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What is the correct spelling for CARRYIGN?

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Correct spellings for CARRYIGN

  • caring She, good, noble girl, had been so busy caring for Jessie, that the news only reached her after Mr. Lee had been gone some hours.
  • carrion "I don't care where he goes," said Correy savagely, "so he goes there as carrion.
  • crayon Louise, Princess of Stolberg-Gedern, and ex-Canoness of Mons, was, if we may judge by the crayon portrait and the miniature done about that time, much more of a child than most women of nineteen.
  • crying And now, dear, you have been crying and your eyes are all red.
  • jarring It was by this engaging, graceful manner, that he was enabled, during all his war, to connect the various and jarring powers of the Grand Alliance, and to carry them on to the main object of the war, notwithstanding their private and separate views, jealousies, and wrongheadedness.
  • quarrying Samples of that new marble he's quarrying in Georgia.
  • scurrying A wave of thunder boomed over the river, sending Knickers scurrying to Ally's side.
  • Arraying But while the two girls were engaged in arraying themselves to do honor to Constance, a most peculiar state of affairs was in progress downstairs.
  • Carrying Carrying the phone, she walked out and followed him.
  • Harrying Well didst thou speak, Minaya, the Campeador he said, Do thou with the two hundred ride on a harrying raid.
  • Marrying And as for marrying, the great beauty of it all was that there was to be no marrying.
  • Parrying Still presently I found there was cause to doubt, for when, parrying his first thrust, I drove at him with all my strength, instead of piercing him through and through the ancient sword, Wave-Flame, bent in my hand like a bow as it is strung, telling me that beneath his Joseph's coat of silk Deleroy wore a shirt of mail.
  • Tarrying But James would not risk his liberty by tarrying, and censured George for running such a risk.
  • Currying It was plain that what Marty had said about currying the horses was quite true.
  • graying It was graying now, as were the untidy loops of hair above it, her face was yellow, furrowed, and the long neck that disappeared into her little flannel bed-sack was lined and yellowed too.
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