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Correct spellings for HAVEIT

  • avert There was no doubt about the origin of the pest, and the new and alarming prospect was opened up of calamities yet to come, without a chance to avert them by submission.
  • caveat Now, bearing this caveat in mind, we have next to observe that when once the nebula began to condense, new relations among its constituent parts would, for this reason, begin to be established.
  • davit It was hanging by the after davit, a mere bunch of smashed sticks.
  • habit It was her habit never to rise until the Elder gave the sign.
  • haft And, swift and silent, I slid the cloak from about me, and took the haft of that wondrous Diskos into mine hand.
  • haiti In 1790, a revolution broke out in that island, including Haiti, and lasted, with more or less violent activity, for nearly ten years.
  • hart V We were to be married at half-past ten on the following Saturday morning but one, at St. George's, Hart Street, Bloomsbury.
  • harvest Meat was gathered and dried in strips by Francke; a full force of men were put to the work of devising equipment; the women were making clothing and dressing skins; and then a traveling party was organized to go south to gather an additional harvest of meat and skins and furs.
  • harvey Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, many years Chief of the U.S. Bureau of Chemistry.
  • hat "Sure," he said easily as he picked up his hat.
  • hate He simply had to live out his own hate.
  • have She could have told them what to do, and what not to do.
  • havel Triple posts in this garrison town, devices to flood instantly the whole under fifteen feet of water from the river Havel, are but items in the system of protection.
  • haven And yet, in spite of a kind of dread that hung about him, in spite of a kind of perception that there was a great deal more in his father than he at present perceived, he could not resist a kind of warm pleasure that here at any rate was some sort of a haven, that no one else in the world might want him, but here was some one who was glad to see him.
  • heat We'll get Mrs. Stoner to heat bricks for our feet.
  • heave Heave her clear of it.
  • heaver As regards the now purely local honours of the representatives of Britain in sculling, Mr. Charles Bush, a well-known supporter of professional sculling, had found a coal-heaver, by name Higgins, who had shown good form in a Thames regatta, and was looked upon as the rising man of the Thames.
  • heft In new countries they would lynch him as soon as they caught him-"A lot of chaps like myself would ride off their farms, heft him up on the nearest tree, and empty their revolvers into him.
  • hefty Presently, to his surprise, they came out, not two or three, nor six or seven, but forty-two stout and hefty men.
  • heist
  • hive So he took his way instinctively to the office, being one of those unquiet newspaper spirits that hover uneasily about the hive, even when they have a brief breathing space in which to drone a little.
  • Halved In the long run, the dealers halved the things, and Jonathan comed out with a clear three hundred and fifty-four pound.
  • Hived The destitute wanderers therefore, erected for themselves a small cell in Freeman-street, where they hived in expectation of harmony.
  • Hove One of your warships hove in sight.
  • Harriet Harriet had the care of one of Mrs. Gray's children, a lively little boy about two years old.
  • heaved She put her arms around him and heaved, lifting the hundred and eighty pounds of his weight clear of the ground.
  • HIT "One couldn't possibly hit anything a day like this.
  • heavier He hoped, too, that the crops would be much heavier.
  • heavies By belts of barbed wire between the lines of retirement, down past Loupart Wood, and then past Grevillers and Achiet, and outside Bapaume, as well as by strong bodies of picked troops holding on to these positions until the last moment before death or capture or escape, and by massing guns eastward of Bapaume in order to impede our pursuit by long-range fire from his "heavies," and to hold the pivot while his troops swing back in this slow and gradual way, he hopes to make things easy for himself and damnably difficult for us.
  • heaviest I had a large family to keep, and a small sum to keep it on; and yet in all this care the loss of Leybourne was heaviest.
  • haven't I haven't very much money.
  • haves
  • Havarti
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