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What is the correct spelling for JUREY?

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Correct spellings for JUREY

  • bury These Kali had to bury .
  • care I don't care so very much for this Dean girl, either.
  • core It is this breadth of conception and unerringness of vision piercing through the external and accidental to the core of man's mixed nature which give certain of her creations something of the life-like complexity of Shakespeare's.
  • cree Sir John did not forget his vow, and many were the deeds of charity he performed, more especially to the poor of his own parish of St. Katharine Cree .
  • crew General Moreto kept away, and the presence of Miss Catherine with the Cuban girl could never have aroused the doubts of the crew .
  • cry Liza started back with a cry and put her hand up to her face.
  • cure It's part of the cure .
  • cured Can't he be cured ?
  • curie Neither James Watt, Stephenson, Marconi, Edison, Pasteur, nor Madame Curie were of the Jewish race, and the same might be said of nearly all the greatest men who have lived since the dawn of our civilization.
  • curry She tells tales; she tries to curry favor with me.
  • frey The rabbi received him in a friendly manner, and warned him to beware of the missionary Frey , yet he did not regard it.
  • fury The outburst of fury in France against England at this humiliation was tremendous.
  • gary Never slowing, Gary threw the next paper entirely across the street.
  • gore It used to hang in the dirty window of Holbein's saloon on West Third Street in Cleveland-that's my home town-and every time I passed it I used to see more gore pouring down old Custer's throat.
  • gory The bull, held back by the rope over his horns, stood with his neck outstretched; and when the end of the rope passed through, he licked his gory nose, pawed the ground, and bellowed.
  • gray He had so fully expected to see the angry face of the big, gray , old Rabbit who had made life so miserable for him that for a minute he couldn't believe that he really saw what he did see.
  • grey The darkness was sinking before the day, and a dim, grey light came through the window.
  • gurney Both she and her sister spoke with much affection of dear Elizabeth J. Fry, and her visit with Joseph John Gurney .
  • guru Doubtless he dreamed of making himself Guru .
  • jerry Jerry went home and brought back some of hers for me.
  • jersey After all, it was a matter of political opinion; and it is against our American ideas to send any man to Jersey for his politics.
  • jewry When old enough, he was apprenticed to a well-to-do London mercer, Robert Large, who carried on business in the Old Jewry .
  • journey A journey (F. journee, from L. diurnus, daily) was primarily a day's work; hence, a movement from place to place within one day, which we now describe as "a day's journey ;" in its extended modern use a journey is a direct going from a starting-point to a destination, ordinarily over a considerable distance; we speak of a day's journey , or the journey of life. Travel is a passing from place to place, not necessarily in a direct line or with fixed destination; a journey through Europe would be a passage to some destination beyond or at the farther boundary; travel in Europe may be in no direct course, but may include many journey s in different directions. A voyage, which was formerly a journey of any kind, is now a going to a considerable distance by water, especially by sea; as, a voyage to India. A trip is a short and direct journey . A tour is a journey that returns to the starting-point, generally over a considerable distance; as, a bridal tour, or business tour. An excursion is a brief tour or journey , taken for pleasure, often by many persons at once; as, an excursion to Chautauqua. Passage is a general word for a journey by any conveyance, especially by water; as, a rough passage across the Atlantic; transit, literally the act of passing over or through, is used specifically of the conveyance of passengers or merchandise; rapid transit is demanded for suburban residents or perishable goods. Pilgrimage, once always of a sacred character, retains in derived uses something of that sense; as, a pilgrimage to Stratford-on-Avon.
  • juarez But if he, uh, happened to get loose, he might just possibly be influenced to think of the Juarez proposal.
  • jude If I tell these villagers outright that Mother Huldah is in need, each person will think, 'O well, Neighbor Jude , or Gossip Dorcas has more to spare than I. Someone else will take care of the poor old lady, I am sure.
  • july During July and August we had a dozen babies at their home.
  • june "Not until next June ," was the reply.
  • juror The judges gave up the attempt in despair, and the governor and his advisers thought that matters were come to a pretty pass when a mere petit juror could declare "that his conscience would not let him take oath whiles Peter Oliver set upon the bench."
  • jury But you're not judge and jury , and you're certainly not Mr. Bellamy.
  • jute In one place cotton goods are produced; in another, woollen goods; in other parts of the country flax, jute , silk are manufactured.
  • lure Rushing northward with forced haste, unreal beauties took form as if to lure us to pause.
  • prey Never more would she allow herself to become the prey of passion,-that "creature of poignant thirst and exquisite hunger...."
  • pure The rush of this body of water always in front of it keeps the air in the passage always pure .
  • quarry But as he came down out of these strange murmuring places with their sense of hiding from the world at large the things that they were occupied in doing, Bucket Lane stuck in his head as a dark little quarry into which he must at the day's end, whatever gorgeous places he had meanwhile encountered, creep.
  • query As a matter of fact it suggested the query why he should object to Miss Hamilton throwing herself away.
  • quire A scribe would take his quire of paper or vellum, and if he were a high-class scribe, mindful of the need of keeping his text clean, he would leave his first leaf blank and begin at the top of his second.
  • sure I am sure that there is something the matter."
  • surrey Some years afterwards we find her and Mr. Lewes permanently taking a house not far off, at Witley in Surrey , which has the same kind of beautiful open scenery.
  • trey It was as if, in the game, a red four which one had neglected to "play up" should actually permit victory after an intricate series of disasters, by providing a temporary resting-place for a black trey , otherwise fatally obstructive, causing the player to marvel afresh at that last fateful but apparently chance shuffle.
  • urea Even in the case of oats the albuminoids, which are the more digestible principles, and therefore those that are the most easily and speedily converted into urea , are present only to the amount of two-thirds of that which exists in the wheat bran.
  • urey
  • Gere Then Gere and his men were lodged and men bade take their steeds in charge.
  • Grew You never grew up-thank the Lord!
  • Juries R60546. A treatise on the law of instructions to juries ...
  • Cray And when Pierson undressed us, and had tucked us all in comfortably, we kissed her, and repeated how much we wished that we were going to live in the pretty village of Cray with her, instead of staying in this gloomy London, with Mrs. Partridge.
  • Curer 9463. You are a merchant and fish-curer at Seafield?
  • Cary Capt Cary Gratz, of the 1st Mo.
  • Corey A man of considerable business interests in the city, Mr. J. B. Corey , finally heard of him through the daily papers, and was led to call upon him in company with a number of the officials of the institution.
  • Cory And you are, you know, sitting here among the big people, I say, Cory , I am proud of you."
  • Jared Jared took the book and looked at it.
  • Jeremy So also, in our American Book, Jeremy Taylor, the modern Chrysostom, meets us in the Office for the Visitation of the Sick, in that solemn prayer addressed to Him "whose days are without end, and whose mercies cannot be numbered."
  • Kory
  • Carey But here Lionel drew the manager still further aside; and then ensued a conversation which neither Nina nor Mr. Carey could in the least overhear.
  • Jeri
  • Judy "Punch or Judy ," replied Father Healy laconically.
  • Joey Rather say we, Joey .
  • cures I have seen in truth strange cures among thy people; and were my ill a fever such as might come to them or the result of an arrow's bite, I would gladly let thy shamans have their will with me.
  • godfearing

9 words made from the letters JUREY

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