How Do You Spell LEG?

Pronunciation: [lˈɛɡ] (IPA)

The word "leg" is spelled with three letters and pronounced as /lɛɡ/. In this word, the "l" is pronounced as a voiced alveolar lateral consonant while the "e" is pronounced with the short "e" sound which is a lax, unrounded vowel. The "g" is pronounced as a voiced velar plosive consonant, and the combination of these sounds gives us the word "leg". Although it is a simple word, its spelling reflects the complex rules of English phonetics that govern its pronunciation.

LEG Meaning and Definition

Leg is a noun that refers to each of the two lower limbs of the human body, extending from the hip to the ankle. It is an essential body part that supports the body's weight and is responsible for movement, balance, and stability. The leg is composed of several components, including bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves.

Anatomically, the leg consists of the femur, which is the long bone in the upper leg, followed by the tibia and fibula in the lower leg. The femur connects to the hip joint, while the tibia forms the shinbone, and the fibula runs parallel to it. Muscles such as the quadriceps, hamstrings, calf muscles, and others function collectively to enable walking, running, jumping, and various physical activities.

Furthermore, the leg encompasses joints such as the hip, knee, and ankle, which facilitate movement and flexibility. These joints are protected and stabilized by various ligaments, tendons, and cartilage. Additionally, the leg carries numerous blood vessels and nerves, ensuring proper circulation and transmitting signals between the brain and muscles.

In a broader sense, "leg" can also refer to a part of an object or piece of furniture that extends outward or is used for support. For instance, the leg of a table or chair plays a crucial role in providing stability and balance to the structure.

Top Common Misspellings for LEG *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for LEG

Etymology of LEG

The word "leg" can be traced back to the Old Norse language, where it was known as "leggr". It is believed to have been derived from the Proto-Germanic word "lagjaz". In turn, "lagjaz" is thought to have originated from the Proto-Indo-European root word "legh", meaning "to bend" or "to flex". This root word also gave rise to related terms in various Germanic languages, such as German "Bein" and Dutch "been". Overall, the etymology of "leg" suggests a connection to the concept of bending or flexing, which is inherent to the function of a leg.

Idioms with the word LEG

  • shake a leg The idiom "shake a leg" is defined as an expression urging someone to hurry up or move quickly.
  • cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" or "cost a small fortune" refers to something that is very expensive, requiring a significant amount of money to obtain or purchase. It implies that the cost is exorbitant or excessively high, often beyond what is considered reasonable or affordable.
  • not have a leg to stand on The idiom "not have a leg to stand on" means to lack evidence, justification, or a valid argument to support one's position or claim. It signifies a situation where someone is unable to provide solid proof or credible reasoning to support their case.
  • leg before wicket The idiom "leg before wicket" is a cricketing term that refers to a dismissal in the sport where the ball hits the batsman's leg before hitting the wickets. In a broader sense, the idiom can be used to describe a situation where someone is obstructed or prevented from making progress or achieving their goal.
  • talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey The idiom "talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey" means to talk excessively or for an unusually long time, often in a persuasive or argumentative manner. It suggests that someone is capable of talking so much that they could even convince a donkey to lose one or both of its hind legs.
  • have a leg up on sb The idiom "have a leg up on sb" means to have an advantage or head start over someone in a competitive situation. It implies having a higher position, more resources, or superior knowledge that gives you an edge over others.
  • cost a bomb/the earth/a packet, at cost an arm and a leg/a small fortune The idioms "cost a bomb" or "cost the earth" or "cost a packet" all mean that something is very expensive. The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" means that something is extremely costly, often to the point of being unaffordable or requiring a significant sacrifice in order to obtain it. Similarly, "cost a small fortune" suggests that something is very expensive, usually beyond what most people would consider reasonable or affordable.
  • break a leg The idiom "break a leg" is a phrase commonly used in the performing arts, particularly theater and show business, to wish someone good luck. It is often said to performers before they take the stage. Despite the literal meaning of the words, the phrase is not meant as a literal command to break one's leg, but rather as an expression of encouragement and success.
  • pull the other leg/one (it's got bells on)! The idiom "pull the other leg/one (it's got bells on)!" is often used as a sarcastic response to express disbelief or skepticism towards something someone has said. It implies that the speaker believes the statement to be false or highly unlikely. It can be interpreted as a dismissive way of saying "I don't believe you" or "You must be joking." The phrase "it's got bells on" is added to further emphasize the incredulity of the statement.
  • an arm and a leg The idiom "an arm and a leg" is used to describe something that is very expensive or costs a significant amount of money. It implies that the price being paid for something is extremely high, often beyond what is reasonable or expected.
  • get your leg over The idiom "get your leg over" is a colloquial and slang expression typically used in informal contexts. It refers to engaging in sexual intercourse or successfully having sexual relations with someone.
  • give sb a leg up The idiom "give someone a leg up" means to provide assistance, support, or an advantage to someone in order to help them progress, achieve success or overcome obstacles. It usually implies giving someone a boost or a helping hand to reach a higher level or position, both literally and figuratively.
  • pull sb's leg The idiom "pull someone's leg" means to tease or joke with someone in a playful or teasing manner in order to make them believe something that is not true. It involves intentionally misleading someone or telling them a fabricated story for amusement.
  • pay an arm and a leg The idiom "pay an arm and a leg" means to pay a very high price or cost for something, often implying that the price is excessively expensive or unreasonable.
  • cost an arm and a leg The idiom "cost an arm and a leg" refers to something that is extremely expensive or involves a significant sacrifice or high price. It implies that the cost or price being asked is excessively high and requires the person to give up something valuable or significant.
  • Show a leg! The idiom "Show a leg!" is a phrase often used in a military or naval context to rouse or wake up soldiers or sailors. It can be interpreted as a command to get out of bed or start the day. It originated from the practice of military drill sergeants or officers commanding their subordinates to show one leg from under their blankets as a means of getting them up and ready for duty.
  • have a leg to stand on The idiom "have a leg to stand on" means to have valid or convincing evidence, arguments, or basis for one's beliefs, claims, or actions. It refers to having a strong enough position or justification to support one's stance or viewpoint.
  • can talk the hind leg off a donkey The idiom "can talk the hind leg off a donkey" is used to describe someone who talks excessively or has the ability to talk persuasively for an extended period, often overpowering or boring others with their endless conversation. It implies that the person's talkativeness is such that they could even convince a donkey to lose its hind leg through excessive conversation.
  • first leg The idiom "first leg" typically refers to the initial part or stage of a journey, race, or competition. It is commonly used in sporting contexts such as relay races or multi-stage events, where each participant or team completes one leg before passing the baton or continuing to the next stage. It can also generally describe the beginning or starting point of any kind of endeavor or process.
  • He puts his pants on one leg at a time The idiom "He puts his pants on one leg at a time" means that a person is just like everyone else and is not exceptional or superior in any way. It implies that the person being referred to is not privileged or possesses any extraordinary abilities or qualities.
  • cost (sb) an arm and a leg The idiom "cost (sb) an arm and a leg" means that something is extremely expensive or costs a large amount of money. It is used to emphasize that the price of something is very high and can be seen as excessive or unreasonable.
  • can talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey The idiom "can talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey" refers to someone who is extremely talkative or persuasive, and has the ability to continuously engage in conversation or argument for an extended period of time without becoming tired or giving up. It implies that the person possesses exceptional communication skills and can dominate a conversation or discussion to the point that others cannot get a word in edgewise.
  • to have a hollow leg The idiom "to have a hollow leg" means to have an unusually large capacity or appetite for eating and drinking. It implies that the person can consume a large amount of food and drink without getting full or intoxicated.
  • Pull the other leg! The idiom "Pull the other leg!" is an ironic and humorous way of expressing disbelief or skepticism towards something someone has said. It implies that the speaker is not easily fooled or convinced and that they find the statement highly implausible.
  • pull leg The idiom "pull someone's leg" means to tease or play a prank on someone by tricking them or telling a joke in a way that it seems believable. It involves intentionally misleading or fooling someone in a light-hearted or playful manner.
  • leg up on The idiom "leg up on" means to have an advantage or head start over someone or something. It refers to a favorable position or opportunity that provides one with an edge or superior position compared to others.
  • leg up The idiom "leg up" typically means to provide someone with assistance or support in order to help them achieve a certain goal or gain an advantage. It can be used to describe giving someone a boost, helping them get ahead, or providing them with an opportunity they might not otherwise have had.
  • have a leg up on The idiom "have a leg up on" means to have an advantage or head start in a particular situation or competition. It implies being in a superior position compared to others, often due to having more knowledge, experience, skills, or resources.
  • give a leg up The idiom "give a leg up" means to provide someone with assistance or support in order to help them succeed or progress. It can involve lending a helping hand, offering guidance, or providing an advantage to someone in reaching their goals.
  • get leg over The idiom "get leg over" is a colloquial and somewhat vulgar expression that primarily exists in British English slang. It is often used informally to describe the act of having sexual intercourse or engaging in a sexual encounter. Its meaning is derived from the imagery of one's leg being positioned over another person during sexual activity.
  • a leg up The idiom "a leg up" is used to describe a situation where someone is given assistance or an advantage, typically in the form of support, guidance, or a boost to their position or prospects. It suggests that someone is being provided with an opportunity or helping hand to improve or advance in some way.
  • pull someone's leg The idiom "pull someone's leg" means to tease or joke with someone in a playful manner, often by saying something that is not true but is intended to make them believe it momentarily.
  • cost/pay an arm and a leg The idiom "cost/pay an arm and a leg" means that something is very expensive or costs a great deal, often in a figurative sense. It implies that the price or expense is extremely high, to the point of being unreasonable or exorbitant.
  • pull somebody’s leg The idiom "pull somebody's leg" means to playfully tease or joke with someone, often by telling them something that is not true in order to see their reaction. It is a light-hearted way of engaging in playful deception or trickery.
  • talk the hind leg off a donkey The idiom "talk the hind leg off a donkey" means someone who talks excessively or without pause, often to the point of annoyance or exhaustion for those listening. It suggests that the person is so talkative that they could even convince a donkey to lose its hind leg by talking to it.
  • leg it The idiom "leg it" means to run or move quickly, often with a sense of urgency or haste.
  • arm and a leg The idiom "arm and a leg" is used to describe something that is very expensive or costs a significant amount of money. It implies that the price is exceedingly high, often exaggeratedly so.
  • give an arm and a leg (for something) The idiom "give an arm and a leg (for something)" means to be willing to sacrifice a significant or extreme amount, often referring to a high monetary price or a great personal effort, for the desired thing or outcome. It implies willingness to give up something very valuable or make a substantial sacrifice in order to obtain or achieve something desired.
  • give an arm and a leg for The idiom "give an arm and a leg for" means to be willing to give up something of great value, often used to emphasize how much someone desires or is willing to sacrifice for something or someone.
  • (one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time The idiom "(one) puts (one's) pants on one leg at a time" means that everyone, regardless of their status or abilities, performs daily tasks or routines in the same way as others. It emphasizes the idea that no one is inherently superior or above basic activities.
  • give leg bail The idiom "give leg bail" means to run away or escape from a difficult or dangerous situation. It implies making a hasty retreat on foot to avoid capture or trouble.
  • pull the other leg (it's got bells on)! The idiom "pull the other leg (it's got bells on)!" is an expression used to convey disbelief or skepticism towards a statement or claim that someone has made. It implies that the speaker finds the statement too incredible or unlikely to be true. The phrase suggests that the person being addressed is attempting to deceive or trick the speaker, but the speaker is not convinced and believes they are being played for a fool. The addition of "it's got bells on" emphasizes the speaker's refusal to believe the statement, suggesting that it is even more absurd or ridiculous.
  • a leg in the door The idiom "a leg in the door" means to have an initial opportunity or advantage that can potentially lead to further success or further opportunities. It refers to gaining entry or an initial foothold into a particular field, career, or situation, which can then be used to advance or achieve one's goals.
  • get a/(one's) leg in the door The idiom "get a/(one's) leg in the door" means to establish an initial entry or opportunity, often in a competitive field or in beginning a relationship. It typically refers to getting a foothold or initial access, which may potentially lead to further progress or success.
  • put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "put (one's) pants on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means that someone is ordinary or just like everyone else, emphasizing their lack of superiority or special treatment. It is often used to remind someone not to consider themselves superior or believe they are exempt from the usual rules or routines that apply to others.
  • put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "put (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means to emphasize that someone is ordinary or not exceptional in any way. It implies that individuals should not be treated as more important or superior than others because they have the same basic human routines and abilities as everyone else.
  • puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else) The idiom "puts (one's) trousers on one leg at a time (just like everybody else)" means that someone is not above or different from others; they have the same basic abilities, responsibilities, or limitations as everyone else. It emphasizes that despite any achievements, status, or accomplishments one may have, they are still fundamentally equal to others and do not possess any extraordinary qualities.
  • get (one's) leg over The idiom "get (one's) leg over" is a colloquial and often explicit phrase that is primarily used in British English to refer to having sexual intercourse.
  • get a leg up The idiom "get a leg up" means to gain an advantage or improve one's position, especially in a competitive situation. It is often used when someone acquires an advantage or opportunity that helps them succeed or progress over others.
  • get a leg up on (someone) The idiom "get a leg up on (someone)" means to gain an advantage or head start over someone else in a competitive situation. It refers to acquiring a beneficial position or opportunity that gives a higher chance of success or progress compared to others.
  • give (one) a leg up The idiom "give (one) a leg up" means to help or assist someone in achieving something, often by providing them with an advantage or opportunity. It refers to lending support to someone in order to help them progress or succeed in a particular situation.
  • give someone a leg up The idiom "give someone a leg up" means to provide assistance or support to someone, especially in helping them gain an advantage or achieve success in a particular situation or endeavor. It can refer to offering a boost to someone's career, providing an opportunity, or lending a helping hand in general.
  • without a leg to stand on The idiom "without a leg to stand on" means to be without any evidence, basis, or support for one's argument or position. It implies the lack of a strong or valid argument that can be used to defend oneself or prove a point.
  • a leg to stand on The idiom "a leg to stand on" is used to describe the presence of evidence, justification, or support that makes an argument or position valid or credible. Having "a leg to stand on" means having a strong basis or substantial proof to back up one's claims or assertions. It implies that one has solid ground to defend their viewpoint.
  • have a leg up on (someone) The idiom "have a leg up on (someone)" means to have an advantage or head start over someone else in a particular situation or competition. It implies that one person is in a superior position or has more favorable circumstances compared to others.
  • leg man The idiom "leg man" refers to a person, typically a man, who has a strong appreciation or fascination for women's legs, often viewing them as a physical attraction.
  • leg up, a The idiom "leg up" typically refers to giving someone a helping hand or advantage in achieving success, progress, or advancement in a particular situation. It can be used to describe providing assistance or support in order to gain an advantage or improve one's position.
  • leg work The idiom "leg work" refers to the physical effort or legwork required to complete a task or achieve a goal. It involves actively going out, gathering information, conducting research, or undertaking necessary actions by using one's legs to move from place to place. It implies the act of doing the groundwork, fieldwork, or practical aspects of an undertaking, often involving physical exertion, exploration, or investigation.
  • make a leg
  • peg-leg The idiom "peg-leg" refers to a person who has a prosthetic leg, typically made of wood, resembling a peg. It is often used metaphorically to describe someone who has a visible disability or impairment.
  • pull (one's) leg The idiom "pull (one's) leg" means to tease or playfully deceive someone. It is used when someone tells a joke, makes a sarcastic comment, or says something in a lighthearted manner to make someone believe something that isn't true, often just for amusement.
  • pull somebody's leg To "pull somebody's leg" means to tease or trick someone in a playful or harmless manner, usually by pretending something that is not true. It involves creating or promoting a false story or situation to make the other person believe it, typically leading to a moment of amusement or surprise when they realize it was a joke.
  • pull someone’s leg The idiom "pull someone's leg" means to jokingly deceive or tease someone by making a false or exaggerated statement in order to trick or amuse them. It is often used in a lighthearted manner to playfully mislead or mock someone.
  • you're pulling my leg The idiom "you're pulling my leg" means that someone is joking or teasing in a playful manner, typically by trying to trick or deceive someone else. It implies that what the person is saying or doing is not to be taken seriously.

Similar spelling words for LEG

Plural form of LEG is LEGS

Conjugate verb Leg

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have legged
you would have legged
he/she/it would have legged
we would have legged
they would have legged
I would have leg
you would have leg
he/she/it would have leg
we would have leg
they would have leg

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been legging
you would have been legging
he/she/it would have been legging
we would have been legging
they would have been legging

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would leg
you would leg
he/she/it would leg
we would leg
they would leg

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be legging
you would be legging
he/she/it would be legging
we would be legging
they would be legging

FUTURE

I will leg
you will leg
he/she/it will leg
we will leg
they will leg

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be legging
you will be legging
he/she/it will be legging
we will be legging
they will be legging

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have legged
you will have legged
he/she/it will have legged
we will have legged
they will have legged

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been legging
you will have been legging
he/she/it will have been legging
we will have been legging
they will have been legging

IMPERATIVE

you leg
we let´s leg

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to leg

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was legging
you were legging
he/she/it was legging
we were legging
they were legging

PAST PARTICIPLE

legged

PAST PERFECT

I had legged
you had legged
he/she/it had legged
we had legged
they had legged

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been legging
you had been legging
he/she/it had been legging
we had been legging
they had been legging

PRESENT

I leg
you leg
he/she/it legs
we leg
they leg

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am legging
you are legging
he/she/it is legging
we are legging
they are legging

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

legging

PRESENT PERFECT

I have legged
you have legged
he/she/it has legged
we have legged
they have legged

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been legging
you have been legging
he/she/it has been legging
we have been legging
they have been legging

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it leg

SIMPLE PAST

I legged
you legged
he/she/it legged
we legged
they legged

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