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What is the correct spelling for PATRIENT?

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Correct spellings for PATRIENT

  • co-shed
  • nutrient Hence it is that protein is required as a nutrient by the animal body, and it cannot be produced from non-nitrogenous compounds.
  • parent I do not speak of the vine, because it is the parent of misery.
  • patent That won't answer with ladies' patent-leather shoes!
  • patient Be as patient with me as you can.
  • patriot It did great credit to the head and heart of this devoted patriot then dawning into manhood.
  • patron Preparations were immediately made for dancing, and the ball was opened by the patron of the saint.
  • pertinent Clearly, a person may be hampered in any of these three regards: His thinking may be irrelevant, narrow, or crude because he has not enough actual material upon which to base conclusions; or because concrete facts and raw material, even if extensive and bulky, fail to evoke suggestions easily and richly; or finally, because, even when these two conditions are fulfilled, the ideas suggested are incoherent and fantastic, rather than pertinent and consistent.
  • portent Twice he read it through, and at the last reading he seemed to realize its dread portent.
  • potent What greater service can a representative company of thinking Americans render to their land than to visit and touch at first hand the sources of so much that is valuable to the world, and to carry home lessons and messages which may easily be potent in forming stronger ties in the old time intimate relationship between our country and France.
  • print It led me through a place like the Valley of the Shadow of Death, in an old print I remember in my mother's copy of the Pilgrim's Progress.
  • prurient But I love a quiet village for its own sake above most things, and would rather spend my leisure amongst its simple cottage folk, take my rest on the bench at the village alehouse door, and walk amid the smock-frocked peasantry to the grey village church, than mingle with the fashionable, over-dressed, prurient, hollow-hearted, and artificial products of civilisation that constitute themselves society-yea a thousand-fold rather.
  • Trent Mrs. Trent and Lotty, the second girl, the big, handsome one-and he evidently knows them...."
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