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How Do You Spell NARROWS?

Correct spelling for the English word "narrows" is [ nˈaɹə͡ʊz] (IPA phonetic alphabet).

Common Misspellings for Narrows

Below is the list of 3 misspellings for the word "Narrows". Misspellings percentages are collected from over 510 000 spell check sessions on www.spellchecker.net from Jan 2010 - Jun 2012.

  • narows (33.3%)
  • narros (33.3%)
  • narrrows (33.3%)

Usage Examples for Narrows

  1. Instead of that, the body narrows away till there is seen a tail like that of a fish. - "Old Jack" by W.H.G. Kingston
  2. Its ownership by Mexico puts the great population that will eventually live in the valley of the Colorado River in the same position with reference to their national outlet to the sea that the people of the Mississippi Valley would be in, if some other nation owned the mouth of the Mississippi River, or that New York would occupy if, for instance, Germany or France owned Long Island and Staten Island and the territory immediately adjacent to the Narrows and Long Island Sound on the mainland. - "Our National Defense: The Patriotism of Peace" by George Hebard Maxwell
  3. For the island of Sphacteria, stretching along in a line close in front of the harbour, at once makes it safe and narrows its entrances, leaving a passage for two ships on the side nearest Pylos and the Athenian fortifications, and for eight or nine on that next the rest of the mainland: for the rest, the island was entirely covered with wood, and without paths through not being inhabited, and about one mile and five furlongs in length. - "The History of the Peloponnesian War" by Thucydides
  4. It was only to cross the narrows from Haul- Away Head to Daddy Tool's Point, no more than a stone's throw for a stout lad. - "Every Man for Himself" by Norman Duncan
  5. Seated in their quarters on the Heights, Dick, Tom and Ben, and the other soldiers were discussing the matter and wishing that the redcoats would do something, when suddenly the rattle of musketry was heard, coming from down on the Narrows road, near the bay, where General Stirling's division was stationed. - "The Dare Boys of 1776" by Stephen Angus Cox