How Do You Spell MANY?

Pronunciation: [mˈɛni] (IPA)

The word "many" is spelled 'mɛni' in IPA, with two syllables. The 'a' sound is pronounced as a short 'ɛ' sound, which is common in many English words like "pen" and "set". The 'y' at the end is pronounced as 'i', creating the 'nee' sound. This spelling of "many" has remained consistent throughout English history, with roots in Old English and Middle English. It is important to properly spell and pronounce words, as it ensures effective communication and understanding.

MANY Meaning and Definition

Many is an adjective that refers to a large quantity or number, denoting a large amount, extent, or degree. It can describe a variety of items, individuals, or things that exist or occur in abundant numbers. It indicates a considerable amount that surpasses the norm or usual count.

The term suggests a multitude or multiplicity, depicting a diverse or numerous grouping of objects or people. It often implies a substantial or significant quantity that surpasses what might be considered common or expected.

Many is commonly used to describe a wide range of scenarios or contexts, from describing the number of individuals in a crowd, to expressing the abundance of options available, or the multiplicity of factors or elements impacting a situation.

It can also indicate a large proportion of a specific attribute, such as many reasons, many possibilities, or many benefits. The term emphasizes the high quantity or number while leaving room for interpretation regarding an exact count or precise scale.

Many is versatile in its application, accommodating various contexts, and accommodating a broad sense of abundance or quantity. Its usage extends beyond numerical precision, capturing the concept of a plentiful occurrence, substantial quantity, or rich diversity.

Top Common Misspellings for MANY *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for MANY

Etymology of MANY

The word "many" originated from the Old English term "manig" which meant "many" or "numerous". It can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic word "managaz" and further to the Proto-Indo-European root "*menegh-" or "*menegh-wo-", both of which conveyed the sense of "many" or "much". The word "many" has been used in English since the 8th century.

Idioms with the word MANY

  • of many (or few) words The idiom "of many (or few) words" means someone who speaks sparingly or uses few words to express themselves. It refers to a person's tendency to communicate concisely or the trait of being quiet and reserved.
  • so many The idiom "so many" usually means a large or excessive number of something, often used to express surprise, frustration, or overwhelm. It indicates an abundance or an overwhelming quantity of a particular thing.
  • the many The idiom "the many" refers to a large number of people or things. It suggests a collective group rather than focusing on individuals or specifics. It is often used to emphasize the quantity or variety of things or people being referred to.
  • He who begins many things, finishes but few. The idiom "He who begins many things, finishes but few" refers to a person who starts multiple projects or tasks but fails to complete most of them. It implies that the individual lacks determination, consistency, or focus, often leaving projects or responsibilities unfinished.
  • have finger in too many pies The idiom "have a finger in too many pies" means to be involved in too many activities or projects at the same time, often resulting in a lack of focus, efficiency, or effectiveness. It refers to someone who tries to be a part of multiple things simultaneously, potentially spreading themselves too thin and not fully committing or achieving in any particular area.
  • Many are called but few are chosen The idiom "Many are called but few are chosen" refers to a situation where a large number of people may be considered or given an opportunity, but only a select few are ultimately chosen or succeed. It implies that while many individuals may be invited or considered for a certain task or position, only a small number exhibit the necessary qualities or abilities to be selected or succeed in that particular endeavor.
  • have many irons in the fire The idiom "have many irons in the fire" means to be involved in various activities or projects at the same time. It often implies being busy, managing multiple tasks, or having numerous responsibilities or interests simultaneously.
  • many a true word is spoken in jest The idiom "many a true word is spoken in jest" means that people often reveal their true thoughts or intentions through humor or joking. It suggests that humor can sometimes serve as a disguise for expressing serious or truthful ideas.
  • too many cooks in the kitchen The idiom "too many cooks in the kitchen" refers to a situation where there are too many people involved in a task or project, causing confusion, inefficiency, and often resulting in a negative outcome. It implies that when there are too many individuals offering input or trying to control a situation, it can create chaos and hinder progress.
  • there's many a slip twixt cup and lip The idiom "there's many a slip twixt cup and lip" means that even if success or achievement seems certain or close at hand, unexpected events or circumstances can still prevent it from actually happening. It signifies that things can easily go wrong or take an unexpected turn, causing plans or outcomes to change or fail.
  • a great many The idiom "a great many" means a large number or quantity of something.
  • have one too many The idiom "have one too many" typically means to consume or partake in an excessive amount of alcohol or to be intoxicated. It suggests having more than one's tolerance level, resulting in impaired judgment or behavior due to the excess consumption of alcohol.
  • many happy returns The idiom "many happy returns" is commonly used as a greeting or wish on someone's birthday. It is a way of expressing good wishes for the person to have many more happy and fulfilling years to come.
  • have a few (too many) The idiom "have a few (too many)" means to consume or enjoy an excessive amount of alcoholic beverages, often to the point of intoxication or drunkenness. It suggests exceeding the usual or desired limit of drinking, usually in a social setting.
  • many a The idiom "many a" is used to refer to a large number of something or someone, often emphasizing their frequency or common occurrence. It is typically used with a singular noun to indicate that there are numerous instances of that noun.
  • wear too many hats The idiom "wear too many hats" refers to a situation where someone is taking on multiple roles or responsibilities all at once. It implies that a person is attempting to handle more tasks than they can effectively manage, possibly resulting in overwhelm or a lack of focus.
  • a good/great many The idiom "a good/great many" is used to indicate a large number or quantity of something. It suggests that there are a significant amount of items, people, or occurrences being referred to.
  • house of many doors The idiom "house of many doors" typically refers to a complex or intricate situation with various possibilities or choices. It suggests that there are numerous paths or opportunities available, often leading to different outcomes or experiences.
  • have too many irons in the fire The idiom "have too many irons in the fire" means to be involved in or managing too many tasks or projects simultaneously, causing potential overwhelm or inefficiency. It suggests that by having too many commitments, responsibilities, or interests at once, one might not be able to effectively handle all of them or give proper attention to each.
  • many moons ago The idiom "many moons ago" is typically used to indicate that something happened a long time ago. It is a figurative expression that compares the passage of time to the cycle of the moon.
  • Too many cooks spoil the stew. The idiom "Too many cooks spoil the stew" means that when too many people are involved in a task or project, it can lead to confusion, inefficiency, and a lower quality outcome. Too many individuals trying to influence or control a situation can result in chaos and a loss of focus or coherence.
  • There's many a true word spoken in jest. The idiom "There's many a true word spoken in jest" means that sometimes jokes or humorous remarks may contain an element of truth or express a serious sentiment. It suggests that people often reveal their true thoughts or feelings in a lighthearted manner, without explicitly stating them.
  • There's many a good tune played on an old fiddle The idiom "There's many a good tune played on an old fiddle" means that older individuals can still possess wisdom, talent, or abilities that surpass their age. It suggests that one should not underestimate or dismiss the capabilities of someone simply based on their age or appearance.
  • too many chiefs and not enough Indians The idiom "too many chiefs and not enough Indians" refers to a situation where there are too many people trying to give orders or assert authority, while there is a shortage of people to actually carry out the work or tasks at hand. It implies that a group or organization is lacking in adequate resources or manpower, leading to inefficiency or confusion due to an imbalance of leaders and followers.
  • There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip The idiom "There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip" means that despite being close to achieving something or having a certain outcome, there are often unforeseen obstacles or challenges that can prevent it from being successful. It emphasizes the idea that even if things appear certain or promising, nothing is guaranteed until it actually happens.
  • many a (something) The idiom "many a (something)" is used to refer to a large number of things or instances of something. It implies a large quantity or frequency.
  • be too many for The idiom "be too many for" is used to describe a situation or opponent that is overwhelming or difficult to handle. It implies that the quantity, strength, or complexity of something is beyond one's ability to manage or cope with.
  • too many balls in the air The idiom "too many balls in the air" means having too many tasks, responsibilities, or commitments to manage or handle effectively at the same time. It refers to a situation where a person is overwhelmed or unable to keep up with multiple demands simultaneously.
  • great many The idiom "great many" is generally used to describe or refer to a large or significant number of something. It implies a considerable quantity or a substantial amount of a particular item or concept.
  • many happy returns (of the day) The idiom "many happy returns (of the day)" is a traditional greeting or wish often used on someone's birthday. It essentially means wishing the person many more joyful birthdays in the coming years.
  • only so much/many The idiom "only so much/many" means that there is a limited amount or degree of something, often implying that it is insufficient or restricted. It implies that there is a specific limit or boundary to what can be achieved or attained.
  • Cowards die many times before their death(s). The idiom "Cowards die many times before their death(s)" means that individuals who lack courage or are constantly afraid often experience a significant amount of anxiety or distress, similar to the feeling of dying, even when facing minor challenges or difficult situations.
  • there is many a slip twixt cup and lip The idiom "there is many a slip twixt cup and lip" means that even though something seems certain or likely to happen, there can still be unforeseen obstacles or mistakes that prevent its success. It emphasizes that a lot can go wrong or change before a planned outcome is achieved.
  • be several/many removes (away) from sth To be several/many removes away from something means to be far removed or distant from it in terms of knowledge, understanding, or relation. It suggests that there are numerous intermediaries or steps between one and the thing being referred to. It implies a significant degree of separation or detachment.
  • have many strings to (one's) bow The idiom "have many strings to (one's) bow" means to have several different skills, abilities, or options available to handle or pursue a variety of tasks, goals, or opportunities. It implies being versatile, resourceful, and capable of adapting to different circumstances or demands.
  • Cowards die many times before their death The idiom "Cowards die many times before their death" means that individuals who lack bravery or courage experience fear and anxiety repeatedly throughout their lives, even in non-threatening situations. It implies that their fear and anxiety prevent them from fully embracing and enjoying life.
  • have one's finger in too many pies The idiom "have one's finger in too many pies" means to be involved in too many activities or to have too many responsibilities at the same time, often resulting in a lack of focus or effectiveness in each endeavor. It implies that one's attention is divided among multiple things, making it difficult to handle them all effectively.
  • many 's the time The idiom "many's the time" means "often" or "numerous occasions." It implies that something has happened many times in the past or is likely to happen frequently in the future.
  • Many hands make light work The idiom "Many hands make light work" means that a task or project becomes easier and quicker when many people help or contribute together. The more people involved, the less burdensome or difficult the work is for each individual.
  • so many countries, so many customs. The idiom "so many countries, so many customs" means that different countries have different traditions, cultures, and ways of doing things. It implies that there is a great diversity of customs and practices across the world, and it encourages acceptance and understanding of these variations.
  • too many cooks spoil the soup, at too many cooks spoil the broth The idiom "too many cooks spoil the soup" (or "too many cooks spoil the broth") means that when there are too many people involved in a task or project, especially where there is a need for coordination, too many divergent opinions or actions can lead to confusion and a negative outcome. It suggests that having too many individuals involved can result in a lack of organization and coherence, ultimately diminishing the quality of the end result.
  • as many The idiom "as many" means to have an equal or equivalent amount or number of something. It can refer to having the same quantity or extent as another thing or person.
  • in so many words The idiom "in so many words" means to directly express or state something explicitly, without using any additional or indirect language. It implies that someone is speaking or writing in a straightforward and concise manner, leaving no room for ambiguity or misunderstanding.
  • be (one) too many for someone The idiom "be (one) too many for someone" means to be overwhelming or beyond someone's capabilities or tolerance. It suggests that something or someone is too challenging, difficult, or demanding for an individual to handle or cope with.
  • too many cooks spoil the soup The idiom "too many cooks spoil the soup" means that when there are too many people involved in a task or project, especially without clear organization or coordination, it can lead to confusion, inefficiency, and a subpar final outcome.
  • too many cooks spoil the broth The idiom "too many cooks spoil the broth" means that when there are too many people involved in a task or decision-making process, it becomes less efficient or effective. This phrase suggests that having too many people with differing opinions or ideas can lead to confusion, conflict, or a lack of coordination, ultimately resulting in a negative outcome.
  • many a time The idiom "many a time" means frequently or often.
  • too many chefs in the kitchen The idiom "too many chefs in the kitchen" means that when there are too many people involved in making decisions or giving their input in a particular task or project, it can lead to confusion, inefficiency, or a disorganized outcome. It suggests that having too many people involved can hinder progress or create chaos, as multiple individuals compete for control or try to assert their ideas, making it difficult to effectively coordinate and achieve a desirable outcome.
  • there are many ways to skin a cat The idiom "there are many ways to skin a cat" means that there are multiple methods or approaches to achieve a particular goal or solve a problem. It emphasizes the existence of different alternatives or strategies to accomplish something.
  • irons in the fire, too many The idiom "irons in the fire, too many" refers to a situation where a person is juggling or handling too many tasks, projects, or responsibilities at the same time. It suggests that they may be overburdened or overwhelmed due to being involved in numerous commitments or ventures simultaneously.
  • too many chiefs The idiom "too many chiefs" refers to a situation where there are too many people in a position of authority or leadership, without a clear hierarchy or coordination, leading to confusion, inefficiency, or a lack of decisive decision-making.
  • How many times do I have to tell you? The phrase "How many times do I have to tell you?" is an idiom used to express frustration or annoyance with someone's repeated failure to understand or remember something that has been previously communicated. It implies that the speaker feels exasperated at the need to continually repeat themselves.
  • have had one too many The idiom "have had one too many" refers to having consumed an excessive amount of alcohol, often to the point of being drunk. It implies that the person has reached a limit in terms of alcohol consumption and should stop drinking.
  • Too many cooks The idiom "Too many cooks" means that when too many people are involved or have a say in a particular task or decision, it can lead to confusion, inefficiency, or a lack of coordination. This phrase is often used to highlight the negative consequences of having too many people involved in a task or project, suggesting that too much input and influence can hinder the successful completion of the task.
  • at least so many The idiom "at least so many" refers to a minimum number or amount required or expected. It implies that the mentioned quantity is the minimum and can be equal to or greater than the stated number.
  • there’s many a slip ’twixt cup and lip The idiom "there's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip" means that even though something appears likely or certain to happen, there are still many possible obstacles or uncertainties that may prevent it from occurring. It highlights the unpredictability of life and the potential for unexpected events or circumstances to disrupt plans or expectations.
  • one too many The idiom "one too many" refers to consuming or experiencing more of something (often alcohol) than is considered acceptable or reasonable, to the point of it being excessive or harmful. It indicates surpassing a limit or indulging excessively, leading to negative consequences or regret.
  • half again as many The idiom "half again as many" means to increase the quantity of something by 50%. It suggests adding an additional half of the original amount to obtain the new total.
  • as many as The idiom "as many as" is used to indicate an extensive or large quantity of something, often referring to a number or amount that may be surprising or impressive. It implies that there is a significant number or quantity of the mentioned thing.
  • many a sb/sth The idiom "many a sb/sth" is used to refer to a large number or a considerable amount of people or things. It signifies that there are numerous instances or examples of someone or something. It is often used to emphasize frequency, quantity, or repetition.
  • success has many fathers, failure is an orphan The idiom "success has many fathers, failure is an orphan" means that when something is successful or achieved, many people are quick to claim credit or responsibility for it. However, when something fails or goes wrong, people often distance themselves and avoid taking responsibility.
  • be too many for (someone) The idiom "be too many for (someone)" means to overwhelm or surpass someone's abilities or capacity to handle a situation or task. It implies that the person is unable to cope or deal effectively with a particular challenge or demand.
  • a good many The idiom "a good many" means a fairly large or considerable number of something. It is often used to indicate a larger amount than expected or anticipated.
  • know how many beans make five The idiom "know how many beans make five" refers to someone who is described as being knowledgeable, clever, or astute. It implies that the person has a good understanding of a situation or is able to figure things out easily. The idiom originates from the notion that counting beans is a simple task requiring basic math skills, hence someone who knows how many beans make five is seen as intelligent or quick-witted.
  • a man of many parts "A man of many parts" is an idiomatic expression used to describe someone who possesses multiple skills, talents, or abilities. It suggests that the individual is versatile, adaptable, and capable in various areas or fields of expertise.
  • good many
  • have many, etc. irons in the fire Having many irons in the fire means being involved in multiple activities or projects simultaneously. It suggests that the individual is keeping themselves busy with various ventures or opportunities.
  • good many, a The phrase "good many, a" is an informal way to express a large or considerable amount of something. It is often used to indicate a significant number or quantity of items or people.
  • many's the The idiom "many's the" is used to indicate a large number or quantity of something. It is commonly used to suggest that there have been numerous occasions or instances of a particular event or situation occurring.
  • a man/woman of (many) parts A person who possesses many different skills, talents, or qualities.

Similar spelling words for MANY

Plural form of MANY is MANY

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