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Correct spellings for COPASITY

  • allowed for
  • allowed go
  • allowed the use of
  • allowing go
  • allright
  • capacitor The tuned circuit consisted of a coil with a small pressure operated capacitor across it.
  • capacity However, another emotion of a very great pride in her capacity and in her frankness and a sense of guilt made him very abject.
  • cast "One more cast of the line," said he, "and that shall be the last."
  • caste "No need for excitement, my dear administrator," the physician replied evenly, politely avoiding comment on Ruut's crude, low caste self control.
  • coast But I am glad that I did not do that, as the men would perish on the way, and, even if they reached the coast, why should we awaken vain hopes?
  • coaster He had gone aboard one of the vessels-a coaster from Boston.
  • come-apart
  • composite He's a composite individual: an Englishman, a German, a State official, a spy, a thief, and an alleged murderer.
  • compost 46 A social structure in which few farmers feed a great number of idlers forces the farmers into labor-saving, high-yield, mass-supply agriculture, and this necessitates the heavy use of agricultural chemicals and chemical fertilizers, as well as making the farmers neglect the application of compost to the land.
  • copacetic
  • COPES Amongst the many copes treasured at South Kensington there are none, amidst all their splendour, as fine as this, although the fragment of the "Jesse" cope runs it very closely.
  • Cops He explained it all to the cops!
  • copse In the distance, hidden in a dense copse of blue tree-like vegetation, he saw the fragments of his wrecked ship.
  • copyist But the ci-devant Beau Arthur considered every sort of work that was suggested to him very far beneath him; he thought that he would degrade himself by becoming a copyist or a minstrel, and he was not ashamed to borrow a hundred sous when he knew that he could not repay them.
  • cupidity The girl's beauty, her indifference, the mistaken attitude of Stark urged him, and, strongest of all, he was drawn by his cupidity, for she would be very rich, so the knowing ones said.
  • hast made
  • jocosity I guessed by his jocosity that he had already been making somewhat free; for although I love a bold face put upon a difficulty, ours was a situation in which only a tipsy man could find food for merriment.
  • opacity If we knew on what other relations to light, or on what peculiarities of structure, opacity depends, we might find that this is only an apparent, not a real, exception to the general proposition in the text.
  • past The past was over.
  • pasta A certain majesty in the turn of the head, the fall of the shoulders, the breadth of the brow, and the exceeding calmness of the features, invested her with an air which I have never seen equalled by any one, but which, had Pasta been a beauty, she might have possessed.
  • paste Send out cards of invitation in the shape of small Christmas trees, or else paste or paint little evergreen trees on white cards.
  • pasty The bread is scorched at two corners and raw at the other two, brown on top, but pasty at the bottom.
  • paucity Yet it is instructive even to him, for the frequency of rain and mist and the paucity of landmarks which can be seen more than a few yards off, coupled with the necessity of constantly watching the ground, render it one of the easiest places in the world in which to lose one's way in any but the finest weather.
  • posit Every gen'leman as craves to enter dis gander-pullin' will kin'ly ride up here and de-posit a quarter 'f a dollar.
  • rapacity A more important class of undertakings in which the State's industrial advantage lies in its superiority to the temptations of self-interest, is that of industries which naturally assume something of the character of a monopoly, and in which self-interest lacks both the check on its rapacity, and the spur to its activity supplied by effective competition.
  • sparsity The sparsity of jewellery and the rich simplicity of her attire proved that, and moreover she was accompanied by a French maid to whom she spoke French in a manner which testified that before acquiring the French maid she had been in the custody of a French nurse.
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