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Correct spellings for BURUE

  • bare And they bare it.
  • barque Conduis ta barque avec prudence!
  • barrie Barrie suddenly felt perfectly happy.
  • biro It was a Protestant who married me-the Reverend Martin Biro, who lives in Constantinople in banishment, and to whom my husband in his gratitude gave a house where the Transylvanians and Hungarians living in Constantinople can meet for worship.
  • blue This blue suit and three house dresses are all the clothes I have in the world.
  • bore I hope their coming won't bore you, Richard.
  • borer They had great thick chisels and heavy wooden mallets in their hands, and there was a big bit, or "borer," as the little boy called it, lying on the ground between them.
  • br On one occasion, indeed, he was so proud of an uncompromising cold that had "sat down" in his head that he wrote to a friend in these terms:-"Br.
  • bra Sometimes he would amuse himself with looking through the alabaster walls into the outer rooms, Cada and Bra.
  • bray When you hear a donkey bray, you not only hear a noise, but realize that it comes from a donkey.
  • brew A shelter was made in which to melt snow and brew tea.
  • brie But, hold, you see that pretty little Comtesse de la Brie, all in white?
  • brier The wind blew against him, and the brier odor, sickening sweet, poured over Jenieve.
  • brow He stopped, wiped his brow, and settled back into his chair with a heavy sigh.
  • bruce In the introduction to Barbour's Bruce, though the point at issue is not translation, there is a similar idea.
  • brut Simple and informal at first, it had gradually assumed pretentious proportions, until it had passed from a North Side hall, cold suppers, lemonade and nine o'clock, to the Hotel Mazarin, terrapin, brut champagne, and eleven o'clock.
  • brute He was an ugly brute, and around the circus was known to be the most difficult to manage.
  • bur "My dear Melbourne," wrote Lord John, "I have seen Spencer, who says that we could not have done otherwise than we have done as gentlemen, but that bur difficulties with the Radicals are not diminished...."
  • bureau It is a kind of self-admiration society, which serves the mission of a lecture bureau.
  • burg But the stuff lies buried out there in that burg, and you and I, Ted, are going there to dig some of it up.
  • burgh Soon, the sea he hath crossed, to Palestine; And there his heart doth chafe and pine,- For Hubert de Burgh is not in that land: He loitereth in France, with Philip's band.
  • buried His face he buried in his hands.
  • burke As Burke once remarked to me, 'Active intelligences, like appropriate ingredients in chemistry, never meet without fresh combinations.
  • burl It was a burl tree.
  • burn To burn is to subject to the action of fire, or of intense heat so as to effect either partial change or complete combustion; as, to burn wood in the fire; to burn one's hand on a hot stove; the sun burns the face. One brands with a hot iron, but cauterizes with some corrosive substance, as silver nitrate. Cremate is now used specifically for consuming a dead body by intense heat. To incinerate is to reduce to ashes; the sense differs little from that of cremate, but it is in less popular use. To kindle is to set on fire, as if with a candle; ignite is the more learned and scientific word for the same thing, extending even to the heating of metals to a state of incandescence without burning. To scorch and to singe are superficial, and to char usually so. Both kindle and burn have an extensive figurative use; as, to kindle strife; to burn with wrath, love, devotion, curiosity. Compare LIGHT.
  • burner As if I don't know, old lime-burner!
  • burp Then he gave the burp gun back to the boy.
  • burr What chance has he in New York with Hamilton and Burr, to carry off all the big prey?
  • burred He winked them indignantly, strove to clear his burred throat.
  • burro It was only some rascal that came through here and stole my riding burro-did they care for old Jack at the Works?
  • burrow The mole cannot soar in the face of the sun like the eagle; neither can the bird that comes out of the eagle's egg burrow like the mole.
  • burt A young Mrs. Burt and her husband were returning to the states after six years with the Kennicott Copper Co.
  • bury In fear lest he should die in Scotland and they would not bury him in Antrim churchyard beside Anna.
  • cure I will take a rifle and go, for it is necessary to cure meat.
  • guru The new Guru was a man of peace.
  • lure Then he understood the lure of the trail.
  • pure Naturally, the fathers thought it a pure case of nerves.
  • rue He walked with her as far as the corner of the Rue de Lille.
  • sure She was not sure.
  • true Could Mabel Digby's story be true?
  • Brae I was present at the first meeting which was held at Brae.
  • Bursae Wounds involving tendons, bursae and closed articulations become swollen and discharge synovia.
  • Byre She was thus sometimes the last to be driven into the byre.
  • Barr Finn Barr is said to have been a County Cork man of great sanctity; and he probably came to Barra with the colony, for he is the patron saint of the island, and hence its name.
  • buries Johannes buries his head in his arms and dreams to himself.
  • BRR The window, the lamp, Brr-pp!"
  • BRO So again I went to interview Bro.
  • BURS 76 49. Grouse, fox, and dog carry burs .
  • barre Le Monarque will meet no other craft, and Captain Barre knows the secrets of his own calling-he has run a cargo before now.
  • burger Burger wrote too little of any expansive compass to give the measure of his powers, or to found national impression; Lichtenberg, though a very sagacious observer, never rose into what can be called a power, he did not modify his age; yet these were both men of extraordinary talent, and Burger a man of undoubted genius.
  • barer In that part and along the river banks there are great possibilities of agricultural development, while the uplands, where the subjacent rock is granite or gneiss, with occasional beds of slate or schist, are generally barer and more dry, fit rather for pasture than for tillage.
  • tied-up
  • for These rivers, you see, come down with surprising swiftness, and then, of course, if you delay, you may be stuck for a week or more. What on earth have I been worried for? Soon I won't be worried anymore. – Do it Alone by Unknown Author
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