How Do You Spell MADE?

Pronunciation: [mˈe͡ɪd] (IPA)

The word "made" is spelled with the letters "m," "a," "d," and "e." It is pronounced /meɪd/ in IPA phonetic transcription. The "m" makes a "muh" sound, the "a" makes a "long a" sound, the "d" makes a "duh" sound, and the "e" makes a "long e" sound. This word is the past tense of the verb "to make," which means to create or produce something. It is a common word used in everyday language.

MADE Meaning and Definition

Made is the past tense and past participle of the verb "make." It refers to the act of creating or producing something by combining or shaping materials, or by performing a particular action or process. When an object or item is made, it means that it has been formed, fabricated, or manufactured.

"Made" can also describe the process of causing or causing to be, bringing about, accomplishing, or carrying out. It implies that one has taken the necessary steps or actions to achieve a particular result or outcome.

Furthermore, "made" can denote the state of being successful or wealthy, often as a result of hard work, talent, or certain circumstances. It suggests that an individual has achieved a certain level of accomplishment or financial stability.

In addition to its verb form, "made" can also be used as an adjective to describe something that has been created or produced. It signifies that an item is not natural or naturally occurring, but rather, it has been fashioned, synthesized, or developed by human intervention.

Overall, "made" is a versatile word that encompasses the actions, processes, results, and qualities associated with creating, accomplishing, or fabricating. Whether used as a verb or adjective, "made" signifies the act of bringing something into existence, achieving goals, or possessing certain characteristics or qualities.

Top Common Misspellings for MADE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for MADE

Etymology of MADE

The word "made" comes from the Old English verb "macian" or "macian". Over time, the term evolved and eventually became "made" in Middle English. Its root can be traced back to the Germanic language group, where similar words with the same meaning are found in languages like Dutch ("maken") and German ("machen"). The ultimate origin of "made" can be linked to the Proto-Germanic word "makōną", meaning "to fashion" or "to construct".

Idioms with the word MADE

  • rules are made to be broken The idiom "rules are made to be broken" means that rules are not absolute and can and sometimes should be disregarded or overlooked in certain situations or circumstances. It implies that some rules may be too rigid or not applicable in every situation, and that sometimes it is necessary or advantageous to go against established guidelines or norms.
  • you've made your bed and now you must lie in it The idiom "you've made your bed and now you must lie in it" means that someone has done something to create a difficult or unfavorable situation for themselves, and they must now accept the consequences of their actions without complaining or seeking help. It emphasizes personal responsibility for the outcomes of one's choices or actions.
  • made of sterner stuff The idiom "made of sterner stuff" refers to someone who possesses exceptional strength, resilience, or determination in difficult or challenging situations. It suggests that the person has a tough and unyielding character that enables them to endure and persevere.
  • have (got) it made The idiom "have (got) it made" means to be in a highly favorable or successful position or situation. It implies that someone has achieved great success, wealth, or advantage and does not have to face difficulties or hardships. It can also suggest that the person in question has accomplished their goals or desires effortlessly.
  • be made of money 1 The idiom "be made of money" is used to describe someone who seems to have an unlimited amount of wealth or resources. It implies that the person is extremely rich and can afford anything they desire.
  • be made of money 2 The idiom "be made of money" is used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy or appears to have an endless amount of money. It suggests that the person is so rich that money is a natural part of their being or that they have an excessive amount of wealth.
  • be made for sb/sth The idiom "be made for sb/sth" means that a person or thing is perfectly suited or well-suited for a particular purpose, role, or situation. It implies that the person or thing is ideally designed or created for the specific needs or requirements.
  • what sb is (really) made of The idiom "what sb is (really) made of" refers to discovering or revealing someone's true character, abilities, or qualities during challenging or difficult situations. It implies digging beneath the surface and understanding the core essence and true nature of an individual.
  • have it made in the shade The idiom "have it made in the shade" means to have achieved great success or to be in a comfortable and advantageous position. It implies being well-off, having everything in your favor, or having a simple and worry-free life.
  • have it made The idiom "have it made" means to be in a favorable or advantageous position in life, particularly in terms of having achieved success, wealth, or comfort. It implies that a person has reached a point where they have accomplished their goals or desires, and their future seems secure and easy.
  • a marriage made in heaven The idiom "a marriage made in heaven" refers to a perfect or highly compatible union between two people. It implies that the couple is exceptionally well-suited for each other, as if their relationship was predestined or ordained by a higher power.
  • a marriage/match made in heaven The idiom "a marriage/match made in heaven" refers to a perfect or well-suited union, typically between two people. It suggests that the two individuals involved are an ideal match, complementing each other perfectly with great compatibility, happiness, and love. This idiom often implies that the relationship is destined or blessed.
  • Marriages are made in heaven. The idiom "Marriages are made in heaven" refers to the belief that the union of two people in marriage is predestined or arranged by fate or a higher power. It suggests that the coming together of a couple is meant to be, as if it were planned and ordained by a divine force. It implies the idea that some cosmic or spiritual force brings soulmates or compatible partners together, creating an everlasting bond between them.
  • made to measure The idiom "made to measure" refers to something that is custom-made or tailored specifically to fit a certain person's requirements or specifications. It implies that the item or service has been created or designed with careful attention to detail and tailored to suit the individual perfectly. It can be used figuratively to describe something that is perfectly suited to a particular situation or purpose.
  • show what are made of The idiom "show what you are made of" means to demonstrate or reveal one's true abilities, character, or qualities when faced with a difficult or challenging situation. It is often used to encourage someone to exhibit their true potential and capabilities.
  • made for each other The idiom "made for each other" is used to describe a couple or two individuals who are perfectly suited or compatible for one another. It typically refers to a strong and harmonious match, suggesting that the two individuals are ideal partners or soulmates.
  • You've made your bed The idiom "You've made your bed" typically means that the person being referred to has created a problem or difficult situation for themselves through their own actions, and they must now face the consequences or deal with the results of their choices. It implies that the person is solely responsible for their predicament.
  • Fingers were made before forks The idiom "Fingers were made before forks" means that the use of simple, primitive tools and methods predated the development of more sophisticated or technological ones. It suggests that human beings have relied on their own ingenuity and adaptability since ancient times. It can also imply a preference for simplicity or a belief in the value of traditional, straightforward approaches.
  • sure as God made little green apples The idiom "sure as God made little green apples" is an expression used to emphasize absolute certainty or to assert that something is undeniably true. It means that the outcome or statement being discussed is a definite reality, as certain as the fact that God, in this case, has created little green apples, which serves as a metaphor for something unquestionable.
  • Promises are like piecrust, made to be broken. The idiom "Promises are like piecrust, made to be broken" means that promises are often made without true intention or commitment to fulfill them. It suggests that just like a piecrust that can easily crumble or break, promises are unreliable and easily broken.
  • Have I made myself clear? The idiom "Have I made myself clear?" is a rhetorical question used to emphasize that the speaker believes they have expressed their message or instructions clearly and expects the listener to fully understand and comply. It often implies that the speaker is seeking confirmation or assurance that their message has been comprehended.
  • (made up) out of whole cloth The idiom "(made up) out of whole cloth" means something that is completely fabricated or invented, with no basis in truth or fact. It refers to a story, information, or idea that is entirely concocted or imagined, lacking any evidence or credibility. It implies that the thing being described is entirely false, as if it were made from a whole piece of fabric, rather than being woven from real threads of truth.
  • made to order The idiom "made to order" refers to something custom-made or specifically created to fit a particular person's or group's preferences, requirements, or specifications. It indicates that something is tailored or customized to meet individual needs or desires.
  • a match made in heaven The idiom "a match made in heaven" refers to two people or things that are perfectly suited for each other, as if their pairing was divinely orchestrated or meant to be. It emphasizes the idea of a harmonious or ideal combination.
  • They broke the mould when they made sb/sth. The idiom "They broke the mold when they made sb/sth" is used to express that someone or something is unique, extraordinary, or one of a kind. It implies that the individual or object being referred to is so exceptional that it cannot be replicated or replaced.
  • not made of money The idiom "not made of money" means that someone does not have a lot of money or is not wealthy. It suggests that the person is unable to spend excessively or does not have unlimited financial resources.
  • I'm not made of money! The idiom "I'm not made of money!" is a figurative expression used to convey the message that one does not possess an unlimited amount of wealth or resources. It is often used to reject or protest against unreasonable demands for money or extravagant spending, emphasizing the idea that one's financial means are limited and cannot fulfill every request or expectation.
  • They broke the mould when they made The idiom "They broke the mould when they made" means that someone or something is unique or exceptional, so much so that there has not been anyone or anything like them since. It suggests that the person or thing being referred to is one-of-a-kind and cannot be replicated or replaced.
  • made for The idiom "made for" refers to someone or something that is perfectly suited or designed for a particular purpose or situation. It indicates a strong compatibility or alignment between the person or thing and the circumstances or task at hand.
  • have made
  • be made for The idiom "be made for" typically means that something or someone is perfectly suited or designed for a particular purpose or role. It implies a strong compatibility or natural affinity between an individual or an object and its intended function.
  • made it The idiom "made it" generally refers to achieving success, reaching a desired goal, or attaining a position of accomplishment or recognition. It implies that someone has overcome challenges, worked hard, and achieved their desired outcome.
  • match made in heaven The idiom "match made in heaven" refers to a perfect or ideal pairing or combination of two people or things. It suggests that the partnership or relationship is so well-suited and harmonious that it seems destined or divinely ordained.
  • you’ve made your bed The idiom "you've made your bed" typically means that someone has created or caused their own problems or difficulties and now must face the consequences. It implies that a person is responsible for the outcomes of their actions or choices.
  • be made of sterner stuff The phrase "be made of sterner stuff" means to have a stronger or tougher character or disposition. It implies that a person has the mental or emotional fortitude to endure difficult situations or challenges without succumbing to weakness or fear. This idiom suggests resilience and the ability to withstand adversity.
  • you’ve made your bed and you must lie in/on it The idiom "you've made your bed and you must lie in/on it" means that one must accept the consequences or face the results of their actions or decisions, even if they are unfavorable or have negative outcomes. It emphasizes taking responsibility for one's choices and not being able to escape the consequences that follow.
  • be/be born/be made that way The idiom "be/be born/be made that way" refers to the innate or inherent qualities, characteristics, or behavior of an individual that are believed to be natural, unchangeable, or predetermined. It suggests that these attributes or traits are deeply rooted in a person's nature from birth or have been developed over time and are not easily altered.
  • (one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it The idiom "(one) has made (one's) bed and (one) will have to lie in it" means that one has taken actions or made choices that have led to unfavorable consequences, and now one must accept the resulting outcomes or face the corresponding responsibilities. It suggests that individuals are solely accountable for dealing with the repercussions of their own decisions or actions.
  • (one) has made (one's) bed The idiom "(one) has made (one's) bed" means that someone is facing the consequences or experiencing the results of their own actions or choices. It suggests that a person is responsible for their own circumstances, whether they are positive or negative, because they brought them upon themselves.
  • have made your bed and have to lie on it The idiom "have made your bed and have to lie on it" is used to convey the idea that if one has created a difficult or unfavorable situation for oneself, they must accept the consequences or face the difficulties resulting from their actions. It implies taking responsibility for one's choices, even if they have led to undesirable outcomes.
  • you have made your bed and must lie in it The idiom "you have made your bed and must lie in it" means that you must accept the consequences of your actions, even if they are unpleasant or undesirable. It implies that you are responsible for the decisions you have made, and you must endure the results or outcomes, whether they are favorable or not. It emphasizes the notion of taking ownership and facing the circumstances arising from your choices.
  • you've made your bed, now lie on it The idiom "you've made your bed, now lie on it" means that you are responsible for dealing with the consequences of your actions or decisions. It implies that once you have made a choice or taken a certain course of action, you must accept and endure the outcomes, even if they are undesirable. In essence, it emphasizes taking responsibility for one's own decisions and not expecting to escape the consequences.
  • who died and made you boss The idiom "who died and made you boss?" is a rhetorical question used to express annoyance or disagreement towards someone who is acting authoritative or making decisions without proper authority or justification. It implies that the person in question is assuming a position of power or control that they do not rightfully possess or deserve.
  • they broke the mold when they made (someone or something) The idiom "they broke the mold when they made (someone or something)" means that the person or thing being referred to is unique and extraordinary. It implies that there is no one else quite like that individual or nothing else quite like that thing. The phrase suggests that the person or thing is unparalleled and stands out from the rest.
  • they broke the mould when they made someone The idiom "they broke the mould when they made someone" is used to describe an individual who is completely unique and different from others in a particular way. It implies that the person being referred to has exceptional or extraordinary qualities that are unparalleled and cannot be replicated in others. It emphasizes their individuality and distinctiveness, suggesting that there is no one else quite like them.
  • made in China The idiom "made in China" refers to the concept that a product is manufactured or produced in China. It is often used to describe products that are perceived to be of lower quality, mass-produced, or inexpensive due to the prevalence of manufacturing in China and associated stereotypes.
  • made out of whole cloth The idiom "made out of whole cloth" refers to something that is entirely fabricated or invented, without any basis in truth or reality. It suggests that something has been completely made up or created, often with the intention of deceiving others.
  • made from whole cloth The idiom "made from whole cloth" means to create or invent something entirely false or fabricated, without any basis in truth or reality. It refers to the act of completely making up a story, idea, or concept, with no elements of truth or existing facts involved.
  • You made my day The idiom "You made my day" is an expression used to convey immense happiness or gratitude towards someone for making a positive impact on one's day or significantly improving their mood or situation.
  • made for somebody/each other The idiom "made for somebody/each other" means that two people are perfectly suited or compatible for each other, typically in terms of romantic compatibility. It suggests that their personalities, values, or interests complement each other exceptionally well, as if they were specifically created or designed to be together.
  • have something made To have something made is an idiom that means to have something custom-created or fabricated according to one's specifications or desires. It typically refers to the process of commissioning or ordering a personalized or unique item or product, often involving a skilled craftsman or manufacturer.
  • what (one) is made of The idiom "what (one) is made of" refers to the true nature, character, or qualities of a person or thing. It implies understanding the essential traits or abilities that define or reveal someone's capabilities or core identity.
  • marriage made in heaven A marriage made in heaven refers to a perfect or ideal match between two people. It implies that the couple is meant to be together and that their relationship is destined to be harmonious and successful.
  • a match made in hell "A match made in hell" is an idiom used to describe a couple or partnership that is ill-suited for each other, often leading to longstanding conflict, discord, or dysfunction. It implies that the individuals are incompatible or have a negative influence on each other, akin to the negativity associated with the concept of hell.
  • a promise made is a promise kept The idiom "a promise made is a promise kept" means that when someone makes a commitment or assurance, they are expected to fulfill it and follow through. It emphasizes the importance of keeping one's word and staying true to one's promises and obligations.
  • you've made your bed, now lie in it The idiom "you've made your bed, now lie in it" is an expression used to convey the notion that once someone has made a decision or taken a certain course of action, they must accept the consequences or live with the outcomes of their choices. It implies that individuals are responsible for the circumstances they find themselves in and should not complain or seek to avoid the results of their own actions.

Similar spelling words for MADE

Conjugate verb Made

CONDITIONAL

I would made
you would made
he/she/it would made
we would made
they would made
I would make
we would make
you would make
he/she/it would make
they would make

CONDITIONAL CONTINUOUS

I would be making
you would be making
he/she/it would be making
we would be making
they would be making

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have made
you would have made
he/she/it would have made
we would have made
they would have made

CONDITIONAL PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I would have been making
you would have been making
he/she/it would have been making
we would have been making
they would have been making

FUTURE

I will make
you will make
he/she/it will make
we will make
they will make

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be making
you will be making
he/she/it will be making
we will be making
they will be making

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have made
you will have made
he/she/it will have made
we will have made
they will have made

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been making
you will have been making
he/she/it will have been making
we will have been making
they will have been making

IMPERATIVE

you make
we let´s make

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to make

PAST

I made
you made
he/she/it made
we made
they made

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was making
you were making
he/she/it was making
we were making
they were making

PAST PARTICIPLE

made

PAST PERFECT

I had made
you had made
he/she/it had made
we had made
they had made

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been making
you had been making
he/she/it had been making
we had been making
they had been making

PRESENT

I make
you make
he/she/it makes
we make
they make

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am making
you are making
he/she/it is making
we are making
they are making

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

making

PRESENT PERFECT

I have made
you have made
he/she/it has made
we have made
they have made

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been making
you have been making
he/she/it has been making
we have been making
they have been making

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