How Do You Spell NAME?

Pronunciation: [nˈe͡ɪm] (IPA)

The word "name" is spelled /neɪm/ in IPA phonetic transcription. The first sound is /n/, a voiced alveolar nasal sound, followed by the long vowel sound /eɪ/ as in "day". Finally, the word is concluded with the voiced alveolar consonant sound /m/. English spelling rules usually dictate that the letter "e" following a consonant is not pronounced, but in this case, it is silent and serves as an indicator for the long vowel sound. Overall, the spelling of "name" reflects the pronunciation of each individual sound.

NAME Meaning and Definition

Name (noun):

1. A word or combination of words that is used to identify and refer to a particular person, animal, place, object, or thing. It serves as a unique label or designation by which an individual or entity is recognized and distinguished from others of its kind. Names are often given at birth, and they play a significant role in personal identification, social interactions, and cultural customs. They can embody cultural, historical, or familial significance, reflecting traditions or honoring ancestors.

Example: "John is a popular name for boys in many English-speaking countries."

2. A reputation or fame associated with a person or thing. It encompasses the general opinion or perception that others have regarding an individual or entity, considering their reputation, achievements, or attributes. Names can carry positive or negative connotations and have an impact on an individual's perception and opportunities within society.

Example: "She has made a name for herself as a leading scientist in the field."

3. An individual's title, such as a first name, middle name, or last name, used to indicate their personal identification within a given society or culture. These names are often chosen or given by parents or legal guardians and are used to address or distinguish individuals within various contexts.

Example: "Her full name is Elizabeth Anne Smith."

4. The act of assigning a specific designation or tag to an object, event, or concept, representing its nature, purpose, or function.

Example: "The scientist named the newly discovered species after his mentor."

5. A word or phrase used as a symbol or code to identify or represent a specific idea, concept, or object.

Example: "The chemical compound has a complex systematic name."

Top Common Misspellings for NAME *

* The statistics data for these misspellings percentages are collected from over 15,411,110 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

Other Common Misspellings for NAME

Etymology of NAME

The word "name" originates from the Old English word "nama", which can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic term "*namon". This Proto-Germanic root is ultimately derived from the Proto-Indo-European word "*nṓm-", meaning "name" or "noun". This ancient root has cognates in various Indo-European languages, such as the Latin word "nomen" and the Greek word "ṓnoma".

Idioms with the word NAME

  • not have two pennies to rub together, at not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have two pennies to rub together" or "not have a penny to your name" refers to a state of extreme poverty, indicating that someone lacks even the most basic financial resources. It suggests that the person is so destitute that they don't even possess a small amount of money.
  • name and shame The idiom "name and shame" refers to the act of publicly revealing or exposing someone's identity, typically in order to criticize or condemn their actions, behavior, or wrongdoings. It involves disclosing the identity of a person or organization that is believed to have acted dishonestly, unethically, or immorally, with the intention to hold them accountable and potentially create social pressure or embarrassment.
  • drag sb's name through the mire/mud The idiom "drag someone's name through the mire/mud" means to tarnish or unfairly damage someone's reputation or good name, often by spreading negative information or rumors about them. It implies the act of publicly disgracing or humiliating the person, leading to their diminished standing or credibility in the eyes of others.
  • under the name of The idiom "under the name of" means using a particular pseudonym or assumed identity instead of one's real name. It refers to the act of operating or conducting something, such as business or artistic endeavors, under a different name or alias.
  • your name is mud The idiom "your name is mud" refers to a situation where someone's reputation or social standing has been significantly damaged or tarnished, often due to involvement in a negative or controversial event. It implies that the person is regarded with disfavor, distrust, or disrepute by others.
  • you name it "You name it" is an idiom used to suggest or imply that there is a wide range or limitless options available for something. It can be used when asking or inviting someone to provide examples or suggestions without any limitations or restrictions.
  • in all but name The idiom "in all but name" is used to describe something or someone that is essentially or effectively the same as what is being referred to, even though it may not be officially or explicitly recognized or named as such. It suggests that the only thing lacking is formal acknowledgment or recognition.
  • to your name The idiom "to your name" refers to actions or acquisitions that are credited or attributed solely to an individual. It implies having one's personal reputation associated with a particular accomplishment, possession, or responsibility.
  • lend your name to sth To lend your name to something means to allow your name to be associated with or used in support of a particular cause, project, or activity. It implies giving credibility, prestige, or endorsement to that cause by virtue of your reputation or influence.
  • be a name to conjure with The idiom "be a name to conjure with" means that someone or something is highly respected, powerful, or influential. It suggests that the mentioned person or thing has a reputation that holds great significance and evokes awe or admiration.
  • not have a penny to your name The idiom "not have a penny to your name" means to be completely broke or penniless, having no money at all.
  • what's your poison?, at name your poison The idiom "what's your poison?" or "name your poison" is a colloquial phrase used as a lighthearted way to ask someone what they would like to drink or consume, typically referring to alcoholic beverages. It implies that the person has a preferred drink or indulgence that they enjoy.
  • make a name for yourself The idiom "make a name for yourself" means to become well-known or establish a reputation for oneself through one's achievements, skills, or accomplishments. It refers to gaining recognition and respect in a particular field or community.
  • take sb's name in vain The idiom "take someone's name in vain" means to use someone's name disrespectfully or irreverently, especially in a casual or thoughtless manner. It typically refers to mentioning or invoking a person's name without genuine reverence or without proper regard for their importance or significance. This expression often carries a religious connotation, as it originally derived from the biblical commandment "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain" which admonishes against using God's name flippantly or for trivial purposes. However, the idiom is commonly used more broadly to refer to any situation where a person's name is used inappropriately or without due respect.
  • name the day The idiom "name the day" means to specify or announce a particular date for an event or occasion. It is often used to request someone to choose and declare the date they prefer for a future activity or meeting.
  • give a dog a bad name The idiom "give a dog a bad name" means to unfairly or unjustly tarnish someone's reputation or character, often by spreading false or misleading information about them. It implies that once someone's reputation is damaged or associated with negativity, it becomes challenging for them to regain a positive image or be perceived differently.
  • the name of the game The idiom "the name of the game" is often used to describe the essential or most important aspect of a particular situation, endeavor, or activity. It refers to the key element or objective that one needs to prioritize or focus on in order to succeed.
  • in sth's name, at in the name of sth The idiom "in something's name" or "in the name of something" refers to doing something on behalf of or in representation of that thing or idea. It implies that an action or decision is being made with the authority or permission of a particular entity or in support of a cause. It usually indicates that the action is done to honor, acknowledge, or align with the perceived intentions or wishes of that entity or cause.
  • in God's/heaven's name The idiom "in God's/heaven's name" is an exclamatory expression used to convey the speaker's surprise, frustration, or strong emotion while emphasizing the urgency or importance of a matter. It implies a plea or request for assistance, guidance, or clarification from a higher power.
  • in sb's/sth's name, at in the name of sb/sth The idiom "in sb's/sth's name" or "in the name of sb/sth" refers to acting or speaking on behalf of someone or something. It means to carry out an action, make a decision, or express oneself using the authority or authorization of another person or entity. It signifies that the person or thing mentioned is the source of approval, endorsement, or responsibility for the action or statement.
  • in the name of God/heaven, at in God's/heaven's name The idiom "in the name of God/heaven" or "in God's/heaven's name" is an expression used to emphasize or call upon a higher power to support or validate something. It is typically employed when someone is perplexed, astonished, or shocked by an action, event, or situation and seeks to convey their disbelief or appeal to a divine authority for an explanation.
  • in name only The idiom "in name only" refers to something or someone that is said or claimed to be a certain thing, but in reality does not possess the essential characteristics or qualities associated with it. It implies that the person or thing carries the title or label, but lacks the substance, true nature, or genuine inclusion in the specified category.
  • in the name of sth The definition of the idiom "in the name of sth" is to act, speak, or do something with the authority, power, or justification provided by a particular person, group, or cause. It can also imply that something is being done as a means of honoring, promoting, or supporting a particular idea, belief, or cause.
  • in the name of sb/sth The idiom "in the name of sb/sth" is used to indicate that someone is acting on behalf of or in the authority of someone or something. It implies that an action or decision being taken is made in representation or with the approval of someone or something.
  • be sb's middle name The idiom "be someone's middle name" means that someone possesses a particular quality or skill to a high degree. It indicates that the person is closely associated with or known for that specific trait.
  • name names The idiom "name names" refers to the act of specifically identifying or revealing the individuals involved in a certain situation or wrongdoing. It implies that someone is providing or demanding specific names rather than making vague or general accusations.
  • name your poison The idiom "name your poison" is a colloquial phrase used to suggest that someone can choose or express their preference for a situation, option, or choice, especially when all options are perceived to be equally unpleasant, difficult, or undesirable.
  • name after The idiom "name after" means to give someone or something the same name as another person or thing, often as a way to honor, pay tribute, or show respect.
  • What was the name again? The idiom "What was the name again?" is typically used when someone cannot recall or remember someone's name, even though they were previously introduced or had heard it before. It often implies forgetfulness or a momentary lapse in memory.
  • rose by any other name would smell as sweet The idiom "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet" means that the name of something does not affect its true nature or qualities. It suggests that the essence or inherent qualities of a person or thing remain unchanged, regardless of what they are called. This phrase is derived from the famous quote by William Shakespeare's character Juliet in the play Romeo and Juliet.
  • sb's name is mud The idiom "sb's name is mud" means that someone's reputation has been tarnished or their credibility has been severely damaged, typically due to a particular action or event. It implies that the person is widely disliked, distrusted, or considered disreputable by others.
  • one's name is mud The idiom "one's name is mud" means that someone's reputation or social standing has been tarnished or ruined, often due to a disgraceful or unacceptable action they have committed. It suggests that the person is widely regarded negatively and their name is associated with a bad reputation.
  • answer to the name (of) sth To "answer to the name (of) sth" means to acknowledge being called or referred to by a particular name or title. It implies that the person or object being mentioned is recognized or identified by that specific name.
  • appear under the name of (sm name) The idiom "appear under the name of (someone's name)" typically refers to the act of presenting oneself or something as belonging to or being associated with a particular person. It implies that the person or thing is utilizing a different name or identity than their true one.
  • throw name around The idiom "throw name around" means to mention or drop the names of influential or important people in a conversation, typically for the purpose of impressing others or gaining authority or prestige. It implies leveraging the association with these individuals to enhance one's own reputation or status.
  • have name in lights The idiom "have name in lights" means to achieve fame or recognition, typically in a theatrical or entertainment context, where one's name is prominently displayed in a lit-up sign or marquee. It signifies being celebrated or acknowledged prominently.
  • give a bad name The idiom "give a bad name" means to tarnish or damage someone's or something's reputation. It implies that due to a person's or thing's actions or behavior, the perception or reputation associated with them becomes negative or unfavorable.
  • have name inscribed in the book of life The idiom "have name inscribed in the book of life" typically refers to being recognized or recorded as a righteous or virtuous individual. It originates from religious traditions where it symbolizes being chosen for eternal salvation or being granted a place in heaven. It is often used metaphorically to imply being highly regarded or remembered for one's good deeds, actions, or character.
  • call by a name The idiom "call by a name" refers to the act of addressing or referring to someone or something using a specific name or title. It implies using a specific identifier to address or describe a person or thing, often highlighting a particular characteristic or role.
  • I didn't catch the name, and I didn't catch your name
  • a name to conjure with The idiom "a name to conjure with" refers to someone who has a widely recognized and respected reputation or influence that can inspire awe or command attention. It implies that the person's name alone carries significant power and invoking it can evoke strong emotions or reactions.
  • drag name through the mire The idiom "drag name through the mire" means to tarnish or ruin someone's reputation or good name by spreading false accusations, gossip, or scandalous information. It refers to the act of intentionally and persistently defaming or discrediting someone in order to bring harm or disgrace upon them.
  • clear name The idiom "clear name" refers to having a reputation or background that is free from any suspicion or wrongdoing. It suggests that the person's name is not tarnished or associated with any unethical or illegal behavior. Having a clear name implies trustworthiness and integrity.
  • It has name on it The idiom "It has your name on it" means that something is specifically intended or predetermined for a particular person. It suggests that the person has an exclusive claim or ownership over something, emphasizing the connection between the person and the object.
  • a household name The idiom "a household name" refers to a person or thing that has become widely known or recognized by people in a particular region or society. It implies that the name is so familiar that almost every household would recognize or be aware of it.
  • worthy of the name The idiom "worthy of the name" refers to something or someone that possesses the true qualities or characteristics associated with a particular name, title, or reputation. It implies that the person or thing lives up to the expectations or standards set by that name, demonstrating deserving qualities and proving their authenticity.
  • have sb's name written all over it The idiom "have sb's name written all over it" means that something is so perfectly suited to or characteristic of a particular person that it is as if their name is literally written on it. It suggests that the person's influence, preferences, or style are so evident in the situation or object that it couldn't belong to anyone else.
  • know by name The idiom "know by name" means to recognize or be familiar with someone's name or reputation without necessarily having met or interacted with them personally. It implies having knowledge of someone's existence or existence of something without necessarily knowing or understanding the details or characteristics associated with it.
  • have one's name inscribed in the book of life The idiom "have one's name inscribed in the book of life" refers to the concept found in various religious and spiritual traditions where a person's name is recorded or written in a divine record, often symbolizing their salvation, righteousness, or eternal existence. It represents being granted a place or recognition in a higher power's eternal register, which signifies a person's spirituality or goodness.
  • name of the game The idiom "name of the game" means the essential or most important aspect or objective of a particular situation or activity. It refers to the primary focus or key purpose that one should prioritize or keep in mind.
  • in heaven's name The idiom "in heaven's name" is an exclamation used to emphasize astonishment, surprise, or disbelief about something. It is often used to show frustration, confusion, or to strongly question or challenge someone's actions or decisions.
  • I can't put a name to her/him. The idiom "I can't put a name to her/him" means that you are unable to remember or recall someone's name, even though you may be familiar with their face or recognize them. It implies that the person is familiar but you cannot accurately identify or remember their name.
  • in sb's name The idiom "in sb's name" typically means doing something on behalf of someone else, using their authority or representing their interests. It refers to performing an action, making a statement, or conducting a transaction in the name or behalf of another person or entity.
  • in sm's name The idiom "in sm's name" typically refers to doing something on behalf of someone else, using their authority or influence. It indicates that the action is being performed in the person's name, representing their interests or as their representative.
  • your name in lights The idiom "your name in lights" is an expression used to indicate fame, recognition, or public attention. It refers to seeing one's name prominently displayed or highlighted on a sign, marquee, or other media, typically associated with theatrical or showbiz contexts. It conveys the idea of being acknowledged, celebrated, or achieving a high level of success and visibility in one's field.
  • have/see your name in lights The idiom "have/see your name in lights" means to achieve widespread recognition and fame, typically in show business or a similar field. It implies that a person's name is prominently displayed, often in bright lights, on a marquee or billboard, signaling their success and popularity.
  • name sm after (sm else) The idiom "name sm after (sm else)" means to give someone or something a name that is the same as, or in honor or tribute to, another person or thing. It indicates that the person or thing being named is being recognized or celebrated by taking inspiration from someone or something else.
  • name sm or sth for sm or sth The definition of the idiom "name someone or something for someone or something" is to give someone or something a particular name as a way to honor or commemorate another person or thing. It is a gesture of recognizing the importance or influence that someone or something had on the named person or thing.
  • What's in a name? The idiom "What's in a name?" is a rhetorical question used to convey the idea that a name or label does not necessarily define or determine the true nature or essence of a thing or person. It suggests that the significance or importance of something is not solely based on its name, but rather on its attributes, qualities, or actions.
  • take name in vain The idiom "take name in vain" refers to the act of using someone's name or reputation without proper respect or without any sincere intention. It typically implies that the person's name is used carelessly, thoughtlessly, or irrelevantly, usually causing offense, disrespect, or misuse of their reputation.
  • name is mud The idiom "name is mud" means that someone's reputation is damaged or tarnished, often resulting in widespread disapproval or loss of trust.
  • name in lights The idiom "name in lights" typically refers to a moment or achievement when someone's name or reputation is prominently displayed or celebrated. It is often associated with fame, recognition, or public acknowledgment of an individual's success.
  • name for The idiom "name for" typically refers to a phrase or term used to identify or describe someone or something. It signifies assigning a particular name or designation to a person, place, or thing based on their attributes, characteristics, or qualities.
  • name as
  • make a name for The idiom "make a name for" means to establish or achieve a reputation, usually by accomplishing noteworthy or remarkable things that gain recognition and respect from others. It refers to the act of becoming well-known, respected, or renowned in a particular field or context.
  • make a name The idiom "make a name" means to become well-known, establish a reputation, or gain recognition for oneself or one's accomplishments. It implies achieving a notable status or leaving an enduring impact in a particular field or area of expertise.
  • in the name of The idiom "in the name of" is typically used to denote doing something as an authorized representative or with the authority of someone or something. It can also indicate that an action is being done for the sake or in honor of someone or something.
  • in name The idiom "in name" generally means that something or someone has a specific title or designation, but lacks the corresponding qualities, characteristics, or abilities typically associated with that title. It implies that the person or thing is only represented by name, while falling short in terms of actual performance or substance.
  • I can't put a name to her The idiom "I can't put a name to her" means that someone cannot recall or remember someone's name or can't identify or recognize someone.
  • have name written all over it The idiom "have name written all over it" means that something is clearly or obviously intended for a particular person or purpose. It suggests that the characteristics, qualities, or features of the thing are a perfect match or fit for a specific individual or situation.
  • have name on it The idiom "have name on it" means that something is specifically intended for or designed for a particular person or purpose. It suggests that there is a clear connection or relevance to that person or purpose. It implies that whatever is being referred to is meant for someone or something in particular and may not suit others.
  • go under the name of The idiom "go under the name of" means to be known or identified by a particular name or pseudonym. It refers to adopting an alternative or false name for various reasons, such as for anonymity, to hide one's true identity, or to present oneself in a particular way.
  • go by the name of The idiom "go by the name of" means to be known or referred to as a particular name or title. It suggests that the individual or object being referred to may have a different, alternative, or chosen name that they prefer to be called.
  • by the name The definition of the idiom "by the name" refers to identifying or referring to someone or something based on the given name or title they possess. It signifies a way of recognizing or addressing someone or something solely by the name they go by, without delving into further details or background information.
  • black mark beside name The idiom "black mark beside name" refers to a negative or unfavorable reputation or record that someone has. It suggests that an individual's reputation has been tarnished due to a particular event, action, or behavior, often resulting in a loss of trust or respect from others. This idiom can be used to describe a person's past mistakes or wrongdoings that continue to be associated with them, impacting their reputation or standing in society.
  • appear under the name of The idiom "appear under the name of" means to be published, exhibited, or credited using a particular name or pseudonym instead of the true identity of the author or artist. It refers to the act of presenting oneself or one's work using a different name or title for various reasons, such as anonymity, privacy, or strategic purposes.
  • answer to the name The idiom "answer to the name" means responding or acknowledging when called or referred to by a particular name or label. It implies that a person or thing is known or recognized by a specific name and willingly identifies themselves as such.
  • know only by name The idiom "know only by name" means that one is familiar with the name or reputation of someone or something, but has no personal or in-depth knowledge or experience with them.
  • to one's name The idiom "to one's name" means to possess or have accomplished something or some amount that is specifically associated with oneself. It refers to the possession or attribution of something as a personal achievement or accomplishment.
  • household name The idiom "household name" refers to a person or thing that is widely known or recognized by most people within a given community or society. It implies that the individual or entity is so familiar that their name is commonly spoken within households, emphasizing their widespread popularity or notoriety.
  • a rose by any other name would smell as sweet "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" is an idiom derived from a famous quote by William Shakespeare in his play Romeo and Juliet. The idiom means that the name or label of something does not change its inherent qualities or nature. In other words, the true essence or characteristics of something remain the same regardless of what it is called.
  • answer to the name of something The idiom "answer to the name of something" means to acknowledge or respond to being called or referred to by a specific name or title. It suggests that the person, object, or entity being talked about is recognized or identified by a particular name.
  • a name to reckon with The idiom "a name to reckon with" refers to someone who is widely respected, influential, and significant, commanding attention and consideration. It implies that this person or entity possesses a reputation, status, or power that demands recognition and careful consideration.
  • have letters after (one's) name The idiom "have letters after (one's) name" refers to having one or more academic degrees or professional qualifications that are indicated by abbreviations placed after one's name. It suggests that someone is highly educated or accomplished in a specific field.
  • letters after (one's) name The idiom "letters after (one's) name" refers to the additional qualifications or titles that someone has earned or acquired, typically denoted by abbreviations that are added after their name. These letters indicate specialized training, professional certifications, academic degrees, or memberships in certain organizations. The idiom is often used to emphasize someone's expertise or credibility in a particular field.
  • answer to the name (of) The idiom "answer to the name (of)" means to acknowledge or respond to a particular name or title. It suggests that a person or thing is known or referred to by a specific name and will react or comply when that name is mentioned or used. This idiom is commonly used when talking about people, animals, or fictional characters.
  • a rose by any other name The idiom "a rose by any other name" is a phrase derived from William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. It means that the essence or nature of something or someone remains the same, regardless of the name it is given. It suggests that changing or disguising the name of something doesn't alter its true characteristics or qualities.
  • appear under the name of (some name) The idiom "appear under the name of (some name)" means to present oneself or be known by a different name or alias. It refers to adopting a pseudonym or using an alternate identity, often done for various purposes such as anonymity, privacy, or to deceive others.
  • bad name The idiom "bad name" refers to having a reputation or image that is tarnished or discredited, often due to negative actions or behavior. It suggests that someone or something is widely known for their negative qualities or have become infamous in a particular context.
  • give (someone or something) a bad name The idiom "give (someone or something) a bad name" means to tarnish or damage the reputation of someone or something by associating them with negative qualities or actions. It implies that the person or thing being criticized is wrongly and unfairly judged or labeled as undesirable, leading to a loss of respect or credibility.
  • give a bad name to The idiom "give a bad name to" means to discredit or tarnish the reputation of someone or something by associating it with negative qualities or actions. It suggests that the actions or behavior of a particular individual or group are damaging the reputation or image of a larger category or concept.
  • give a dog a bad name and hang him The idiom "give a dog a bad name and hang him" means to unfairly blame or condemn someone based on their reputation or past actions, regardless of their actual guilt or innocence. It refers to the tendency to judge and punish individuals solely because of a negative perception that has been associated with them.
  • have (one's) name written all over it The idiom "have (one's) name written all over it" is used to express that something is perfectly suited or tailored to a specific person. It suggests that the thing in question seems like it was specifically made or designed for that person.
  • a black mark beside (one's) name The idiom "a black mark beside (one's) name" is used to describe a negative mark or blemish on someone's reputation, usually due to their involvement in a particular wrongdoing or failure. It signifies a stain or a strike against one's character or standing.
  • big name The idiom "big name" refers to a highly prominent or influential person, usually well-known in a particular field or industry. It suggests that the person has achieved significant recognition and fame in their respective domain.
  • by name The idiom "by name" means identifying or addressing someone specifically by their given name.
  • by the name (of) The idiom "by the name (of)" refers to identifying or referring to someone or something by a specific name or title. It implies that the mentioned name is the particular one associated with the person or thing being mentioned.
  • can't put a name to (someone) The idiom "can't put a name to (someone)" refers to the inability to remember or recall a person's name, even if you may be familiar with their face or recognize them in some way. It implies a temporary lapse in memory or difficulty in bringing forth the specific name associated with that individual.
  • clear (one's) name The idiom "clear (one's) name" refers to the act of proving one's innocence or removing any doubt or suspicion that may be associated with an individual. It involves providing evidence or information that vindicates a person and restores their reputation or credibility.
  • clear somebody's name The idiom "clear somebody's name" means to remove suspicions or accusations of wrongdoing or restore someone's good reputation. It refers to the act of vindicating or proving someone innocent of alleged misconduct or disgraceful actions.
  • common name The idiom "common name" refers to a frequently used or widely known name for a person, place, or thing. It is a term that is easily recognizable and does not stand out in a distinctive way.
  • name to conjure with The idiom "name to conjure with" refers to a name that carries great significance, influence, or reputation. It implies that the person (or their name) is well-known and respected, often associated with power, authority, or expertise. It suggests that merely mentioning or invoking their name invokes a certain level of recognition and respect.
  • not have a penny to (one's) name The idiom "not have a penny to (one's) name" means to have no money or any financial resources at all. It implies complete destitution and a lack of possessions or assets.
  • drag (one's) name through the mire The idiom "drag (one's) name through the mire" means to tarnish or ruin someone's reputation or good standing in a disgraceful or humiliating manner. It refers to subjecting someone to public criticism, scandal, or humiliation, typically regarding their character, actions, or any perceived wrongdoing.
  • drag (one's) name through the mud The idiom "drag (one's) name through the mud" means to slander or maliciously tarnish someone's reputation by spreading damaging rumors or making false accusations about them. It implies intentionally and unjustly damaging someone's image or social standing.
  • your, his, etc. name is mud The idiom "your, his, etc. name is mud" means that someone's reputation or image has been tarnished, usually as a result of being involved in a scandal, controversy, or some kind of disreputable behavior. It suggests that the person's name is associated with disgrace or disfavor.
  • to name a few The idiom "to name a few" is used when mentioning only a small or limited number of examples within a larger group or list. It implies that there are many more examples beyond the ones mentioned.
  • name of the game, the The idiom "name of the game" refers to the essential or most important aspect, objective, or characteristic of a particular activity, situation, or endeavor. It can also mean the key element or priority that determines success or failure in a specific context.
  • give (one's) name to (something) The definition for the idiom "give (one's) name to (something)" is to become strongly associated with or deemed responsible for the creation or development of something, typically an invention, innovation, or idea. It implies that the person's name becomes linked or attributed to the thing they have contributed significantly to.
  • why in God's name The idiom "why in God's name" is used to express extreme surprise, disbelief, or frustration in questioning someone's actions, choices, or decisions. It is used to emphasize the confusion or astonishment one feels towards certain actions.
  • have a good name (somewhere or in something) The idiom "have a good name (somewhere or in something)" means to have a favorable reputation or a respected standing in a particular place or context. It implies that the person or thing being referred to is well-regarded and highly esteemed by others. This can have implications for trustworthiness, credibility, integrity, or overall positive perception.
  • you name it, (one's) got it The idiom "you name it, (one's) got it" means that the person being referred to possesses or has access to a wide range of things or possessions. It suggests that they have a large variety of items or an extensive collection in a particular domain. It is often used to imply that the person has everything one could imagine or desire.
  • you name it, somebody's got it The definition of the idiom "you name it, somebody's got it" is that whatever specific item, category, or thing you can think of or mention, there is always someone who possesses it or who can provide it. It implies that there is a wide range of options available for selection or acquisition.
  • have (one's) name taken The idiom "have (one's) name taken" refers to a situation where someone's name is recorded or noted, often for a negative or problematic reason. It implies that individual's actions or behavior have attracted attention, scrutiny, or potential consequences. It can also suggest being implicated in a wrongdoing or being recognized for something of importance or significance.
  • have (one's) name on it The idiom "have (one's) name on it" means that something is specifically meant or destined for a particular person. It implies that the person is associated with or meant to possess the mentioned thing, often in a prominent or significant way.
  • put (one's) name in the hat The idiom "put (one's) name in the hat" means to express interest or willingness to participate or be considered for something, usually a competition, appointment, or opportunity. It implies throwing one's name into a pool of potential candidates or participants, hoping to be chosen or selected.
  • throw (one's) name in the hat The idiom "throw (one's) name in the hat" means to express interest in or submit oneself as a potential candidate for a position, opportunity, or competition. It implies a willingness to participate or be considered for the said opportunity.
  • toss (one's) name in the hat The idiom "toss (one's) name in the hat" means to express one's interest or intention to participate or be considered for something. It is often used when referring to joining a competition, running for a position, or offering oneself as a candidate for a particular opportunity. It implies putting oneself forward as a potential contender or participant.
  • have (one's) name in lights The idiom "have (one's) name in lights" means to achieve fame or recognition, typically through a prominent public display or acknowledgment. It refers to someone's name being displayed prominently, often on a marquee or billboard, symbolizing their success or popularity.
  • have (something) to (one's) name The idiom "have (something) to (one's) name" means to possess or own a specific amount or type of something. It implies that the person has achieved or attained something, typically material or tangible, and can claim ownership of it.
  • be (one's) middle name The idiom "be (one's) middle name" means to be something that is characteristic or deeply ingrained in someone's nature or behavior. It implies that the specific trait or quality being mentioned is an integral part of who the person is.
  • make a name for (oneself) The idiom "make a name for (oneself)" means to become well-known or famous for one's actions or achievements. It refers to someone who establishes a reputation or gains recognition in a particular field or area.
  • in (one's) name The idiom "in (one's) name" refers to something that is officially registered or belongs to a specific person. It implies that the person has ownership, control, or responsibility over something.
  • in someone's name The idiom "in someone's name" means to act or speak on behalf of someone else, using their authority or giving the impression that the action or words are coming directly from them. It often implies that the person taking such action has been granted permission or authorization to do so in the person's name.
  • in the name of (someone or something) The idiom "in the name of (someone or something)" refers to doing something on behalf of or in recognition of a particular person, cause, or entity. It implies that actions are carried out in the interest of someone or something, often to convey respect, honor, or allegiance.
  • lend (one's) name to (something) The idiom "lend (one's) name to (something)" refers to the act of providing one's reputation or endorsement to something or someone. It implies granting credibility or support by associating one's name with the mentioned thing or person.
  • lend your name to something The idiom "lend your name to something" means to publicly associate oneself or one's reputation with a cause, organization, or project in order to enhance its credibility or status. It implies that the person is allowing their name to be used for endorsement or support.
  • have your name in lights The idiom "have your name in lights" means to gain public recognition or fame. It refers to seeing one's name illuminated on a marquee or billboard, typically associated with popular performers or celebrities. It signifies achieving a significant level of success or visibility in one's field.
  • see (one's) name in lights "See (one's) name in lights" is an idiom that means to have one's name prominently displayed or celebrated, typically in recognition of success, fame, or achievement. It refers to the idea of seeing one's name illuminated on the marquee of a theater or other public display, symbolizing public recognition and acclaim.

Similar spelling words for NAME

Plural form of NAME is NAMES

Conjugate verb Name

CONDITIONAL PERFECT

I would have named
you would have named
he/she/it would have named
we would have named
they would have named
I would have name
you would have name
he/she/it would have name
we would have name
they would have name

CONDITIONAL PERFECT PROGRESSIVE

I would have been naming
you would have been naming
he/she/it would have been naming
we would have been naming
they would have been naming

CONDITIONAL PRESENT

I would name
you would name
he/she/it would name
we would name
they would name

CONDITIONAL PRESENT PROGRESSIVE

I would be naming
you would be naming
he/she/it would be naming
we would be naming
they would be naming

FUTURE

I will name
you will name
he/she/it will name
we will name
they will name

FUTURE CONTINUOUS

I will be naming
you will be naming
he/she/it will be naming
we will be naming
they will be naming

FUTURE PERFECT

I will have named
you will have named
he/she/it will have named
we will have named
they will have named

FUTURE PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I will have been naming
you will have been naming
he/she/it will have been naming
we will have been naming
they will have been naming

IMPERATIVE

you name
we let´s name

NONFINITE VERB FORMS

to name

PAST CONTINUOUS

I was naming
you were naming
he/she/it was naming
we were naming
they were naming

PAST PARTICIPLE

named

PAST PERFECT

I had named
you had named
he/she/it had named
we had named
they had named

PAST PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I had been naming
you had been naming
he/she/it had been naming
we had been naming
they had been naming

PRESENT

I name
you name
he/she/it names
we name
they name

PRESENT CONTINUOUS

I am naming
you are naming
he/she/it is naming
we are naming
they are naming

PRESENT PARTICIPLE

naming

PRESENT PERFECT

I have named
you have named
he/she/it has named
we have named
they have named

PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

I have been naming
you have been naming
he/she/it has been naming
we have been naming
they have been naming

PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE

he/she/it name

SIMPLE PAST

I named
you named
he/she/it named
we named
they named

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