How Do You Spell MILE?

Pronunciation: [mˈa͡ɪl] (IPA)

"Mile" is a five-letter word with the phonetic transcription /maɪl/. The word originates from the Latin word "mille passus" which means "a thousand steps". Interestingly, the spelling of this word has not changed much since it was first introduced into the English language, and the pronunciation has remained relatively consistent as well. The "i" and "e" in the word are pronounced as the long vowel sounds /aɪ/ and /i/, respectively, which is why the spelling is retained in this form. Overall, "mile" is a straightforward word to spell and pronounce.

MILE Meaning and Definition

The noun "mile" refers to a unit of distance, commonly used in both the imperial and the United States customary systems of measurement. It is equivalent to 5,280 feet or 1,760 yards, and is denoted by the symbol "mi." The term is derived from the Latin word "mille passus," which translates to "a thousand paces," as a mile historically represented the distance an average person could walk in a thousand steps.

In everyday usage, a mile is often utilized to measure long distances, such as the distance between two cities, or the length of a race or marathon. It is frequently employed for road signage and map references, allowing for ease of understanding and navigation. Moreover, in the United States, a mile is commonly used to express speed, as in miles per hour (mph).

The metric equivalent of a mile is the kilometer (km). One mile is approximately equivalent to 1.609 kilometers. This difference in measurement systems often requires conversion when communicating distances across countries or regions that utilize different units.

Overall, a mile serves as a widely recognized unit of length, providing a practical means of measuring and comparing long distances and speeds, particularly in English-speaking countries.

Top Common Misspellings for MILE *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for MILE

Etymology of MILE

The word "mile" has its origins in Latin. It comes from the Latin word "milia" which means "thousands". In Ancient Rome, the unit of distance called "mille passus" meaning "a thousand paces" was commonly used. The word "mile" was derived from this Latin phrase. The "mille passus" was equivalent to 1,000 double paces or roughly 1,480 meters. Over time, the unit of distance evolved in different ways across various regions, eventually settling on the modern mile we use today.

Idioms with the word MILE

  • run a mile The idiom "run a mile" means to quickly and instinctively avoid or be highly cautious about someone or something because they seem dangerous, untrustworthy, or unfavorable. It suggests that the person would go to great lengths or distance to keep away from the situation or individual.
  • give sm an inch and they'll take a mile The idiom "give someone an inch and they'll take a mile" means that when you grant someone a small opportunity or concession, they will use it as an excuse to demand or take much more than what was originally given. It implies that some individuals may exhibit a tendency to exploit a situation to their advantage, even if it was intended to be a small favor or concession.
  • stand/stick out a mile The idiom "stand/stick out a mile" means that something is very obvious, noticeable, or easily seen. It implies that there is no effort required to recognize or identify the thing in question because it is so clear or apparent.
  • a mile a minute The idiom "a mile a minute" is used to describe someone who speaks quickly or rapidly. It means that the person is talking at a very fast pace or thinking and acting quickly. It can also refer to someone who is extremely energetic or always on the move.
  • a mile off The idiom "a mile off" is used to depict the ability to see or recognize something or someone from a great distance, often implying that it is very obvious or easily identifiable. It denotes a sharp perception or awareness of something that may be noticeable to everyone.
  • go the extra mile The idiom "go the extra mile" means to make an additional effort or go beyond what is expected in order to achieve a goal, help someone, or to provide exceptional service. It implies taking additional steps or going beyond the required effort to accomplish something.
  • a mile away The idiom "a mile away" typically means that something is easily recognizable or noticeable, often suggesting that someone can detect or predict something from a long distance or with little effort. It can also indicate that someone is easily able to see through someone's intentions or behavior.
  • stand out a mile The idiom "stand out a mile" refers to something that is clearly obvious or easily noticeable, often due to its unique or distinctive qualities. It implies that there is no effort required to identify or distinguish it, as it stands out clearly, just like a mile is noticeably longer than shorter distances.
  • stick out a mile The idiom "stick out a mile" means that something or someone is very noticeable or obvious, often to the point of being impossible to miss or ignore.
  • mile a minute The idiom "mile a minute" typically means to talk or move very quickly or at a rapid pace.
  • country mile The idiom "country mile" is used to describe a great distance, typically one that is much longer than expected or anticipated. It signifies a measurement beyond the norm or a considerable extent, often emphasizing the difference between a rural or countryside perspective and a more urban or familiar one.
  • by a mile The idiom "by a mile" means to win or achieve something by a significant or overwhelming margin or distance. It implies that the accomplishment or victory is much greater or more substantial than the competitors or expectations.
  • Give sb an inch and they'll take a mile. The idiom "Give someone an inch and they'll take a mile" means that if you give someone a small amount of power, freedom, or leeway, they will take advantage of it and try to get much more than was originally given to them. It suggests that allowing someone a small concession or flexibility might lead them to demand or exploit even more than they initially deserved or were entitled to.
  • A miss is as good as a mile. The idiom "A miss is as good as a mile" means that a failure or a mistake, regardless of its magnitude, has the same outcome as a complete failure. It implies that even a small error can have significant consequences or lead to the same result as a much bigger mistake.
  • miss is as good as a mile The idiom "miss is as good as a mile" means that regardless of how close one may have come to achieving a goal or a desired outcome, if they have ultimately fallen short, the result is the same as if they had missed by a significant margin. It emphasizes that the actual degree of failure or success may not matter much if the desired outcome is not achieved.
  • miss (sth) by a mile The idiom "miss (sth) by a mile" is used to describe a situation where someone or something fails by a large margin or is far off the mark. It implies that the attempted action or outcome was way off target or greatly inaccurate.
  • Give sm an inch and he'll take a mile. The phrase "Give someone an inch and he'll take a mile" means that if you provide someone with a small opportunity or concession, they will try to exploit it to gain a much larger advantage or benefit for themselves. It suggests that the person is eager to take advantage of any opportunity presented to them, often exceeding the limits of what is reasonable or fair.
  • give (one) an inch and (one) will take a mile The idiom "give (one) an inch and (one) will take a mile" is used to describe someone who takes advantage of a small concession or opportunity and then tries to exploit it further, pushing the limits or taking more than what was initially offered or intended. It suggests that once someone is given a little leeway or freedom, they will try to seize even greater advantages or benefits.
  • Give an inch and he'll take a mile The idiom "Give an inch and he'll take a mile" means that if someone is given a small amount of freedom or leeway, they will exploit it and take advantage to the fullest extent possible. It implies that this person has a tendency to push boundaries or exceed the limits set for them.
  • give an inch and they'll take a mile The idiom "give an inch and they'll take a mile" means that if you offer someone a small concession or compromise, they will likely try to exploit or take advantage of it by demanding more than what was initially given or agreed upon. It implies that granting a small amount can lead to others taking excessive amounts or pushing boundaries.
  • give someone an inch and they'll take a mile The idiom "give someone an inch and they'll take a mile" refers to someone who, after receiving a small amount or concession, will try to take advantage of the situation and demand or take a lot more than was originally offered. It implies that if you give someone a small opportunity or favor, they will exploit it to its fullest extent.
  • from a mile away The idiom "from a mile away" means to clearly or easily notice or recognize something or someone, often due to obvious or distinctive characteristics. It implies that the object or person is easily distinguishable even from a great distance.
  • miss by a mile The idiom "miss by a mile" means to fail or be very far off the mark, either in a literal or figurative sense. It implies a substantial and noticeable deviation from the intended target or expectation.
  • can see (from) a mile off The idiom "can see (from) a mile off" means to recognize or detect someone or something easily or immediately, often implying that the intentions or qualities of the person or thing are very obvious or transparent. It indicates having the ability to perceive something or someone from a great distance, metaphorically highlighting the lack of subtlety or concealment.
  • a country mile The idiom "a country mile" refers to a significant distance, usually much longer than expected or compared to other distances. It implies a considerable amount or extent, often emphasizing a great difference or superiority.
  • see, spot, smell, etc. something a mile off The idiom "see, spot, smell, etc. something a mile off" means to detect or recognize something easily, often due to its evident or distinctive characteristics. It implies that the thing being observed is so obvious or noticeable that it can be identified or perceived even from a great distance or with minimal effort.

Similar spelling words for MILE

Plural form of MILE is MILES

Infographic

Add the infographic to your website: