually for future use or consideration. It implies temporarily disregarding or postponing attention or action on something.
  • put/lay your cards on the table The idiom "put/lay your cards on the table" means to be honest and open about your intentions, opinions, or feelings, especially in a negotiation, discussion, or relationship. It refers to revealing or disclosing all relevant information or issues in a straightforward manner, similar to the act of revealing all the cards in a card game.
  • lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overdo something, especially when trying to make something seem more emotional, dramatic, or impressive than it actually is. It refers to emphasizing or embellishing a statement, story, or performance in an excessively noticeable or conspicuous way.
  • lay up trouble for yourself The idiom "lay up trouble for yourself" means to engage in actions or behaviors that will result in problems or difficulties in the future. It refers to the act of knowingly or inadvertently creating problems or challenges through one's actions, decisions, or choices.
  • lay waste, at lay sth to waste The idiom "lay waste" or "lay something to waste" means to destroy or devastate something completely, leaving it in ruins or in a state of total destruction. It implies causing extensive damage or destruction to land, property, or resources.
  • lay sth to waste The idiom "lay something to waste" means to destroy or devastate something completely or extensively. It generally refers to causing severe damage or ruin to a place, object, or person.
  • lay yourself open to ridicule The idiom "lay oneself open to ridicule" means making oneself vulnerable or susceptible to being made fun of or mocked due to one's actions, behavior, or statements. It refers to the act of exposing oneself to potential embarrassment or public humiliation.
  • put/lay sth on the line To put/lay something on the line means to risk something valuable or important in order to achieve a desired outcome, or to be willing to face the consequences of one's actions. It often implies taking a bold or courageous stance, and being willing to give up something significant in pursuit of a goal.
  • get/lay/put your hands on sb The idiom "get/lay/put your hands on somebody" means to physically find, locate, or make contact with a person, often with the intention of confronting, attacking, or engaging with them. It can be used both literally and figuratively, depending on the context.
  • get/lay/put your hands on sth The idiom "get/lay/put your hands on sth" means to find or obtain something, especially something that is difficult to locate or acquire. It suggests actively searching or reaching out to obtain the desired object or item.
  • lay it on with a trowel, at lay it on a bit thick The idiom "lay it on with a trowel" or "lay it on a bit thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, typically for dramatic effect or to emphasize a point. It implies that someone is presenting information, compliments, or flattery in an excessively embellished and insincere manner. It suggests an over-the-top expression that may seem exaggerated or unbelievable.
  • lay the foundations of/for The idiom "lay the foundations of/for" means to establish or create the basic structure or basis for something. It refers to the initial stages of setting up or preparing for the development of an idea, project, or organization. It is similar to the process of constructing a building by carefully placing the foundation, which provides stability and support for the entire structure.
  • lay sth at sb's door The idiom "lay something at someone's door" means to blame or attribute a fault or responsibility to someone. It is used to indicate that someone holds another person accountable for a particular situation or problem.
  • lay down the law The idiom "lay down the law" typically means to assert one's authority or establish firm rules or expectations. It refers to the act of setting strict guidelines or making authoritative statements in order to enforce compliance or control a situation.
  • lay a finger on sb The idiom "lay a finger on someone" means to physically harm or touch someone, often used to convey a threat or a warning. It implies the act of taking aggressive action towards someone, potentially resulting in physical violence or confrontation.
  • lay the ghost of sth (to rest) "Lay the ghost of something (to rest)" is an idiom that means to finally resolve or put an end to a troubling or distressing issue or memory from the past. It suggests bringing closure, finding peace, or overcoming the emotional or psychological effects of a particular event or situation.
  • lay a hand on sb The idiom "lay a hand on someone" means to physically harm, attack, or make physical contact with someone in an aggressive or violent manner. It can also imply causing harm or mistreatment towards someone.
  • the lay of the land, at the lie of the land The idiom "the lay of the land" or "the lie of the land" refers to the overall situation or condition of a particular place, situation, or set of circumstances. It describes understanding or becoming familiar with the current state or structure of something, including its physical features, arrangement, or prevailing conditions.
  • lay sth on the line The idiom "lay something on the line" means to be frank, honest, or sincere about something, especially when it involves a risk or potential consequences. It typically implies revealing or confessing something important and significant, often expressing an opinion, belief, or intention with complete honesty and without reservation. It can also refer to putting oneself at risk or offering something valuable in pursuit of a goal or objective.
  • lay yourself open to attack, criticism, ridicule, etc. The idiom "lay yourself open to attack, criticism, ridicule, etc." means to expose oneself to potential negative responses, judgments, or mockery due to one's words, actions, or behavior. It suggests not taking proper precautions or defending oneself, thus becoming vulnerable to various forms of criticism, ridicule, or attack from others.
  • lay sb to rest The idiom "lay sb to rest" means to bury or perform the funeral rites for someone who has died. It involves putting the deceased person's body in its final resting place, typically in a grave, and conducting any religious or ceremonial rituals associated with their passing.
  • lay sth to rest The idiom "lay sth to rest" means to put an issue, concern, or argument to rest or resolve it completely, usually by reaching a conclusive or final decision or by finding closure for it. It implies ending any further discussion, speculation, or unrest related to the matter at hand.
  • lay down your life for sth The idiom "lay down your life for something" means to make the ultimate sacrifice or willingly give up one's life for a specific cause, belief, or person. It indicates a willingness to endure or face extreme danger, hardship, or death in order to protect or preserve something of great value.
  • lay to rest The idiom "lay to rest" means to put to rest or settle a matter, typically referring to resolving a dispute, ending a discussion or controversy, or dispelling doubts or concerns. It can also refer to the act of burying a deceased person to bring a sense of closure or peace.
  • lay sm sweet lines on The idiom "lay some sweet lines on" means to speak or write in a charming and flattering manner, often with the intention of seducing or impressing someone. It refers to using persuasive or romantic words to capture someone's attention or affection.
  • lay it on the line To "lay it on the line" means to speak honestly and directly, without holding back or sugarcoating the truth. It implies being straightforward and upfront about one's thoughts, feelings, or intentions, often in a clear and assertive manner. This idiom is often used when someone wants to express themselves honestly, without any ambiguity or deception.
  • lay alongside sth The idiom "lay alongside sth" typically means to place or position something parallel to or next to something else. It implies that the two objects are lined up or aligned side by side.
  • lay sth alongside (of sth) The idiom "lay something alongside (of something)" refers to comparing or contrasting two things with each other. It means to place or present two things side by side in order to highlight their similarities or differences. This idiom is often used to analyze or evaluate different aspects or features of two objects or concepts.
  • lay (sm) rubber The idiom "lay (sm) rubber" is an expression that means to drive a vehicle so fast and aggressively that the tires leave skid marks or burn rubber on the road. It is often used to describe a situation where someone accelerates quickly and forcefully, often in a showy or reckless manner.
  • lay sb up The idiom "lay sb up" means to cause someone to be unable to work, move, or participate in their usual activities due to illness, injury, or similar circumstances. It can also refer to confining someone to their bed or home for a period of recovery.
  • lay sth up The idiom "lay sth up" typically means to store something for future use or to set something aside, especially when referring to goods or supplies that are not currently needed or not in use. It can also imply that an item or person is unable to function or participate temporarily due to illness, injury, or other reasons.
  • lay sm up
  • lay low and sing small The idiom "lay low and sing small" means to adopt a low-profile or stay inconspicuous in order to avoid attention, conflict, or trouble. It suggests remaining quiet, avoiding confrontations, or not drawing attention to oneself in a difficult or sensitive situation.
  • lay down arms The idiom "lay down arms" refers to the act of stopping fighting or surrendering in a conflict or war. It implies peacefully putting down weapons or renouncing violence.
  • lay around The idiom "lay around" means to pass time or idle in a leisurely or non-productive manner without any particular purpose or activity. It suggests a lack of motivation or diligence in engaging in tasks or responsibilities.
  • lay aside for The idiom "lay aside for" means to set something aside or reserve it for a future use or purpose, often in terms of money or resources. It implies saving or putting away something for a specific purpose or occasion.
  • lay aside The idiom "lay aside" means to set aside or put away, usually in reference to physical objects. It can also refer to setting aside or suspending emotions, thoughts, or disagreements temporarily in order to focus on a different matter or maintain harmony in a situation.
  • lay eyes on The idiom "lay eyes on" means to see or perceive something for the first time, often with a sense of wonder, admiration, or surprise. It refers to the act of setting one's eyes upon something or someone that is new or unfamiliar.
  • lay away The idiom "lay away" refers to the act of reserving or setting aside an item for purchase at a later time, usually in a retail setting. It involves making partial payments or deposits towards the item's total cost, allowing the customer to pay for it in installments. The item is typically held by the retailer until the full payment is made and the customer can claim it.
  • lay before The idiom "lay before" typically means to present or place something, such as a proposition, argument, or evidence, for consideration or judgment. It involves offering information or a situation to someone's attention or awareness.
  • lay the blame on sb/sth The idiom "lay the blame on somebody/something" means to assign responsibility or fault to someone or something for a certain problem, mistake, or wrongdoing. It involves attributing the cause or guilt to a specific person or thing.
  • lay the blame (for sth) on sm The idiom "lay the blame (for sth) on sm" means to assign responsibility or fault for something to someone else, typically in a critical or accusatory manner. It implies holding someone accountable for a mistake, problem, or negative outcome.
  • lay it on thick The idiom "lay it on thick" means to exaggerate or overstate something, often in a very dramatic or excessive manner. It refers to adding an excessive amount of praise, flattery, emotions, or intensity to a statement or situation.
  • lay emphasis on sth The idiom "lay emphasis on sth" means to give something special attention or focus on it in order to signify its importance or significance. It implies intensifying the emphasis or highlighting a particular aspect or element of a subject or issue.
  • lay sm sweet lines on sm The idiom "lay some sweet lines on someone" means to use flattering or charming words to impress or seduce someone, often in a romantic or flirtatious manner. It implies the act of speaking in a smooth, persuasive, or affectionate way to gain someone's attention or affection.
  • lay cards on the table The idiom "lay cards on the table" means to be open, honest, and transparent in revealing one's thoughts, intentions, or information. It signifies openly sharing information or discussing a situation without hiding anything.
  • lay/put your cards on the table To "lay/put your cards on the table" means to be open, honest, and transparent about your intentions, opinions, or plans. It refers to the act of revealing all relevant information or expressing your true thoughts without any deceit or ambiguity. This idiom is often used in discussions, negotiations, or personal relationships when one wants to promote trust and create a level playing field for all parties involved.
  • lay one's cards on the table To "lay one's cards on the table" means to be open, honest, and transparent about one's thoughts, intentions, or feelings, usually in a discussion or negotiation. It suggests revealing one's true opinions or motivations without holding back any information or secrets.
  • lay claim to sth The idiom "lay claim to something" means to assert or demand one's right or ownership over something. It implies making a strong and formal statement of ownership or possession over a particular thing or territory.
  • lay eyes on sb/sth The idiom "lay eyes on sb/sth" means to see someone or something for the first time or after a long period of time. It often implies a sense of surprise, fascination, or admiration upon seeing the person or thing.
  • lay/set eyes on sb/sth The idiom "lay/set eyes on someone/something" means to see someone or something for the first time.
  • lay together
  • lay a (heavy) trip on sm The idiom "lay a (heavy) trip on someone" refers to the act of causing emotional or psychological distress to someone by burdening them with guilt, blame, or by subjecting them to pressure or criticism. It often involves manipulating someone's emotions or thoughts in a negative and burdensome way.
  • the lay of the land The idiom "the lay of the land" refers to the overall situation or circumstances of a particular place or situation. It signifies an understanding or assessment of how things are positioned, organized, or structured. It can also refer to gaining insight into the prevailing conditions or factors that may influence an outcome or decision.
  • lay of the land The idiom "lay of the land" means to understand or become familiar with the current situation or circumstances, particularly in regard to a specific area, environment, or set of conditions. It refers to getting a sense of the overall situation, the terrain, or the way things are organized or positioned. It can also imply gaining insight about the people involved, the dynamics at play, or the challenges that may need to be navigated.
  • lay waste (to sth) The idiom "lay waste to something" means to completely destroy or devastate something, leaving it in ruins or in a state of complete disorder. It is often used to describe large-scale destruction or devastation caused by war, natural disasters, or any other catastrophic event.
  • lay the blame on The idiom "lay the blame on" means to assign responsibility or fault to someone or something for a particular event, mistake, or problem. It refers to placing the burden of guilt or accusation on a specific person or entity.
  • lay at door The idiom "lay at one's door" means to blame or place responsibility on someone for a particular action, mistake, or problem. It suggests holding someone accountable or attributing fault to them for a specific situation.
  • lay the ghost of sth/sb (to rest) The idiom "lay the ghost of something/somebody (to rest)" means to put to rest or resolve a troubling or unsettling issue or memory that has been haunting or troubling someone. It refers to finding closure, closure or release from a past event or situation that has been emotionally distressing or burdensome.
  • lay hold of The idiom "lay hold of" means to grasp or seize something firmly or to capture or acquire something with determination.
  • lay an egg The idiom "lay an egg" generally means to fail or to be unsuccessful in a particular endeavor or performance. It is often used to describe a situation where an expected result or outcome turns out to be disappointing, embarrassing, or subpar. This phrase derives from the literal act of a hen laying an egg, which is a natural, expected occurrence. However, if a hen fails to lay an egg, it would be considered an unusual and unsuccessful event in that usual process, leading to the figurative meaning of the idiom.
  • lay against
  • lay down the law (to sm) (about sth) The idiom "lay down the law to someone (about something)" means to assert authority or make demands in a strict or commanding manner. It originates from the legal practice where a judge or an authority figure delivers a decisive ruling or sets clear rules for others to follow. Figuratively, it refers to someone firmly establishing their position, expressing a strong opinion, or issuing instructions in a forceful manner.
  • lay open The idiom "lay open" typically means to reveal or expose something, often a truth or a secret that was previously hidden or unknown. It can also refer to making someone vulnerable or susceptible to harm or criticism.
  • lay a finger on The idiom "lay a finger on" means to physically touch or harm someone or something. It implies taking action or getting involved physically, often with negative consequences or aggression.
  • lay waste The idiom "lay waste" means to completely destroy or devastate something, often referring to a place or a person's accomplishments or efforts. It implies total ruin, reduction to ruins, or extensive damage.
  • lay up The idiom "lay up" has several definitions, depending on the context: 1. To preserve or save something for future use: This can refer to saving money, resources, or provisions for later use or when needed. 2. To take a break or rest due to illness or injury: This usage is often used when someone is temporarily unable to work or perform daily activities due to a health condition. 3. To store or stockpile supplies or belongings: This can refer to accumulating or gathering items and storing them for future use. 4. To disable or incapacitate someone: In this context, "laying someone up" means causing them to be unable to proceed or continue, often due to physical or emotional impairment. 5. To keep a
  • lay under
  • lay to waste The idiom "lay to waste" means to completely destroy or devastate something, often referring to land, property, or a place. It implies causing extensive damage and leaving nothing of value or usefulness behind.
  • lay to The idiom "lay to" has several different meanings depending on the context: 1. To start or begin doing something quickly and energetically. Example: The workers laid to and completed the project in record time. 2. To aim or direct something toward a target. Example: The soldier laid the crosshair to the enemy's position before firing. 3. To accuse or blame someone for something. Example: The teacher laid it to the student for not completing the assignment. 4. To apply oneself, usually with great effort or determination. Example: She laid to with her studying and managed to get top grades. 5. Nautical term meaning to cause a ship to lie head-on into the wind and waves, thereby reducing or eliminating forward motion
  • lay the ghost of The idiom "lay the ghost of" means to put to rest or resolve a problem, issue, or haunting thought that has been troubling someone. It implies resolving or letting go of a past event or memory in order to move on or find closure.
  • lay rubber The idiom "lay rubber" typically means to accelerate a vehicle quickly and forcefully, causing the tires to skid and leave rubber marks on the road surface.
  • lay over The idiom "lay over" refers to a situation where someone or something stops temporarily during a journey or process before proceeding or continuing further. It typically implies a period of rest or waiting.
  • lay out on The idiom "lay out on" typically means to spend time leisurely or to relax without any particular goal or purpose. It refers to taking a break or indulging in idle activities for rest or enjoyment.
  • lay out in lavender
  • lay out The idiom "lay out" has several possible meanings depending on the context: 1. To arrange something or set it up systematically or orderly. Example: The interior designer will lay out the furniture in the new house. 2. To explain or present something in a clear and detailed manner. Example: The professor will lay out the methodology in the upcoming lecture. 3. To spend money lavishly or extravagantly. Example: He decided to lay out a significant amount of money on a new car. 4. To knock someone unconscious, typically with a punch. Example: The boxer managed to lay out his opponent with a powerful hook. 5. To create a plan or design for a project or undertaking. Example: The architect will lay out the blue
  • lay on The idiom "lay on" typically means to provide, give, or offer something generously, excessively, or emphatically. It can also refer to delivering a strong blow or attack.
  • lay off The idiom "lay off" means to dismiss or terminate someone from their job, typically due to lack of work or financial constraints. It can also refer to the act of ceasing or reducing specific activities, such as cutting back on spending or implementation of a certain practice.
  • lay low The idiom "lay low" means to keep a low profile, to hide or stay out of sight, usually for protection or avoiding attention, trouble, or danger.
  • lay into The idiom "lay into" means to fiercely attack or criticize someone or something, usually verbally or with great intensity. It can also refer to physically assaulting someone.
  • lay in The idiom "lay in" means to stock up or acquire an adequate supply of something, typically for future use or to be prepared for a specific situation.
  • lay for To lay for someone is an idiom that means to wait and prepare to catch or confront them, often with the intention of causing harm or seeking revenge. It implies strategic planning and lurking in order to ambush or surprise the targeted person.
  • lay emphasis on The idiom "lay emphasis on" means to give special importance or focus to something. It refers to highlighting or placing significant emphasis on a particular aspect or idea.
  • lay down life The idiom "lay down life" refers to sacrificing or giving up one's life for a cause, duty, or belief. It signifies a willingness to make the ultimate sacrifice and put one's own life at stake.
  • lay down The idiom "lay down" typically means to establish or establish rules, principles, or guidelines that others are expected to follow.
  • lay claim to The idiom "lay claim to" means to assert or stake a right or ownership over something. It implies making a strong or confident declaration that something belongs to an individual or group.
  • lay bare The idiom "lay bare" means to expose or reveal something that was previously hidden or secret, often referring to emotions, truths, or information.
  • lay at feet The phrase "lay at feet" typically means to present or offer something, such as praise, blame, or responsibility, to someone. It suggests giving recognition or acknowledgment directly to someone, usually in a humble or submissive manner.
  • lay alongside The idiom "lay alongside" typically refers to the act of placing something or someone beside another thing or person. It can be used literally, such as laying two objects or people side by side, or figuratively, indicating a comparison or close proximity.
  • lay a trip on The idiom "lay a trip on" typically means to heavily criticize, manipulate, or burden someone with guilt, blame, or emotional pressure. It refers to the act of imposing one's negative emotions or expectations onto someone else, often to manipulate their behavior or to make them feel guilty or responsible.
  • lay a hand on The idiom "lay a hand on" means to touch or harm someone physically, usually in a threatening or violent manner. It can also refer to punishment or discipline, often implying a display of force or aggression.
  • lay sth together
  • lay for sm or sth The idiom "lay for someone or something" means to wait or lie in ambush for someone or something, usually with the intention of causing harm or capturing them. It implies a planned or deliberate action to catch or confront someone or something.
  • lay sth for sm or sth
  • lay hold of sm or sth The idiom "lay hold of someone or something" means to grasp or seize someone or something firmly, typically to gain control or possession. It indicates taking hold with physical or metaphorical intent.
  • lay sth on sb The idiom "lay something on someone" means to provide or offer something to someone, especially in a generous or lavish manner. It can refer to providing food, drink, entertainment, information, or any other kind of assistance or favor to another person.
  • lay sth on sm The idiom "lay something on someone" means to burden or impose something upon someone, typically a task, responsibility, or obligation.
  • lay sth on sm or sth The idiom "lay something on someone or something" means to provide or offer something to someone or something. It can refer to presenting information, supplies, or responsibilities. It often involves offering or providing something in a generous or helpful manner.
  • lay sth on The idiom "lay something on" means to provide or offer something, especially in a generous or extravagant manner. It can refer to offering food, drinks, or services to someone, often as a gesture of hospitality or to shower them with special treatment. It can also be used to indicate the act of organizing or arranging something for others to enjoy or participate in.
  • lay sb/sth open (to sth) The idiom "lay sb/sth open (to sth)" means to leave someone or something vulnerable or exposed to a particular risk, danger, or criticism.
  • lay sth to sth The idiom "lay sth to sth" typically means to attribute or assign something to a particular cause or reason. It implies connecting or blaming something for an outcome or situation.
  • lay sth before sm The idiom "lay something before someone" means to present or submit something, such as information, a proposal, or a problem, to someone for their consideration or decision.
  • lay sm out in lavender The idiom "lay sm out in lavender" means to dress someone up elegantly or present them in a classy and distinguished manner. It is often used to describe someone's appearance or attire after putting effort into making them look their best.
  • lay aside sth The idiom "lay aside something" means to set aside or put aside something, such as thoughts, feelings, or tasks, often temporarily or temporarily suspend or postpone them.
  • lay sth aside The idiom "lay something aside" means to set something aside or put it away for later use or reference, usually in a deliberate and purposeful manner. It can also refer to saving or storing something, both physically and metaphorically.
  • lay sth away (for sm) The idiom "lay sth away (for sm)" means to save or set aside money or resources for a specific purpose or person's future use or benefit. It implies the act of storing or preserving something for future use, often in preparation for an anticipated or planned event. It commonly refers to setting aside money for emergencies, retirement, or specific goals.
  • lay sm away
  • lay down sth The idiom "lay down sth" typically refers to establishing or setting a rule, guideline, condition, or requirement. It means to formally establish or specify something, often in a authoritative or assertive manner.
  • lay sth down (on sth) To "lay something down on something" typically means to place or put something down on a particular surface or area. This idiom is often used when referring to the act of setting down an object or substance on a specific location.
  • lay sm down
  • lay sth in The idiom "lay sth in" typically means to stock or acquire something, usually in preparation for a future event or situation. It can refer to gathering or procuring supplies, resources, or provisions necessary for a particular purpose or undertaking. The phrase can often be associated with ensuring one is well-prepared or well-equipped for a task or goal.
  • lay sm or sth in(to) sth The idiom "lay sm or sth into sth" generally means to put or place something into something else. It can also imply exerting a lot of effort or energy into a particular task or project.
  • lay into sth To "lay into something" means to attack, criticize, or scold someone or something with intense energy or aggression. It usually refers to expressing strong disapproval or delivering a forceful verbal or physical assault.
  • lay into sb The idiom "lay into someone" means to aggressively criticize, attack, or verbally assault someone, often in a harsh or forceful manner. It can also imply physically assaulting someone.
  • lay into sm or sth The idiom "lay into someone or something" means to criticize, attack, or scold someone or something severely or aggressively. It can also refer to physically attacking or assaulting someone.
  • lay off (sth) The idiom "lay off (sth)" refers to the act of ceasing or stopping a particular activity, typically with the intention of taking a break or reducing the amount of involvement. It can also figuratively mean dismissing someone from their job or reducing the number of employees in a company.
  • lay sb off The idiom "lay sb off" refers to the act of terminating or dismissing someone from their job or position, usually due to financial constraints, reduced business demands, or organizational restructuring.
  • lay off (sm or sth) The idiom "lay off (sm or sth)" means to stop or cease something, usually temporarily, or to stop employing or dismissing someone from their job.
  • lay sm off (from sth) To "lay sm off (from sth)" is an idiom that means to terminate someone's employment, usually as a result of downsizing or redundancy. It refers to the act of letting someone go or dismissing them from their job, often due to economic or organizational reasons.
  • lay out sth The idiom "lay out something" can have different meanings depending on the context. Here are two common definitions: 1. To "lay out something" can mean to arrange or organize it in a specific way. This could refer to physically arranging objects or designing the layout of a space. For example, "She laid out the books on the shelf in alphabetical order" or "The architect laid out the blueprint for the new building." 2. To "lay out something" can also mean to explain, present, or describe something in a clear and organized manner. It often involves providing detailed information or instructions. For example, "During the meeting, the presenter laid out the project plan step by step" or "The professor laid out the guidelines for
  • lay sth out The idiom "lay sth out" means to organize or arrange something, typically in a planned and orderly manner. It can refer to arranging objects or materials in a specific order or layout, or it can pertain to outlining or explaining a plan, concept, or idea in a clear and comprehensive manner. Additionally, it can imply presenting information, facts, or details in a systematic and visually appealing format.
  • lay sm out
  • lay over (sm place) The idiom "lay over (in a certain place)" refers to a situation where someone's journey or travel involves a temporary stop or stay at a particular location before continuing on to their final destination.
  • lay sth over sm or sth To "lay something over someone or something" typically means to place or position something on top or above them. It can be used literally or figuratively.
  • lay sm to rest The idiom "lay sm to rest" means to put an issue, dispute, or controversy to an end or resolution, typically through clarification, closure, or final resolution. It can also refer to the act of burying a deceased person.
  • lay waste (to) The idiom "lay waste (to)" means to completely destroy or devastate something, to cause extensive damage or ruin. It is often used to describe the act of demolishing or ravaging a place or inflicting significant harm on something.
  • lay hands on The idiom "lay hands on" means to physically acquire or obtain something, often suggesting a sense of urgency or struggle in obtaining the object or achieving the goal.
  • lay about one The idiom "lay about one" means to physically attack or strike with great force and intensity. It refers to someone engaging in a violent or aggressive manner towards others.
  • lay a course The idiom "lay a course" typically refers to the act of planning or setting a direction for a journey or goal, especially in the context of sailing or navigation. It implies the careful consideration of various factors, such as wind, currents, and desired destination, to determine the optimal path to follow. In a broader sense, it can also be used metaphorically to mean establishing a plan or strategy to achieve a particular objective.
  • lay by The idiom "lay by" typically means to set aside or save something (especially money or resources) for future use or emergencies. It can also refer to taking a break or pausing temporarily from work or a task.
  • lay oneself open The idiom "lay oneself open" means to put oneself in a vulnerable position or to expose oneself to criticism, attack, or possible danger by revealing too much information or being unguarded.
  • lay something on someone To "lay something on someone" means to inform or tell someone something, often in a direct or forceful manner. It can also imply burdening or assigning someone with a responsibility or task.
  • lay at the door of The idiom "lay at the door of" means to blame or hold responsible someone or something for a particular situation or outcome. It suggests that the person or entity being blamed is fully accountable for the issue at hand.
  • lay siege to The idiom "lay siege to" means to surround or blockade a place in order to conquer or capture it. It typically refers to a military tactic of cutting off all access to a target, either by land or by sea, to weaken and eventually overcome it. Figuratively, it can also describe persistent and relentless efforts to achieve a goal or conquer a challenge.
  • lay somebody to rest The idiom "lay somebody to rest" typically means to bury or give a proper burial to a deceased person. It refers to the act of holding funeral services and interring the body in its final resting place.
  • lay somebody low The idiom "lay somebody low" means to cause someone to become ill, incapacitated, or weakened physically or emotionally. It refers to the act of bringing someone down or reducing their strength and vitality.
  • lay a finger on somebody The idiom "lay a finger on somebody" means to physically harm or touch someone with ill intentions or aggression.
  • lay something bare To "lay something bare" means to reveal or expose something completely, often referring to secrets, truths, or hidden aspects of a situation or person. It implies removing any cover, disguise, or ambiguity surrounding the subject and bringing it into the open or making it evident for all to see and understand.
  • lay down your arms The idiom "lay down your arms" means to willingly surrender, give up, or cease fighting, usually in a conflict or dispute. It signifies a decision to stop using violence or force and seek peace or resolution instead.
  • lay claim to something The idiom "lay claim to something" means to assert or establish one's right or ownership over something, often in a possessive or assertive manner. It refers to making a formal or informal declaration of ownership or control over a particular thing or territory.
  • lay bare (something) The idiom "lay bare (something)" means to reveal or expose something that was previously hidden, concealed, or kept secret. It refers to making something known or visible, often bringing to light the true nature, motives, or facts about a situation, person, or event.
  • lay alongside something The idiom "lay alongside something" typically means to place or put one thing next to or parallel to another thing. It can also imply a close proximity or alignment between two objects or concepts.
  • lay something alongside (of something) The idiom "lay something alongside (of something)" typically means to compare or place something side by side with something else for the purpose of examination, assessment, or observation. It implies juxtaposing two entities in order to draw comparisons and evaluate their similarities or differences.
  • lay by the heels The idiom "lay by the heels" refers to the act of imprisoning or restraining someone, typically by binding their ankles together. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the act of subduing or immobilizing someone or something.
  • lay store by (something or someone) The idiom "lay store by (something or someone)" means to value or place importance on something or someone. It implies that the object or person holds significance or is highly regarded by someone.
  • lay your cards on the table The idiom "lay your cards on the table" means to be completely honest and open about your intentions, feelings, or opinions. It refers to the act of revealing all relevant information or telling the whole truth in order to clarify a situation or establish trust.
  • lay the blame on (one) The idiom "lay the blame on (one)" means to assign responsibility or fault to someone for a particular mistake, wrongdoing, or failure. In this expression, blame is figuratively placed upon the person as a form of accusation or censure.
  • lay something on The idiom "lay something on" means to provide or offer something to someone, especially in a generous or excessive manner. It can refer to presenting information, sharing a burden, giving a lecture, organizing an event, or offering an opportunity or benefit.
  • lay something on someone or something The idiom "lay something on someone or something" means to burden or impose something, such as responsibility, duty, or a task, onto someone or something. It can also refer to explaining or telling something to someone in a direct or forceful manner.
  • lay the blame (for something) on someone The idiom "lay the blame (for something) on someone" means to attribute responsibility or fault for a particular situation, problem, or mistake to a specific person, often in an unfair or unjust manner. It implies placing the sole or majority of the blame on someone, disregarding other potential contributing factors.
  • lay a charge The idiom "lay a charge" typically refers to the act of formally accusing someone of a crime or offense, usually done by reporting it to the authorities or filing an official complaint. It implies taking legal action or making a formal allegation against someone for misconduct.
  • clap (or lay or set) eyes on The idiom "clap (or lay or set) eyes on" means to see or look at something or someone for the first time. It implies a sense of surprise, delight, or interest in the object or person being observed.
  • lay (or put) it on the line To "lay (or put) it on the line" means to be open, honest, and straightforward about something, often expressing one's thoughts or feelings without reservation or fear of consequences. It involves being willing to take a risk by speaking openly and honestly, even if it might lead to conflict or difficult outcomes.
  • lay down and die The idiom "lay down and die" is used to describe a state of extreme resignation or defeat, meaning to give up or succumb to a difficult or hopeless situation without putting up a fight or making any effort to overcome it.
  • lay (something) at (one's) door The idiom "lay (something) at (one's) door" means to blame or accuse someone for something that has gone wrong or for a mistake or failure. It suggests that the responsibility or fault solely lies with the person being referred to.
  • lay at someone's door The idiom "lay at someone's door" means to place blame or responsibility on a particular person for a certain action, event, or situation. It implies attributing the fault solely to that person's actions or decisions.
  • lay something at somebody's door To lay something at somebody's door means to blame or attribute something to someone or hold them responsible for a particular action, mistake, or problem. It implies assigning fault or holding someone accountable for something negative.
  • lay something at someone's door The idiom "lay something at someone's door" means to blame or accuse someone for something, often by attributing a fault or responsibility to them for a particular action or outcome.
  • lay (one's) eyes on (something) The idiom "lay (one's) eyes on (something)" means to see something for the first time, or to have a firsthand visual experience of something. It implies a sense of anticipation or excitement upon encountering that particular thing.
  • lay (something) at (one's) feet The idiom "lay (something) at (one's) feet" means to present or offer something as a gift or tribute to someone. It can also imply taking responsibility for or placing blame on someone for a certain situation or outcome.
  • lay (something) at the feet of (someone) The idiom "lay (something) at the feet of (someone)" refers to the act of blaming, giving responsibility, or holding someone accountable for a particular situation or outcome. It implies attributing the fault, burden, or consequences of something to someone else.
  • lay the finger on (one) The idiom "lay the finger on (one)" means to accuse or identify someone as being responsible for something, typically a wrongdoing or a problem. It implies singling out or assigning blame to a specific individual or pointing out their involvement in a particular situation.
  • not lay a finger on someone The idiom "not lay a finger on someone" means to not physically harm or touch another person. It suggests that there will be no act of aggression or violence towards someone.
  • lay a ghost The idiom "lay a ghost" means to confront and resolve a past issue or fear in order to find closure or peace. It refers to the act of addressing and overcoming a lingering emotional or psychological disturbance.
  • lay the ghost of (something) to rest The idiom "lay the ghost of (something) to rest" means to finally resolve or put an end to an issue or problem that has been causing distress, anxiety, or lingering thoughts. It typically refers to letting go of a troubling past event, memory, or situation, allowing oneself to move on and find peace.
  • lay the ghost of something The idiom "lay the ghost of something" means to finally put an end to or overcome a past experience, trauma, fear, or problem. It implies finding closure, resolution, or peace regarding a particular issue that has been lingering or haunting someone's mind or emotions.
  • lay a guilt trip on (one) To "lay a guilt trip on someone" means to intentionally make someone feel guilty or ashamed in order to manipulate or control their actions or behavior. It involves using emotional tactics or words that aim to evoke a sense of guilt or obligation, often as a form of pressure or coercion.
  • lay a (heavy) trip on someone To "lay a (heavy) trip on someone" means to burden or overwhelm someone with excessive or unnecessary pressure, guilt, criticism, or emotional stress. It refers to the act of intentionally imposing or imposing excessively negative feelings or ideas on someone, often causing them to feel anxious, guilty, or upset.
  • lay a guilt trip on someone The idiom "to lay a guilt trip on someone" means to make someone feel guilty or responsible for something as a way of manipulating or controlling them. It refers to using emotional pressure or manipulation tactics to make someone feel bad about their actions or behavior.
  • lay a guilt trip on To "lay a guilt trip on" someone means to manipulate or pressure someone by making them feel guilty about a situation or their actions. It involves using guilt as a tool to influence or control someone's behavior or decisions.
  • lay (one's) hands on (someone or something) The idiom "lay (one's) hands on (someone or something)" means to find or acquire someone or something, often with the implication of force or urgency. It can also refer to physical contact with someone in a forceful or aggressive manner.
  • lay a hand on (one) The idiom "lay a hand on (one)" means to hurt or physically attack someone. It implies using force or violence towards another person.
  • lay (our/your/their) heads together The idiom "lay (our/your/their) heads together" means to collaborate, brainstorm, or work together with others to come up with a solution, find an answer, or make a decision. It implies the act of gathering and pooling ideas, knowledge, or expertise from different individuals in order to achieve a shared goal or solve a problem collectively.
  • lay (oneself) out The idiom "lay (oneself) out" means to exert a great amount of effort or energy in order to accomplish something. It often implies going to great lengths or pushing oneself to the limit to achieve a goal or complete a task.
  • lay of the land, the The idiom "lay of the land" refers to understanding or being familiar with the current situation or circumstances of a particular place, organization, or field of knowledge. It indicates having an awareness of the general conditions, terrain, or dynamics of a situation or environment. It can also be used to describe gaining insights or knowledge about a specific area or context.
  • lay down on the job The idiom "lay down on the job" means to neglect or fail to carry out one's responsibilities or perform their duties in a lazy or careless manner. It refers to someone who is not putting in the necessary effort or dedication required for a task or job.
  • lay (one's) life on the line The idiom "lay (one's) life on the line" means to put oneself in a dangerous or life-threatening situation for a particular cause, goal, or person, usually displaying great courage, bravery, or selflessness. It implies risking one's life, possibly with the understanding that there is a high chance of injury or death.
  • lay (someone or something) to rest The idiom "lay (someone or something) to rest" means to bury a deceased person or animal in a final resting place, or to resolve and put an end to an issue, argument, or dispute.
  • lay (something) at rest The idiom "lay (something) at rest" means to conclude or settle a matter, dispute, or concern. It refers to putting an issue or problem to rest, resolving it, and eliminating any lingering doubts or uncertainty.
  • lay (something) on the table The idiom "lay (something) on the table" means to present or disclose something, especially a proposal, idea, or issue, for discussion or consideration. It refers to openly discussing or making something known in order to have a transparent and effective communication or negotiation.
  • lay (something) waste The idiom "lay (something) waste" means to completely destroy, devastate, or ruin something, typically involving significant damage or destruction. It can refer to physical destruction, such as a city or landscape being completely devastated, or it can also be used metaphorically to describe the severe damage caused to a person or situation.
  • lay a wager The idiom "lay a wager" means to place a bet or make a prediction on the outcome of a particular event or situation, usually involving money. It implies a willingness to take a risk and gamble on the outcome of something.
  • lay down (one's) arms The idiom "lay down (one's) arms" refers to the act of stopping a fight or conflict, by putting down or surrendering one's weapons or ending one's opposition. It often implies a willingness to negotiate or seek peace.
  • lay down (one's) life The idiom "lay down (one's) life" means sacrificing oneself or willingly facing death for a cause or another person's well-being. It refers to the act of giving up one's own life with bravery, selflessness, or devotion. This idiom can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • lay into (someone or something) The idiom "lay into (someone or something)" means to fiercely attack or criticize someone or something verbally or physically. It implies a forceful or intense assault, often in terms of vehemently expressing disapproval, anger, or frustration.
  • lay it on with a trowel The idiom "lay it on with a trowel" means to exaggerate or overstate something, often in a dramatic or excessive manner. It refers to the act of spreading or applying something thickly with a trowel, emphasizing the excessive or heavy-handed nature of the action.
  • lay out the welcome mat (for someone) To "lay out the welcome mat (for someone)" means to warmly and eagerly receive or welcome someone, particularly to one's home or organization. It implies a hospitable and friendly attitude towards the person being welcomed, making them feel valued and comfortable.
  • lay store in (something or someone) The idiom "lay store in (something or someone)" means to place a great amount of importance, trust, or reliance on someone or something. It implies having high expectations or investing heavily in someone or something. It can also mean to have a strong belief or confidence in the reliability or effectiveness of someone or something.
  • lay the pipe The idiom "lay the pipe" is a euphemism used to describe the act of engaging in sexual intercourse, particularly when referring to a man's role.
  • lay wait for The idiom "lay wait for" means to carefully and strategically plan or set a trap or ambush for someone, usually with the intention of causing harm or catching them by surprise. It often implies hiding or being in a concealed position while observing or awaiting the arrival of the target.
  • lay waste to (something) The idiom "lay waste to (something)" refers to causing extensive damage or destruction to something, often resulting in its complete ruin or devastation. It implies a forceful and thorough destruction, leaving little or nothing usable or intact.
  • lay (something) up in lavender The idiom "lay (something) up in lavender" means to store or preserve something carefully and delicately. It can be used figuratively to describe keeping something valuable, sentimental, or important in a safe and secure manner.
  • lay someone out in lavender The idiom "lay someone out in lavender" typically means to give someone a gentle reprimand or scolding, often in a polite and delicate manner, rather than being harsh or confrontational. It can also refer to scolding someone discreetly or privately. The origin of this idiom is unclear.
  • lay (one's) The idiom "lay (one's)" typically refers to a situation where an individual comforts or attends to someone, often a friend or family member, who is ill or going through a difficult time. It implies that the person is providing emotional support, care, or assistance to the other person in a time of need.
  • lay (one) low The idiom "lay (one) low" means to defeat, humble, or overpower someone, causing them to become subdued, defeated, or weak. It can also refer to an action or event that causes someone to be physically or emotionally weakened or incapacitated.
  • lay a finger on (someone or something) The idiom "lay a finger on (someone or something)" means to touch or harm someone or something, typically with aggressive or violent intent. It suggests physical contact, often indicating a threat or act of aggression towards the person or thing being referred to.
  • lay a trip on someone The idiom "lay a trip on someone" typically means to manipulate, guilt, or pressure someone into doing something or behaving in a certain way. It refers to the act of intentionally causing emotional distress or instilling a burden on someone's conscience.
  • lay at rest The idiom "lay at rest" typically refers to the act of burying or placing a deceased person's body in its final resting place, such as a grave or tomb. It signifies the physical act of giving a deceased person their final farewell and also implies providing closure and peace for the departed soul.
  • lay down the marker To "lay down the marker" is an idiom that means to establish a clear standard or boundary, typically in terms of expectations or requirements for a particular situation or relationship. It implies setting a definitive point that others are expected to adhere to or follow.
  • lay down your life The idiom "lay down your life" means sacrificing oneself, usually in a heroic or selfless manner, for a cause, belief, or another person's well-being. It refers to the act of giving up one's own life or putting oneself in extreme danger without hesitating.
  • lay it on thick/with a trowel The idiom "lay it on thick/with a trowel" means to overemphasize or exaggerate something, often in a way that is insincere or not entirely truthful. It implies that the speaker is being excessively dramatic, sentimental, or flattering in order to manipulate or impress others.
  • lay odds The idiom "lay odds" means to predict or guess the likelihood of something happening, typically by estimating the probability or outcome of an event. It can also refer to offering a wager or bet on a particular outcome.
  • lay off someone/something The idiom "lay off someone/something" can have two different meanings: 1. To stop employing or to dismiss someone from their job, especially due to a reduction in workforce or as a cost-cutting measure. It refers to the act of temporarily or permanently terminating the employment of an individual. Example: During the economic downturn, many companies had to lay off workers to stay afloat. 2. To stop bothering or harassing someone, or to stop focusing on or paying attention to something. It implies letting someone or something alone, particularly in a critical or negative sense. Example: Sarah asked her friends to lay off making fun of her new hairstyle.
  • lay on the line The idiom "lay on the line" means to risk or put something at stake, typically in a straightforward and courageous manner. It implies being open, honest, and direct about a situation, even if it involves potential consequences or vulnerability.
  • lay on, Macduff The idiom "lay on, Macduff" is a phrase derived from William Shakespeare's play "Macbeth." It is often used to encourage someone to take action or to express a desire for a fight or confrontation. It signifies the call for someone to boldly engage in a task or challenge, drawing inspiration from the character Macduff's motivation to confront and defeat Macbeth in the play.
  • lay one on The idiom "lay one on" generally means to deliver a powerful hit or strike, either physically or metaphorically. It can also refer to giving a strong or passionate kiss or expressing intense emotions towards someone.
  • lay siege to something The idiom "lay siege to something" refers to a situation where someone or something is surrounded or attacked in a persistent and determined manner, often in an attempt to gain control or overcome obstacles. It can be used metaphorically to describe an intense effort to overpower or overwhelm a person, organization, or an idea.
  • lay some rubber The idiom "lay some rubber" refers to the act of quickly accelerating a vehicle, usually a car or motorcycle, causing the tires to leave rubber streaks on the road due to intense friction. It is often used to describe a person driving or riding aggressively, with a focus on speed and power.
  • lay some sweet lines on The idiom "lay some sweet lines on" typically means to use smooth or charming words to flirt with or impress someone. It refers to the act of delivering flattering or appealing compliments, often with the intention of gaining the person's favor or affection.
  • lay some sweet lines on someone The idiom "lay some sweet lines on someone" means to skillfully and smoothly deliver compliments, flattering words, or charming phrases to someone, particularly with the intention of attracting, impressing, or seducing them. It typically refers to using persuasive or affectionate language to convey admiration or interest.
  • lay someone low The idiom "lay someone low" means to bring someone down, typically through illness, injury, or a setback, causing them to become weak or unable to function as usual. It implies a physical or emotional incapacitation that leaves someone in a diminished or vulnerable state.
  • lay someone out The idiom "lay someone out" typically means to knock someone down or render them unconscious with a powerful blow, usually in a physical altercation or fight. It can also be used figuratively to describe verbally or emotionally overwhelming someone, defeating them completely either physically or mentally.
  • lay something on thick The idiom "lay something on thick" means to exaggerate or overemphasize something, often to an excessive or insincere extent. It is usually used to describe someone who is being overly effusive or excessively praising someone or something.
  • lay something out The idiom "lay something out" typically means to arrange or organize something in a systematic or methodical manner. It can refer to physically arranging objects or planning and explaining a concept or idea in a clear and structured way.
  • lay something to rest The idiom "lay something to rest" means to resolve or settle a matter, dispute, or controversy so that it no longer bothers or causes concern. It implies putting an issue or argument to rest, making peace, or finding closure.
  • lay the groundwork (for something) To "lay the groundwork (for something)" means to establish a foundation or prepare the necessary basis for something. It involves setting up the initial conditions, making necessary preparations, or taking preliminary steps that will enable the desired outcome or development to occur. It involves laying the necessary groundwork or foundation as a prerequisite for future progress, growth, or success.
  • lay the table The idiom "lay the table" refers to the act of setting the table with plates, cutlery, and other necessary items before a meal. It is commonly used to imply the preparation or organization of a situation or event, rather than its literal meaning of arranging a dining table for a specific occasion.
  • let it lay The definition of the idiom "let it lay" is to allow a particular situation or issue to rest or remain unresolved, usually in order to avoid unnecessary confrontation or further complications. It implies refraining from taking any action or making any further comments regarding the matter.
  • not lay a finger on (someone or something) The idiom "not lay a finger on (someone or something)" means to not touch, harm, or injure someone or something. It implies the act of complete non-interference or refraining from causing physical harm or damage.
  • lay something against something The idiom "lay something against something" means to compare or contrast two things, typically to evaluate their advantages and disadvantages or to make a judgment based on their differences. It often involves weighing the pros and cons or considering the merits and drawbacks of each element being compared.
  • lay something aside The idiom "lay something aside" means to set something aside or keep it for future use or consideration. It can refer to setting aside money, time, resources, or any other valuable asset for a specific purpose or future need.
  • lay something at someone's feet The idiom "lay something at someone's feet" means to attribute the responsibility or blame for something to someone. It is often used when someone is being held accountable or accused of causing a particular situation or problem.
  • lay someone away The idiom "lay someone away" typically means to prepare and organize a funeral or burial for someone who has passed away. It involves making arrangements, conducting ceremonies, and properly interring the deceased individual.
  • lay something away (for someone) The idiom "lay something away (for someone)" means to set aside or reserve something for someone else's future use or benefit. It often refers to placing an item in storage or saving money for someone to use or receive at a later time. It implies a sense of responsibility, planning, and consideration for the needs or desires of another person.
  • lay something before someone To "lay something before someone" means to present or offer something, such as an idea, proposal, or information, for their consideration or judgment. It implies a formal or deliberate act of presenting something in a clear and straightforward manner.
  • lay someone down The idiom "lay someone down" typically refers to the act of putting someone to rest, usually in a horizontal position, such as laying them down to sleep or to rest in a bed or a grave. It can also metaphorically imply ending or concluding someone's life.
  • lay something down (on something) The idiom "lay something down (on something)" typically means to establish or state something clearly and definitively, usually as a rule or requirement. It can also imply setting down specific guidelines or principles for others to follow.
  • lay down the law (to someone) (about something) The idiom "lay down the law (to someone) (about something)" means to assert one's authority or establish strict rules or expectations for someone regarding a specific matter. It implies issuing strong commands, setting firm boundaries, or making it clear what is expected from the other person. It is often used when someone wants to establish control or discipline in a situation.
  • lay emphasis on something The idiom "lay emphasis on something" means to give special attention or importance to a particular thing or idea in order to highlight its significance or promote understanding. It suggests focusing on a specific element or concept to make it stand out or be better understood by emphasizing its importance or relevance.
  • lay something for someone or something The idiom "lay something for someone or something" typically means to prepare or set up something to benefit or accommodate someone or something in the future. It involves making necessary arrangements or groundwork for someone's arrival, use, or convenience.
  • lay for someone or something The idiom "lay for someone or something" means to wait or be ready in order to catch or attack someone or something, often with the intention of causing harm or seeking revenge. It suggests a sense of preparedness or anticipation for a particular target or opportunity to arise.
  • lay hold of someone or something The idiom "lay hold of someone or something" means to physically or emotionally grip, seize, or take possession of someone or something. It implies a strong or firm grasp to either capture or control the person or object.
  • lay someone or something in(to) something The idiom "lay someone or something in(to) something" means to place or deposit someone or something in a particular location or position. It can also imply providing resources, provisioning, or making arrangements for someone or something to be prepared for a future purpose or event.
  • lay something in The idiom "lay something in" generally refers to the act of stockpiling or accumulating something in preparation for future use or need. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.
  • lay something on thick (or with a trowel) The idiom "lay something on thick" (or with a trowel) means to exaggerate or overstate something, particularly in a way that may seem insincere or excessive. It refers to the act of applying an excess amount of a substance, such as plaster or paint, in a heavy and conspicuous manner, thus drawing attention to it. Metaphorically, it implies using excessive or overly flattering language, compliments, or emotions to make a point or influence others' perceptions.
  • lay (or give) odds The idiom "lay (or give) odds" typically means to offer or provide a prediction or assessment of the likelihood of a particular outcome or event. It is often used in the context of betting or gambling, but can also be used more broadly in expressing a personal opinion or estimation.
  • lay someone off (from something) The idiom "lay someone off (from something)" refers to the act of terminating someone's employment, usually due to reasons such as downsizing, budget cuts, or company restructuring. It involves temporarily or permanently dismissing an employee from their job position.
  • lay off (someone or something) The idiom "lay off (someone or something)" has a few different definitions depending on the context. Here are the most common meanings: 1. To stop employing or terminate the employment of someone. Example: "The company had to lay off several employees due to financial difficulties." 2. To stop discussing or criticizing someone or something. Example: "You need to lay off your brother and stop constantly criticizing him." 3. To stop using or consuming something excessively. Example: "I really need to lay off the junk food and start eating healthier." 4. To give up or refrain from pursuing something. Example: "I've decided to lay off dating for a while and focus on my career." In general, the idiom "lay off (
  • lay something over someone or something The idiom "lay something over someone or something" means to place or cover something on top of someone or something else. It can refer to physically placing an object over another object or person, or metaphorically placing responsibility or blame on someone or something.
  • lay over (some place) The idiom "lay over (some place)" refers to a temporary stop or pause during a journey, usually when traveling by plane, bus, or train. It means to stay somewhere briefly, usually for a few hours or overnight, before continuing on with the journey.
  • lay something to something The idiom "lay something to something" means to attribute the cause or responsibility of a situation or problem to a particular factor or person. It can also refer to assigning or attributing a particular meaning or interpretation to something.
  • lay someone to rest The idiom "lay someone to rest" typically refers to the act of giving a proper burial or funeral to someone who has passed away. It can also imply the final closure or completion of the mourning process.
  • lay something under something The idiom "lay something under something" typically means to place an object or item beneath or underneath another object or surface. It can also imply the act of hiding or concealing something beneath another thing.
  • lay someone up The idiom "lay someone up" means to cause someone to be confined or incapacitated, typically due to illness, injury, or surgery. It refers to someone being unable to engage in their usual activities or work due to these reasons.
  • lay something up The idiom "lay something up" means to store or reserve something for future use or to save something for later. It often refers to keeping an item or a supply of something safe and secure until it is needed or desired.

Similar spelling words for LAY

Plural form of LAY is LAYS

Conjugate verb Lay

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have laid
you would have laid
he/she/it would have laid
we would have laid
they would have laid
I would have lay
you would have lay
he/she/it would have lay
we would have lay
they would have lay

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been laying
you would have been laying
he/she/it would have been laying
we would have been laying
they would have been laying

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would lay
you would lay
he/she/it would lay
we would lay
they would lay

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be laying
you would be laying
he/she/it would be laying
we would be laying
they would be laying

FUTURE

I will lay
you will lay
he/she/it will lay
we will lay
they will lay

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be laying
you will be laying
he/she/it will be laying
we will be laying
they will be laying

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have laid
you will have laid
he/she/it will have laid
we will have laid
they will have laid

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been laying
you will have been laying
he/she/it will have been laying
we will have been laying
they will have been laying

IMPERATIVE

you lay
we let´s lay

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to lay

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was laying
you were laying
he/she/it was laying
we were laying
they were laying

PAST PARTICIPLE

laid

PAST PERFECT

I had laid
you had laid
he/she/it had laid
we had laid
they had laid

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been laying
you had been laying
he/she/it had been laying
we had been laying
they had been laying

PRESENT

I lay
you lay
he/she/it lays
we lay
they lay

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am laying
you are laying
he/she/it is laying
we are laying
they are laying

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

laying

PRESENT PERFECT

I have laid
you have laid
he/she/it has laid
we have laid
they have laid

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been laying
you have been laying
he/she/it has been laying
we have been laying
they have been laying

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it lay

SIMPLE PAST

I laid
you laid
he/she/it laid
we laid
they laid

Infographic

Add the infographic to your website: