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Correct spellings for KIRSIE

  • airs They received invitations from every quarter, and everywhere were met with that graceful welcome so sure to greet those whose airs and whose dress are the ornaments of a salon.
  • case I see the whole case now.
  • cassie "I have no doubt," said Kate, "that Cassie will take her up."
  • circe Was Athena Maule a cruel, devouring Circe, lacking mercy, honour, shame?
  • cirque Amphitheater Lake, at the end of the trail, occupies a protected glacial cirque and is the starting point for Teton Glacier, the most accessible of the ice fields, three-fourths of a mile northwest from the end of the trail.
  • coarse There she sat looking out over the magnificent scene before her with her great brooding eyes, and ate the coarse corn cake Amalia put in her hands.
  • corsair They returned with the intelligence that the corsair prince, with, several of his ships, had escaped, leaving behind, however, a considerable number, which fell into our hands.
  • course Of course I shall stay away as much as I can!
  • curie Curie and her daughter are in charge of the X-ray apparatus at the hospital.
  • curse Cain and the curse of Cain!
  • cursive That it is not wholly and entirely successful is due to the fact that for so many centuries Greek types have been dominated by the models set by Aldus and the other printers of the early sixteenth century, who tried to imitate the rapid cursive hand of the Greek scholars of their day.
  • dixie First they gave a number of well-known Southern melodies such as Old Black Joe, Swanee Riber, Dixie, Massa's in de Cold, Cold Ground.
  • erse Is it not folly, this anglicising of the Indians, Irish, and Scots by the English schoolmaster, who knows as little of Sanscrit as of Erse Scottis or gaelic; calls England an island!
  • goose Mignon made a goose of herself to-night.
  • gorse It is true that he was turned out of his bedroom, the best in the house, which commands an unrivalled view of Knollington Gorse, and had to be content with humbler quarters; but our Bayard was so perfectly au courant with all that had happened, even unto the presence of the four men in plain clothes in the shrubbery, that the situation was much to his taste.
  • guise When one's honor is bartered by thieves under the guise of friends-and when these thieves are part of a government from which justice is expected-Then one is bound to uncover the leprous spots of one's accusers.
  • horse On came the galloping horse.
  • irs "Stayed up-sta-irs," sobbed Flaxie.
  • issue She was, as we know, a woman who made plans, and who carried out her plans to a successful issue.
  • jersey He's rich as Jersey cream, and he owns the bulk of stock in the institution.
  • josue
  • kaiser You compare me to the Kaiser!
  • kasai Of one of these boats the Deliverance was only one-third the size, but I took passage on her because she would give me a chance to see not only something of the Congo, but also one of its great tributaries, the less travelled Kasai.
  • kine There was great sadness on his foster-mother, and she told him to bring the kine back to life.
  • kinsey The Kinsey side was toward him.
  • kiosk It was a small kiosk, built upon a projecting rock that looked down upon the Bosphorus and the city, and had evidently, from the extended views it presented, been selected as the spot to build upon.
  • kirghiz Six ugly Tartar horsemen with very uncomfortable-looking spears and appalling shouts, and mounted on their swift Kirghiz ponies, were charging down upon him, while neither the rushing Yellow River on the right hand, nor the steep dirt-cliffs on the left, could offer him shelter or means of escape.
  • kirk 4977. Is that near Dunrossness kirk?
  • kirsch Let's take a drink of kirsch.
  • kiss I shall always call it a "red day," because then I got my first kiss from her.
  • kisser Kisser, which is said still to exist, means a maker of cuishes, thigh-armour, Fr, cuisses- "Helm, cuish, and breastplate streamed with gore."
  • kissing "Better, Lieutenant," returned her mother, kissing the pretty, flushed face.
  • kite Such a kite will go away up in the air and with a powerful wind will fly the Lord knows where- Here he suddenly struck his forehead.
  • kiwi The other group of Cretaceous birds, of the Hesperornis type, show an actual degeneration of the power of flight through adaptation to an environment in which it was not needed, as happened, later, in the kiwi of New Zealand, and is happening in the case of the barn-yard fowl.
  • ks I'll have to take it down to Joe Marks' blacksmith shop.
  • liaise The jewellery heister tried to warn Par to stay away from Kentucky, who continued to liaise with the aliens on a regular basis.
  • morse Nearly as impressive is it to catch by night the glimmer of the Morse code flashing from ships which are revealing their names and journeys to those ever-vigilant watchers in the signal station as they pass.
  • norse The fourth great element was the Norse or Scandinavian; introduced by the so-called Sea-kings of Denmark and Norway in the ninth and tenth centuries.
  • nurse And so is the lady nurse.
  • pixie You found a pixie.
  • purse The man was a kind sort o' a body, an' he took me oot to eat wi' him at a cafy, an' he paid it himsel', but I'm thinkin' his purse was sair empty whan he got through wi' it.
  • quasi Quasi eyed the insect very attentively; at last he saw him alight on his master's nose, and immediately fly off.
  • rise To rise is to move up or upward whether slowly or quickly, whether through the least or greatest distance; the waves rise; the mists rise; the river rises after heavy rains; as said of persons, to rise is to come to an erect position after kneeling, sitting, reclining, or lying down; as, to rise from a sick-bed; my friend rose as I entered; the guests rose to depart; so a deliberative assembly or a committee is said to rise when it breaks up a session; a sun or star rises when to our apprehension it comes above the horizon and begins to go up the sky. To ascend is to go far upward, and is often used in a stately sense; as, Christ ascended to heaven. The shorter form rise is now generally preferred to the longer form arise, except in poetic or elevated style. The sun rises or arises; the river springs at a bound from the foot of the glacier and flows through the lands to the ocean. Smoke issues from a chimney and ascends toward the sky. Light and heat emanate from the sun.
  • vise Glenning, on his knees, sent all his strength to his vise-like hands.
  • wise She was wise all of a sudden.
  • worse The man is warned that a worse thing will fall upon him if he sins.
  • Geese "He would have shot us like wild geese for food," added Gebhr.
  • Jesse If He had not chastened David for his sin, then, by acting as before, He would have been other at heart than when He rejected Saul for disobedience and chose the son of Jesse to fulfil all His word.
  • Kissed Not so had they kissed on that day in London.
  • Kris She wouldn't kris us!
  • Jose We went to the San Jose Church, one of the oldest in Panama.
  • Kari Then was Frodi yet before Kari, but the eldest born was Alf.
  • Kasey
  • Kurtis
  • Jessie Aunt Jessie was talking to herself about her cards in a very agitated whisper-Now it's the King I want-how provoking!
  • Josie There was a certain dignity in this reserve, and both Mrs. Thatcher and Josie were impressed by it.
  • Katie Very likely he was quite as cunning as Katie.
  • Maisie Just then Maisie stirred uneasily, which brought a flush of shame to the elder girl's cheeks; but hearing nothing further, Hilda jumped into bed and pushed the cracker under her own pillow.
  • Keys The swindler told a long story of having lost the keys to his trunk, and he ordered the locksmith to make him three keys from impressions furnished by Snipper.
  • Keri One or two of such coincidences of language, occurring in words which are prominent throughout the book, should be borne constantly in mind as a sort of Keri perpetuum: for instance, the identity in the original of the words "spirit" and "mind," and of the phrases "supreme being" and "highest essence."
  • Essie "Aunt Sadie said Auntie Essie was cross.
  • Rosie Rosie had been one of those young ladies who, to use a technical term, "walk on"; and because she was extraordinarily pretty, she was always placed in the front row of the foolish musical comedy of which he could still recall, not only every tune, but almost every word, so often had he been to the theatre after that first meeting.
  • Susie Old Miss Susie May Lanley!
  • firs The forest road leading towards Rynkan Falls was fragrant with the soft, soothing odor of pines and firs, mingled with that of blue, pink, and yellow flowers, blossoms whose local names only served to puzzle us,-"wee, modest, crimson-tipped flowers."
  • kisses "Yes-if-if-" Then he caught her to him, and stopped her mouth with kisses.
  • jars After all, "somewhere" does not jar in America, and "somewheres" very distinctly jars in England.
  • cars On and on rolled the heavy engine, with its long train of cars.
  • kitties I like kitties, I do!
  • kids The women, having first from a distance sated their eyes with looking at the "Good Mzimu," began to vie with the warriors in bringing gifts to her, consisting of kids, chickens, eggs, black beans, and beer brewed of millet.
  • kits The "kits" came on the run; so did Amarilly.
  • KIPS "But you should read my hottest ones-them I kips for slums and seaports.
  • RSI
  • GARS But it gars me greet I canna look after you any longer."
  • SIRS "Now, Sirs, we have done a noble deed; "We have revenged the Galliard's bleid: "For every finger of the Galliard's hand, "I vow this day I've killed a man."
  • CURS Another Newfoundland dog, of a noble and generous disposition, was often assailed in the same way by noisy curs in the streets.
  • OISE Meanwhile the French troops were sustaining a terrific attack on their centre by the German left centre, which culminated at Guise, on the River Oise, to the north-east of St. Quentin, where the river, which runs between beautiful meadows, was choked with corpses and red with blood.
  • kiddie Is the kiddie worse, Stella?
  • kiddies Then a nice little home, all new and clean; tea all put ready for you by your wife; the kiddies keen to see you; that's the one way, I tell you, for all men to come home.
  • kiwis Hitherto the kings had ordinarily dealt with each town severally; and as the majority were almost independent, or invested with privileges of different kiwis and carefully respected, neither the king nor any great suzerain dreamed of prescribing general rules for communal regimen, nor of administering after a uniform fashion all the communes in their domains.
  • gassier When Gounod's "Faust" received its first performance in England, in 1863, the cast included Tietiens, as Marguerite; Trebelli, as Siebel; Giuglini, as Faust; Gassier, as Mephistopheles; and Charles Santley, as Valentine.
  • nisei
  • authoritativenesses
  • intrenches
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