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Correct spellings for FACTES

  • acts A few acts of war occurred at once; but Austria and Russia pressed for delay, the latter with the view of overthrowing Murat.
  • fact I admitted that fact.
  • fates And so they parted-these two, whose fates had so strangely met and mingled for a little while-parted kindly, but, totally without one desire on either side that it should be otherwise.
  • gates When they arrived there they saw the mob already before the gates.
  • Fats Fats, starch, and most of the proteids do not dissolve in water.
  • Faces As he passed out the crowd made way for him, and many of the faces expressed admiration-some even pity.
  • fetes These kinds of fetes did not resemble what they afterwards became; their attraction consisted in the splendour of military dress: and Bonaparte was always sure that whenever he mounted his horse, surrounded by a brilliant staff from which he was to be distinguished by the simplicity of his costume, his path would be crowded and himself greeted with acclamations by the people of Paris.
  • factors Consequently, this subject can not be treated in one single effort; it must be studied, in turn, in its relations to our three factors-intellectual, emotional, unconscious.
  • facts What, however, are the facts?
  • facades Lunatic asylums, in ghastly sarcasm on a self-styled intellectual age, reared their colossal facades and enclosed their thousands of human wrecks.
  • fakes I don't know what other ingenious fakes you have added.
  • fades With one alone when fades the glowing West, Beneath the moonbeam let thy spirit rest, While childhood's silvery tones the stillness break And all the echoes of thy heart awake.
  • FARTS
  • FACETS Between two elegant iron railings of the same character as that of the magnificent railing which formerly surrounded the garden of the Place Royale in Paris, now so unfortunately destroyed, stood a brick pavilion, with stone courses hewn in facets like those of the chateau, with a very pointed roof and window-casings of stone cut in the same manner.
  • faucets
  • fagots One thing alone was left, after the red-brick villages had been turned into heaps and the murdered fruit trees into black fagots, on the hill outside of St. Quentin.
  • fatties
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