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What is the correct spelling for QUITL?

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Correct spellings for QUITL

  • guilt She felt that rather would she defy the prowling panthers, the night-chill, hunger and thirst, than appear again before Dame Dorothea, the senator, and Marthana, with this guilt on her soul; and the flying Miriam was one of the goblin forms that had terrified Paulus. Then deem it evil, what thou wilt; But say, oh say, hers was not guilt ! – Giaour, The by george gordon, lord byron
  • quail He looked piercingly at the woman as if expecting to see her quail.
  • quid Then Marah would heave a sea-boot at him, and tell him to hold his jaw; and the old man would mutter over his quid and say that we should see.
  • quiet Well, will you be good and quiet if I do?
  • quietly I did turn to go, but he walked quietly forward at the same time.
  • quill "Nor do I," said Captain Quill.
  • quilt He fetched a pink quilt with yellow dots on it to the freckled man, and a black one with red roses on it to the tall man.
  • quirt Under the sting of the quirt, he scrambled to his feet only to find his inexorable rider again on his back, with merciless spurs set deep in the quick of his quivering sides.
  • quit He must quit it."
  • quite I can't be quite sure."
  • quito He marched out of Quito with the greater part of his forces, pretending that he was going to support his lieutenant in the south, while he left a garrison in the city under the command of Puelles, the same officer who had formerly deserted from the viceroy.
  • quits "When he quits he'll be dead.
  • quoit The Italian goes over seas, indeed; huddled under the hatches of emigrant ships; miserable, starved, confined; unable to move, scarce able to breathe, like the unhappy beasts carried with him. But he never goes willingly; he never wrenches himself from the soil without torn nerves and aching heart; if he lives and makes a little money in exile he comes back to the shadow of the village church, to the sound of the village bell which he knew in his boyhood, to walk in the lanes where he threw his wooden quoit as a lad, and to play dominoes under the green bough of the winehouse where as a child he used to watch his elders and envy them.
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