How Do You Spell LEAD?

Pronunciation: [lˈiːd] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "lead" can be confusing because it can be pronounced in two different ways. When referring to the metal, it is pronounced as /led/ and spelled "lead". However, when referring to guiding or directing, it is pronounced as /li:d/ and spelled "lead". This difference in pronunciation is due to the use of the silent "a" in the second syllable in the latter usage of the word. So, it's important to pay attention to the context and pronunciation when spelling "lead".

LEAD Meaning and Definition

Lead can be defined as a verb or a noun, with various meanings depending on the context.

As a noun, lead is a heavy, soft, bluish-gray metal that is found in the earth's crust and used in various applications such as batteries, soldering, and plumbing. It has low melting and boiling points and is highly malleable and resistant to corrosion.

In the context of a person or thing leading, lead is the act of guiding, directing, or influencing others. It refers to a position of being in charge or at the forefront, setting an example and guiding others towards a particular course of action or goal. A leader is often seen as someone who takes initiative, provides guidance, and assumes responsibility.

As a verb, lead means to take charge or guide others in a particular direction. It can also mean to be at the forefront, preceding others in a process or endeavor. Lead can also refer to being the cause or source of a particular event, result, or outcome.

In the context of communication or information, lead refers to the first or introductory section of a news article, essay, or story, which aims to capture the reader's attention and provide essential information. It is often used to summarize the main points of the piece and entice the reader to continue reading.

In summary, lead encompasses a range of meanings, including a heavy metal, a position of guidance or responsibility, being at the forefront, causing or source of something, as well as the introductory section of a piece of writing.

Top Common Misspellings for LEAD *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for LEAD

Etymology of LEAD

The word "lead" has an interesting etymology. It can be traced back to the Old English word "lædan", which means "to guide" or "to show the way". This word is related to other Germanic languages, such as Old Frisian "lēda", Old High German "leiten", and Old Norse "leitha", which have similar meanings.

Over time, the spelling and pronunciation of "lædan" evolved. In Middle English, it became "leaden" or "lēdan", and eventually, during the late 14th century, it transformed into the modern spelling and pronunciation, "lead".

The word took on additional meanings as well. In the late 14th century, "lead" began to be used to describe the metal, derived from the action of leading (molten) metals.

Idioms with the word LEAD

  • take/lead sb on/to one side The idiom "take/lead sb on/to one side" means to separate or remove someone from a group or a larger gathering in order to have a private conversation with them. It typically implies that the conversation is important or confidential and requires a more isolated setting away from others.
  • sink like a lead balloon, at sink like a stone The idiom "sink like a lead balloon" is interchangeable with "sink like a stone" and it means to fail miserably, to achieve no success or to receive a negative response. Just as a lead balloon would quickly and inevitably fall to the ground instead of floating like a regular balloon, the idiom suggests that something or someone is met with an immediate and total lack of support or enthusiasm.
  • you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink The idiom "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink" means that it is possible to provide someone with an opportunity or the necessary information, but you cannot force them to take advantage of it or act upon it. It often refers to situations where you can offer advice or assistance, but ultimately, the decision to accept or act lies with the individual.
  • lead the field/pack/world The idiom "lead the field/pack/world" means to be the best or the most successful in a specific area or competition. It refers to surpassing all others and being at the forefront or in the front position. Being the leader in the field/pack/world indicates being ahead of the competition and setting a standard that others strive to achieve.
  • lead sb by the nose The idiom "lead someone by the nose" means to have complete control over someone and to easily influence or manipulate them. It implies that the person being led is submissive or easily persuaded, akin to being controlled or guided like a docile animal.
  • lead sb a (merry) dance To "lead someone a (merry) dance" means to cause someone to have a lot of difficulty or trouble by making them follow a complex or confusing course of actions or instructions. It often implies that the person is being intentionally misled or deceived.
  • go down like a lead balloon The idiom "go down like a lead balloon" means that something is received or accepted very poorly or unfavorably by others. It suggests that the idea, suggestion, or action fails to make a positive impression and is met with disappointment, disapproval, or indifference.
  • lead sb up the garden path The idiom "lead someone up the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone by giving them false information or leading them in the wrong direction, typically with the intention of causing confusion or frustration for personal gain.
  • all roads lead to Rome The idiom "all roads lead to Rome" means that there are many different ways to achieve a goal or reach the same outcome. Regardless of the path taken, the ultimate destination or result will be the same. It suggests that various approaches or methods can lead to a common objective.
  • have/lead a sheltered life The idiom "have/lead a sheltered life" refers to someone who has been protected, guided, or kept isolated from the realities and challenges of everyday life, usually resulting in a lack of experience or understanding of the outside world. Such individuals may be overly innocent, naive, or lacking in street smarts due to their limited exposure to different situations or hardships.
  • lead/live the life of Riley To "lead/live the life of Riley" is an idiomatic expression that means to live a comfortable, carefree, and luxurious lifestyle without any hardships or worries. It suggests living a life of ease, abundance, and indulgence, often depicting someone who enjoys leisure, pleasure, and minimal responsibilities.
  • lead the life of Riley To "lead the life of Riley" means to live a luxurious, carefree, and comfortable life, often characterized by leisure, pleasure, and lack of responsibilities or worries. It implies enjoying an easy and privileged existence without facing any significant challenges or hardships. The idiom originated from the character named Riley in the popular American song "The Life of Riley."
  • lead out of
  • lead sb astray The idiom "lead someone astray" refers to causing someone to make bad decisions, take the wrong path, or engage in immoral or misguided actions. It implies influencing or misleading someone in a way that takes them off course or leads to negative consequences.
  • lead sm astray "Lead someone astray" is an idiom used to describe the act of influencing or misleading someone in a negative or misguided way. It means to divert someone from the right path or to cause them to make poor decisions or choices.
  • get the lead out The idiom "get the lead out" means to hurry up, or to speed up one's actions or movements. It is often used as a way to encourage someone to act more quickly or to stop procrastinating. The term originates from the idea of removing the weighted material called "lead" from one's shoes, which would allow the person to move more swiftly.
  • go over like a lead balloon The idiom "go over like a lead balloon" means that something, such as a joke, idea, or suggestion, is poorly received or completely unsuccessful. It implies that the response or reaction is extremely negative or unenthusiastic, similar to a heavy lead balloon that falls quickly and fails to float.
  • lead by the nose The idiom "lead by the nose" means to exercise complete control or domination over someone, usually by manipulating or exploiting their weaknesses or vulnerabilities. It implies that the person being led is submissive or easily influenced and does not make independent decisions.
  • lead to believe The idiom "lead to believe" means to make someone think or believe something, often by providing them with information or evidence that supports a certain conclusion. It implies guiding or influencing someone's understanding or perception of a situation or idea.
  • You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink The idiom "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink" means that you can provide someone with an opportunity or the necessary resources, but you cannot force them to take advantage of it or do what is in their best interest. It emphasizes that while you may assist or guide someone, ultimately, it is their decision to act or make use of the provided options.
  • swing the lead To "swing the lead" is an idiom that means to pretend to be ill or to avoid work by wasting time or feigning laziness.
  • have/lead/live a charmed life The idiom "have/lead/live a charmed life" means to have an exceptionally lucky or fortunate existence, seemingly protected from harm or misfortune. It refers to someone who consistently experiences positive outcomes, often defying the odds or avoiding any major difficulties in life.
  • lead sm on a merry chase "Lead someone on a merry chase" is an idiom that means to intentionally mislead or deceive someone by creating a confusing or unpredictable situation, often resulting in a pursuit or quest that is thrilling, exciting, or challenging. It suggests that the person being led is chasing after something or someone, but is being driven in various directions or prevented from achieving their goal.
  • lead a double life The idiom "lead a double life" means to maintain two separate and different identities or lifestyles, often with one being hidden or secret from others. It implies engaging in contrasting behaviors or having conflicting roles, often in order to deceive or keep certain aspects of one's life hidden from others.
  • Crosses are ladders that lead to heaven. The idiom "Crosses are ladders that lead to heaven" emphasizes the notion that enduring hardships, challenges, or sacrifices can ultimately bring one closer to achieving spiritual or moral growth, enlightenment, or salvation. It suggests that the difficulties and struggles faced in life can serve as opportunities for personal transformation and a pathway towards heavenly rewards or a higher state of being.
  • You can lead a horse to water The idiom "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink" means that one can provide someone with an opportunity, but they cannot force them to take advantage of it or make use of it if they are not willing to.
  • lead the way The idiom "lead the way" means to take the position of leading or guiding others in a specific action, task, or endeavor. It refers to being the person who sets an example or takes the initiative in a particular situation, showing others the right path or approach to follow.
  • lead a dog's life The idiom "lead a dog's life" means to live a difficult, unhappy life full of hard work, exploitation, or mistreatment. It implies the notion of facing constant struggles and challenges similar to how some people believe dogs are often mistreated or living in unfavorable conditions.
  • fill sm full of lead The idiom "fill someone full of lead" is a phrase that is commonly associated with crime or violence. It figuratively means to shoot someone multiple times with bullets, intending to cause them severe harm or death. However, it is important to note that this expression should be seen in the context of fictional scenarios or certain informal conversations, as it promotes violence and is not to be taken literally in real-life situations.
  • lead against
  • put lead in pencil
  • lead with The idiom "lead with" typically means to begin a conversation or interaction by mentioning or emphasizing a particular topic or point. It suggests taking the initiative or directing the focus towards a specific subject matter or argument, often to make it clear or prominent.
  • lead up to The idiom "lead up to" means the events, actions, or circumstances that occur or happen before reaching a certain outcome or result. It refers to the progression or series of steps that build up and pave the way towards a particular event or situation.
  • lead up the garden path The idiom "lead up the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone with false promises or assurances, typically to manipulate or exploit them for personal gain. It denotes the act of intentionally leading someone astray or causing them to have false expectations or hopes.
  • lead up The idiom "lead up" typically means the sequence of events or actions that culminate or lead to a specific outcome or result. It refers to the process or progression that precedes a significant event, development, or situation.
  • lead to do The idiom "lead to do" typically means to guide or influence someone to do something. It implies that a particular action or situation prompts or inspires someone to take certain actions.
  • lead to The idiom "lead to" means to result in or cause a particular outcome or consequence. It implies a cause-and-effect relationship, where one action or event leads or contributes to another.
  • lead the pack The definition of the idiom "lead the pack" means to be the first or the best in a particular group or activity, surpassing others in terms of skill, performance, or success. It refers to taking the lead and setting a high standard for others to follow.
  • lead the field To "lead the field" means to be the best or most successful in a particular field or industry. It refers to being at the forefront or ahead of others in terms of performance, innovation, or achievement.
  • lead on a merry chase The idiom "lead on a merry chase" refers to a situation where someone or something leads another person on a long, meandering, and often adventurous pursuit or pursuit filled with twists and turns. It can also imply that the pursuit is enjoyable, entertaining, or even comical in nature.
  • lead on The idiom "lead on" is typically used to mean to deceive or mislead someone, often with false promises or intentions. It can also refer to someone encouraging or enticing another person, usually in a romantic or personal context, without any intention of committing to a relationship or following through on their actions.
  • lead off The idiom "lead off" means to begin or start something, usually a discussion, an event, or an activity, often by taking the first action or making the first move. It can also refer to being the first person or team to bat or perform in a game or competition.
  • lead into The idiom "lead into" means to bring about or initiate a certain situation or event. It refers to the act of starting or introducing something, often with the intention of directing or influencing its outcome.
  • lead in The idiom "lead in" refers to the introductory or opening part of something, typically a conversation, speech, or presentation. It is used to create interest, engage the audience, or provide background information before delving deeper into the main topic or subject matter.
  • lead forth The idiom "lead forth" typically means to guide or take someone or something forward or ahead, often in a figurative sense. It can imply taking a lead or initiating action, as well as showing the way or being in charge of a situation.
  • lead down to
  • lead down the garden path "Lead down the garden path" is an idiom that means to deceive or mislead someone, often by providing false or misleading information, leading them to a wrong conclusion or course of action. It implies manipulating or tricking someone into believing something that is not true.
  • lead down
  • lead by The idiom "lead by" refers to the act of leading or guiding others by setting an example or demonstrating strong leadership skills. It implies taking charge and inspiring others through one's actions, decisions, or behavior.
  • lead back The idiom "lead back" can be defined as a phrase used to indicate returning to a previous situation, place, or state. It often suggests going back to where one started or retracing steps.
  • lead astray The idiom "lead astray" means to cause someone to believe or follow something that is false, misleading, or morally wrong. It refers to the act of misleading or deceiving someone from a proper or intended course of action.
  • lead a dance The idiom "lead a dance" means to take control or assume a dominant position in a situation or group. It typically refers to someone who is in charge, influencing others, or directing the course of events.
  • lead The idiom "lead" has multiple definitions, depending on the context. Here are a few common definitions: 1. Take the lead: To be in a dominant or influential position, leading or guiding others. Example: "She took the lead in organizing the event." 2. Follow someone's lead: To imitate or follow someone else's example or instructions. Example: "The team successfully followed their coach's lead and won the match." 3. Lead the way: To show or guide others in a specific direction or course of action. Example: "The experienced hiker will lead the way up the mountain." 4. Lead by example: To demonstrate through one's actions how others should behave or act. Example: "A responsible leader should
  • follow lead The idiom "follow the lead" means to imitate or emulate someone's actions or ideas, to conform or adhere to the instructions or guidance given by someone, or to adopt a similar course of action.
  • fill full of lead The idiom "fill full of lead" typically refers to shooting someone multiple times with a gun, often resulting in their death.
  • lead sm to believe sth The idiom "lead someone to believe something" means to give someone a specific impression or understanding that influences their thoughts or actions. It suggests that through words, actions, or a combination of both, a person or situation misguides or convinces someone to hold a certain belief or assumption, whether it is true or not.
  • follow sm's lead The idiom "follow someone's lead" means to imitate or mimic someone's actions, behaviors, or decisions. It refers to following the guidance, directions, or example set by someone else.
  • lead the way (smw) The idiom "lead the way" means to go first or guide others in a particular direction or action. It is often used to indicate someone taking the initiative or assuming a role of leadership in a situation.
  • lead sm or sth forth The idiom "lead someone or something forth" means to guide, direct, or bring someone or something into a different place, situation, or action. It implies taking the initiative to move someone or something forward, often in a figurative sense. It can also refer to leading someone or something out of a specific place or circumstance.
  • lead sb down the garden path The idiom "lead someone down the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone by providing false information, false promises, or false hope. It implies manipulating someone into believing something that may not be true or leading them to an undesirable outcome or situation.
  • lead sm down the garden path To lead someone down the garden path means to deceive or mislead them, often by creating false hopes or expectations.
  • put lead in your pencil The idiom "put lead in your pencil" refers to gaining or restoring energy, vitality, or sexual vigor. It is often used to suggest that someone needs to increase their motivation, enthusiasm, or stamina in their personal or professional life.
  • lead (sm or an animal) to sth The idiom "lead (someone or an animal) to something" means to guide, direct, or take someone or something to a particular place or situation. It can refer to physically leading someone by holding their hand or using a leash on an animal, or it can be used metaphorically to indicate guiding or influencing someone's actions or decisions.
  • lead up to sth The idiom "lead up to something" refers to the sequence of events or actions that occur prior to a certain significant event or outcome. It describes the gradual progress or development that builds up to a particular situation, often implying a causal or logical connection between the events.
  • lead with sth The idiom "lead with something" typically means to begin or introduce a conversation, or any form of communication, by focusing or emphasizing on a particular topic or aspect. It implies that the person is initiating the discussion by starting with the specific subject matter they consider important or relevant.
  • lead with sm or sth The idiom "lead with sm or sth" means to begin or start with something or someone as the main focus or point of emphasis. It indicates putting that particular thing or person at the forefront or in the leading position.
  • lead sm by the nose To "lead someone by the nose" is an idiomatic expression that means to have complete control or influence over someone, often manipulating or guiding them in a particular direction without their knowledge or against their will. It signifies the idea of leading someone like a docile animal that can be controlled by a physical grip on its nose.
  • lead off (sth) The idiom "lead off (sth)" has various meanings depending on the context. Here are a few possible definitions: 1. To begin or start something, especially an event, discussion, or performance. Example: "He will lead off the conference with the opening speech." 2. To take the first action or step in a series of actions. Example: "The team captain will lead off the game with the first pitch." 3. To be the first person or thing in a line, sequence, or procession. Example: "The mayor will lead off the parade on a float." 4. In baseball, to be the first player to bat in an inning. Example: "The leadoff batter hit a home run." Overall, the id
  • lead off (with sm or sth) To "lead off (with something)" means to start or begin with something specific, often used in a discussion, presentation, or performance. It refers to taking the initiative to introduce or initiate a particular topic, idea, or action. It is similar to taking the lead or being the first to bring up a particular subject.
  • lead sm or sth off To "lead someone or something off" is an idiomatic expression that means to initiate or begin something, usually a discussion, event, or activity. It refers to taking the first step or leading the way in starting something.
  • lead sb on The idiom "lead sb on" means to intentionally give someone false hope or encouragement, typically in a romantic or emotional context, causing the person to believe that a relationship or opportunity is possible when it is not.
  • lead sm on The idiom "lead someone on" refers to the act of giving someone false hope or encouragement, usually in a romantic or personal context, by engaging in behaviors or making statements that suggest impending romantic or intimate involvement, while having no intention of pursuing such a relationship. It involves misleading someone into believing there is a mutual interest or attraction, causing them to develop feelings that are not reciprocated.
  • lead sm up sth The correct idiom seems to be "lead someone up the garden path," not "lead sm up sth." This idiom means to deceive or mislead someone by giving false information or leading them to believe something that is not true. It refers to the act of leading someone down a path that seems promising or favorable but ultimately leads to disappointment or confusion.
  • lead someone a merry chase To lead someone a merry chase means to cause someone to engage in a wild and futile pursuit or search, often with the intention of confusing or taunting them. It implies that the person being chased is not easily caught or outsmarted, resulting in a frustrating and playful experience for those attempting to catch or find them.
  • lead with one's chin To lead with one's chin means to recklessly or boldly provoke or invite criticism, attack, or confrontation, often by expressing a controversial opinion or taking a strong stand on a particular issue. This idiom is derived from the literal action of tilting one's chin forward, which exposes it as a vulnerable target.
  • lead to the altar The idiom "lead to the altar" means to have a romantic relationship that ultimately results in marriage. It implies the idea of guiding or progressing towards the commitment of marriage.
  • lead somebody a (merry) dance The idiom "lead somebody a (merry) dance" means to cause someone a lot of trouble or confusion by behaving unpredictably or irresponsibly. It implies that the person being led is being manipulated, misled, or made to jump through hoops by someone else's actions or behavior. The addition of "merry" to the idiom usually suggests a playful or mischievous tone to the manipulation or confusion caused.
  • lead someone up the aisle The idiom "lead someone up the aisle" is typically understood as guiding or escorting someone to the altar during a wedding ceremony. It refers to the act of walking alongside or ahead of someone as they make their way down the aisle towards marriage.
  • lead (one) around by the nose The idiom "lead (one) around by the nose" means to control or manipulate someone easily by guiding or influencing their actions or decisions. It implies that the person being led is easily swayed or controlled, possibly due to their lack of assertiveness or strong will.
  • lead someone by the nose The idiom "lead someone by the nose" means to control or manipulate someone easily, often by taking advantage of their ignorance or gullibility. It suggests that the person being led is blindly following someone else's instructions or influence without any resistance or independent thought.
  • lead (one) astray The idiom "lead (one) astray" means to misguide, deceive, or tempt someone into making wrong decisions or engaging in immoral or misguided actions. It suggests causing someone to deviate from the right path or divert them from their true course or values.
  • lead someone astray The idiom "lead someone astray" refers to the act of causing someone to go in the wrong direction or make poor decisions, usually by providing them with false or misleading information or guidance. It implies leading someone into error or confusion, diverting them from the right path or making them lose their way, either literally or metaphorically.
  • lead (one) to the altar The idiom "lead (one) to the altar" refers to the act of bringing or guiding someone to the point of marriage. It typically implies that one person has successfully convinced or persuaded their partner to commit to a lifelong commitment of marriage.
  • lead balloon The idiom "lead balloon" is used to describe an idea, statement, or joke that fails to generate any interest or enthusiasm, and is met with complete silence or a negative response from others. It implies that the idea or item falls flat and is received as a disappointment or failure.
  • go down (or over) like a lead balloon The idiom "go down (or over) like a lead balloon" is an expression used to describe something that is poorly received, unsuccessful, or fails to generate the desired response or impact. It implies that an idea, statement, or joke falls flat, not eliciting any positive reaction or enthusiasm from others, similar to a lead balloon that quickly falls to the ground due to its weight.
  • lead somebody to believe The idiom "lead somebody to believe" means to intentionally cause someone to think or assume something, typically by providing them with false or misleading information.
  • bury the lead The idiom "bury the lead" is often used in journalism and storytelling contexts, referring to the act of placing the most important or significant piece of information towards the end of a narrative, article, or conversation, rather than presenting it at the beginning where it would grasp immediate attention. This practice may confuse or mislead the audience, as they have to invest more time and attention to identify the crucial point. It can also be interpreted as failing to emphasize the main or exciting aspect of a subject or event, thus undermining its impact.
  • lead somebody by the nose The idiom "lead somebody by the nose" means to have complete control or influence over someone, causing them to do everything according to one's own wishes, desires, or instructions
  • lead a cat and dog life The idiom "lead a cat and dog life" means to have a difficult, turbulent, or constantly quarrelsome relationship with someone, resembling the way cats and dogs are often portrayed as natural enemies. It suggests a state of constant conflict or discord.
  • lead a charmed life The idiom "lead a charmed life" means that someone consistently experiences good fortune, luck, or success, often without any negative consequences or setbacks. It implies that the person seems to be protected or blessed in a way that enables them to avoid or overcome hardships or dangers effortlessly.
  • lead a charmed existence The idiom "lead a charmed existence" means to live a life that is unusually protected, fortunate, or free from harm or misfortune. It suggests that someone has frequently experienced positive outcomes, luck, or favorable circumstances throughout their life.
  • lead a chase The idiom "lead a chase" typically means to take the initiative or assume control in pursuing a goal or objective. It refers to being at the forefront of a pursuit, often indicating a proactive and determined approach to achieving something.
  • put lead in one's pencil The idiom "put lead in one's pencil" is a colloquial expression typically used to refer to enhancing or boosting one's sexual vitality or performance. It implies increasing one's energy, stamina, or effectiveness in intimate relationships.
  • lead with your chin The idiom "lead with your chin" means to act or speak boldly and without caution, often resulting in facing challenges or criticism head-on. It suggests being overly confident or not considering the potential consequences of one's actions or words.
  • lead (one) (on) a merry dance The idiom "lead (one) (on) a merry dance" means to cause someone to feel confused, annoyed, or frustrated by repeatedly changing plans, giving contradictory information, or leading them in circles. It suggests the act of manipulating or toying with someone's emotions or expectations, often with a sense of enjoyment or amusement for the person doing the leading.
  • lead somebody a dance The idiom "lead somebody a dance" means to manipulate or control someone, typically by confusing or frustrating them, causing them to be unable to navigate a situation independently. It implies that the person being led is in a subordinate or powerless position, while the person leading is asserting authority or exerting control over them.
  • lead someone a dance To "lead someone a dance" means to control or manipulate someone, often by leading them on in a confusing or reluctant manner, causing them to be uncertain or frustrated in their interactions or attempts to understand or deal with the person.
  • lead someone a merry dance To "lead someone a merry dance" means to intentionally deceive or manipulate someone, often by causing confusion or chaos and making them go through a series of challenging or frustrating situations. It implies having control over someone's actions, thoughts, or emotions, while enjoying the amusement or satisfaction derived from the situation.
  • fill someone full of lead The idiom "fill someone full of lead" is a violent and figurative expression that originated in the early 20th century. It typically refers to shooting someone multiple times with a firearm, specifically with bullets made of lead. This phrase is used metaphorically to convey the idea of causing serious harm or killing someone.
  • lead from the front The idiom "lead from the front" refers to the act of taking a proactive and prominent role in guiding or influencing others. It describes a leadership style where an individual leads by example, actively participating in the tasks or activities they expect others to perform, and setting a positive precedent. This idiom is often used to emphasize the importance of being actively involved and not simply giving orders or delegating responsibilities.
  • lead (one) down the garden path The idiom "lead (one) down the garden path" means to deceive, mislead, or trick someone into believing something that is not true or into taking a course of action that is ultimately detrimental. It implies manipulation or the intentional misleading of another person.
  • lead (one) up the garden path The idiom "lead (one) up the garden path" means to deceive or mislead someone, often with the intention of causing confusion or creating false hope. It suggests that the person is being guided towards a pleasant or desirable outcome, but in reality, they are being fooled or taken advantage of.
  • lead someone down the garden path The idiom "lead someone down the garden path" means to deceive, mislead, or manipulate someone intentionally, often by providing false information or promising something that is not true, in order to achieve personal gain or to confuse and distract them.
  • lead someone up the garden path The idiom "lead someone up the garden path" means to deceive, mislead, or trick someone by providing false or misleading information. It suggests intentionally luring someone into a situation or belief that is ultimately unproductive, confusing, or false.
  • lead down garden path The idiom "lead down the garden path" refers to the act of deceiving or misleading someone by enticing them with false information or promises. It implies leading someone in the wrong direction or into a situation that is ultimately fruitless or disappointing.
  • give a lead The idiom "give a lead" means to provide information, direction, or guidance that can help someone in solving a problem, finding a solution, or making progress in a particular situation. It implies offering a clue or pointer that leads to further understanding or action.
  • have lead in (one's) pants The idiom "have lead in one's pants" typically refers to someone who is slow-moving, lazy, or lacking in motivation. It suggests that the person is weighed down by a heavy substance, like lead, which impedes their ability to act or progress quickly.
  • lead someone or something (away) (from someone or something) The idiom "lead someone or something (away) (from someone or something)" means to guide or direct someone or something away from a particular person, place, or thing. It often implies diverting attention, distracting, or causing a change in direction or focus.
  • be swinging the lead The idiom "be swinging the lead" means to pretend to be working or making a genuine effort when actually one is being lazy or intentionally wasting time.
  • have lead in one’s pencil The idiom "have lead in one's pencil" is a colloquial way to express that someone has a strong sexual drive or energy. It implies that the person is filled with vigor and enthusiasm in their romantic or sexual pursuits.
  • in the lead The idiom "in the lead" refers to being ahead or in a position of advantage compared to others in a competition, race, or any other pursuit. It suggests that someone or something is currently in the position closest to achieving victory or success.
  • lead (one) on The idiom "lead (one) on" means to give someone false hope or encouragement, usually in a romantic or emotional context, leading them to believe that there is a possibility of a relationship or further progress when there isn't. It implies that someone is intentionally or unintentionally manipulating or misleading another person's expectations or feelings.
  • lead (one) to believe The idiom "lead (one) to believe" means to cause or persuade someone to think or assume something, often by providing information or evidence that strongly suggests a particular outcome or conclusion. It implies that the action or information presented leads the person to form a specific belief or understanding.
  • lead (one) up the aisle The idiom "lead (one) up the aisle" typically refers to guiding or escorting someone down the aisle during a wedding ceremony. It implies that the individual being led is getting married, with the aisle symbolizing the path towards their marriage.
  • lead in (one's) pencil The idiom "lead in one's pencil" is an informal expression that refers to having a high level of energy, enthusiasm, or sexual vigor. It is often used to describe someone who is feeling lively, energetic, or sexually potent.
  • lead in your pencil The idiom "lead in your pencil" is a colloquial expression that refers to having sexual vigor or energy. It is often used to describe someone who is lively, energetic, or sexually active.
  • lead nowhere The idiom "lead nowhere" means to result in no productive outcome or have no future prospects. It implies engaging in a situation or pursuing a certain course of action that does not yield any meaningful progress or success.
  • lead one to To lead one to (somewhere or something) means to guide or direct someone towards a particular place, condition, outcome, or understanding. It implies showing the way, introducing someone to something, or causing someone to reach a certain conclusion or result. It can be used in both literal and figurative senses.
  • lead poisoning
  • lead somebody astray The idiom "lead somebody astray" means to guide or persuade someone to make a wrong or misguided decision, or to mislead someone into believing something that is incorrect or misleading.
  • lead the line The idiom "lead the line" typically means to be at the forefront or take the lead in a particular situation or endeavor. It often suggests being in a position of authority or responsibility and guiding or setting an example for others to follow.
  • lead time The idiom "lead time" refers to the amount of time required or available before a specific event or action must occur. It commonly refers to the period between placing an order for a product or service and receiving or completing it. It can also be used to describe the time needed for preparation, planning, or execution of any given task or project.
  • lead/live the life of Reilly/Riley To "lead/live the life of Reilly/Riley" is an idiom that means to live a carefree, comfortable, and luxurious life, with no worries or responsibilities. It implies an existence of ease and indulgence, often characterized by wealth, leisure, and little effort or work required. The phrase originates from the 19th-century song "The Life of Reilly" by Pat Rooney, in which Reilly is depicted as someone who leads a privileged and enjoyable life.
  • take the lead The idiom "take the lead" means to assume control, take charge, or be the first to initiate action in a particular situation or endeavor. It refers to stepping forward and assuming a leading role or responsibility.
  • lead someone into something The idiom "lead someone into something" refers to the act of guiding or luring someone into a specific situation, often with unfavorable consequences or outcomes.
  • lead someone or something off The idiom "lead someone or something off" typically means to guide, direct, or escort someone or something away from a particular location or situation. It can involve physically guiding someone away or taking charge in a situation in order to divert attention or initiate a different course of action.
  • lead off (with someone or something) The idiom "lead off (with someone or something)" refers to taking the first or initial action in a series of events or tasks with the involvement or introduction of a particular person or thing. It implies starting or beginning in a prominent or influential manner.
  • lead someone on The idiom "lead someone on" means to intentionally give someone false hope or encouragement, usually in a romantic or emotional context. It refers to when someone makes another person believe that there is the potential for a romantic relationship, without sincere intentions or willingness to pursue it.
  • lead someone on a merry chase The idiom "lead someone on a merry chase" refers to deliberately leading someone on a long, confusing, or wild pursuit or journey, typically involving various twists, turns, or misdirections. It implies that the person being led is actively being deceived, manipulated, or toyed with, resulting in a frustrating or entertaining experience, depending on the context.
  • lead (someone or an animal) to something The idiom "lead (someone or an animal) to something" means to guide or direct someone or an animal towards a specific destination, objective, or outcome. It implies taking responsibility for showing the way or encouraging someone to pursue a particular course of action.
  • lead someone to believe something The idiom "lead someone to believe something" means to intentionally or unintentionally convince or persuade someone to think or consider that something is true or likely to happen, even if it might not be accurate or certain.
  • lead someone to do something The idiom "lead someone to do something" means to guide or influence someone to engage in a particular action or behavior. It suggests that someone is convincing or persuading another person to take a specific course of action.
  • lead someone up something The idiom "lead someone up something" typically means to guide or direct someone towards a specific path, course of action, or outcome. It implies taking the initiative in showing someone the way or providing guidance for them to successfully reach a goal or destination.
  • lead up to something The idiom "lead up to something" means to gradually progress towards or build up to a particular event, outcome, or conclusion. It involves a series of events, actions, or developments that precede and prepare for something significant or important.
  • lead with someone or something The idiom "lead with someone or something" generally means to begin a conversation, presentation, or any form of engagement by introducing or emphasizing a particular person or topic. It suggests that this person or thing is taking the foremost position or being the primary focus.
  • lead with something To "lead with something" means to begin or start a conversation, presentation, or argument by introducing or emphasizing a particular point, idea, or topic. It can also refer to initiating an action or making an offer by highlighting a specific aspect or element.

Similar spelling words for LEAD

Plural form of LEAD is LEADS

Conjugate verb Lead

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have led
you would have led
he/she/it would have led
we would have led
they would have led
I would have lead
you would have lead
he/she/it would have lead
we would have lead
they would have lead

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been leading
you would have been leading
he/she/it would have been leading
we would have been leading
they would have been leading

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would lead
you would lead
he/she/it would lead
we would lead
they would lead

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be leading
you would be leading
he/she/it would be leading
we would be leading
they would be leading

FUTURE

I will lead
you will lead
he/she/it will lead
we will lead
they will lead

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be leading
you will be leading
he/she/it will be leading
we will be leading
they will be leading

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have led
you will have led
he/she/it will have led
we will have led
they will have led

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been leading
you will have been leading
he/she/it will have been leading
we will have been leading
they will have been leading

IMPERATIVE

you lead
we let´s lead

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to lead

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was leading
you were leading
he/she/it was leading
we were leading
they were leading

PAST PARTICIPLE

led

PAST PERFECT

I had led
you had led
he/she/it had led
we had led
they had led

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been leading
you had been leading
he/she/it had been leading
we had been leading
they had been leading

PRESENT

I lead
you lead
he/she/it leads
we lead
they lead

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am leading
you are leading
he/she/it is leading
we are leading
they are leading

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

leading

PRESENT PERFECT

I have led
you have led
he/she/it has led
we have led
they have led

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been leading
you have been leading
he/she/it has been leading
we have been leading
they have been leading

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it lead

SIMPLE PAST

I led
you led
he/she/it led
we led
they led

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