How Do You Spell MAN?

Pronunciation: [mˈan] (IPA)

The spelling of the word "man" is fairly straightforward, with each letter representing a specific phoneme in its pronunciation. The initial sound is the voiced bilabial nasal /m/, represented by the letter "m". The second sound is the short, front vowel /æ/, represented by the letter "a". Finally, the word ends with the voiced alveolar nasal /n/, represented by the letter "n". When spoken in isolation, the IPA phonetic transcription for the word "man" is /mæn/.

MAN Meaning and Definition

Man, noun, refers to an adult male human being belonging to the species Homo sapiens. It is the primary human sex, typically distinguished by the presence of both the Y-chromosome and male reproductive organs. The term "man" has been historically used to denote masculinity, and it often carries social and cultural connotations relating to gender roles, expectations, and identity.

In addition to sex, the term "man" has broader meanings and can be used to describe humanity as a whole. It encompasses both men and women, encompassing the entire human race irrespective of gender. This usage aims to emphasize the shared characteristics, abilities, and experiences of humans rather than focusing solely on male individuals.

The historical and social contexts surrounding the term "man" have evolved over time, reflecting the changing attitudes towards gender and equality. The concept of "manhood" has witnessed cultural variations and interpretations across societies and periods, encompassing notions of masculinity, strength, courage, responsibility, and authority.

In contemporary usage, there is an increased recognition of the need for gender inclusivity and the acknowledgment of different gender identities beyond the traditional binary. As a consequence, the use of the term "man" is often expanded to include a range of diverse gender expressions and identities, recognizing that defining someone's essence solely through their biological sex is overly simplistic and exclusionary.

Overall, the definition of "man" has been shaped by various factors, and its understanding depends on the cultural, historical, and societal contexts in which it is employed.

Top Common Misspellings for MAN *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for MAN

Etymology of MAN

The word "man" traces its origins back to the Old English word "mann" (plural: "men") which has Germanic roots. This word is related to the Old High German word "man" and Old Norse word "maðr", both meaning "man" or "human being". The Germanic roots of the word can be traced further back to the Proto-Germanic word "*mannaz". The word "man" has also been influenced by the Proto-Indo-European root "*manu-" meaning "man" or "person". Ultimately, the etymology of the word "man" suggests its ancient origins and its connection to the concept of a male human being.

Idioms with the word MAN

  • see a man about a dog The idiom "see a man about a dog" is a humorous and euphemistic way of saying that one needs to excuse oneself temporarily or leave a gathering to attend to a personal or private matter, often without disclosing the specific reason. It is often used to politely decline or avoid providing further details about one's intended course of action.
  • early to bed and early to rise (makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise) The idiom "early to bed and early to rise (makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise)" is a proverb that suggests that one's well-being, financial success, and wisdom are results of having a consistent routine of going to bed early and waking up early. It implies that being disciplined, responsible, and proactive in managing one's time and daily habits can lead to overall prosperity and a fulfilled life.
  • behind every great/successful man there stands a woman The idiom "behind every great/successful man there stands a woman" suggests that the success or achievements of a man are often supported or made possible by the efforts, contributions, or influence of a woman. It implies that women play significant roles in the background, providing support, guidance, inspiration, or assistance to facilitate the greatness or success of men.
  • a drowning man will clutch at a straw The idiom "a drowning man will clutch at a straw" means that when a person is desperate or in a dire situation, they will grasp onto any slight chance or hope, no matter how unlikely or insignificant, to try to save themselves or improve their situation. It implies that when someone is at their most vulnerable, they will desperately seek any possible solution, no matter how futile it may be.
  • the man/woman/person in/on the street The idiom "the man/woman/person in/on the street" refers to the average person, usually an ordinary citizen who does not have any specialized knowledge or expertise in a particular field. It represents the opinions, beliefs, or experiences of everyday individuals who may not have a deep understanding of complex issues or topics. It is often used to contrast with the views of experts or professionals.
  • may the best man/person win! The idiom "may the best man/person win" is an expression used to convey good sportsmanship or fair competition. It means that, regardless of personal preferences or alliances, the speaker hopes that the most deserving or skilled individual will come out victorious in a competition or contest.
  • time and tide wait for no man The idiom "time and tide wait for no man" means that time and opportunities will not pause for anyone. It emphasizes the notion that time keeps moving forward and waits for no one, and thus, one must not delay actions or decisions because there may not be another chance in the future.
  • to a man The idiom "to a man" means that every individual in a particular group or situation is in complete agreement or united in a particular action, opinion, or characteristic. It emphasizes the unanimity or solidarity of the group.
  • be man enough to do sth The idiom "be man enough to do something" suggests someone being brave, courageous, or confident enough to face a challenging or demanding task or situation regardless of their gender. It emphasizes the importance of exhibiting strength and courage in the face of adversity, without regard to the person's sex or gender identity.
  • not be beyond the wit of man/sb The idiom "not be beyond the wit of man/sb" means that something is not too difficult or complicated for people to understand, solve, or accomplish. It suggests that a problem or task is within human capability and can be successfully achieved with sufficient intelligence, ingenuity, or effort.
  • a man of action The idiom "a man of action" refers to someone who is proactive, decisive, and takes immediate steps to achieve their goals or solve problems. It describes a person who prefers to take action rather than just talk or contemplate.
  • man/woman of the people The idiom "man/woman of the people" refers to an individual who represents or identifies with the common people and their concerns. It describes someone who is relatable, down-to-earth, and accessible to individuals from all walks of life. This person typically displays empathy, approachability, and a genuine interest in the well-being of the general public.
  • a man/woman of few words The idiom "a man/woman of few words" refers to a person who tends to speak very little or only says what is necessary. They are typically reserved or introverted and choose not to communicate at length or in great detail.
  • like a man/woman possessed The idiom "like a man/woman possessed" is used to describe someone who is intensely focused, determined, or exuberantly engaged in a particular activity, often to the extent that it appears as if they are possessed by an uncontrollable force or passion. It suggests that the person is behaving with an extreme level of energy, enthusiasm, or dedication, often surpassing what is considered normal or reasonable.
  • feel like a new woman/man The idiom "feel like a new woman/man" refers to experiencing a complete transformation or revitalization, typically after a positive change or improvement in one's life. It implies feeling refreshed, renewed, and rejuvenated, as if one has been reborn or has undergone a significant positive change.
  • a man/woman of the world A man/woman of the world is an idiom referring to someone who is well-traveled, worldly, and experienced in various cultures and situations. They have a broad understanding of the world, possess sophistication, and are knowledgeable about different customs, languages, and lifestyles. They have a cosmopolitan outlook and are often seen as socially adept, adaptable, and cultured individuals.
  • a fine figure of a man/woman The idiom "a fine figure of a man/woman" refers to someone who is physically attractive or well-proportioned. It suggests that the person being described possesses an appealing and pleasing physique or appearance.
  • the man/woman in sb's life The idiom "the man/woman in someone's life" refers to a significant romantic partner or a person who holds a special and influential role in someone's emotional or romantic experiences. It typically implies that this person is of great importance and has a profound impact on the individual's day-to-day life and overall happiness.
  • be your own person/woman/man The idiom "be your own person/woman/man" means to have independence and individuality, not being easily influenced or controlled by others. It implies being true to oneself, making decisions based on personal values and beliefs rather than conforming to societal expectations or the opinions of others. It emphasizes finding and asserting one's unique identity and pursuing personal goals and desires without being overly influenced by external pressures.
  • a man/woman of his/her word The idiom "a man/woman of his/her word" refers to someone who is reliable, trustworthy, and consistently keeps their promises or commitments. It implies that the person can be counted on to fulfill their word and can be trusted to follow through with their stated intentions.
  • just the man/woman for the job The idiom "just the man/woman for the job" refers to someone who is perfectly suited or ideally qualified to handle a particular task or responsibility, usually due to their skills, expertise, or experience in that specific area.
  • the man/woman on the Clapham omnibus The idiom "the man/woman on the Clapham omnibus" refers to an ordinary, average person or member of the general public, who may not be highly educated or have any specialized knowledge. It is often used in legal contexts to represent the reasonable person's perspective when making judgments or decisions. The Clapham omnibus specifically refers to a regular bus service in London, implying that the opinion of an average passenger is a reliable gauge for societal norms and expectations.
  • for a man/woman/person of his/her years The idiom "for a man/woman/person of his/her years" can be defined as an expression used to describe someone who is still capable, active, or accomplished despite their advanced age. It emphasizes that the individual is exceptional or exceptional in comparison to others of the same age group.
  • young lady/man The idiom "young lady/man" refers to a polite way of addressing a person, usually a girl or boy, emphasizing their youthfulness and implying the expectation of respectful behavior or proper manners.
  • in the country of the blind, the oneeyed man is king The idiom "in the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king" refers to a situation where someone with limited or mediocre abilities is considered superior or extraordinary, solely because everyone else around them is even less competent or knowledgeable. It implies that even a person with a slight advantage or skill can appear remarkably outstanding when surrounded by individuals lacking the same abilities.
  • man and boy The idiom "man and boy" typically refers to someone's lifetime or the entirety of their life experiences. It emphasizes the idea that the person has spent their entire life doing or being something. For example, if someone says they have been in a certain profession "man and boy," it means they have been involved in that profession since they were young and throughout their adult life.
  • man cannot live by bread alone The idiom "man cannot live by bread alone" is derived from a biblical passage in the New Testament (Matthew 4:4) and refers to the notion that physical nourishment alone is insufficient for human well-being. It implies that human beings require more than just basic needs, such as food, to truly thrive and find fulfillment. This idiom suggests that emotional, intellectual, and spiritual nourishment are equally important for a person's overall growth and happiness.
  • it's every man for himself The idiom "it's every man for himself" means that in a given situation, individuals are expected or allowed to prioritize their own interests or survival without regard for others. It implies a lack of cooperation or collaboration, indicating that everyone should look out for their own well-being rather than relying on or considering the needs of others.
  • a man's man The idiom "a man's man" refers to a man who is perceived to possess qualities or characteristics traditionally associated with masculinity and manliness. This individual is typically strong, brave, independent, self-reliant, and exhibits a rugged or tough exterior. A man's man is often admired by other men and seen as someone who embodies traditional ideals of masculinity.
  • you the man! The idiom "you the man!" is an expression typically used to praise or commend someone for their impressive accomplishment, skills, or qualities. It is a way of congratulating someone and expressing respect and admiration for their abilities or achievements.
  • the common man The idiom "the common man" refers to the average, ordinary individual in society who lacks exceptional wealth, power, or social status. It symbolizes the collective working class, representing the average person's perspective, needs, and interests.
  • as one man The idiom "as one man" means unanimously or in complete agreement. It refers to a group of people acting or speaking with a single voice or a unified purpose, all sharing the same opinion or goal.
  • the grand old man of sth The idiom "the grand old man of something" refers to a person who is considered the most experienced, respected, and influential figure in a particular field or domain. This individual is often regarded as a historical or iconic figure who has made significant contributions and has extensive knowledge in their respective realm, usually due to their long and distinguished career.
  • to the last (man) The idiom "to the last (man)" means to continue a certain action or pursuit until every single person involved is exhausted or completely defeated. It emphasizes the unwavering commitment and determination of a group to fight or persist until the very end, without anyone giving up or surrendering.
  • the low man on the totem pole The idiom "the low man on the totem pole" refers to someone who holds the lowest status or authority in a particular group or organization. It symbolizes being at the bottom of a hierarchy or ranking system, often implying less influence, power, or importance compared to others.
  • make a man (out) of sb The idiom "make a man (out) of sb" implies the act of developing or transforming someone into a more competent, courageous, or self-reliant individual, typically through challenging or demanding experiences. It often signifies the process of maturing, gaining maturity, or surpassing certain obstacles in order to become a fully grown, capable person.
  • the odd man out, at the odd one out The idiom "the odd man out" or "the odd one out" refers to someone or something that is different, unique, or does not fit in with the others in a group or a situation. It can also describe a person who is excluded or left out from a social setting or an activity.
  • the man in the moon The idiom "the man in the moon" refers to the popular belief or perception of seeing a human face or figure on the surface of the moon. It implies the idea of finding familiar shapes or objects in random patterns, often reflecting the human tendency to perceive meaningful images even where there may be none.
  • (as) man to man The idiom "(as) man to man" refers to a direct and straightforward conversation or interaction between two individuals, typically men. It conveys an honest and sincere dialogue, usually addressing a sensitive or important matter. It implies that the individuals involved are speaking openly and honestly without any pretense or hidden agenda.
  • man's inhumanity to man The idiom "man's inhumanity to man" refers to the cruel or savage actions that one human being inflicts upon another. It highlights the capacity of humans to treat each other in a degrading, brutal, or inhumane manner, often reflecting the darker aspects of human nature. This idiom addresses the injustice, violence, or lack of empathy displayed by individuals or societies towards their fellow human beings.
  • man on! The definition of the idiom "man on!" is an exclamation used in team sports, usually soccer or basketball, to alert a player that an opponent is approaching or marking them closely, urging them to be aware and take action.
  • a Renaissance man The idiom "a Renaissance man" refers to a person who is highly skilled or knowledgeable in a wide variety of fields, such as arts, sciences, literature, and philosophy. This term originates from the Renaissance period in European history, when individuals were encouraged to excel in multiple disciplines. A Renaissance man is versatile, well-rounded, and exhibits a deep curiosity and passion for learning across different areas of knowledge.
  • man after my own heart The idiom "man after my own heart" refers to someone who possesses the same attitudes, values, or preferences as oneself. It implies a strong liking or admiration for someone who shares similar qualities or interests.
  • a man after own heart The idiom "a man after my own heart" refers to a person who has similar opinions, characteristics, or interests as oneself. It implies admiration or approval for someone who shares the same values, beliefs, or tastes.
  • righthand man The idiom "righthand man" refers to a person who is an essential and trusted assistant or close partner, usually assisting someone in a position of power or authority. This individual is reliable, supportive, capable, and has a significant influence and involvement in decision-making processes.
  • sb's righthand man/woman The idiom "sb's righthand man/woman" refers to a trusted and reliable person who consistently assists and supports someone in their work or endeavors. This individual is closely involved in decision-making processes and often possesses a deep understanding of the other person's requirements, preferences, and goals. They are considered indispensable and play a crucial role in the success and functioning of the person or organization they support.
  • Man does not live by bread alone. The idiom "Man does not live by bread alone" is derived from a passage in the Bible (Matthew 4:4) and signifies that human beings require more than basic or material needs to live a fulfilled life. It suggests that people need other aspects, such as emotional, spiritual, intellectual, or social fulfillment, in addition to the necessities for survival. It emphasizes the importance of diverse experiences and values beyond mere physical sustenance.
  • Every man is the architect of his own fortune. The idiom "Every man is the architect of his own fortune" means that each individual has the ability to shape and determine their own success or fate through their actions, choices, and efforts. It emphasizes personal responsibility and the idea that one's destiny is not solely dictated by external circumstances, but rather influenced by one's own decisions and endeavors.
  • a man for all seasons The idiom "a man for all seasons" refers to someone who is versatile, adaptable, and able to handle various situations or roles effectively, regardless of the circumstances. This person is typically flexible, versatile, and capable of thriving in different conditions or environments. They are skillful, versatile, and well-suited to any occasion or challenge that comes their way.
  • go to see a man about a dog The idiom "go to see a man about a dog" is a humorous and ambiguous phrase that is often used as an excuse or a euphemism for temporarily leaving a situation or a conversation without revealing the actual reason. It is typically employed when one needs to exit discreetly to attend to an undisclosed personal matter, without providing any specific details.
  • No man can serve two masters The idiom "No man can serve two masters" means that it is impossible for an individual to effectively serve or be loyal to two conflicting or contradictory authorities or interests at the same time. It implies that divided loyalties or commitments will ultimately lead to difficulties or compromises in fulfilling either role or responsibility.
  • For want of a nail the shoe was lost for want of a shoe the horse was lost and for want of a horse the man was lost. The idiom "For want of a nail the shoe was lost for want of a shoe the horse was lost and for want of a horse the man was lost" is an ancient proverb that highlights the significance of small details and the chain of consequences that can result from neglecting or overlooking them. It suggests that an apparently insignificant or trivial action or object, if overlooked or neglected, can lead to far greater and serious consequences down the line. It emphasizes the importance of paying attention to even the smallest details in order to avoid potential disasters or failures.
  • Let every man skin his own skunk The idiom "Let every man skin his own skunk" means that each person should be responsible for dealing with their own problems or issues, rather than relying on others to solve them. It implies that individuals should take ownership of their actions and take care of the consequences themselves, rather than expecting someone else to handle it for them.
  • be no good/use to man or beast The idiom "be no good/use to man or beast" is used to describe a person or thing that is completely useless or ineffective, making no positive contribution or serving any purpose.
  • May the best man win The idiom "May the best man win" means that in a competition or contest, the person who is most skilled, deserving, or able should be the one to emerge victorious. It expresses a sentiment of fairness and acknowledges that the outcome will be determined by merit rather than luck or favoritism.
  • big man on campus The idiom "big man on campus" refers to a person, typically a male, who is popular, influential, and highly respected within a particular community or social context, often a school or university. This individual usually possesses a high level of confidence, dominance, and prominence, and is regarded as a leader or prominent figure by their peers. They may excel in various areas such as academics, sports, or social activities, and are often well-known and admired by the campus community.
  • Man proposes, God disposes The idiom "Man proposes, God disposes" is often used to highlight the unpredictable nature of life and the realization that despite one's careful plans and intentions, external circumstances or fate will ultimately determine the outcome. It suggests that human beings can make plans or set goals, but it is ultimately up to a higher power or the forces of the universe to determine the actual result.
  • a man of God The idiom "a man of God" refers to a person, typically a man, who is deeply religious, devoted to their faith, and exhibits strong moral and ethical qualities. It often implies that the person is held in high regard within their religious community and seen as a spiritual leader or authority figure.
  • stick man
  • straight man The idiom "straight man" refers to a person, often in comedy or entertainment, who plays the serious or rational role, while another character, usually a comedian, provides comedic or absurd commentary or behavior. The straight man's purpose is to set up or enhance the comedic effect by contrast.
  • a man of straw The idiom "a man of straw" refers to a person who appears to be influential or powerful but is actually weak or lacking substance. It suggests that this person can be easily controlled or manipulated.
  • straw man The idiom "straw man" refers to a rhetorical technique where someone presents a deliberately misrepresented or distorted version of an argument or position in order to make it easier to attack or refute. It involves attacking a weaker or simplified version of an opponent's argument, rather than addressing their actual claims or ideas.
  • the man on the street The idiom "the man on the street" refers to the average person or ordinary individual in society. It is often used to indicate the perspective or opinions of everyday citizens. It emphasizes the idea of taking into account the views and experiences of common people in discussions or decision-making processes.
  • the man/woman/person in the street The idiom "the man/woman/person in the street" refers to an ordinary, average person, typically referring to the general public or common individuals who may not have specialized knowledge or expertise. It represents the perspective or opinion of the average citizen on a particular matter.
  • man in the street The idiom "man in the street" refers to an ordinary or average person, often used to represent the general public or the common perspective of everyday individuals. It usually indicates the views, opinions, or experiences of the majority rather than those of experts or authorities.
  • Every man has his price. The idiom "Every man has his price" means that everyone can be persuaded or influenced to act in a certain way if the right motivation or incentive is offered. It suggests that there is a point at which individuals can be swayed or compromised by material gain or power, regardless of their initial values or principles.
  • Call no man happy till he dies The idiom "Call no man happy till he dies" is a philosophical concept attributed to the ancient Greek philosopher Solon. It conveys that true happiness or judgment of a person's life cannot be fully determined until their life is complete or until they have passed away. It suggests that circumstances may change, and someone's current happiness or success may not be lasting or definitive. Thus, it implies that it is premature or inaccurate to make conclusive judgments about a person's overall happiness or fulfillment before their life has come to an end.
  • a man of few words The idiom "a man of few words" refers to someone who tends to speak very little or is not particularly talkative. This person typically communicates in a concise and succinct manner, choosing to express themselves through actions rather than words.
  • man of few words The idiom "man of few words" refers to a person, typically a man, who speaks very little or is generally quiet and reserved in their communication.
  • Every man to his taste. The idiom "Every man to his taste" means that individual preferences and opinions vary from person to person. It implies that everyone has different tastes and preferences, and what may be enjoyable or appealing to one person may not be the same for someone else.
  • man is known by the company he keeps The idiom "man is known by the company he keeps" means that a person's character can be judged by the type of people they associate with or spend time with. It suggests that a person's friends and acquaintances reflect their own values, beliefs, and overall reputation.
  • child is father of the man The idiom "child is father of the man" means that a person's character or behavior in adulthood is greatly influenced by their experiences and upbringing during childhood. In other words, the qualities and traits that a person develops as a child shape who they become as an adult.
  • a man of the cloth The idiom "a man of the cloth" refers to a person who is a clergy member or a religious leader, particularly in the Christian faith. It specifically refers to someone who wears a clerical or religious robe, such as a priest, minister, or pastor. The expression suggests that the person is dedicated to their religious vocation and is committed to serving and guiding others in matters of faith.
  • man of the cloth The idiom "man of the cloth" refers to a clergyman, specifically a male religious leader or priest who wears a traditional robe or vestments made of cloth during their religious duties. This term is often used interchangeably with "clergyman" or "minister."
  • Clothes make the man. The phrase "Clothes make the man" is an idiom that means a person's appearance and choice of clothing are important in shaping others' perception of their character, abilities, or social status. It suggests that one's outer appearance can influence how they are perceived and treated by others.
  • low man on the totem pole The idiom "low man on the totem pole" refers to a person who holds the lowest position in a group or organization, usually indicating that they have the least authority, influence, or prestige. It suggests that this individual has the least power and is often assigned the most undesirable or menial tasks. The idiom originates from the totem poles, which are artistic structures in some Native American cultures that depict a hierarchy of clan or family members, with the highest-ranking individuals positioned at the top.
  • high man on the totem pole The idiom "high man on the totem pole" refers to someone who holds a position of high authority or importance within a group or organization. It originated from the Native American totem poles, where the figure at the top represents the most significant or respected individual. Therefore, being the "high man on the totem pole" implies being in a position of power or prestige.
  • man about town The idiom "man about town" refers to a man who is socially active and familiar with various social activities, events, and places in a city or town. He is often seen as fashionable, popular, and well-connected, regularly participating in social gatherings and having a wide circle of acquaintances.
  • a man of his word The idiom "a man of his word" is used to describe someone who is reliable, trustworthy, and always keeps their promises or commitments. It indicates that the person can be relied upon to follow through with what they have said they would do.
  • You can't keep a good man/woman down. The idiom "You can't keep a good man/woman down" means that someone with strong character, determination, or talent will ultimately overcome any obstacles or setbacks they may face. It suggests that a resilient and capable individual cannot be kept down or suppressed for long, as they will inevitably rise above adversity.
  • the man/woman/sth of your dreams The idiom "the man/woman/sth of your dreams" refers to an individual or thing that is considered to be perfect in every way and meets all the idealized expectations or desires of a person. It implies that the person or thing is the embodiment of one's fantasies or idealization.
  • be a fine figure of a man/woman The idiom "be a fine figure of a man/woman" refers to someone who possesses outstanding physical qualities, particularly in terms of appearance or physique. It suggests that the person is attractive, well-proportioned, and presents themselves in an admirable manner.
  • be your own man/woman/person The idiom "be your own man/woman/person" means to be independent and self-reliant, making decisions and living life according to one's own principles and values rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes the importance of being true to oneself and not conforming to societal expectations or pressures.
  • a man/woman of means The idiom "a man/woman of means" refers to a person who has a significant amount of wealth or financial resources. It implies that the individual is well-off, financially stable, and capable of affording a comfortable lifestyle.
  • a man/woman after your own heart The idiom "a man/woman after your own heart" refers to someone who shares the same beliefs, values, or interests as you. It typically implies that this person is someone you admire or find compatible with your own preferences.
  • a kept man/woman The idiom "a kept man/woman" refers to an individual who is financially supported by their partner or spouse. This person may not have to work or may rely heavily on their partner's financial resources for their day-to-day living expenses. They are typically seen as being economically dependent on their partner, often with an implication of reliance or control.
  • be no good to man or beast The idiom "be no good to man or beast" means to be completely useless, ineffective, or inadequate in a particular situation or task. It implies the lack of any value or benefit to anyone or anything.
  • dirty old man The idiom "dirty old man" typically refers to an older man, often characterized as lecherous or sexually inappropriate, who has a tendency to behave inappropriately towards younger individuals, particularly women. This term is used to describe someone who engages in or has a reputation for indulging in inappropriate sexual thoughts, comments, or actions. It often implies a lack of respect for personal boundaries and a disregard for societal norms regarding appropriate behavior.
  • a dirty old man The idiom "a dirty old man" refers to an older man, typically of advanced age, who displays inappropriate thoughts, desires, or behaviors related to sexual matters. This term is used to describe someone who has a penchant for making vulgar, lewd, or offensive comments or actions towards others, especially younger individuals.
  • a man of the world The idiom "a man of the world" refers to a person who is experienced and knowledgeable in various aspects of life, cultures, and social situations. It describes someone who is cosmopolitan, sophisticated, and has a broad understanding of the world through traveling, education, or personal experiences.
  • the man The idiom "the man" is typically used to refer to a person or entity in a position of power or authority, often associated with influential figures in government, corporations, or institutions.
  • be a fine figure of a man The idiom "be a fine figure of a man" means that someone, usually a man, is physically attractive, well-built, or has an imposing and impressive appearance. It often refers to someone who is considered handsome, distinguished, or stands out due to their physical appearance.
  • a yes man The idiom "a yes man" refers to a person who always agrees with and approves everything that someone else says or does, often in order to gain favor or avoid conflict. These individuals are often considered submissive and unquestioning followers, lacking independent thought or the ability to provide honest feedback or criticism.
  • Every man for himself The idiom "Every man for himself" means that each person is primarily concerned with their own advantage or well-being, often implying that individuals should prioritize themselves and act independently, without consideration for others.
  • every man jack The idiom "every man jack" is often used to refer to every single person, without exception. It emphasizes inclusivity by emphasizing that it includes both men and women.
  • man enough to The idiom "man enough to" refers to someone who displays bravery, courage, or strength to undertake a difficult or challenging task, regardless of their gender. It suggests that a person exhibits qualities traditionally associated with masculinity, demonstrating resilience, determination, or toughness to face a particular situation. However, it is important to note that this idiom is not exclusive to men; it can be used to describe anyone who possesses these characteristics, irrespective of their gender.
  • be man enough The idiom "be man enough" is often used to challenge someone to display traditionally masculine qualities or to prove their courage, strength, or ability to handle a difficult or challenging situation. It implies that one should demonstrate bravery, resilience, or the ability to take responsibility and handle adversity in a manner traditionally associated with stereotypical masculinity.
  • a hatchet man A hatchet man is a person who is hired or appointed to carry out difficult, unpleasant, or controversial tasks, particularly those involving the removal or elimination of obstacles, opponents, or opposition. The term often implies an individual who acts ruthlessly or without mercy to achieve a specific objective, often disregarding the potential negative consequences of their actions.
  • hatchet man The idiom "hatchet man" refers to a person who is assigned to perform ruthless or aggressive actions on behalf of someone else, often involving terminating employees, executing unpopular decisions, or carrying out destructive tasks. This term typically implies that the individual is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve the desired outcome, even if it means causing harm or damage.
  • a hit man A hit man refers to a professional assassin or a hired killer who is contracted to murder or eliminate a specific target, usually for financial or other criminal motives.
  • a girl/man/person Friday The idiom "a girl/man/person Friday" refers to a reliable and trustworthy assistant or employee who is capable of handling a wide range of tasks. It originates from the character "Friday" in the novel "Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe, where Friday is depicted as a loyal and versatile companion to the protagonist. Nowadays, this phrase is used to describe someone who is highly skilled and dependable in helping with various responsibilities and duties.
  • the man of the moment The idiom "the man of the moment" refers to a person who is currently being recognized or admired for their abilities, achievements, or actions. They are seen as the most important or influential individual at a specific time or in a particular situation.
  • You can't keep a good man down The idiom "You can't keep a good man down" means that a genuinely capable and resilient person will keep bouncing back or recovering from setbacks or adversity. Despite facing challenges or obstacles, their positive qualities and determination help them to rise above difficult circumstances and ultimately find success or happiness.
  • the odd man out The idiom "the odd man out" refers to a person or thing that is different or does not fit in with others in a particular group or situation. It typically means someone or something that is distinct, uncommon, or not included in a certain pattern or arrangement.
  • the man on the Clapham omnibus "The man on the Clapham omnibus" is an idiom used to refer to an ordinary and reasonable person, typically representative of the general public or average citizen. It signifies the common sense, viewpoints, and expectations of an average individual, usually used in legal contexts to gauge a hypothetical standard of ordinary care or understanding. The term originates from the Clapham omnibus, a popular public transportation vehicle in nineteenth-century London, implying that its passengers were typical everyday people.
  • the man in the street The idiom "the man in the street" refers to the average person or the common people, often symbolizing the general public or the ordinary individuals who are not specifically involved or knowledgeable in a particular field or issue. It can be used to describe the opinions, perspectives, or concerns of regular citizens.
  • the grand old man of The idiom "the grand old man of" typically refers to a respected and influential figure who has had a significant impact in a particular field or domain, usually due to their age, experience, and wisdom. It often signifies a person who has achieved a high level of expertise and is seen as a revered authority in their respective field. The phrase is used to acknowledge and honor someone's long-standing contribution, knowledge, and leadership.
  • take it like a man The idiom "take it like a man" refers to the expectation or encouragement for someone, particularly a male, to endure hardship, criticism, or pain without complaining or showing weakness. It implies that one should face challenges or adversity with strength, resilience, and dignity, typically associated with societal expectations of masculinity.
  • so's your old man The idiom "so's your old man" is a playful and mildly insulting response used to dismiss or sarcastically counter an insult or criticism aimed at oneself. It suggests that the same insult or criticism can be applied to the person making it, especially their father.
  • own man The idiom "own man" refers to an individual who possesses independence, autonomy, and the ability to think and act in a self-determined manner, free from the influence or control of others. It implies that this person makes their own decisions based on their own convictions and principles, rather than being swayed by external pressures or expectations.
  • odd man out The idiom "odd man out" refers to someone or something that is different or does not fit in with the majority or the rest of a group. It could also mean the person who is left out or excluded from a particular situation or activity.
  • marked man The idiom "marked man" refers to a person who is being targeted or pursued, often by authorities or enemies, with intense scrutiny or the intention to harm or capture them. This idiom implies that the person is at a heightened state of vulnerability and potentially facing significant danger or consequences.
  • make a man of The idiom "make a man of" means to mature or develop someone into a responsible and self-reliant adult, particularly a young male. It often involves teaching them essential life skills, instilling discipline or toughness, and guiding them towards becoming independent and capable.
  • like a man possessed The idiom "like a man possessed" is used to describe someone who is behaving with an intense and uncontrollable determination or passion towards a particular task or objective. It implies that the person is acting with an extreme focus and dedication, often to an extent that might seem excessive or unusual to others.
  • ladies' man The idiom "ladies' man" refers to a man who is charming, attractive, and generally successful in gaining the attention and affection of women. This individual is skilled at captivating and charming women and typically has several romantic interests or admirers.
  • be own man The idiom "be your own man" refers to being independent, self-sufficient, and making decisions or taking actions that are true to oneself, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes having one's individuality, autonomy, and the ability to think and act independently.
  • Are you a man or a mouse? The idiom "Are you a man or a mouse?" is often used to challenge someone's bravery or courage. It implies that the person being addressed should prove themselves and not back down from a difficult or risky situation. It questions whether they have the qualities and strength traditionally associated with being a man, rather than being timid or fearful like a mouse.
  • an iron man The idiom "an iron man" typically refers to someone who is extremely tough, physically or emotionally resilient, and persevering, often in the face of difficult or challenging situations. This person displays great strength, endurance, and determination.
  • a selfmade man The idiom "a self-made man" refers to an individual who has achieved success or prosperity through their own efforts and without any assistance or privileges inherited from family or social connections. It implies that the person has worked hard, persevered, and overcome challenges to attain their accomplishments.
  • a New Man The idiom "a New Man" typically refers to someone who has undergone a significant transformation or changed their behavior, attitudes, or personality for the better. This expression is often used to describe individuals who have experienced personal growth, self-improvement, or a profound shift in their lives. It implies that the person is no longer the same as they were before, having evolved into a better version of themselves.
  • a medallion man The idiom "a medallion man" refers to a showy, flamboyant, or self-assured man who is often associated with excessive vanity and a flashy lifestyle. It originated from the trend in the 1970s when men would wear large medallions on chains around their necks as a symbol of status and attractiveness. The term is often used in a somewhat derogatory manner to describe a man who is perceived as being overly concerned with his appearance and image.
  • a marked man The idiom "a marked man" refers to someone who is being targeted, watched, or pursued by others, often in a negative or threatening way. It implies that the person is in serious danger or at risk due to specific circumstances, actions, or enemies.
  • a man of means The idiom "a man of means" refers to someone who is affluent or wealthy, possessing significant financial resources or assets. This phrase implies that the person is able to support a comfortable or luxurious lifestyle due to their wealth.
  • a man of many parts The idiom "a man of many parts" refers to a person who possesses a wide range of skills, talents, or abilities. It suggests that the individual is versatile, adaptable, and capable of excelling in multiple areas or undertaking various roles.
  • a man of letters The idiom "a man of letters" refers to a person who is well educated and knowledgeable in literature and the humanities. It typically describes someone who is well-versed in various literary works and possesses a deep appreciation for literature and its various forms. This term is often used to denote a scholar or an intellectual individual with an extensive literary background.
  • a kept man The idiom "a kept man" refers to a man who relies financially on a woman in a romantic or marital relationship. A kept man typically does not work or support himself financially, instead being entirely dependent on his female partner for financial stability and support.
  • a family man The idiom "a family man" refers to a man who prioritizes and values his family above all else. He is dedicated, committed, and actively involved in the well-being of his spouse and children, providing love, support, and quality time with them. A family man puts his family's needs and happiness first, making them a top priority in his life.
  • the odd man/one out The idiom "the odd man/one out" refers to someone or something that is considered different, unique, or doesn't fit in with the rest of a group or a situation. It signifies a person or object that stands apart from the others due to distinct characteristics, behavior, or attributes.
  • every man jack (of us/them) The idiom "every man jack (of us/them)" is used to refer to every person in a particular group or collective, emphasizing the inclusivity and lack of exceptions. It implies that no one is exempt or excluded, encompassing everyone without distinction or favoritism.
  • Every man for himself (and the devil take the hindmost),
  • man (or woman) of his (or her) word The idiom "man (or woman) of his (or her) word" refers to someone who is reliable, trustworthy, and consistently honors their promises or commitments. It describes individuals who always keep their word and can be relied upon to fulfill their obligations.
  • the man of the house The idiom "the man of the house" refers to the male head or leader of a family or household. It implies a sense of authority, responsibility, and decision-making power within the home. This phrase is often used to indicate that a particular man is the dominant figure or primary decision-maker in domestic matters.
  • as a man The idiom "as a man" typically means to act or behave in a strong, courageous, or determined manner, often implying that one is facing adversity or taking responsibility. It is often associated with masculine qualities such as bravery, resilience, or assertiveness.
  • be one's own man The idiom "be one's own man" typically means to be independent, self-reliant, and not easily influenced or controlled by others. It suggests that an individual has a strong sense of individuality and autonomy, making their own decisions and taking responsibility for their actions without being swayed by external pressures or opinions.
  • a good man is hard to find The idiom "a good man is hard to find" typically means that it is difficult to find someone with genuinely virtuous qualities or attributes, especially when looking for a suitable partner or spouse. It suggests that truly kind, dependable, and morally upright individuals are rare to come by.
  • no man is an island The idiom "no man is an island" means that no person can thrive or live in isolation. It signifies that human beings are interconnected and rely on their relationships and connections with others for support, fulfillment, and understanding. It emphasizes the importance of community, social interaction, and the need for individuals to be involved in the lives of others.
  • self-made man The idiom "self-made man" refers to an individual who achieves success or becomes wealthy through their own efforts and hard work, as opposed to inheriting wealth or relying on external support. It commonly describes someone who has overcome significant obstacles or started with little to no advantages but has risen to a position of success or prominence through personal determination and perseverance.
  • yes man The idiom "yes man" refers to a person who always agrees with or obeys someone else, often in a subservient or sycophantic manner. It typically implies a lack of independent thought or the tendency to blindly support the opinions or decisions of a superior or authority figure.
  • yesterday’s man The idiom "yesterday's man" refers to a person who is no longer relevant or influential in current times. It implies that the individual's ideas, skills, or abilities are outdated or past their prime, suggesting they belong to an earlier era or generation that is no longer relevant or valued.
  • be somebody’s man The idiom "be somebody’s man" typically means to be a loyal and devoted supporter, ally, or subordinate of someone, particularly in a professional or personal context. It implies that one is dedicated to fulfilling the needs, wants, or desires of the other person. It can also suggest being under someone's authority or influence and carrying out their instructions or wishes.
  • be man enough (to do something/for something) The idiom "be man enough (to do something/for something)" refers to exhibiting the qualities typically associated with being a mature, courageous, and responsible person, particularly in the context of facing challenges, taking responsibility, or exhibiting bravery. It implies that one should possess the strength and character traditionally associated with being a man, regardless of their gender, in order to stand up for what is right or to fulfill a difficult task.
  • be your own man/woman The idiom "be your own man/woman" means to be independent, self-reliant, and make decisions based on one's own judgment and principles, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It suggests taking ownership of one's actions and beliefs, and not conforming to societal expectations or yielding to external pressures.
  • a/the grand old man (of something) The idiom "a/the grand old man (of something)" refers to a person who is respected, revered, and highly regarded in their field or profession due to their long-standing experience, wisdom, and significant contributions. This phrase is often used to honor a person who has achieved a high level of expertise, influence, or leadership over a considerable period.
  • make a man (out) of somebody To "make a man (out) of somebody" means to help or encourage someone to become more mature, responsible, or self-reliant. It often refers to transforming someone into an independent and capable individual, typically through experiences that challenge or test their character. This idiom is commonly used to describe situations or efforts that aim to develop or toughen a person's nature or prepare them for adulthood or significant life responsibilities.
  • a/the man about town The idiom "a man about town" or "the man about town" refers to a man who is well-known and highly visible in social circles, often seen at various parties, events, and venues. It typically implies that he is fashionable, influential, and socially active, often charming and capturing attention wherever he goes.
  • the man (and/or woman) in the street "The man (and/or woman) in the street" is an idiom used to refer to the average, ordinary person or people who are not experts in a specific field or profession. This phrase represents the perspective or opinion of the common person who does not possess specialized knowledge or insider information. It highlights the viewpoint or interests of regular citizens in contrast to those who hold positions of power or expertise.
  • a man of God/the cloth The idiom "a man of God/the cloth" refers to a person, usually a man, who has devoted their life to religious or spiritual pursuits, such as being a minister, priest, or clergy member. It implies that the person is deeply committed to their faith and dedicated to serving others in the name of their religious beliefs.
  • the man of the match The idiom "the man of the match" is typically used in the context of sports, particularly team sports like football (soccer), rugby, or cricket. It refers to the player who has performed exceptionally well and has had the most significant impact on the game. This player is considered the standout performer and is often awarded a special title or recognition as the "man of the match."
  • a man/woman of (many) parts The idiom "a man/woman of (many) parts" refers to an individual who possesses a diverse range of talents, skills, or abilities. It suggests that the person is versatile, multi-talented, and capable of excelling in many different areas or roles.
  • a man of the people The idiom "a man of the people" refers to someone who is relatable, down-to-earth, and connects well with the general public or ordinary citizens. It denotes an individual who understands, supports, and represents the interests, concerns, and values of the common people. They are often perceived as approachable, empathetic, and caring, making them a natural leader or advocate for the masses.
  • a man/woman of substance The idiom "a man/woman of substance" refers to an individual who possesses notable qualities, such as intellect, integrity, or achievements, that give them worth, credibility, and influence. It implies that the person has depth, character, and accomplishments that distinguish them from others.
  • a man’s man The idiom "a man's man" refers to a man who is typically admired by and exhibits characteristics that are considered traditionally masculine. He is often seen as strong, assertive, tough, independent, and embodies the qualities associated with traditional masculinity.
  • man to man The idiom "man to man" refers to a conversation or interaction that occurs directly between two individuals, typically males, in a candid and straightforward manner. It implies a honest, open, and direct approach, where important matters are discussed honestly and sincerely without any intermediaries.
  • a marked man/woman The idiom "a marked man/woman" refers to someone who is in grave danger or has become the target of constant scrutiny or threat. It typically implies that the person is being watched closely or is easily recognizable due to certain circumstances.
  • the next man, woman, person, etc. The idiom "the next man, woman, person, etc." refers to the idea that someone or something is easily replaceable or of little importance since there are numerous alternatives readily available. It implies that one individual is essentially indistinguishable from the others, highlighting a lack of uniqueness or significance.
  • you can’t keep a good man down The idiom "you can't keep a good man down" means that a resilient and determined individual will overcome difficulties or setbacks and ultimately succeed. It suggests that no matter what challenges or obstacles come their way, a strong-willed person will always find a way to rise above and achieve their goals.
  • see a man about a horse The idiom "see a man about a horse" is a humorous and euphemistic way to excuse oneself or politely avoid discussing the actual reason for leaving. It often refers to the need to visit the restroom or attend to one's personal needs.
  • man of action The idiom "man of action" refers to a person, usually a man, who is known for taking decisive and immediate steps to accomplish tasks or achieve goals. Such an individual is characterized by their proactive approach, initiative, and ability to undertake actions quickly and effectively.
  • man after (one's) own heart The idiom "man after (one's) own heart" refers to a person who shares similar interests, qualities, or values with another person. It suggests that the individual being referred to is highly favored or admired by the speaker because of their resemblance or compatibility in some way.
  • iron man The idiom "iron man" typically refers to a person who possesses exceptional physical or mental strength, endurance, or resilience. It is often used to describe individuals who are tough, resilient, or unyielding in the face of challenges or obstacles.
  • butter-and-egg man The idiom "butter-and-egg man" refers to a wealthy or prosperous person, typically a businessman, who is involved in the production or distribution of goods associated with agriculture or livestock. It is often used to describe someone who enjoys a comfortable lifestyle, exudes affluence, and deals with products like butter and eggs, which were considered valuable commodities in the past.
  • angry young man The idiom "angry young man" refers to a person, typically a young adult or artist, who is characterized by rebelliousness, frustration, and a strong desire for social or political change. It originated in the mid-20th century to describe a particular group of British playwrights and novelists who expressed their discontent with society through their works. The term has since been expanded to encompass individuals who display similar qualities or attitudes.
  • be (of) no use to man or beast The idiom "be (of) no use to man or beast" is used to describe something or someone that is completely useless or ineffective. It implies that the thing or person in question is incapable of serving any practical or beneficial purpose whatsoever.
  • strong-arm man The idiom "strong-arm man" refers to a person who uses physical force or intimidation to achieve a desired outcome, often in an aggressive or ruthless manner. It typically describes someone who uses their physical strength to control or coerce others.
  • con man The idiom "con man" refers to an individual who is skilled in the art of deception and fraud, often using charm, persuasion, and manipulation to gain the trust and confidence of others in order to exploit them financially or otherwise. A con man is essentially a professional swindler or confidence trickster who operates by deceit and dishonesty.
  • as as the next man The idiom "as as the next man" is used to indicate that someone is typical or average in a particular aspect or quality. It implies that the person being referred to is no different or unique compared to others in a given situation or characteristic.
  • backdoor man The idiom "backdoor man" typically refers to a slang term for someone who has a secret romantic or sexual relationship with a person who is already in a committed relationship. It suggests that the person sneaks in or enters through the metaphorical "backdoor" to avoid detection or direct confrontation.
  • man (or go to) the barricades The idiom "man (or go to) the barricades" refers to taking a strong and active stance in defense of a particular cause, often involving resistance, protest, or fighting against oppression or injustice. It originated from the use of barricades, which are makeshift barriers constructed during times of conflict or revolution. The phrase implies a willingness to physically or metaphorically stand up for one's beliefs or principles, even if it involves confrontational or difficult situations.
  • man alive The idiom "man alive" is an exclamation used to express surprise, excitement, or astonishment. It can be used to convey a strong reaction to something unexpected or to emphasize a point.
  • have a man by the balls The idiom "have a man by the balls" is an informal expression used to describe having complete control or power over someone, usually in a situation where they cannot escape or resist. It figuratively portrays dominance, manipulation, or leverage over another person.
  • be a man The idiom "be a man" typically means to act bravely, courageously, or responsibly, especially in situations that may be deemed challenging, difficult, or demanding. It often implies the expectation of displaying certain traits traditionally associated with masculinity, such as strength, boldness, determination, and resilience. However, it is essential to note that this idiom can carry different connotations and interpretations depending on cultural, societal, and individual perspectives.
  • be your own man (or woman or person) The idiom "be your own man (or woman or person)" means to be independent and make decisions based on one's own principles, rather than being influenced or controlled by others. It emphasizes the importance of individuality, self-reliance, and the ability to think and act independently.
  • no use to man or beast The idiom "no use to man or beast" is used to describe something or someone that is completely useless or ineffective, serving no purpose to anyone. It suggests that the particular thing or person lacks any practical value or utility.
  • no good to man or beast The idiom "no good to man or beast" typically means utterly useless or of no value to anyone or anything. It implies that whatever is being referred to cannot serve any purpose or be of any use to humans or animals.
  • early to bed, early to rise (makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise) The idiom "early to bed, early to rise (makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise)" suggests that individuals who go to sleep and wake up early tend to have better overall well-being, financial success, and knowledge or wisdom.
  • boldly go where no man has gone before The idiom "boldly go where no man has gone before" is commonly associated with the famous phrase from the television series Star Trek. It conveys the idea of venturing into unexplored or unfamiliar territories, taking risks, and pushing boundaries in order to discover new realms, ideas, or possibilities. It emphasizes the courageous and pioneering spirit needed to explore unknown territories or dive into unconventional endeavors.
  • you should know a man seven years before you stir his fire The idiom "you should know a man seven years before you stir his fire" means that it is important to truly understand someone's character and personality before provoking or challenging them. It suggests that one should have a deep understanding of a person's motivations, reactions, and temperament before engaging in potentially contentious or confrontational situations. This idiom emphasizes the significance of patience and familiarity before triggering someone's strong emotions or passions.
  • man boobs The idiom "man boobs" refers to excess fat or glandular tissue in a man's chest area that gives the appearance of breasts. It is used humorously or mockingly to describe this condition.
  • boss man The idiom "boss man" typically refers to a person in a position of authority, often an employer or supervisor. It is used to describe someone who holds the highest level of power or control in a specific setting or organization.
  • Fuller Brush man The idiom "Fuller Brush man" refers to a door-to-door salesperson who sells cleaning products, typically associated with the Fuller Brush Company. This idiom is often used to describe a persuasive and persistent salesperson who tries to sell products or services directly to customers at their homes or workplaces.
  • man bun The idiom "man bun" refers to a hairstyle in which a man's long hair is tied up and secured in a bun-like formation on top or back of his head.
  • candy man The idiom "candy man" typically refers to a person who distributes or sells candy, often in a generous or indulgent manner. This can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who provides pleasurable or desirable things or experiences.
  • man cave The idiom "man cave" is used to refer to a space, typically within a home or building, that is exclusively or primarily used by a man. It is a space where a man can pursue his hobbies, interests, or activities without interference or interruption from others. It is often associated with a room or area where a man can relax, unwind, and enjoy leisure activities that are traditionally associated with masculinity, such as watching sports, playing video games, or working on DIY projects.
  • In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king The idiom "In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king" means that in a group or society of people who lack knowledge, awareness, or skill in a particular area, even someone with limited ability or understanding can be considered superior or more capable.
  • the child is father of the man The idiom "the child is father of the man" means that the traits and characteristics developed during childhood significantly influence a person's future personality, behavior, or outlook on life. It suggests that the person's childhood experiences shape their adult self.
  • clothes don't make the man The idiom "clothes don't make the man" means that a person's character or worth cannot be judged solely based on their appearance or external factors such as clothing. It suggests that true qualities and values lie beneath the surface and are not determined by outward appearances.
  • company man The idiom "company man" refers to a person who is extremely loyal to their employer or company and consistently follows their rules and policies without questioning or expressing personal opinions or individuality. They prioritize the interests and objectives of the company over their own, often displaying unwavering dedication and commitment to the organization.
  • a fool may give a wise man counsel The idiom "a fool may give a wise man counsel" means that even someone who is generally foolish or lacking in intelligence may sometimes offer valuable advice or insight to someone who is wise or knowledgeable. It emphasizes the idea that wisdom and intelligence can come from unexpected sources and that one should be open-minded and willing to consider advice from unlikely individuals.
  • man crush Monday The idiom "Man Crush Monday" refers to a social media trend where individuals, usually men, post pictures or express admiration for another man on Mondays. It is typically used to showcase non-romantic appreciation or adoration for someone of the same gender.
  • dead man walking The idiom "dead man walking" typically refers to a person or situation that is doomed or facing imminent demise. It often conveys the sense that someone is in serious trouble or that their fate is sealed, emphasizing the inevitability of a negative outcome. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a person who is walking into a situation where they are likely to face criticism, punishment, or social rejection.
  • each man for himself The idiom "each man for himself" means that in a situation of competition or crisis, every individual is primarily concerned with their own interests and survival rather than helping others. It implies a lack of cooperation or teamwork and emphasizes everyone's selfishness or individualistic tendencies.
  • give a man enough rope and he will hang himself The idiom "give a man enough rope and he will hang himself" means that if someone is provided with sufficient opportunity or freedom to act, they will inevitably make a mistake, reveal their true nature, or bring about their own downfall.
  • every last man of us/them The idiom "every last man of us/them" is typically used to emphasize that every single person in a group is included or involved in a particular action, event, or situation. It suggests that no one is excluded or left out.
  • face man The idiom "face man" refers to a person who is skilled at interacting with others and is often chosen to represent a group, organization, or company in a public or social setting. This individual is adept at presenting a positive image, maintaining good relationships, and effectively communicating with different stakeholders. The term "face man" can also be used to describe someone who is primarily responsible for handling public relations and external communication for a particular entity.
  • family man The idiom "family man" refers to a person, particularly a man, who prioritizes and cherishes their family above all else. It describes someone who is dedicated to their spouse and children, and actively takes responsibility for their well-being and happiness.
  • of few words, man of The idiom "of few words, man of" refers to someone who is known for being introverted or having a reserved personality. It suggests that the person is not very talkative and tends to communicate using as few words as possible.
  • teach a man to fish The idiom "teach a man to fish" means to empower or educate someone to be self-sufficient instead of providing them with temporary assistance or solutions. It emphasizes the importance of teaching skills or providing knowledge that allows people to fend for themselves and solve their own problems in the long run.
  • a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client The idiom "a man who is his own lawyer has a fool for a client" suggests that individuals who represent themselves in legal matters are often perceived as foolish or unwise. It implies that it is generally better to seek professional help or advice rather than attempting to handle complex legal issues without proper knowledge or expertise.
  • man the fort The expression "man the fort" refers to the act of taking charge or being responsible for a specific situation or place, especially in times of difficulty or when others are absent. It originated from the military practice of assigning soldiers to defend a fort or stronghold. It is used figuratively to suggest that someone needs to take on a leadership role or assume control in a particular setting.
  • man Friday The idiom "man Friday" refers to a loyal assistant or a person who is trustworthy, reliable, and helpful in various tasks or responsibilities. It is derived from the character Friday in the novel "Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe, who becomes the protagonist's loyal and devoted companion on the deserted island. The term often implies someone who is capable of providing valuable assistance or support in one's endeavors.
  • a man Friday "A man Friday" is an idiomatic expression that refers to a loyal or trusted assistant or aide, typically someone who provides a great deal of support and help to another person. This phrase originated from the novel "Robinson Crusoe" by Daniel Defoe, where the protagonist's companion on the deserted island is named Friday. It implies a dedicated and reliable individual who is always there to assist and support another person.
  • front man The idiom "front man" typically refers to a person who serves as the public face or spokesperson for a group or organization, often taking a leading role in presentations, media appearances, or public interactions. This term is commonly used in the context of bands or musical groups, where the front man is the lead singer or performer who captures the attention of the audience and represents the group as a whole. However, the idiom can also be applied to other contexts, such as business or politics, where someone is responsible for representing and promoting a collective entity.
  • funny man The idiom "funny man" refers to someone who is humorous or entertaining, typically skilled at making jokes or providing comedic relief. It commonly describes a comedian, a jokester, or simply someone who has a knack for making others laugh.
  • God's gift to man The idiom "God's gift to man" refers to a person who believes or portrays themselves to be the best or most superior in a particular area or attribute. It implies a sense of arrogance or entitlement in their abilities or qualities, often exaggerating their own importance or worth.
  • man of God A "man of God" is an idiom used to describe a male individual who is deeply religious, devout, and dedicated to his faith. It often refers to a person who exhibits moral integrity, spiritual wisdom, and carries out religious duties or preaching.
  • man plans and God laughs The idiom "man plans and God laughs" is used to express the idea that humans may make detailed plans or set certain expectations, but ultimately unforeseen circumstances or a higher power disrupts those plans, rendering them futile or insignificant. It suggests that despite our best efforts to control or foresee the future, external forces often have different plans in store for us.
  • good-time man The idiom "good-time man" refers to an individual who consistently seeks pleasure, enjoyment, and indulgence in various activities and social situations. This person is often known for their ability to have fun, be lively, and bring a sense of excitement to events or gatherings. They are typically characterized by their love for parties, socializing, and seeking out pleasurable experiences.
  • nothing is so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse The idiom "nothing is so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse" means that there is no better remedy for a person's wellbeing and character development than spending time with horses or engaging in activities related to them. It suggests that being in the presence of horses, caring for them, and riding them can have profound positive effects on a person's mental, emotional, and physical state.
  • the grand old man of (something) The grand old man of (something) refers to a highly respected and influential person who is considered an authority or expert in a particular field, usually due to their long-standing experience, wisdom, and accomplishments. This term is often used to denote the oldest or most senior figure associated with a specific profession, organization, or activity.
  • a (or the) grand old man of The idiom "a (or the) grand old man of" refers to a person who is considered wise, respected, and influential in a particular field, often due to their significant experience or long-standing contributions. It is often used to describe someone who is seen as a patriarch or an esteemed figure in their profession, community, or organization.
  • right-hand man The idiom "right-hand man" refers to a person who is extremely reliable, trusted, and supportive. They are often considered the most important assistant, ally, or confidant of someone in a position of power or leadership. The term originates from the notion that the right hand is usually considered the stronger and more dominant hand, implying that the "right-hand man" is someone who plays a crucial and influential role in their partner's or superior's endeavors.
  • You heard the man The idiom "You heard the man" means acknowledging and emphasizing the instruction or statement made by someone authoritative or in a position of power. It denotes that the person being addressed should pay attention and comply with what was said.
  • a man after (one's) own heart The idiom "a man after (one's) own heart" means that someone shares the same views, preferences, or characteristics as the person expressing the idiom, and is therefore highly liked or admired by them. It indicates a strong sense of approval and finding someone who embodies qualities that resonate with one's own values or desires.
  • hit man The idiom "hit man" refers to a professional assassin or hired killer who is employed to murder someone. It can also be used figuratively to describe someone who accomplishes a difficult or crucial task effectively and decisively.
  • kept man The idiom "kept man" refers to a man who is financially supported by someone else, typically a wealthy woman. This man does not work or provide for himself but instead relies on the financial support or "keeping" of another person.
  • a man of my kidney The idiom "a man of my kidney" is an expression used to refer to someone who is similar in personality, temperament, or characteristics to oneself. It suggests that the person being described shares similar qualities or traits with the speaker or a known individual. It can also imply a sense of affinity or camaraderie with the person mentioned.
  • low man on the ladder The idiom "low man on the ladder" refers to a person in a low-ranking or less desirable position within a hierarchy or organization. It implies that the person has a lower status, less authority, and fewer opportunities for advancement compared to others. The phrase is often used to emphasize the disadvantages or challenges faced by individuals occupying such positions.
  • leg man The idiom "leg man" refers to a person, typically a man, who has a strong appreciation or fascination for women's legs, often viewing them as a physical attraction.
  • lady (or man or gentleman) of leisure The idiom "lady (or man or gentleman) of leisure" refers to an individual, typically a wealthy person, who does not need to work or engage in any productive activity due to a comfortable lifestyle or financial independence. This person is often seen as having a lot of free time to engage in leisurely pursuits or enjoy a life of luxury.
  • man of letters The idiom "man of letters" refers to someone who is well-educated and knowledgeable in various areas of literature and the humanities. It describes a person who is deeply engaged in literary and intellectual pursuits, often with a high level of expertise and literary sophistication.

Similar spelling words for MAN

Plural form of MAN is MEN

Conjugate verb Man

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have manned
you would have manned
he/she/it would have manned
we would have manned
they would have manned
I would have man
you would have man
he/she/it would have man
we would have man
they would have man

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been manning
you would have been manning
he/she/it would have been manning
we would have been manning
they would have been manning

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would man
you would man
he/she/it would man
we would man
they would man

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be manning
you would be manning
he/she/it would be manning
we would be manning
they would be manning

FUTURE

I will man
you will man
he/she/it will man
we will man
they will man

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be manning
you will be manning
he/she/it will be manning
we will be manning
they will be manning

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have manned
you will have manned
he/she/it will have manned
we will have manned
they will have manned

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been manning
you will have been manning
he/she/it will have been manning
we will have been manning
they will have been manning

IMPERATIVE

you man
we let´s man

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to man

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was manning
you were manning
he/she/it was manning
we were manning
they were manning

PAST PARTICIPLE

manned

PAST PERFECT

I had manned
you had manned
he/she/it had manned
we had manned
they had manned

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been manning
you had been manning
he/she/it had been manning
we had been manning
they had been manning

PRESENT

I man
you man
he/she/it mans
we man
they man

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am manning
you are manning
he/she/it is manning
we are manning
they are manning

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

manning

PRESENT PERFECT

I have manned
you have manned
he/she/it has manned
we have manned
they have manned

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been manning
you have been manning
he/she/it has been manning
we have been manning
they have been manning

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it man

SIMPLE PAST

I manned
you manned
he/she/it manned
we manned
they manned

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