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What is the correct spelling for OIVER?

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Correct spellings for OIVER

  • aver I aver that it is a species of snobbery-a very contemptible species of snobbery.
  • cover Though our horses were tired, their eagerness to obtain water made them exert themselves, and they did not take long to cover the ground.
  • diver That's just about the only really dangerous thing a diver can do."
  • dover 4. We shall return by way of Dover.
  • eve It was probably a sad surprise to the Queen when, on the eve of the war, she discovered the intensity of the hatred with which her faith was regarded by a large section of her husband's subjects.
  • ever Did he ever do so?"
  • fiver But no: they rest content with a fiver and cherish their wind.
  • giver The pressure of her bracelet on her arm would recall its giver, and she saw again in her mind his eyes, so kind when they smiled on her, so stern at other times.
  • hover And if any ghosts hover round the little place, they will be the ghosts of a purity, a kindness, and of a love for humanity which are not often met with in this workaday world.
  • iv 5 368 Glove, The 1845 iv.
  • iva Iva settled herself and looked somewhat embarrassed, as if not knowing quite how to begin.
  • ives There is an intimacy between our families at present; which was first occasioned by an affection which your sister Louisa and Anna St. Ives conceived for each other, and which has continually increased, very much indeed to my satisfaction.
  • ivy With the exception of a small chapel and a solitary tower which remain intact, the castle is in ruins; only a few fragments of walls, thickly covered with ivy, are standing.
  • liver 17. What effect does alcohol have upon the liver?
  • lover She left the village and hastened to Honfleur, hoping every hour, every moment, to receive some tidings of her lover.
  • mover This had been suggested by Mrs. Cliff, because, she said, that as they were both hard-working men with families, and although the house-mover was not a citizen of Plainton, he had once lived there, she was very glad of this opportunity of helping them along.
  • o'er Let float your flags, and let your lanterns rise Like fruit upon the trees in Paradise, In many-coloured lights as rich as Rome O'er road and tent; and let the children come, It is their world, these Beauty Dwellers bring."
  • offer I also got the offer of a pass-book to-day.
  • olive At the corner of Olive Street, a young man walking with long strides almost bumped into them.
  • oliver "It has," said Oliver.
  • olivier One of the most interesting occasions of which they speak was a Missionary Meeting, in which the minister Olivier unfolded his experience of a divine call to leave his country, and go abroad on the service of the gospel.
  • osier I imitated the savages, and, dipping the osier goblet into the drink, I approached it to my lips, and passed it to the unfortunate Alila, who could not avoid this infernal beverage.
  • oven There ain't any wind so sarchin and penetratin as the East wind, an it will blow your fire all out of the oven."
  • over As he looked her over, he had a lot on his mind.
  • overt That was the overt act of renunciation of the part; and as she turned to me I put my arm round her and kissed her.
  • river That is, as long as we stay near the river.
  • rover "The Pilot" and "The Red Rover" are considered his best sea novels.
  • Ave The evenings when he had listened at St. Sulpice to the admirable chanting during the Octave of All Souls, he had felt himself caught once for all; but that which had put most pressure on him, and brought him yet more completely into bondage were the ceremonies and music of Holy Week.
  • I've "I've been thinking over it for a long time.
  • Ova One may learn much, it is true, of the wonders of nature in the dead time of the year by watching the great trout on the spawn beds as they pile up the gravel day by day, and store up beautiful, transparent ova, of which but a ten-thousandth part will live to replenish the stock for future years.
  • AVIOR
  • OVERS Do you remember that afternoon at Mother Spurlock's when we were ten, and you climbed the tree and got the apples, while I picked them up for her to make apple turn-overs for us?
  • am on the and up
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